Submission of U.S. Nomination to the World Heritage List, 16492-16493 [2022-06121]

Download as PDF 16492 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 56 / Wednesday, March 23, 2022 / Notices After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs with assistance of the Arizona State Museum is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: March 17, 2022. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2022–06130 Filed 3–22–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–OIA–DTS–33245; PPWODIREI0–PIN00IO15.XI0000– 223P104215] Submission of U.S. Nomination to the World Heritage List National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Department of the Interior has submitted a nomination to the World Heritage List for the ‘‘Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks,’’ consisting of eight properties in Ohio, five of which are in Hopewell Culture National Historical Park in Ross County: Hopeton Earthworks, Mound City, High Bank Works, Hopewell Mound Group and Seip Earthworks; and three that are National Historic Landmarks: Fort Ancient in Licking County, owned by the State of Ohio, and the Octagon Earthworks and Great Circle Earthworks in Warren County, owned by the statechartered Ohio History Connection. This is the third notice required by the Department of the Interior’s World Heritage Program regulations. ADDRESSES: To request paper copies of documents discussed in this notice, contact April Brooks, Office of International Affairs, National Park Service, 1849 C St. NW, Room 2415, Washington, DC 20240 (202) 354–1808, or sending electronic mail (Email) to: april_brooks@nps.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stephen Morris, Chief, Office of International Affairs at (202) 354–1803 or Jonathan Putnam, International Cooperation Specialist, at (202) 354– 1809. Complete information about U.S. participation in the World Heritage Program and the process used to develop the U.S. World Heritage Tentative List is posted on the National jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with NOTICES1 SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:07 Mar 22, 2022 Jkt 256001 Park Service, Office of International Affairs website at: https://www.nps.gov/ subjects/internationalcooperation/ worldheritage.htm. This constitutes the official notice of the decision by the United States Department of the Interior to submit a nomination to the World Heritage List for the ‘‘Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks,’’ as enumerated in the Summary above, and serves as the Third Notice referred to in 36 CFR 73.7(j) of the World Heritage Program regulations (36 CFR part 73). The nomination was submitted through the U.S. Department of State to the World Heritage Centre of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for consideration by the World Heritage Committee, which will likely occur at the Committee’s 46th annual session in mid-2023. This property has been selected from the U.S. World Heritage Tentative List, which comprises properties that appear to qualify for World Heritage status and which may be considered for nomination by the United States to the World Heritage List, as required by the World Heritage Committee’s Operational Guidelines. The U.S. World Heritage Tentative List appeared in a Federal Register notice on December 9, 2016 (81FR 89143) with a request for public comment on possible nominations from the 19 sites on the Tentative List. A summary of the comments received, the Department of the Interior’s responses to them and the Department’s decision to request preparation of this nomination appeared in a subsequent Federal Register Notice published on May 25, 2018 (83 FR 24337–24338). These are the First and Second Notices required by 36 CFR 73.7(c) and (f). In making the decision to submit this U.S. World Heritage nomination, pursuant to 36 CFR 73.7(h) and (i), the Department’s Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks evaluated the draft nomination and the recommendations of the Federal Interagency Panel for World Heritage. She determined that the property meets the prerequisites for nomination by the United States to the World Heritage List that are detailed in 36 CFR part 73. The properties are nationally significant, being part of a unit of the National Park System