Notice of Deep Space Food Challenge Phase 2, 3589-3590 [2022-01310]

Download as PDF jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with NOTICES1 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 15 / Monday, January 24, 2022 / Notices of the validation count (plus or minus one percent for a GPRA-related element). The software also draws samples of most transaction types from the extract files. Guided by a state-specific handbook, the validators review these sample records against documentation in the state’s management information system to determine whether the transactions in the extract file are supported by system documentation. This qualitative check determines whether the state management information system accurately reflects data elements of UI transactions. The UI Benefits extract files are considered to pass this ‘‘quality’’ review if random samples indicate that no more than five percent of the records contain errors. The UI Tax extract files are subjected to different ‘‘quality’’ tests. An extract file of a population is considered valid only if the reported count differs from the reconstructed (validation) count by no more than the appropriate criterion of plus or minus two percent or plus or minus one percent and the samples of transactions have satisfied all quality tests. For Federal fiscal years 2011 and beyond, all states are required to conduct a complete validation every three years. In the following three cases, the three-year rule does not apply and a re-validation must occur within one year: (1) Groups of reported counts that are summed for purposes of making a Pass/Fail determination and do not pass validation by being within plus or minus two percent of the reconstructed counts or the extract file does not pass all quality tests; (2) the validation applies to the two UI Benefits populations and one UI Tax population used for GPRA measures; and (3) reports are produced by new reporting software following a state’s information technology modernization effort. Every year, states must also certify that Module 3, the state specific validation manual of the UI Benefits and UI Tax information systems, are up to date. Section 303(a)(6) of the Social Security Act authorizes this information collection. This information collection is subject to the PRA. A Federal agency generally cannot conduct or sponsor a collection of information, and the public is generally not required to respond to an information collection, unless it is approved by OMB under the PRA and displays a currently valid OMB Control Number. In addition, notwithstanding any other provisions of law, no person shall generally be subject to penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information that does not display a VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:11 Jan 21, 2022 Jkt 256001 valid Control Number. See 5 CFR 1320.5(a) and 1320.6. Interested parties are encouraged to provide comments to the contact shown in the ADDRESSES section. Comments must be written to receive consideration, and they will be summarized and included in the request for OMB approval of the final ICR. In order to help ensure appropriate consideration, comments should mention OMB control number 1205– 0431. Submitted comments will also be a matter of public record for this ICR and posted on the internet, without redaction. DOL encourages commenters not to include personally identifiable information, confidential business data, or other sensitive statements/ information in any comments. DOL is particularly interested in comments that: • Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; • Evaluate the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; • Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and • Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, (e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses). Agency: DOL–ETA. Type of Review: Extension without changes. Title of Collection: Unemployment Insurance (UI) Data Validation (DV). Form: ETA Handbooks 361 and 411. OMB Control Number: 1205–0431. Affected Public: State Workforce Agencies. Estimated Number of Respondents: 53. Frequency: Varies. Total Estimated Annual Responses: 53. Estimated Average Time per Response: Varies. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 23,644. Total Estimated Annual Other Cost Burden: $0. PO 00000 Frm 00095 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 3589 Authority: 44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A). Angela Hanks, Acting Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training, Labor. [FR Doc. 2022–01245 Filed 1–21–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4510–FW–P NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice: (22–006)] Notice of Deep Space Food Challenge Phase 2 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of Deep Space Food Challenge Phase 2. AGENCY: Phase 2 of the Deep Space Food Challenge is open, and teams that wish to compete may now register. NASA seeks to stimulate research and technology solutions to support future missions and inspire new national aerospace capabilities through public prize competitions called Centennial Challenges. The Deep Space Food Challenge is one such competition. Centennial Challenges are managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama and are part of the Prizes, Challenges, and Crowdsourcing program within NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate at the agency’s Headquarters in Washington. Phase 2 of the Deep Space Food Challenge is a prize competition with a total prize purse of $1,000,000 USD, (one million United States dollars) to be awarded to Competitor Teams that build and successfully demonstrate prototypes of novel technologies, systems and approaches for food production for long duration space exploration missions. Teams are not required to have participated in Phase 1 and must meet eligibility requirements in order to participate. NASA is providing the prize purse for U.S. Teams, and the Methuselah Foundation will be conducting the Challenge on behalf of NASA. NASA is considering a Phase 3 (full system demonstration phase) of the competition depending on the outcome of the Phase 2 competition. DATES: Challenge registration for Phase 2 opened January 20, 2022 and will remain open until February 28, 2022. No further requests for registration will be accepted after the stated deadline. Other important dates, including deadlines for key deliverables from the Teams, are listed on the Challenge website: deepspacefoodchallenge.org. ADDRESSES: Phase 2 of the Deep Space Food Challenge requires competitors to SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\24JAN1.SGM 24JAN1 3590 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 15 / Monday, January 24, 2022 / Notices jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with NOTICES1 build and demonstrate their prototypes at their own facility. Required samples from the prototypes will be sent to external laboratories for testing as described in the Official Rules document. