Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Technical Corrections for 18 Southwestern United States Species Found in Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas, 67352-67360 [2021-25549]

Download as PDF 67352 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 225 / Friday, November 26, 2021 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 17 [Docket No. FWS–R2–ES–2021–0044; FXES11130200000–212–FF02ENEH00] RIN 1018–BE47 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Technical Corrections for 18 Southwestern United States Species Found in Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Direct final rule. AGENCY: nine plant species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA). We are revising the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and the List of Endangered and Threatened Plants (‘‘the Lists’’) to reflect the current scientifically accepted taxonomy and nomenclature for these species that occur in the southwestern United States. We are also correcting errors in the Lists made in previous publications. The taxonomic revisions and correction of publication errors are editorial in nature and involve no substantive changes to the Lists or any applicable regulations. This rule is effective February 24, 2022 without further action, unless significant adverse comment is received by December 27, 2021. If significant adverse comment is received, we will DATES: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the revised taxonomy of nine wildlife and SUMMARY: Common name Individuals who are hearing impaired or speech impaired may call the Federal Relay Service at 800–877–8337 for TTY (telephone typewriter or teletypewriter) assistance 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 Public Comments You may submit your comments and materials regarding the taxonomic revisions, identified below in Table 1, by one of the methods listed in ADDRESSES. Please include sufficient information with your comments that will allow us to verify any scientific or commercial information you include. We will not consider comments sent by email or fax, or to an address not listed in ADDRESSES. We will post all comments on https:// www.regulations.gov. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal information in your comment, you should be aware 16:31 Nov 24, 2021 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Contact person golden-cheeked warbler ..................................... Government Canyon Bat Cave spider. Texas blind salamander. Tooth Cave spider. Nellie’s cory cactus. Lloyd’s Mariposa cactus. white bladderpod. Zapata bladderpod. Texas snowbells. Gulf Coast jaguarundi ......................................... Yuma clapper rail (=Yuma Ridgway’s rail) ......... Arizona hedgehog cactus. Fickeisen plains cactus. Peebles Navajo cactus. Sinaloan jaguarundi ............................................ Sonoran tiger salamander. Mount Graham red squirrel. San Francisco Peaks ragwort ............................ VerDate Sep<11>2014 publish a timely withdrawal of the relevant portions of the rule in the Federal Register. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by one of the following methods: • Electronically: Go to the Federal eRulemaking Portal: https:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments to FWS–R2–ES–2021–0044, which is the docket number for this rulemaking. • By hard copy: Submit comments by U.S. mail to: Public Comments Processing, Attn: FWS–R2–ES–2021– 0044, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MS: PRB/3W, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041–3803. See Public Comments, below, for more information about submitting comments. Jkt 256001 Adam Zerrenner, 512–490–0057 (phone), or Adam_Zerrenner@fws.gov (email). Chuck Ardizzone, 281–286–8282 (phone), or Chuck_Ardizzone@fws.gov (email). Jeff Humphrey, 602–242–0210 (phone) or Jeff_Humphrey@fws.gov (email). Julie McIntyre, 520–670–6150 (phone), or Julie_McIntyre@fws.gov (email). Shaula Hedwall, 928–556–2118 (phone), or Shaula_Hedwall@fws.gov (email). that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information— may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Comments and materials we receive, as well as supporting documentation we used in preparing this direct final rule, will be available for public inspection on the internet at https:// www.regulations.gov. Please note that comments posted to https:// www.regulations.gov are not immediately viewable. When you submit a comment, the system receives it immediately. However, the comment will not be publicly viewable until we post it, which might not occur until several