established by Act of Congress or having been designated by the Department of the Interior as individual National Historic Landmarks. The owners of the properties have concurred in writing with the nomination, and SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00040 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 each property is well protected legally and functionally as documented in the nomination. It appears to meet two of the World Heritage criteria for cultural properties. The ‘‘Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks’’ are nominated under World Heritage cultural criteria (i) and (iii), as provided in 36 CFR 73.9(b)(1), as a group, or ‘‘series,’’ that collectively appears to justify criterion (i) by demonstrating a masterpiece of human creative genius: A 2,000-year-old series of precise squares, circles, and octagons and a hilltop sculpted to enclose a vast plaza. They were built on an enormous scale and the geometric forms are consistently deployed across great distances and encode alignments with both the sun’s cycles and the far more complex patterns of the moon. The series also justifies criterion (iii) in providing testimony to its builders, people now referred to as the Hopewell Culture: Dispersed, non-hierarchical groups whose way of life was transitioning from foraging to farming. The earthworks were the center of a continent-wide sphere of influence and interaction and have yielded exceptionally finely crafted ritual objects fashioned from raw materials obtained from distant places. The properties, both individually and as a group, also meet the World Heritage requirements for integrity and authenticity. The World Heritage List is an international list of cultural and natural properties nominated by the signatories to the World Heritage Convention (1972). The World Heritage Committee, composed of representatives of 21 nations elected as the governing body of the World Heritage Convention, makes the final decisions on which nominations to accept on the World Heritage List at its annual meeting each summer. Although the United States is not a member of UNESCO, it continues to participate in the World Heritage Convention, which is an independent treaty. There are 1,154 World Heritage sites in 167 of the 194 signatory countries. The United States has 24 sites inscribed on the World Heritage List. U.S. participation and the role of the Department of the Interior are authorized by title IV of the National Historic Preservation Act Amendments of 1980, Public Law 96–515, 94 Stat. 2987, 3000, codified as amended at 54 U.S.C. 307101, and conducted by the Department through the National Park Service in accordance with the regulations at 36 CFR part 73 which implement the Convention pursuant to the 1980 Amendments. E:\FR\FM\23MRN1.SGM 23MRN1 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 56 / Wednesday, March 23, 2022 / Notices Neither inclusion in the Tentative List nor inscription as a World Heritage Site imposes legal restrictions on owners or neighbors of sites, nor do they give the United Nations any management authority or ownership rights in U.S. World Heritage Sites, which continue to be subject only to U.S. federal and local laws, as applicable. Authority: 54 U.S.C. 307101; 36 CFR part 73. Shannon A. Estenoz, Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks. [FR Doc. 2022–06121 Filed 3–22–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0033621; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the BIA. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the BIA at the address in this notice by April 22, 2022. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. BJ Howerton, NAGPRA Coordinator, Bureau of Indian Affairs, 1001 Indian School Road NW, Room 341, Albuquerque, NM 87104, telephone (505) 563–3013, email BJ.Howerton@ bia.