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To register for or get additional information regarding the Deep Space Food Challenge, please visit: deepspacefoodchallenge.org. Questions and comments regarding the challenge should be addressed to Monsi Roman, Centennial Challenges Program Manager, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812. Email address: hq-stmdcentennialchallenges@mail.nasa.gov. For general information on NASA prize competitions, challenges, and crowdsourcing opportunities, please visit: nasa.gov/solve. For general information on the Canadian Space Agency please visit: https://www.canada.ca/en/spaceagency.html. General questions and comments regarding the program should be addressed to ASC.DefiAELDSFChallenge.CSA@canada.ca. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Summary Food is a critical component of human space exploration missions. When humans return to the lunar surface, the early missions are expected to use prepackaged foods similar to those in use on the International Space Station (ISS) today but extending the duration of lunar missions requires reducing resupply dependency on Earth. Thus, testing a sustainable system on the Moon that meets lunar crews’ needs is a fundamental step for both lunar sustainability and will also support Mars exploration. As part of this, space agencies are focused on how to furnish crew members with a viable system that produces food for all long duration space missions. Solutions from the Deep Space Food Challenge could be part of the larger food system as an integrated solution that: • Provides all daily nutritional needs • Provides a variety of palatable and safe food choices • Enables acceptable, safe, and quick preparation methods • Limits resource requirements with no dependency on direct periodic resupply from Earth over durations increasing from months to years In short, space agencies will need to provide their future crew members with nutritious foods they will enjoy eating within all of the constraints of current technology for life away from Earth. They must also ensure that the process VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:11 Jan 21, 2022 Jkt 256001 to create, grow, and/or prepare the food is not time consuming and not unpleasant. Although there are many food systems on Earth that may offer benefits to space travelers, the ability of these systems to meet spaceflight demands has not yet been established. Additionally, food insecurity is a significant chronic problem on Earth in urban, rural, and harsh environments and communities. In places like the Arctic and Canada’s North, the cost of providing fresh produce on the shelves can be incredibly high. This can also support greater food production in other milder environments, including major urban centers where vertical farming, urban agriculture and other novel food production techniques can play a more significant role. Disasters can also disrupt supply chains, on which all people depend, and further aggravate food shortages. Developing compact and innovative advanced food system solutions can further enhance local production and reduce food supply chain challenges, providing new solutions for humanitarian responses to floods and droughts, and new technologies for rapid deployment following disasters. The Deep Space Food Challenge will identify technology solutions that can: • Help fill food gaps for a crew of 4 for a three-year round-trip mission with no resupply • Improve the accessibility of food on Earth, in particular, via production directly in urban centers and in remote and harsh environments • Achieve maximum food output with minimal inputs and minimal waste • Create a variety of palatable, nutritious, and safe foods that requires little processing time for crew members This Challenge seeks to incentivize Teams to develop novel technologies, systems and/or approaches for food production that need not meet the full nutritional requirements of future crews but can contribute significantly to and be integrated into a comprehensive food system. I. Prize Amounts Phase 2 of the Deep Space Food Challenge has a total prize purse of $1,000,000 USD, (one million United States dollars). Up to 10 top scoring U.S. Teams will be named ‘‘finalists’’ and will receive $20,000 USD each from NASA and will move on to compete in the final on-site demonstration. After the final on-site demonstration up to 5 top scoring U.S. Teams will each be awarded $150,000 USD each and be PO 00000 Frm 00096 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 invited to compete in Phase 3 (should Phase 3 open for competition). Additionally, a total of $50,000 USD will be available for bonus prizes for up to 5 U.S. Teams to be awarded when finalists Teams are announced. U.S. Teams do not need to be named as a finalist in order to be awarded a bonus prize. U.S. Teams must meet the eligibility requirements for the NASA Prize in order to receive a prize from NASA. II. Eligibility To Participate and Win Prize Money To be eligible to win a prize, competitors must register and comply with all requirements in the Official Rules. Interested Teams should refer to the official Challenge website (deepspacefoodchallenge.org) for full details on eligibility and registration. III. Official Rules The complete official rules for the Deep Space Food Challenge can be found at: deepspacefoodchallenge.org. Deborah F. Bloxon, NASA Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 2022–01310 Filed 1–21–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7510–13–P NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Sunshine Act Meetings The National Science Board’s (NSB) Committee on Oversight hereby gives notice of the scheduling of a teleconference for the transaction of National Science Board business pursuant to the National Science Foundation Act and the Government in the Sunshine Act. TIME AND DATE: Wednesday, January 26, 2022, from 1:00–2:15 p.m. EST. PLACE: This meeting will be held by teleconference through the National Science Foundation. STATUS: Parts of this meeting will be open to the public. The rest of the meeting will be closed to the public. MATTERS TO BE CONSIDERED: Committee Chair’s opening remarks; Approval of prior Committee minutes; Discussion of Committee plans for the remainder of the NSB term; Committee Chair’s opening remarks; Presentation on NSF’s Annual Performance Report, and Committee discussion. PORTIONS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC: Between 1:00–1:30 p.m. EST, the following matters will be considered: Committee Chair’s opening remarks; Approval of prior Committee minutes; Discussion of Committee plans for the remainder of the NSB term. E:\FR\FM\24JAN1.SGM 24JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 87, Number 15 (Monday, January 24, 2022)]
[Notices]
[Pages 3589-3590]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2022-01310]