days after submission. Information regarding this rule is available in alternative formats upon PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 request (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). Background The List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and the List of Endangered and Threatened Plants (‘‘the Lists’’), set forth in title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at §§ 17.11 and 17.12, respectively, contain the names of endangered species and threatened species federally listed pursuant to the ESA (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). The regulations at 50 CFR 17.11(c) and 17.12(b) direct us to use the most recently accepted scientific name of any wildlife or plant species, respectively, that we have determined to be an endangered or threatened species. Purpose of Direct Final Rule and Final Action The purpose of this direct final rule is to notify the public that we are E:\FR\FM\26NOR1.SGM 26NOR1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 225 / Friday, November 26, 2021 / Rules and Regulations revising the Lists at 50 CFR 17.11(h) and 17.12(h) to reflect the scientifically accepted taxonomy and nomenclature of nine wildlife species and nine plant species listed under section 4 of the ESA. These revisions reflect the most recently accepted scientific nomenclature in accordance with 50 CFR 17.11(c) and 17.12(b). We are publishing this rule without a prior proposal because this is a noncontroversial action that is in the best interest of the public and should be undertaken in as timely a manner as possible. For the taxonomic revisions provided below in Table 1, this rule will be effective, as published in this document, on the effective date specified in DATES, unless we receive significant adverse comments on or before the comment due date specified in DATES. Significant adverse comments are comments that provide strong justification as to why this rule should not be adopted or why it should be changed. If we receive significant adverse comments regarding the taxonomic changes for any of the species included in Table 1, below, we will publish a document in the Federal Register withdrawing this rule for the appropriate species before the effective date, and we will publish a proposed rule to initiate promulgation of those changes to 50 CFR 17.11(h) and/or 17.12(h). In addition, we are notifying the public that we have identified editorial errors in the Lists, and they will be corrected on the effective date of this rule (see DATES, above). The identified errors are provided below in Table 2. While you may submit comments by one of the methods listed in ADDRESSES on the corrections provided below in Table 2, we consider these corrections 67353 purely administrative, and we intend to make these editorial corrections on the effective date of this rule. None of these changes are regulatory in nature; they are for accuracy and clarity. These revisions do not alter species’ protections or status in any way. Any actions altering a species’ protection or status would require a separate rulemaking action following the procedures of 50 CFR part 424. Summary Tables of Taxonomic Changes and Editorial Corrections Table 1 provides taxonomic changes we are making to reflect the scientifically accepted taxonomy and nomenclature of nine wildlife and nine plant species listed under section 4 of the ESA. These changes reflect the most recently accepted scientific nomenclature in accordance with 50 CFR 17.11(c) and 17.12(b). TABLE 1—TAXONOMIC REVISIONS TO THE LISTS REFLECTING THE CURRENT SCIENTIFICALLY ACCEPTED TAXONOMY AND NOMENCLATURE FOR THESE SPECIES Species name as currently listed Corrected species name Common name (scientific name) Common name (scientific name) § 17.11 Endangered and threatened wildlife MAMMALS Gulf Coast jaguarundi (Herpailurus (=Felis) yagouaroundi cacomitli) ..... Sinaloan jaguarundi (Herpailurus (=Felis) yagouaroundi tolteca) ............ Mount Graham red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis) .... Gulf Coast jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi cacomitli). Sinaloan jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi tolteca). Mount Graham red squirrel (Tamiasciurus fremonti grahamensis). BIRDS golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) ................................... Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) ................................. golden-cheeked warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia). Yuma Ridgway’s rail (Rallus obsoletus yumanensis). AMPHIBIANS Sonoran tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum stebbinsi) .................... Texas blind salamander (Typhlomolge rathbuni) ..................................... Sonoran tiger salamander (Ambystoma mavortium stebbinsi). Texas blind salamander (Eurycea rathbuni). ARACHNIDS Government Canyon Bat Cave spider (Neoleptoneta microps) .............. Tooth Cave spider (Neoleptoneta myopica) ............................................ Government Canyon Bat Cave spider (Tayshaneta microps). Tooth Cave spider (Tayshaneta myopica). Scientific name (common name) Scientific name (common name) § 17.12 Endangered and threatened plants jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 FLOWERING PLANTS Coryphantha minima (Nellie’s cory cactus) .............................................. Echinomastus mariposensis (Lloyd’s Mariposa cactus) .......................... Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. arizonicus (Arizona hedgehog cactus) Lesquerella pallida (white bladderpod) .................................................... Lesquerella thamnophila (Zapata bladderpod) ........................................ Pediocactus peeblesianus var. fickeiseniae (Fickeisen plains cactus) .... Pediocactus peeblesianus var. peeblesianus (Peebles Navajo cactus) .. Senecio franciscanus (San Francisco Peaks ragwort) ............................ Styrax texanus (Texas snowbells) ........................................................... VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:31 Nov 24, 2021 Jkt 256001 PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4700 Escobaria minima (Nellie’s cory cactus). Sclerocactus mariposensis (Lloyd’s Mariposa cactus). Echinocereus arizonicus ssp. arizonicus (Arizona hedgehog cactus). Physaria pallida (white bladderpod). Physaria thamnophila (Zapata bladderpod). Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. fickeiseniae (Fickeisen plains cactus). Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. peeblesianus (Peebles Navajo cactus). Packera franciscana (San Francisco Peaks ragwort). Styrax platanifolius ssp. texanus (Texas snowbells). Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\26NOR1.SGM 26NOR1 67354 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 225 / Friday, November 26, 2021 / Rules and Regulations Table 2 identifies the editorial corrections we are making in this rule. Where Table 2 (and text) refers to the ‘‘2016 Reformatting’’ that means an August 24, 2016, final rule (81 FR 51550) that the Service published to update the format of the Lists. The purpose of the 2016 Reformatting was to make the Lists easier to understand by changing the format to reflect current practices and standards, to correct identified errors in entries such as footnotes and spelling, and to update common names, among other changes. Following publication of the 2016 Reformatting we identified editorial errors in the updated Lists. Where Table 2 refers to ‘‘68 FR 17156’’ that is the citation for the final rule designating critical habitat for seven Bexar County, Texas, invertebrates (68 FR 17156; April 8, 2003), which contained a spelling error and listing citation error. TABLE 2—EDITORIAL CORRECTIONS TO THE LISTS Current listed name Error: Action Wildlife: Beetle, (no common name) [Rhadine exilis] ................ Beetle, (no common name) [Rhadine infernalis] .......... Helotes mold beetle (Batrisodes venyivi) ..................... Braken Bat Cave meshweaver (Circurina venii) .......... Cokendolpher cave harvestman (Texella cokendolpheri). Government Canyon Bat Cave meshweaver (Circurina vespera). Government Canyon Bat Cave spider (Neoleptoneta microps). Koster’s springsnail (Juturnia kosteria) ........................ Loach minnow (Rhinichthys cobitis) ............................. Madla Cave meshweaver (Cicurina madla) ................. Robber Baron Cave meshweaver (Cicurina baronia) .. Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) ..... Plants: Fickeisen plains cactus (Pediocactus peeblesianus var. fickeiseniae). Peebles Navajo cactus (Pediocactus peeblesianus var. peeblesianus). jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 Description of Taxonomic Revisions and Editorial Corrections Using the best available scientific information, this direct final rule documents taxonomic changes of the scientific names to three entries under ‘‘Mammals,’’ two entries under ‘‘Birds,’’ two entries under ‘‘Amphibians,’’ and two entries under ‘‘Arachnids’’ on the current List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife (50 CFR 17.11(h)) and to nine entries under ‘‘Flowering Plants’’ on the current List of Endangered and Threatened Plants (50 CFR 17.12(h)). The basis for these taxonomic