American Heart Month, 2022, 6395-6396 [2022-02447]

Download as PDF 6395 Presidential Documents Federal Register Vol. 87, No. 23 Thursday, February 3, 2022 Title 3— Proclamation 10336 of January 31, 2022 The President American Heart Month, 2022 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the United States, claiming the lives of more than 650,000 people each year. During American Heart Month, we raise awareness of the risks of heart disease, remember those we have lost, and highlight steps we can all take to save the lives of countless loved ones and address the unequal burden of heart disease in high-risk communities. Through research and innovation, we have made considerable progress in recent years to advance our knowledge and treatment of heart disease. New technologies allow us to diagnose, prevent, and treat heart disease more rapidly and effectively than ever before. We also have a better understanding of heart disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure, bad cholesterol, smoking, being overweight or obese, and type 2 diabetes. Despite the significant progress we have made, heart disease continues to exact a heartbreaking toll—a burden disproportionately carried by Black and brown Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, and people who live in rural communities. Cardiovascular diseases—including heart conditions and strokes—are also a leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths, which are highest among women of color. Addressing these tragic disparities and improving heart health has never been more important, as people suffering from heart disease and related conditions are also at increased risk of severe illness and long-term effects from COVID–19. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with PRESDOC9 My Administration is committed to supporting Americans in their efforts to achieve better heart health, as well as closing the racial gaps in cardiovascular disease. That is why I have asked the Congress to launch a major new initiative—the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health, or ARPA– H—which would invest billions of dollars in preventing, detecting, and treating cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and other deadly diseases. My Administration is also working across Federal agencies to develop new programs to alleviate heart health disparities, including those that threaten maternal health. Engaging in regular physical activity, maintaining a healthy diet and weight, managing stress, avoiding smoking and vaping, and getting quality sleep each night can all reduce the risk of heart disease and help people live longer, healthier lives. While it is essential to see a health care professional if you have symptoms or risk factors related to heart disease, research shows that taking a little time each day to promote a healthy lifestyle can help improve your long-term heart health. On Friday, February 4th—National Wear Red Day—we honor those we have lost to heart disease and raise awareness of the actions we can all take to prevent it. The First Lady and I encourage all Americans to observe this important day. Continuing the fight against cardiovascular disease is crucial to improving our Nation’s public health. During American Heart Month, we must recommit ourselves to ensuring a healthier future for all Americans. VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:32 Feb 02, 2022 Jkt 250001 PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4705 Sfmt 4790 E:\FR\FM\03FED0.SGM 03FED0 6396 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 23 / Thursday, February 3, 2022 / Presidential Documents In acknowledgement of the importance of the ongoing fight against cardiovascular disease, the Congress, by Joint Resolution approved December 30, 1963, as amended (36 U.S.C. 101), has requested that the President issue an annual proclamation designating February as ‘‘American Heart Month.’’ NOW, THEREFORE, I, JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR., President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim February 2022 as American Heart Month, and I invite all Americans to participate in National Wear Red Day on February 4, 2022. I also invite the Governors of the States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, officials of other areas subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, and the American people to join me in recognizing and reaffirming our commitment to fighting cardiovascular disease. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of January, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortysixth. [FR Doc. 2022–02447 Filed 2–2–22; 11:15 am] VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:32 Feb 02, 2022 Jkt 250001 PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4705 Sfmt 4790 E:\FR\FM\03FED0.SGM 03FED0 BIDEN.EPS</GPH> khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with PRESDOC9 Billing code 3395–F2–P

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 87, Number 23 (Thursday, February 3, 2022)]
[Presidential Documents]
[Pages 6395-6396]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2022-02447]



[[Page 6393]]

Vol. 87

Thursday,

No. 23

February 3, 2022

Part V





The President





-----------------------------------------------------------------------



Proclamation 10336--American Heart Month, 2022



Proclamation 10337--National Black History Month, 2022



Proclamation 10338--National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and 
Prevention Month, 2022