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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

[Notice: (22-006)]


Notice of Deep Space Food Challenge Phase 2

AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

ACTION: Notice of Deep Space Food Challenge Phase 2.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Phase 2 of the Deep Space Food Challenge is open, and teams 
that wish to compete may now register. NASA seeks to stimulate research 
and technology solutions to support future missions and inspire new 
national aerospace capabilities through public prize competitions 
called Centennial Challenges. The Deep Space Food Challenge is one such 
competition. Centennial Challenges are managed at NASA's Marshall Space 
Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama and are part of the Prizes, 
Challenges, and Crowdsourcing program within NASA's Space Technology 
Mission Directorate at the agency's Headquarters in Washington. Phase 2 
of the Deep Space Food Challenge is a prize competition with a total 
prize purse of $1,000,000 USD, (one million United States dollars) to 
be awarded to Competitor Teams that build and successfully demonstrate 
prototypes of novel technologies, systems and approaches for food 
production for long duration space exploration missions. Teams are not 
required to have participated in Phase 1 and must meet eligibility 
requirements in order to participate. NASA is providing the prize purse 
for U.S. Teams, and the Methuselah Foundation will be conducting the 
Challenge on behalf of NASA. NASA is considering a Phase 3 (full system 
demonstration phase) of the competition depending on the outcome of the 
Phase 2 competition.

DATES: Challenge registration for Phase 2 opened January 20, 2022 and 
will remain open until February 28, 2022. No further requests for 
registration will be accepted after the stated deadline. Other 
important dates, including deadlines for key deliverables from the 
Teams, are listed on the Challenge website: deepspacefoodchallenge.org.