changes is supported by published studies in peer-reviewed journals. Accordingly, we revise the scientific names of these species under section 4 of the ESA and in accordance with 50 CFR 17.11(c) and 17.12(b). Of the species that are the subjects of the taxonomic revisions in this rule, Mount Graham red squirrel, Government Canyon Bat Cave spider, San Francisco Peaks ragwort, Zapata bladderpod, and Fickeisen plains cactus have designated critical habitat. For clarity and consistency, in this direct final rule, we are revising the headings of the critical habitat designations to reflect the corrected scientific names for the following species: Mount Graham red squirrel at 50 CFR 17.95(a), Government Canyon Bat Cave spider at VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:31 Nov 24, 2021 Jkt 256001 Correction Error in 2016 Reformatting: Correct listing citation Error in 2016 Reformatting: Correct listing citation Error in 2016 Reformatting: Correct listing citation Error in 68 FR 17156: Correct spelling error; error 2016 Reformatting: Correct listing citation. Error in 2016 Reformatting: Correct listing citation ..... ..... ..... in ..... 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(i).CH 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(i).CH 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(i).CH Cicurina venii 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(g).CH 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(g).CH Error in 2016 Reformatting: Correct spelling error and listing citation. Error in 2016 Reformatting: Correct listing citation ..... Cicurina vespera 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(g).CH 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(g).CH Error in 2016 Reformatting: Correct spelling error ...... Error in 2016 Reformatting: Reflect correct taxonomic name. Error in 2016 Reformatting: Correct listing citation ..... Error in 2016 Reformatting: Correct listing citation ..... Update common name ................................................ Juturnia kosteri. Tiaroga cobitis. 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(g).CH 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(g).CH Yuma Ridgway’s rail. Error in 2016 Reformatting: Remove duplicate entry .. Remove duplicate entry from the List. Error in 2016 Reformatting: Add omitted entry ........... Restore omitted species entry to the List. 50 CFR 17.95(g), and for the San Francisco Peaks ragwort, Zapata bladderpod, and Fickeisen plains cactus at 50 CFR 17.96(a). Additionally, we are correcting errors noted in species’ scientific names and Federal Register citations, updating common names, and correcting a duplication and an omission (see Table 2, above). These corrections are not regulatory in nature; they are administrative and for the purpose of clarity. The corrections do not alter species’ protections or status; an action changing a species’ protection or status would require a separate rulemaking following the procedures set forth at 50 CFR part 424. yagouaroundi tolteca, respectively (June 14, 1976; 41 FR 24062). Later, genus classification was changed from Felis to Herpailurus (Wozencraft 1993, p. 291), and this widely accepted change was subsequently made to the ESA listing (August 4, 2016; 81 FR 51550). Thus, these subspecies are currently listed under the ESA as Herpailurus (=Felis) yagouaroundi cacomitli and Herpailurus (=Felis) yagouaroundi tolteca. However, more recent genetic work assigns the jaguarundi to the genus Puma (Johnson and O’Brien 1997, pp. S110–S111; Johnson et al. 2006, p. 74), and this has become the generally accepted nomenclature (Wozencraft 2005, p. 545). The Service recognizes the Gulf coast jaguarundi and Sinaloan jaguarundi name changes to Puma yagouaroundi cacomitli and Puma yagouaroundi tolteca. respectively. This taxonomic change does not affect the range or endangered status of either the Gulf coast jaguarundi or Sinaloan jaguarundi. Taxonomic Classification Gulf Coast and Sinaloan Jaguarundi The Gulf Coast jaguarundi (Herpailurus (=Felis) yagouaroundi cacomitli) and the Sinaloan jaguarundi (Herpailurus (=Felis) yagouaroundi tolteca), subspecies of the jaguarundi, a small cat ranging from Texas to Argentina, were listed as endangered in 1976 (June 14, 1976; 41 FR 24062). The jaguarundi was originally included in the genus Felis, and the Gulf Coast jaguarundi and the Sinaloan jaguarundi were originally listed under the ESA as Felis yagouaroundi cacomitli and Felis PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Mount Graham Red Squirrel The Mount Graham red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis) was listed