Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Council Meetings for 2022, 71077-71079 [2021-26885]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 237 / Tuesday, December 14, 2021 / Notices conservation plan, or other conservation mechanism appropriate to the land status. In addition, conservation easements or other conservation mechanisms appropriate to the land status are held on neighboring lands, such that new developments (e.g., residential, agricultural, and commercial) are minimized and do not impact groundwater availability in the cie´negas supporting Canelo Hills ladiestresses populations. Criterion 5: In fulfillment of Criterion 4, above, conservation and management programs and plans address the threats of cie´nega habitat loss, direct loss of Canelo Hills ladies-tresses, and pollinator decline to ensure continued existence of the species. The following requirements must be met: (a) Sitespecific plans are developed and fully implemented, such that competing native and nonnative vegetation is reduced to a level that ensures Canelo Hills ladies-tresses is not shaded and their vigor is not negatively affected; a more natural fire or other disturbance regime is maintained; natural spring flow supporting cienegas is increased by reducing water loss and increasing water conservation and recharge; moist soil cie´nega habitat is increased; predation and herbivory are minimized; and native plant diversity is maintained, thus promoting native pollinators; and (b) data on the conservation and management of Canelo Hills ladiestresses are collected and shared between land managers and researchers. jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with NOTICES1 Peer Review In accordance with our policy, ‘‘Notice of Interagency Cooperative Policy for Peer Review in Endangered Species Act Activities,’’ which we published on July 1, 1994 (59 FR 34270), and our August 22, 2016, Memorandum, ‘‘Peer Review Process,’’ we have sought the expert opinion of at least three appropriate and independent specialists regarding scientific data and interpretations contained in the species biological report and the draft recovery plan. We have ensured that the opinions of peer reviewers were objective and unbiased by following the guidelines set forth in the 2016 Memorandum, which updates and clarifies our policy on peer review. The purpose of such review was to ensure that our decisions are based on scientifically sound data, assumptions, and analysis. We have addressed peer review comments and incorporated changes in the publicly available version of the SSA and this version of the draft recovery plan. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:24 Dec 13, 2021 Jkt 256001 Request for Public Comments Section 4(f) of the ESA requires us to provide public notice and an opportunity for public review and comment during recovery plan development. Substantive comments may or may not result in changes to the recovery plan. Comments regarding recovery plan implementation will be forwarded as appropriate to Federal or other entities so that they can be taken into account during the course of implementation of recovery actions. We invite written comments on this draft recovery plan. In particular, we are interested in additional information regarding the current threats to the species, ongoing beneficial management efforts, and the costs associated with implementing the recommended recovery actions. We are specifically seeking comments on the following questions: • Understanding that the time and cost presented in the draft recovery plan will be fine-tuned as the RIS is implemented, are the estimated time and cost to recovery presented here realistic? Is the estimate reflective of the time and cost of actions that may have already been implemented by Federal, State, county, or other agencies? If not, please provide suggestions or methods for determining a more accurate estimation. • Do the draft recovery criteria provide clear direction to partners on what is needed to recover Canelo Hills ladies-tresses? How could they be improved for clarity? • Are the draft recovery criteria both objective and measurable given the information available for Canelo Hills ladies-tresses? Please provide suggestions. • Understanding that specific, detailed, and area-specific recovery activities have been developed in the RIS, do the draft recovery actions presented in the draft recovery plan generally cover the types of actions necessary to meet the recovery criteria? If not, what general actions are missing? Are any of the draft recovery actions unnecessary for achieving recovery? Have we prioritized the actions appropriately? The SSA is available as a supporting document for the draft recovery plan, but we are not seeking comments on that document. We will consider all comments we receive by the date specified in DATES, above, prior to final approval of the plan. Public Availability of Comments All comments we receive, including names and addresses, will become part PO 00000 Frm 00076 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 71077 of the administrative record and will be available to the public. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—will be publicly available. While you may request in your comment that we withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Authority We developed our draft recovery plan and publish this notice under the authority of section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Amy Lueders, Regional Director, Southwest Region, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2021–27013 Filed 12–13–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R7–SM–2021–N200; FF07J00000 FXRS12610700000 212] Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Council Meetings for 2022 AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meetings. The Federal Subsistence Board (Board) announces the public meetings of the 10 Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Councils (hereafter, Councils) for the winter and fall cycles of 2022. The 10 Councils each meet approximately twice a year to provide advice and recommendations to the Board about subsistence hunting and fishing issues on Federal public lands in Alaska. SUMMARY: Winter 2022 Meetings: The Alaska Subsistence Councils will meet via teleconference between February 8, 2022, and March 24, 2022, as shown in Table 1. For more information about accessing the meetings, visit the Councils’ website at https:// www.doi.gov/subsistence/regions. DATES: E:\FR\FM\14DEN1.SGM 14DEN1 71078 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 237 / Tuesday, December 14, 2021 / Notices TABLE 1—WINTER 2022 MEETINGS OF THE ALASKA SUBSISTENCE COUNCILS Regional advisory council Dates Southeast AK—Region 1 ............. Southcentral AK—Region 2 ......... Kodiak/Aleutians—Region 3 ........ Bristol Bay—Region 4 .................. Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta—Region 5. Western Interior—Region 6 ......... Seward Peninsula—Region 7 ...... March 22–24. February 10–11. February 22–23. February 8–9. March 1–2. February 16–17. March 3–4. Fall 2022 Meetings: The Alaska TABLE 1—WINTER 2022 MEETINGS OF THE ALASKA SUBSISTENCE COUN- Subsistence Councils will meet between September 20, 2022, and November 2, CILS—Continued Regional advisory council Dates Northwest Arctic—Region 8 ......... Eastern Interior—Region 9 .......... North Slope—Region 10 .............. Joint Southcentral AK—Region 2 and Eastern Interior—Region 9. February 14–15. March 8–9. March 8–9. March 16. 2022, as shown in Table 2. A teleconference will substitute for an inperson meeting if public health or safety restrictions are in effect. To determine whether the meetings will be held via teleconference or in-person, visit the Councils’ website at https:// www.doi.gov/subsistence/regions. jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with NOTICES1 TABLE 2—FALL 2022 MEETINGS OF THE ALASKA SUBSISTENCE COUNCILS Regional advisory council Dates Southeast AK—Region 1 ........................................................................ Southcentral AK—Region 2 .................................................................... Kodiak/Aleutians—Region 3 .................................................................... Bristol Bay—Region 4 ............................................................................. Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta—Region 5 ....................................................... Western Interior—Region 6 ..................................................................... Seward Peninsula—Region 7 ................................................................. Northwest Arctic—Region 8 .................................................................... Eastern Interior—Region 9 ...................................................................... North Slope—Region 10 ......................................................................... October 25–27 ............................... October 13–14 ............................... September 20–21 .......................... November 1–2 ............................... October 27–28 ............................... October 19–20 ............................... October 4–5 ................................... October 31–November 1 ............... October 5–6 ................................... October 13–14 ............................... The meetings are open to the public. For more information see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT, below. ADDRESSES: Specific information about meeting locations and the final agendas can be found on the Federal Subsistence Management Program website at: https://www.doi.gov/subsistence/ regions. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Chair, Federal Subsistence Board, c/o U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Attention: Sue Detwiler, Assistant Regional Director, Office of Subsistence Management; (907) 786–3888 or subsistence@fws.gov. For questions specific to National Forest System lands, contact Gregory Risdahl, Subsistence Program Leader, (907) 302– 7354 or gregory.risdahl@usda.gov. Reasonable Accommodations: The Federal Subsistence Board is committed to providing access to these meetings for all participants. Please direct all requests for sign language interpreting services, closed captioning, or other accommodation needs to Katerina Wessels, (907) 786–3885, katerina_ wessels@fws.gov, or 800–877–8339 (TTY), 7 business days prior to the meeting you would like to attend. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Subsistence Board announces the 2022 public meeting schedule for the 10 Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Councils, in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2). Established in 1993, the Councils are statutory Federal advisory committees that provide a public forum for their regions and VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:24 Dec 13, 2021 Jkt 256001 recommendations to the Federal Subsistence Board about subsistence hunting, trapping, and fishing issues on Federal public lands in Alaska, as authorized by section 805 of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA; 16 U.S.C. 3111–3126). The Councils are a crucial link between federally qualified subsistence users and the Federal Subsistence Board. The Board is a multi-agency body with representation from a Chair and two public members who are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior with concurrence of the Secretary of Agriculture, and representatives of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the USDA–Forest Service. Each Council meets approximately two times per calendar year, once in the winter and once in the fall, to attend to business and develop proposals and recommendations to the Board. Meeting Agendas Winter Meetings • General Council business: Review and adopt agenda; election of officers; review and approve previous meeting minutes; Council Chair and members reports; public and Tribal comments on non-agenda items. • Briefing and Council comments on proposed actions to automate Federal subsistence permits. • Develop proposals and accept public comment to change subsistence take of fish and shellfish regulations. PO 00000 Frm 00077 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Location (if in-person) TBD. TBD. Cold Bay. Dillingham. TBD. Fairbanks. Nome. Kotzebue. Fort Yukon. TBD. • Briefing on the Secretarial regulations proposing the inclusion of identified submerged lands in the Tongass National Forest. • Review and approve Annual Report. • Agency reports. • Future meeting dates. Fall Meetings • General Council business: Review and adopt agenda; review and approve previous meeting minutes; Council Chair and members reports; public and Tribal comments on non-agenda items. • Prepare recommendations and accept public comments on proposals to change subsistence take of fish and shellfish regulations. • Define issues for upcoming Annual Report. • Develop priority information needs for the Fisheries Resource Monitoring Program. • Agency reports. • Future meeting dates. A notice will be published of specific dates, times, and meeting locations in local and statewide newspapers prior to both series of meetings; in addition, announcements will be made on local radio stations and posted on social media and the Federal Subsistence Management Program website. Locations and dates may change based on weather or local circumstances. A teleconference will substitute for an inperson meeting if public health or safety restrictions are in effect. The final draft agendas, call-in numbers, how to participate and provide public comments, and other related meeting E:\FR\FM\14DEN1.SGM 14DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 237 / Tuesday, December 14, 2021 / Notices information will be posted on the Federal Subsistence Management Program website at https://www.doi.gov/ subsistence/regions and on social media at https://www.facebook.com/ subsistencealaska/. Transcripts of the meetings are maintained by the Program and will be available for public inspection within 14 days after each meeting at https://www.doi.gov/ subsistence/regions. Public Disclosure of Comments: Time will be allowed for any individual or organization wishing to present oral or written comments. If you are not available to submit your comments, you may have a second party present your comments on your behalf. Any written comments received will be presented to the Council members by staff. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Authority 5 U.S.C. Appendix. Sue Detwiler, Assistant Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Gregory Risdahl, Subsistence Program Leader, USDA–Forest Service. [FR Doc. 2021–26885 Filed 12–13–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P; 3411–15–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R6–ES–2021–N182; FXES11140600000] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Recovery Plan for Meltwater Lednian Stonefly (Lednia tumana) and Western Glacier Stonefly (Zapada glacier) AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with NOTICES1 Interior. ACTION: Notice of document availability for review and comment. We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the availability of a draft recovery plan for meltwater lednian stonefly and western glacier stonefly, two insect species listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We request SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:24 Dec 13, 2021 Jkt 256001 review and comment on this draft recovery plan from Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies and the public. We must receive any comments on the draft recovery plan on or before February 14, 2022. ADDRESSES: Document availability: Copies of the draft recovery plan are available at http://www.fws.gov/endangered/ species/recovery-plans.html. Alternatively, you may request a copy by U.S. mail from the Montana Ecological Services Field Office; 585 Shepard Way, Suite 1; Helena, MT 59601; or by telephone at 406–449– 5225. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf may call the Federal Relay Service at 800–877–8339. Submitting comments: If you wish to comment on the draft recovery plan, you may submit your comments in writing by email to Ben Conard, at ben_ conard@fws.gov, or by U.S. mail to Ben Conard, Acting Project Leader, at the above U.S. mail address. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ben Conard, Acting Project Leader, at the above U.S. mail address or by telephone at 406–449–5225. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf may call the Federal Relay Service at 800–877–8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the availability of a draft recovery plan for meltwater lednian stonefly (Lednia tumana; hereafter, MWS) and western glacier stonefly (Zapada glacier; hereafter, WGS), two insects listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, as amended (Act; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). The draft recovery plan includes objective, measurable criteria, and site-specific management actions as may be necessary to remove each species from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife. We request review and comment on this draft recovery plan from Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies and the public. DATES: Species Information On December 23, 2019, we listed the MWS and WGS as threatened species (November 21, 2019; 84 FR 64210). We did not designate critical habitat for either species. We prepared a biological report for the MWS and WGS (Service 2020), which is an in-depth but not exhaustive review of the species’ biology and threats, an evaluation of its biological status, and an assessment of the resources and conditions needed to PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 71079 maintain long-term viability. We summarize the biological report below. MWS and WGS are small insects in the stonefly family (Nemouridae) that live in alpine streams that flow from melting glaciers and snowfields in Montana, Wyoming, and southwest Alberta, Canada. Both species begin life as eggs, hatch into aquatic nymphs, and later mature into winged adults, surviving briefly on land before reproducing and dying. Both stonefly species prefer cold water temperatures, and therefore are most often found within the first 600 meters (1,968 feet) of a stream, almost immediately downstream from sources of frozen water, such as glaciers and snowfields. The National Park Service manages 94 percent and 63 percent of habitat for MWS and WGS, respectively. The U.S. Forest Service manages 5 percent and 37 percent of habitat for MWS and WGS, respectively. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes manage less than 1 percent of habitat for MWS. The MWS currently occupies 113 streams across its known range, and the WGS currently occupies 16 streams across its known range; however, cumulatively, both species occupy relatively small amounts of habitat per stream on average, approximately 600 meters (1,968 feet) per stream. Both species occupy only these small amounts of area per stream because of their low thermal tolerances and the rapid warming of meltwater streams downstream of the meltwater sources, from full sun exposure in alpine environments. Further, both species inhabit the most upstream reaches of their meltwater habitats and cannot disperse further upstream if water temperatures warm beyond their thermal tolerances. This narrow distribution within streams and inability to disperse upstream increases the risk of harm due to stochastic events, such as drought or annual weather fluctuations. Thus, the current overall resiliency of the meltwater habitat and sources for both species is low. The primary threat to both stonefly species and their habitat is habitat degradation and fragmentation due to climate change. Both stonefly species are intimately tied to cold meltwater aquatic habitat, the sources of which are glaciers or snowfields. Thus, the viability of both species is closely linked to the persistence of these glaciers and snowfields and their ability to continue to provide meltwater habitat in a warming climate. These meltwater sources vary in size, but most are predicted to completely melt by 2030. Warming air temperatures have already E:\FR\FM\14DEN1.SGM 14DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 237 (Tuesday, December 14, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 71077-71079]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-26885]