ADDRESSES: Phase 2 of the Deep Space Food Challenge requires 
competitors to

[[Page 3590]]

build and demonstrate their prototypes at their own facility. Required 
samples from the prototypes will be sent to external laboratories for 
testing as described in the Official Rules document.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To register for or get additional 
information regarding the Deep Space Food Challenge, please visit: 
deepspacefoodchallenge.org.
    Questions and comments regarding the challenge should be addressed 
to Monsi Roman, Centennial Challenges Program Manager, NASA Marshall 
Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812. Email address: [email protected]. For general information on NASA 
prize competitions, challenges, and crowdsourcing opportunities, please 
visit: nasa.gov/solve.
    For general information on the Canadian Space Agency please visit: 
https://www.canada.ca/en/space-agency.html. General questions and 
comments regarding the program should be addressed to [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Summary

    Food is a critical component of human space exploration missions. 
When humans return to the lunar surface, the early missions are 
expected to use prepackaged foods similar to those in use on the 
International Space Station (ISS) today but extending the duration of 
lunar missions requires reducing resupply dependency on Earth. Thus, 
testing a sustainable system on the Moon that meets lunar crews' needs 
is a fundamental step for both lunar sustainability and will also 
support Mars exploration. As part of this, space agencies are focused 
on how to furnish crew members with a viable system that produces food 
for all long duration space missions. Solutions from the Deep Space 
Food Challenge could be part of the larger food system as an integrated 
solution that:

 Provides all daily nutritional needs
 Provides a variety of palatable and safe food choices
 Enables acceptable, safe, and quick preparation methods
 Limits resource requirements with no dependency on direct 
periodic resupply from Earth over durations increasing from months to 
years

    In short, space agencies will need to provide their future crew 
members with nutritious foods they will enjoy eating within all of the 
constraints of current technology for life away from Earth. They must 
also ensure that the process to create, grow, and/or prepare the food 
is not time consuming and not unpleasant. Although there are many food 
systems on Earth that may offer benefits to space travelers, the 
ability of these systems to meet spaceflight demands has not yet been 
established.
    Additionally, food insecurity is a significant chronic problem on 
Earth in urban, rural, and harsh environments and communities. In 
places like the Arctic and Canada's North, the cost of providing fresh 
produce on the shelves can be incredibly high. This can also support 
greater food production in other milder environments, including major 
urban centers where vertical farming, urban agriculture and other novel 
food production techniques can play a more significant role.
    Disasters can also disrupt supply chains, on which all people 
depend, and further aggravate food shortages. Developing compact and 
innovative advanced food system solutions can further enhance local 
production and reduce food supply chain challenges, providing new 
solutions for humanitarian responses to floods and droughts, and new 
technologies for rapid deployment following disasters.
    The Deep Space Food Challenge will identify technology solutions 
that can:

 Help fill food gaps for a crew of 4 for a three-year round-
trip mission with no resupply
 Improve the accessibility of food on Earth, in particular, via 
production directly in urban centers and in remote and harsh 
environments
 Achieve maximum food output with minimal inputs and minimal 
waste
 Create a variety of palatable, nutritious, and safe foods that 
requires little processing time for crew members

    This Challenge seeks to incentivize Teams to develop novel 
technologies, systems and/or approaches for food production that need 
not meet the full nutritional requirements of future crews but can 
contribute significantly to and be integrated into a comprehensive food 
system.

I. Prize Amounts

    Phase 2 of the Deep Space Food Challenge has a total prize purse of 
$1,000,000 USD, (one million United States dollars).
    Up to 10 top scoring U.S. Teams will be named ``finalists'' and 
will receive $20,000 USD each from NASA and will move on to compete in 
the final on-site demonstration.
    After the final on-site demonstration up to 5 top scoring U.S. 
Teams will each be awarded $150,000 USD each and be invited to compete 
in Phase 3 (should Phase 3 open for competition).
    Additionally, a total of $50,000 USD will be available for bonus 
prizes for up to 5 U.S. Teams to be awarded when finalists Teams are 
announced. U.S. Teams do not need to be named as a finalist in order to 
be awarded a bonus prize.
    U.S. Teams must meet the eligibility requirements for the NASA 
Prize in order to receive a prize from NASA.

II. Eligibility To Participate and Win Prize Money

    To be eligible to win a prize, competitors must register and comply 
with all requirements in the Official Rules. Interested Teams should 
refer to the official Challenge website (deepspacefoodchallenge.org) 
for full details on eligibility and registration.

III. Official Rules

    The complete official rules for the Deep Space Food Challenge can 
be found at: deepspacefoodchallenge.org.

Deborah F. Bloxon,
NASA Federal Register Liaison Officer.
[FR Doc. 2022-01310 Filed 1-21-22; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 7510-13-P