as endangered on June 3, 1987 (52 FR 20994) and was considered a subspecies of the pine squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus; Steele 1998, E:\FR\FM\26NOR1.SGM 26NOR1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 225 / Friday, November 26, 2021 / Rules and Regulations jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 p. 1). This subspecies occurs only in the highest elevations of the Pinalen˜o Mountains in southeastern Arizona. Hope et al. (2016, p. 173) indicates that regional differences in evolutionary dynamics and continental gradients of complexity are reflected in three species of Tamiasciurus: T. douglasii, T. hudsonicus, and T. fremonti. Southwestern red squirrels, including the Mount Graham red squirrel, were assigned to a new species of red squirrel, T. fremonti (Hope et al. 2016, pp. 173, 179). Beginning in 2016, scientists researching the Mount Graham red squirrel acknowledged this new designation (e.g., Merrick and Koprowski 2016, p. 2) and began referring to the Mount Graham red squirrel as T. fremonti grahamensis (e.g., Gwinn and Koprowski 2016, p. 1). Tamiasciurus fremonti grahamensis is now the accepted species and subspecies name for the Mount Graham red squirrel by NatureServe (see https:// explorer.natureserve.org/Taxon/ ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.101915/ Tamiasciurus_fremonti_grahamensis), an organization that works with approximately 100 network organizations and over 1,000 conservation scientists to collect, aggregate, and standardize biodiversity statistics. The validity of the recognized T. fremonti grahamensis subspecies is not in question (Hope et al. 2016, entire). Therefore, the Service recognizes the scientific name change for the Mount Graham red squirrel from Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis to Tamiasciurus fremonti grahamensis. These changes remain consistent with the latest scientific literature on or referencing the subspecies (e.g., Lynch 2018, p. 2; Goldstein et al. 2018, p. 67; Merrick et al. 2021, p. 2). This taxonomic change does not affect the range of, endangered status of, or critical habitat designation for the Mount Graham red squirrel. Golden-Cheeked Warbler The golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) was emergency listed as endangered, due to habitat destruction, on May 4, 1990 (55 FR 18844), and we published a final rule to list the golden-cheeked warbler as endangered on December 27, 1990 (55 FR 53153). In 2011, the American Ornithologists’ Union (AOU) adopted a new classification of the family Parulidae based on a phylogenetic analysis by Lovette et al. (2010, p. 763) that resulted in all Dendroica species being placed into a single clade for which the generic name Setophaga has taxonomic priority VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:31 Nov 24, 2021 Jkt 256001 (Chesser et al. 2011, p. 608). The goldencheeked warbler is now placed in the family Parulidae (new world warblers; wood-warblers) and the genus Setophaga (redstarts). Hereafter, the Service recognizes the golden-cheeked warbler as Setophaga chrysoparia, formerly placed in the genus Dendroica. This taxonomic change does not affect the range or endangered status of the golden-cheeked warbler. Yuma Clapper Rail The Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) was listed as endangered on March 11, 1967 (32 FR 4001) and was considered a subspecies of the clapper rail (Rallus longirostris). This subspecies occurs in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Mexico. Maley and Brumfield (2013, p. 318) better distinguished the phylogenetic relationships in the Rallus longirostris and Rallus elegans complexes using mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences. Their results indicate that the Rallus elegans and Rallus longirostris complexes are paraphyletic, and the complex could be split into five morphologically and genetically distinct species, including Rallus obsoletus, Rallus tenuirostris, Rallus elegans, and Rallus crepitans (Maley and Brumfield 2013, p. 326). In 2014, the AOU accepted this proposed change, reorganizing the clapper rail (R. longirostris) and king rail (R. elegans) species complex and creating five distinct subspecies (Chesser et al. 2014, p. CSv). Under the new accepted taxonomy, the Yuma clapper rail became the Yuma Ridgway’s rail (R. obsoletus yumanensis). The validity of the five currently recognized R. obsoletus subspecies is not in question (Maley and Brumfield 2013, entire; Chesser et al. 2014, p. CSv). Therefore, the Service recognizes the scientific (and common name) change from Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) to