Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, MA, 1185-1186 [2022-00227]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 6 / Monday, January 10, 2022 / Notices Groups referred to in the July 19, 2021 notice as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes and Groups’’ that this notice has been published. Dated: January 3, 2022. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2022–00228 Filed 1–7–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0033208; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, MA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Berkshire Museum, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Berkshire Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Berkshire Museum at the address in this notice by February 9, 2022. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jason Vivori, Berkshire Museum, 39 South Street, Pittsfield, MA 01201, telephone (413) 443–7171 Ext. 341, email jvivori@berkshiremuseum.org. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, MA, that meet the definition of objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:16 Jan 07, 2022 Jkt 256001 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items In the mid-18th century, two cultural items were removed from Whahktukuk in Berkshire County, MA. According to museum documentation, both items were donated to the Berkshire Museum in 1958 by Allen Peck of Pittsfield. According to the donor, both items had been given to Israel Dickinson of Pittsfield (1736–1777), his great-great grandfather, by Sachem John Konkapot of Stockbridge (ca. 1690–1765), a significant leader in the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin. The two objects of cultural patrimony are one wampum pouch and one pair of moccasins. In consultation with the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin, the Berkshire Museum has determined that the date and provenience of the cultural items reasonably accord with the lives of both John Konkapot and Israel Dickinson. Consequently, the information in the possession of the Berkshire Museum shows that Sachem Konkapot was the caretaker of the pouch and moccasins prior to the donor’s great-great grandfather, Israel Dickinson, coming into possession of them. The wampum pouch has ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual, and cannot be alienated, appropriated, or conveyed by an individual regardless of whether or not the individual is a member of the Indian Tribe. Written histories establish the wampum pouch as a continuing culturally significant artifact since at least the eighteenth century. In Stockbridge Past and Present, or, Records of an Old Mission Station, Hendrick Aupaumut, a wellknown 18th century Stockbridge Mohican historian and diplomat wrote, ‘‘The Sachem is allowed to keep Mnoti, or peaceable bag, or bag of peace. . . In this bag they keep various Squau-thowon, or belts of wampum: Also strings; which belts and strings they used to establish peace and friendship with different nations, and to use them on many occasions, and passed as coin. In this bag they keep all belts and strings which they received of their allies of different nations.’’ Aupaumut added, ‘‘Another, and important use of the PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 1185 Wampum was its substitution in the place of writing. The red bead signified blood, the black or dark colors had a severe meaning, while white denoted peace. Then ideas could be conveyed by various figures into which It was wrought, a red hatchet, for instance, readily suggesting the idea of war. Thus, not only the fact that a treaty had been made, but its terms could be kept in mind, and the various circumstances in the history of a nation could be recorded.’’ Accordingly, the wampum pouch is hereditary to the office of the Sachem, allowing the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin to establish treaties with other nations serving as a literal container of history and oral tradition. The pair of moccasins also satisfy NAGPRA’s definition of cultural patrimony. They are significant for having belonged to Stockbridge-Munsee Sachem John Konkapot. Determinations Made by the Berkshire Museum Officials of the Berkshire Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the two cultural items described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the cultural patrimony and the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Jason Vivori, Berkshire Museum, 39 South Street, Pittsfield, MA 01201, telephone (413) 443–7171 Ext. 341, email jvivori@berkshiremuseum.org, by February 9, 2022. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the objects of cultural patrimony to the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin may proceed. The Berkshire Museum is responsible for notifying the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin that this notice has been published. E:\FR\FM\10JAN1.SGM 10JAN1 1186 Federal Register / Vol. 87, No. 6 / Monday, January 10, 2022 / Notices Dated: January 3, 2022. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. reproduction cost) payable to the United States Treasury. Lori Jonas, Assistant Section Chief, Environmental Enforcement Section, Environment and Natural Resources Division. [FR Doc. 2022–00227 Filed 1–7–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P [FR Doc. 2022–00198 Filed 1–7–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–15–P DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE On December 29, 2021, the Department of Justice lodged a proposed Consent Decree with the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina, in the lawsuit entitled United States v. New-Indy Catawba LLC, Civil Action No. 0:21–cv–02053–SAL. The United States filed this lawsuit under the Clean Air Act. The United States’ complaint seeks injunctive relief related to emissions of Hydrogen Sulfide from defendant’s paper mill in Catawba, South Carolina. The consent decree requires the defendant to perform injunctive relief to abate hydrogen sulfide emissions, and to pay a $1.1 million civil penalty. The publication of this notice opens a period for public comment on the Consent Decree. Comments should be addressed to the Assistant Attorney General, Environment and Natural Resources Division, and should refer to United States v. New-Indy Catawba LLC, D.J. Ref. No. 90–5–2–1–12471. All comments must be submitted no later than thirty (30) days after the publication date of this notice. Comments may be submitted either by email or by mail: To submit comments: Send them to: By email ......... pubcomment-ees.enrd@ usdoj.gov. Assistant Attorney General, U.S. DOJ—ENRD, P.O. Box 7611, Washington, DC 20044–7611. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES By mail ........... During the public comment period, the Consent Decree may be examined at and downloaded from this Justice Department website: https:// www.justice.gov/enrd/consent-decrees. We will provide a paper copy of the Consent Decree upon written request and payment of reproduction costs. Please mail your request and payment to: Consent Decree Library, U.S. DOJ— ENRD, P.O. Box 7611, Washington, DC 20044–7611. Please enclose a check or money order for $8.75 (25 cents per page VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:16 Jan 07, 2022 Jkt 256001 Notice of Lodging of Proposed Stipulation and Settlement Agreement Under The Toxic Substances Control Act On January 3, 2022, the Department of Justice lodged a proposed stipulation and settlement agreement with the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York in the lawsuit entitled United States of America v. SYG Realties, L.L.C., All Year Management NY, Inc., and All Year Management, L.L.C., Case No. 22– CV–14. The United States filed this lawsuit to seek civil penalties and injunctive relief for violations of the Toxic Substances Control Act, 15 U.S.C. 2682(c), 2686(b) and 2687, (‘‘TSCA’’) and the Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule, 40 CFR part 745, subpart E (‘‘RRP Rule’’). The alleged violations concern the alleged failure of SYG Realties, L.L.C., All Year Management NY, Inc., and All Year Management, L.L.C. (‘‘defendants’’), business entities that renovated residential units, to comply with TSCA and the RRP Rule at five locations in Brooklyn, New York. The Complaint alleges that defendants, inter alia, failed to obtain firm certification, failed to use certified renovators, failed to comply with safe work-practice requirements, failed to provide the ‘‘Renovate Right’’ Pamphlet or post warning signs, and failed to establish records demonstrating compliance with the RRP Rule, maintain those records, and make them available to EPA. The Stipulation and Settlement Agreement requires defendants to implement injunctive relief that includes advising EPA of any intent to engage in any renovation work governed by the RRP Rule in the future and then to negotiate a compliance plan with EPA that is enforceable through the Stipulation and Settlement Agreement. The publication of this notice opens a period for public comment on the proposed Stipulation and Settlement Agreement. Comments should be addressed to the Assistant Attorney General, Environment and Natural Resources Division, and should refer to United States of America v. SYG PO 00000 Frm 00081 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Realties, L.L.C., All Year Management NY, Inc., and All Year Management, L.L.C., Civil Action No. 22–CV–14, D.J. Ref. No. 90–5–1–1–11074. All comments must be submitted no later than 30 days after the publication date of this notice. Comments may be submitted either by email or by mail: To submit comments: Send them to: By email ....... pubcomment-ees.enrd@ usdoj.gov. Assistant Attorney General, U.S. DOJ—ENRD, P.O. Box 7611, Washington, DC 20044–7611. By mail ......... During the public comment period, the Stipulation and Settlement Agreement may be examined and downloaded at this Justice Department website: https://www.justice.gov/enrd/ consent-decrees. We will provide a paper copy of the Stipulation and Settlement Agreement upon written request and payment of reproduction costs. Please mail your request and payment to: Consent Decree Library, U.S. DOJ—ENRD, P.O. Box 7611, Washington, DC 20044–7611. Please enclose a check or money order for $1.75 (25 cents per page reproduction cost) payable to the United States Treasury. Henry Friedman, Assistant Section Chief, U.S. Department of Justice, Environment and Natural Resources Division, Environmental Enforcement Section. [FR Doc. 2022–00174 Filed 1–7–22; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–15–P DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration [Exemption Application No. D–12065] Proposed Exemption for Certain Prohibited Transaction Restrictions Involving Credit Suisse Group AG (CSG or the Applicant), Zurich, Switzerland Employee Benefits Security Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice of proposed exemption. AGENCY: This document provides notice of the pendency before the Department of Labor (the Department) of a proposed individual exemption from certain of the prohibited transaction restrictions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) and/or the Internal Revenue Code of SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\10JAN1.SGM 10JAN1