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Forest Service

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R7-SM-2021-N200; FF07J00000 FXRS12610700000 212]


Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Council Meetings for 2022

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of meetings.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Federal Subsistence Board (Board) announces the public 
meetings of the 10 Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Councils 
(hereafter, Councils) for the winter and fall cycles of 2022. The 10 
Councils each meet approximately twice a year to provide advice and 
recommendations to the Board about subsistence hunting and fishing 
issues on Federal public lands in Alaska.

DATES: Winter 2022 Meetings: The Alaska Subsistence Councils will meet 
via teleconference between February 8, 2022, and March 24, 2022, as 
shown in Table 1. For more information about accessing the meetings, 
visit the Councils' website at https://www.doi.gov/subsistence/regions.

[[Page 71078]]



    Table 1--Winter 2022 Meetings of the Alaska Subsistence Councils
------------------------------------------------------------------------
         Regional advisory council                      Dates
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Southeast AK--Region 1....................  March 22-24.
Southcentral AK--Region 2.................  February 10-11.
Kodiak/Aleutians--Region 3................  February 22-23.
Bristol Bay--Region 4.....................  February 8-9.
Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta--Region 5...........  March 1-2.
Western Interior--Region 6................  February 16-17.
Seward Peninsula--Region 7................  March 3-4.
Northwest Arctic--Region 8................  February 14-15.
Eastern Interior--Region 9................  March 8-9.
North Slope--Region 10....................  March 8-9.
Joint Southcentral AK--Region 2 and         March 16.
 Eastern Interior--Region 9.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Fall 2022 Meetings: The Alaska Subsistence Councils will meet 
between September 20, 2022, and November 2, 2022, as shown in Table 2. 
A teleconference will substitute for an in-person meeting if public 
health or safety restrictions are in effect. To determine whether the 
meetings will be held via teleconference or in-person, visit the 
Councils' website at https://www.doi.gov/subsistence/regions.

     Table 2--Fall 2022 Meetings of the Alaska Subsistence Councils
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                       Location (if in-
    Regional advisory council            Dates              person)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Southeast AK--Region 1..........  October 25-27.....  TBD.
Southcentral AK--Region 2.......  October 13-14.....  TBD.
Kodiak/Aleutians--Region 3......  September 20-21...  Cold Bay.
Bristol Bay--Region 4...........  November 1-2......  Dillingham.
Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta--Region 5.  October 27-28.....  TBD.
Western Interior--Region 6......  October 19-20.....  Fairbanks.
Seward Peninsula--Region 7......  October 4-5.......  Nome.
Northwest Arctic--Region 8......  October 31-         Kotzebue.
                                   November 1.
Eastern Interior--Region 9......  October 5-6.......  Fort Yukon.
North Slope--Region 10..........  October 13-14.....  TBD.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The meetings are open to the public. For more information see FOR 
FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT, below.