Yuma Ridgway’s rail (R. obsoletus yumanensis). This taxonomic change does not affect the range or endangered status of this subspecies. Sonoran Tiger Salamander The Sonoran tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum stebbinsi) was listed as endangered on January 6, 1997 (62 FR 665). This subspecies occurs in southern Arizona in the United States and in northern Sonora, Mexico. Shaffer and McKnight (1996, Evolution 50: pp. 417–433) provided molecular phylogenetic data indicating that the eastern and western tiger salamanders should be regarded as distinct species and treated the western PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 67355 forms as subspecies of Ambystoma mavortium. Hallock (2005, in Jones, L.L.C., et al., pp. 30–33) placed northwestern populations in A. tigrinum. As a result, in 2008, the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles (SSAR) adopted a new scientific and common name for the species in Scientific and Common Names for Amphibians and Reptiles of North America North of Me´xico (SSAR 2008, pp. 1–84). The SSAR list is the most widely recognized standard for nomenclature of North American amphibians and reptiles. Therefore, the Service recognizes the scientific name change from Ambystoma tigrinum stebbinsi to Ambystoma mavortium stebbinsi. This change remains consistent with the latest SSAR list of standard names (Crother, B.I. (ed.). 2017) and does not affect the range or endangered status of the Sonoran tiger salamander. Texas Blind Salamander The Texas blind salamander (Typhlomolge rathbuni) was listed as endangered on March 11, 1967 (32 FR 4001). This species occurs in the Edwards Aquifer near San Marcos, Texas. The taxonomic classification of Texas blind salamander in the genus Typhlomolge has been widely discussed and controversial (Mitchell and Reddell 1965, pp. 24–26; Potter and Sweet 1981, entire; Lombard and Wake 1986, entire; Chippindale et al. 2000, entire). The Typhlomolge genus is characterized by extreme caveassociated morphologies (tiny nonfunctional vestiges of eyes, loss of pigmentation, long slender legs, and broad flattened head). Some researchers support that the Texas blind salamander is best related to species of Eurycea, which exhibit extreme troglobitic morphologies (Mitchell and Reddell 1965, pp. 24–26; Petraka 1998, pp. 272– 273). Other scientists have suggested that members of Typhlomolge are sufficiently distinct from Edwards Plateau Eurycea to warrant recognition of the Typhlomolge genus (Wake 1966, pp. 51, 73–99; Potter and Sweet 1981, pp. 65–73). However, Chippindale’s (1995, entire) more recent molecular phylogenetic evidence supports that the recognition of the genus Typhlomolge is not warranted. Further, the results of allozyme and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) testing of Texas blind salamander by Chippindale et al. (2000, pp. 20, 23–24) supports the taxonomic revision from the genus Typhlomolge to the genus Eurycea. Therefore, the Service recognizes the scientific name change from Typhlomolge rathbuni to Eurycea rathbuni. This taxonomic E:\FR\FM\26NOR1.SGM 26NOR1 67356 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 225 / Friday, November 26, 2021 / Rules and Regulations change does not affect the range or endangered status of this species. jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 Government Canyon Bat Cave Spider and Tooth Cave Spider The Government Canyon Bat Cave spider (Neoleptoneta microps) is a small, troglobitic spider that inhabits caves and mesocaverns in Bexar County, Texas, and was listed as endangered on December 26, 2000 (65 FR 81419). In the original listing the Government Canyon Bat Cave spider was listed as the Government Canyon cave spider; although the common name was revised to the Government Canyon Bat Cave spider on April 8, 2003 (68 FR 17156). In addition, critical habitat was designated for the Government Canyon Bat Cave spider and Government Canyon Bat Cave meshweaver on February 14, 2012 (77 FR 8450). The Tooth Cave spider (Neoleptoneta myopica) is a small, troglobitic spider that inhabits caves and mesocaverns in Travis and Williamson Counties, Texas. It was listed as endangered on September 16, 1988 (53 FR 36029). The Tooth Cave spider does not have designated critical habitat. The Government Canyon Bat Cave spider and Tooth Cave spider were originally described as Leptoneta microps and Leptoneta myopica, respectively Gertsch (1974, pp. 168–169, 172–173). They were later reassigned to Neoleptoneta following Brignoli (1977, p. 216) and Platnick (1986, p. 15). In a phylogenetic assessment, Ledford et al. (2011, entire) limited the genus