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[Federal Register Volume 87, Number 6 (Monday, January 10, 2022)]
[Notices]
[Pages 1185-1186]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2022-00227]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0033208; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Berkshire Museum, 
Pittsfield, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Berkshire Museum, in consultation with the appropriate 
Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the 
cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of objects of 
cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian 
Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice 
that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request 
to the Berkshire Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, 
transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, 
Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
claim these cultural items should submit a written request with 
information in support of the claim to the Berkshire Museum at the 
address in this notice by February 9, 2022.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jason Vivori, Berkshire Museum, 39 
South Street, Pittsfield, MA 01201, telephone (413) 443-7171 Ext. 341, 
email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the 
control of the Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, MA, that meet the 
definition of objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    In the mid-18th century, two cultural items were removed from 
Whahktukuk in Berkshire County, MA. According to museum documentation, 
both items were donated to the Berkshire Museum in 1958 by Allen Peck 
of Pittsfield. According to the donor, both items had been given to 
Israel Dickinson of Pittsfield (1736-1777), his great-great 
grandfather, by Sachem John Konkapot of Stockbridge (ca. 1690-1765), a 
significant leader in the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin. The 
two objects of cultural patrimony are one wampum pouch and one pair of 
moccasins.
    In consultation with the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin, 
the Berkshire Museum has determined that the date and provenience of 
the cultural items reasonably accord with the lives of both John 
Konkapot and Israel Dickinson. Consequently, the information in the 
possession of the Berkshire Museum shows that Sachem Konkapot was the 
caretaker of the pouch and moccasins prior to the donor's great-great 
grandfather, Israel Dickinson, coming into possession of them.
    The wampum pouch has ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural 
importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, 
rather than property owned by an individual, and cannot be alienated, 
appropriated, or conveyed by an individual regardless of whether or not 
the individual is a member of the Indian Tribe. Written histories 
establish the wampum pouch as a continuing culturally significant 
artifact since at least the eighteenth century. In Stockbridge Past and 
Present, or, Records of an Old Mission Station, Hendrick Aupaumut, a 
well-known 18th century Stockbridge Mohican historian and diplomat 
wrote, ``The Sachem is allowed to keep Mno-ti, or peaceable bag, or bag 
of peace. . . In this bag they keep various Squau-tho-won, or belts of 
wampum: Also strings; which belts and strings they used to establish 
peace and friendship with different nations, and to use them on many 
occasions, and passed as coin. In this bag they keep all belts and 
strings which they received of their allies of different nations.'' 
Aupaumut added, ``Another, and important use of the Wampum was its 
substitution in the place of writing. The red bead signified blood, the 
black or dark colors had a severe meaning, while white denoted peace. 
Then ideas could be conveyed by various figures into which It was 
wrought, a red hatchet, for instance, readily suggesting the idea of 
war. Thus, not only the fact that a treaty had been made, but its terms 
could be kept in mind, and the various circumstances in the history of 
a nation could be recorded.'' Accordingly, the wampum pouch is 
hereditary to the office of the Sachem, allowing the Stockbridge Munsee 
Community, Wisconsin to establish treaties with other nations serving 
as a literal container of history and oral tradition.
    The pair of moccasins also satisfy NAGPRA's definition of cultural 
patrimony. They are significant for having belonged to Stockbridge-
Munsee Sachem John Konkapot.

Determinations Made by the Berkshire Museum

    Officials of the Berkshire Museum have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the two cultural items 
described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural 
importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, 
rather than property owned by an individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
cultural patrimony and the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim 
these cultural items should submit a written request with information 
in support of the claim to Jason Vivori, Berkshire Museum, 39 South 
Street, Pittsfield, MA 01201, telephone (413) 443-7171 Ext. 341, email 
[email protected], by February 9, 2022. After that date, if 
no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the 
objects of cultural patrimony to the Stockbridge Munsee Community, 
Wisconsin may proceed.
    The Berkshire Museum is responsible for notifying the Stockbridge 
Munsee Community, Wisconsin that this notice has been published.


[[Page 1186]]


    Dated: January 3, 2022.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2022-00227 Filed 1-7-22; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P