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with NOTICES1 SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:07 Mar 22, 2022 Jkt 256001 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and in the physical custody of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (ASM), that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items Between 1963 and 1977, 40 cultural items were removed from site AZ P:14:1(ASM), also known as the Grasshopper Pueblo, in Navajo County, AZ. The items were removed during legally authorized excavations conducted by the University of Arizona Archeological Field School. Archeological collections from the site were brought to ASM at the end of each field season and accessioned. The 40 unassociated funerary objects are 39 tree ring samples and one piece of mineral pigment. Site AZ P:14:1(ASM) is a large village site containing approximately 500 rooms in more than a dozen stone room blocks arranged around three main plazas. The site has been dated to A.D. 1275–1400 based on tree ring dates, architectural forms, building technology, and ceramic styles. These characteristics, the mortuary pattern, and other items of material culture are consistent with the archeologically described Upland Mogollon or prehistoric Western Pueblo tradition. In the summers of 1939 and 1940, 136 cultural items were removed from site AZ P:16:1(ASM), also known as Bear Ruin, in Navajo County, AZ. These excavations were legally authorized and carried out by Emil Haury under the auspices of ASM and the Department of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. Archeological collections from Haury’s excavations were brought to ASM at the end of each field season and accessioned. The 136 unassociated funerary objects are one bone awl, two bone awl fragments, one incised bone, 39 ceramic bowls, one ceramic canteen, one ceramic disc, five ceramic vessel fragments, one human figurine fragment, 25 ceramic jars, six miniature PO 00000 Frm 00041 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 16493 vessels, seven ceramic pitchers, eight sherds, 18 pieces of mineral concretion or pigment, one piece of unfired clay, two turquoise beads, three turquoise pendants, 14 shell bracelet fragments, and one shell necklace. Site AZ P:16:1(ASM) consists of 14 houses, two storage rooms, and a kiva. The site has been dated to A.D. 600–800 based on ceramic styles, architectural forms, and tree-ring data. These characteristics, the mortuary pattern, and other items of material culture are consistent with the Mogollon archeological tradition. In the summers of 1940 and 1941, 63 cultural items were removed from site AZ P:16:2(ASM), also known as Tla Kii, in Navajo County, AZ. These excavations were legally authorized and carried out by Emil Haury under the auspices of ASM and the Department of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. Archeological collections from Haury’s excavations were brought to ASM at the end of each field season and accessioned. The 63 unassociated funerary objects are 32 ceramic bowls, one ceramic canteen, three ceramic vessel fragments, one human figurine fragment, seven ceramic jars, one miniature vessel, three ceramic pitchers, one ceramic plate, one ceramic scoop, one ceramic scraper, one sherd, two lithic scrapers, one piece of mineral concretion, six lots of stone beads, and two turquoise pendants. Site AZ P:16:2(ASM) consists of three pit houses, one storage structure, two other structures, a main pueblo, two kivas, and 14 storage pits. Based on architectural forms and ceramic styles, along with other items of material culture, the site is dated to A.D. 900– 1200, and it is associated with the Mogollon archeological tradition. In the summers of 1941 and 1944, one cultural item was removed from site AZ P:16:20(ASM), also known as Bluff Site, in Navajo County, AZ. These excavations were legally authorized and carried out by Emil Haury under the auspices of ASM and the Department of Anthropology at the University of Arizona. Archeological collections from Haury’s excavations were brought to ASM at the end of each field season. Collections were not accessioned upon receipt at ASM; an accession of ‘‘none 1940s’’ was later assigned. The one unassociated funerary object is a ceramic bowl. Site AZ P:16:20(ASM) comprises a pit house village dating to the Cottonwood and Hilltop phases of the Mogollon archeological culture, and it dates to A.D. 200–600 based on architectural forms and tree-ring samples. E:\FR\FM\23MRN1.SGM 23MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 87, Number 56 (Wednesday, March 23, 2022)]
[Notices]
[Pages 16492-16493]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2022-06121]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-OIA-DTS-33245; PPWODIREI0-PIN00IO15.XI0000-223P104215]