ADDRESSES: Specific information about meeting locations and the final 
agendas can be found on the Federal Subsistence Management Program 
website at: https://www.doi.gov/subsistence/regions.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Chair, Federal Subsistence Board, c/o 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Attention: Sue Detwiler, Assistant 
Regional Director, Office of Subsistence Management; (907) 786-3888 or 
[email protected]. For questions specific to National Forest System 
lands, contact Gregory Risdahl, Subsistence Program Leader, (907) 302-
7354 or [email protected].
    Reasonable Accommodations: The Federal Subsistence Board is 
committed to providing access to these meetings for all participants. 
Please direct all requests for sign language interpreting services, 
closed captioning, or other accommodation needs to Katerina Wessels, 
(907) 786-3885, [email protected], or 800-877-8339 (TTY), 7 
business days prior to the meeting you would like to attend.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Subsistence Board announces the 
2022 public meeting schedule for the 10 Alaska Subsistence Regional 
Advisory Councils, in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee 
Act (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2). Established in 1993, the Councils are 
statutory Federal advisory committees that provide a public forum for 
their regions and recommendations to the Federal Subsistence Board 
about subsistence hunting, trapping, and fishing issues on Federal 
public lands in Alaska, as authorized by section 805 of the Alaska 
National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA; 16 U.S.C. 3111-3126).
    The Councils are a crucial link between federally qualified 
subsistence users and the Federal Subsistence Board. The Board is a 
multi-agency body with representation from a Chair and two public 
members who are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior with 
concurrence of the Secretary of Agriculture, and representatives of the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Land 
Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the USDA-Forest Service.
    Each Council meets approximately two times per calendar year, once 
in the winter and once in the fall, to attend to business and develop 
proposals and recommendations to the Board.

Meeting Agendas

Winter Meetings

     General Council business: Review and adopt agenda; 
election of officers; review and approve previous meeting minutes; 
Council Chair and members reports; public and Tribal comments on non-
agenda items.
     Briefing and Council comments on proposed actions to 
automate Federal subsistence permits.
     Develop proposals and accept public comment to change 
subsistence take of fish and shellfish regulations.
     Briefing on the Secretarial regulations proposing the 
inclusion of identified submerged lands in the Tongass National Forest.
     Review and approve Annual Report.
     Agency reports.
     Future meeting dates.

Fall Meetings

     General Council business: Review and adopt agenda; review 
and approve previous meeting minutes; Council Chair and members 
reports; public and Tribal comments on non-agenda items.
     Prepare recommendations and accept public comments on 
proposals to change subsistence take of fish and shellfish regulations.
     Define issues for upcoming Annual Report.
     Develop priority information needs for the Fisheries 
Resource Monitoring Program.
     Agency reports.
     Future meeting dates.
    A notice will be published of specific dates, times, and meeting 
locations in local and statewide newspapers prior to both series of 
meetings; in addition, announcements will be made on local radio 
stations and posted on social media and the Federal Subsistence 
Management Program website. Locations and dates may change based on 
weather or local circumstances. A teleconference will substitute for an 
in-person meeting if public health or safety restrictions are in 
effect. The final draft agendas, call-in numbers, how to participate 
and provide public comments, and other related meeting

[[Page 71079]]

information will be posted on the Federal Subsistence Management 
Program website at https://www.doi.gov/subsistence/regions and on 
social media at https://www.facebook.com/subsistencealaska/. 
Transcripts of the meetings are maintained by the Program and will be 
available for public inspection within 14 days after each meeting at 
https://www.doi.gov/subsistence/regions.
    Public Disclosure of Comments: Time will be allowed for any 
individual or organization wishing to present oral or written comments. 
If you are not available to submit your comments, you may have a second 
party present your comments on your behalf. Any written comments 
received will be presented to the Council members by staff.
    Before including your address, phone number, email address, or 
other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be 
aware that your entire comment--including your personal identifying 
information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can 
ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying 
information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be 
able to do so.

Authority

    5 U.S.C. Appendix.

Sue Detwiler,
Assistant Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Gregory Risdahl,
Subsistence Program Leader, USDA-Forest Service.
[FR Doc. 2021-26885 Filed 12-13-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4333-15-P; 3411-15-P