                        Presidential Documents 



Federal Register / Vol. 87 , No. 23 / Thursday, February 3, 2022 / 
Presidential Documents

___________________________________________________________________

Title 3--
The President

[[Page 6395]]

                Proclamation 10336 of January 31, 2022

                
American Heart Month, 2022

                By the President of the United States of America

                A Proclamation

                Heart disease is a leading cause of death in the United 
                States, claiming the lives of more than 650,000 people 
                each year. During American Heart Month, we raise 
                awareness of the risks of heart disease, remember those 
                we have lost, and highlight steps we can all take to 
                save the lives of countless loved ones and address the 
                unequal burden of heart disease in high-risk 
                communities.

                Through research and innovation, we have made 
                considerable progress in recent years to advance our 
                knowledge and treatment of heart disease. New 
                technologies allow us to diagnose, prevent, and treat 
                heart disease more rapidly and effectively than ever 
                before. We also have a better understanding of heart 
                disease risk factors, such as high blood pressure, bad 
                cholesterol, smoking, being overweight or obese, and 
                type 2 diabetes.

                Despite the significant progress we have made, heart 
                disease continues to exact a heartbreaking toll--a 
                burden disproportionately carried by Black and brown 
                Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, and 
                people who live in rural communities. Cardiovascular 
                diseases--including heart conditions and strokes--are 
                also a leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths, which 
                are highest among women of color. Addressing these 
                tragic disparities and improving heart health has never 
                been more important, as people suffering from heart 
                disease and related conditions are also at increased 
                risk of severe illness and long-term effects from 
                COVID-19.

                My Administration is committed to supporting Americans 
                in their efforts to achieve better heart health, as 
                well as closing the racial gaps in cardiovascular 
                disease. That is why I have asked the Congress to 
                launch a major new initiative--the Advanced Research 
                Projects Agency for Health, or ARPA-H--which would 
                invest billions of dollars in preventing, detecting, 
                and treating cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and 
                other deadly diseases. My Administration is also 
                working across Federal agencies to develop new programs 
                to alleviate heart health disparities, including those 
                that threaten maternal health.

                Engaging in regular physical activity, maintaining a 
                healthy diet and weight, managing stress, avoiding 
                smoking and vaping, and getting quality sleep each 
                night can all reduce the risk of heart disease and help 
                people live longer, healthier lives. While it is 
                essential to see a health care professional if you have 
                symptoms or risk factors related to heart disease, 
                research shows that taking a little time each day to 
                promote a healthy lifestyle can help improve your long-
                term heart health.

                On Friday, February 4th--National Wear Red Day--we 
                honor those we have lost to heart disease and raise 
                awareness of the actions we can all take to prevent it. 
                The First Lady and I encourage all Americans to observe 
                this important day. Continuing the fight against 
                cardiovascular disease is crucial to improving our 
                Nation's public health. During American Heart Month, we 
                must recommit ourselves to ensuring a healthier future 
                for all Americans.

[[Page 6396]]

                In acknowledgement of the importance of the ongoing 
                fight against cardiovascular disease, the Congress, by 
                Joint Resolution approved December 30, 1963, as amended 
                (36 U.S.C. 101), has requested that the President issue 
                an annual proclamation designating February as 
                ``American Heart Month.''

                NOW, THEREFORE, I, JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR., President of 
                the United States of America, do hereby proclaim 
                February 2022 as American Heart Month, and I invite all 
                Americans to participate in National Wear Red Day on 
                February 4, 2022. I also invite the Governors of the 
                States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, officials of 
                other areas subject to the jurisdiction of the United 
                States, and the American people to join me in 
                recognizing and reaffirming our commitment to fighting 
                cardiovascular disease.

                IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this 
                thirty-first day of January, in the year of our Lord 
                two thousand twenty-two, and of the Independence of the 
                United States of America the two hundred and forty-
                sixth.
                
                
                    (Presidential Sig.)

[FR Doc. 2022-02447
Filed 2-2-22; 11:15 am]
Billing code 3395-F2-P