Neoleptoneta to only include seven species restricted to central Mexico. The remaining species were placed in three new genera: (1) Chisoneta, (2) Ozarkia, and (3) Tayshaneta. The Government Canyon Bat Cave spider and Tooth Cave spider were transferred to Tayshaneta (Ledford et al. 2011, pp. 375–385). These taxonomic changes have been recognized by the World Spider Catalog (2019). Therefore, we recognize the scientific names of the Government Canyon Bat Cave spider and Tooth Cave spider as Tayshaneta microps and Tayshaneta myopica, respectively. This does not affect the range or endangered status of these species, or the designated critical habitat of the Government Canyon Bat Cave spider. Arizona Hedgehog Cactus The Arizona hedgehog cactus (Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. arizonicus) was listed as endangered on November 26, 1979 (44 FR 61556). At that time, E. triglochidiatus included all red-flowered hedgehog cacti in the United States, resulting in a large group VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:31 Nov 24, 2021 Jkt 256001 of highly morphologically variable species (Benson 1969, 1982; Taylor 1985 pp. 68–73). Since then, cytological (i.e., the study of chromosome numbers for classification) and morphological studies within E. triglochidiatus have led to separations of taxa based on ploidy levels (i.e., the number of copies of the complete genetic information; Parfitt and Christy 1992; Cota and Philbrick 1994; Baker 2006). The tetraploids (four homologous copies of each chromosome (4n)) are now recognized as E. coccineus Engelmann, and diploids (two homologous copies of each chromosome (2n)) are now recognized as either E. triglochidiatus or E. arizonicus Rose ex Orcutt (Blum et al. 1998, pp. 357–423; Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003, p. 168). In 1998, the Arizona hedgehog cactus was recognized as Echinocereus arizonicus subsp. arizonicus (Rose ex. Orcutt), formalizing E. arizonicus as an independent species separate from E. triglochidiatus and E. coccineus based on chromosome numbers, elevational range, and geographic distribution (Blum et al. 1998, p. 367–369; Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003, p. 168). This taxonomic treatment has been adopted by the Flora of North America (Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003, p. 168). The Service recognizes the scientific name change of the Arizona hedgehog cactus to Echinocereus arizonicus ssp. arizonicus. This taxonomic change does not affect the range or endangered status of the Arizona hedgehog cactus. Fickeisen Plains Cactus and Peebles Navajo Cactus The Peebles Navajo cactus (Pediocactus peeblesianus var. peeblesianus) and Fickeisen plains cactus (Pediocactus peeblesianus var. fickeiseniae) are small, mostly solitary, spherical cacti endemic to northern Arizona. Both were classified as ‘‘varieties’’ when listed as endangered in 1979 (44 FR 61922; October 26, 1979) and 2013 (78 FR 60608; October 1, 2013), respectively. In our 2013 listing rule, we acknowledged that the Flora of North America treated the Fickeisen plains cactus as a subspecies of Pediocactus peeblesianus, finding that the name ‘‘Pediocactus peeblesianus var. fickeiseniae’’ was not validly published by Lyman D. Benson (Heil and Porter 2003, p. 213). However, at that time, we and taxonomic organizations such as the Integrated Taxonomic Information Systems (ITIS) continued to treat the taxon as a variety, but we recognized the need for future taxonomic review. More recently, the Flora of North America (Heil and Porter 2001, pp. 10– PO 00000 Frm 00056 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 11; 2003, p. 213), ITIS (2019), and the broader botanical scientific community (Tropicos 2019) accepted subspecies rank for both Peebles Navajo cactus (Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. peeblesianus) and Fickeisen plains cactus (Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. fickeiseniae [=Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. fickeiseniorum]; Lu¨thy 1999; ITIS 2019). Because of the agreement throughout the scientific community, we recognize the Peebles Navajo cactus as Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. peeblesianus and the Fickeisen plains cactus as Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. fickeiseniae. These changes in nomenclature do not affect the range or endangered status of either cactus, or, for the Fickeisen plains cactus, its designated critical habitat. Lloyd’s Mariposa Cactus On November 6, 1979, we listed Lloyd’s mariposa cactus (Neolloydia mariposensis) as threatened, without critical habitat (44 FR 