Submission of U.S. Nomination to the World Heritage List

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Department of the Interior has submitted a nomination to 
the World Heritage List for the ``Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks,'' 
consisting of eight properties in Ohio, five of which are in Hopewell 
Culture National Historical Park in Ross County: Hopeton Earthworks, 
Mound City, High Bank Works, Hopewell Mound Group and Seip Earthworks; 
and three that are National Historic Landmarks: Fort Ancient in Licking 
County, owned by the State of Ohio, and the Octagon Earthworks and 
Great Circle Earthworks in Warren County, owned by the state-chartered 
Ohio History Connection. This is the third notice required by the 
Department of the Interior's World Heritage Program regulations.

ADDRESSES: To request paper copies of documents discussed in this 
notice, contact April Brooks, Office of International Affairs, National 
Park Service, 1849 C St. NW, Room 2415, Washington, DC 20240 (202) 354-
1808, or sending electronic mail (Email) to: [email protected].

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stephen Morris, Chief, Office of 
International Affairs at (202) 354-1803 or Jonathan Putnam, 
International Cooperation Specialist, at (202) 354-1809. Complete 
information about U.S. participation in the World Heritage Program and 
the process used to develop the U.S. World Heritage Tentative List is 
posted on the National Park Service, Office of International Affairs 
website at: https://www.nps.gov/subjects/internationalcooperation/worldheritage.htm.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This constitutes the official notice of the 
decision by the United States Department of the Interior to submit a 
nomination to the World Heritage List for the ``Hopewell Ceremonial 
Earthworks,'' as enumerated in the Summary above, and serves as the 
Third Notice referred to in 36 CFR 73.7(j) of the World Heritage 
Program regulations (36 CFR part 73).
    The nomination was submitted through the U.S. Department of State 
to the World Heritage Centre of the United Nations Educational, 
Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for consideration by the 
World Heritage Committee, which will likely occur at the Committee's 
46th annual session in mid-2023.
    This property has been selected from the U.S. World Heritage 
Tentative List, which comprises properties that appear to qualify for 
World Heritage status and which may be considered for nomination by the 
United States to the World Heritage List, as required by the World 
Heritage Committee's Operational Guidelines.
    The U.S. World Heritage Tentative List appeared in a Federal 
Register notice on December 9, 2016 (81FR 89143) with a request for 
public comment on possible nominations from the 19 sites on the 
Tentative List. A summary of the comments received, the Department of 
the Interior's responses to them and the Department's decision to 
request preparation of this nomination appeared in a subsequent Federal 
Register Notice published on May 25, 2018 (83 FR 24337-24338). These 
are the First and Second Notices required by 36 CFR 73.7(c) and (f).
    In making the decision to submit this U.S. World Heritage 
nomination, pursuant to 36 CFR 73.7(h) and (i), the Department's 
Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks evaluated the draft 
nomination and the recommendations of the Federal Interagency Panel for 
World Heritage. She determined that the property meets the 
prerequisites for nomination by the United States to the World Heritage 
List that are detailed in 36 CFR part 73. The properties are nationally 
significant, being part of a unit of the National Park System 
established by Act of Congress or having been designated by the 
Department of the Interior as individual National Historic Landmarks. 
The owners of the properties have concurred in writing with the 
nomination, and each property is well protected legally and 
functionally as documented in the nomination. It appears to meet two of 
the World Heritage criteria for cultural properties.
    The ``Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks'' are nominated under World 
Heritage cultural criteria (i) and (iii), as provided in 36 CFR 
73.9(b)(1), as a group, or ``series,'' that collectively appears to 
justify criterion (i) by demonstrating a masterpiece of human creative 
genius: A 2,000-year-old series of precise squares, circles, and 
octagons and a hilltop sculpted to enclose a vast plaza. They were 
built on an enormous scale and the geometric forms are consistently 
deployed across great distances and encode alignments with both the 
sun's cycles and the far more complex patterns of the moon. The series 
also justifies criterion (iii) in providing testimony to its builders, 
people now referred to as the Hopewell Culture: Dispersed, 
non[hyphen]hierarchical groups whose way of life was transitioning from 
foraging to farming. The earthworks were the center of a 
continent[hyphen]wide sphere of influence and interaction and have 
yielded exceptionally finely crafted ritual objects fashioned from raw 
materials obtained from distant places. The properties, both 
individually and as a group, also meet the World Heritage requirements 
for integrity and authenticity.
    The World Heritage List is an international list of cultural and 
natural properties nominated by the signatories to the World Heritage 
Convention (1972). The World Heritage Committee, composed of 
representatives of 21 nations elected as the governing body of the 
World Heritage Convention, makes the final decisions on which 
nominations to accept on the World Heritage List at its annual meeting 
each summer. Although the United States is not a member of UNESCO, it 
continues to participate in the World Heritage Convention, which is an 
independent treaty. There are 1,154 World Heritage sites in 167 of the 
194 signatory countries. The United States has 24 sites inscribed on 
the World Heritage List.
    U.S. participation and the role of the Department of the Interior 
are authorized by title IV of the National Historic Preservation Act 
Amendments of 1980, Public Law 96-515, 94 Stat. 2987, 3000, codified as 
amended at 54 U.S.C. 307101, and conducted by the Department through 
the National Park Service in accordance with the regulations at 36 CFR 
part 73 which implement the Convention pursuant to the 1980 Amendments.

[[Page 16493]]

    Neither inclusion in the Tentative List nor inscription as a World 
Heritage Site imposes legal restrictions on owners or neighbors of 
sites, nor do they give the United Nations any management authority or 
ownership rights in U.S. World Heritage Sites, which continue to be 
subject only to U.S. federal and local laws, as applicable.
    Authority: 54 U.S.C. 307101; 36 CFR part 73.

Shannon A. Estenoz,
Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks.
[FR Doc. 2022-06121 Filed 3-22-22; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P