64247). Hester (1940) described this small cactus as a new species, Echinomastus mariposensis, based on specimens he collected near the Mariposa quicksilver mine, in Brewster County, Texas. Botanists continue to recognize Lloyd’s mariposa cactus as a distinct, valid species, but based on evolving phylogenetic interpretations have disagreed on the genera placement. Benson (1969) assigned species mariposensis to the genus Neolloydia; Glass and Foster (1975), Anderson (1986, 2001), Zimmerman (1985) and the Flora of North America (Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003) returned it to Echinomastus. Additional published classifications include Echinocactus (Weniger 1979), Sclerocactus (Taylor 1987), and Pediocactus (Halda 1998). However, more recently, Porter and Prince (2011) constructed a molecular phylogeny of a narrowly defined Sclerocactus, and related taxa, based on chloroplast DNA sequences using data from five independent investigations (Porter et al. 2000; Butterworth et al. 2002; Crozier 2005; Hernandez et al. 2011; Butterworth and Porter (in prep.)). Although these studies examined different regions of chloroplast DNA, the results were completely congruent. On this basis, Porter and Prince (2011) recognized a monophyletic, though polymorphic, clade, in which Ancistrocactus, Echinomastus, and Toumeya are included in a broadly defined Sclerocactus genus; Echinomastus, as defined in the Flora of North America (Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003), is paraphyletic. Lloyd’s mariposa cactus was assigned to Sclerocactus E:\FR\FM\26NOR1.SGM 26NOR1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 225 / Friday, November 26, 2021 / Rules and Regulations mariposensis in Section Andersonianus (Porter and Prince 2011, pp. 36–37, 58– 59). We concur with this classification, which has also been accepted by the ITIS (2018) and Tropicos (2018). This revision does not affect the species’ range or threatened status. Nellie’s Cory Cactus On November 7, 1979, we listed Nellie’s cory cactus (Coryphantha minima) as endangered, without critical habitat (44 FR 64738). Although botanists continue to recognize Nellie’s cory cactus as a distinct, valid species, differing phylogenetic interpretations retain it in the genus Coryphantha, or place it in another closely related genus, Escobaria. First described by Britton and Rose (1919–1923), Escobaria is distinguished from Coryphantha by pitted seed coats, fringed perianth parts, areoles that lack nectaries, and flowers that are not yellow (Anderson 2001); since Nellie’s cory cactus has these characteristics, it belongs in the Escobaria group. Zimmerman (1985) and the Flora of North America (Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003) recognized Escobaria as a subgenus of Coryphantha that included C. minima. Conversely, Anderson (2001), the International Cactaceae Systematics Group (2006), the ITIS (2011), and Natural Resources Conservation Service (2011) recognized Escobaria as a full genus. More recent phylogenetic studies based on DNA sequences (Butterworth 2010; Va´zquez-Sa´nchez et al. 2013) indicate that Coryphantha sensu lato is not monophyletic. Although more data are needed to circumscribe Coryphantha and Escobaria, Nellie’s cory cactus is more appropriately classified as Escobaria minima, based on the above described morphological characteristics. Thus, we recognize Nellie’s cory cactus as Escobaria minima. This change does not affect the species’ range or endangered status. jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 San Francisco Peaks Ragwort San Francisco Peaks ragwort (Senecio franciscanus),was listed as threatened on November 22, 1983 (48 FR 52743), and is a dwarf alpine plant in the sunflower family that is found only on the talus slopes in the alpine zone on the San Francisco Peaks, north of Flagstaff. Based on morphological and cytological evidence, plants formerly described as Senecio that have pendant heads, branched and nonfleshy roots, and few teeth on the leaves are now described as the genus Packera, (Weber, ´ . Lo¨ve 1981). Weber and Lo¨ve WA and A (1981) are following the European VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:31 Nov 24, 2021 Jkt 256001 botanists’ generic circumscription of Senecio and the segregates. The scientific name change from ‘‘Senecio franciscanus’’ to ‘‘Packera franciscana’’ is widely accepted by professionals and is the accepted name at the Deaver Herbarium at Northern Arizona University (Ayers 2007, pers. comm.). The Service recognizes the San Francisco Peaks ragwort as Packera franciscana. This taxonomic change does not affect the range, endangered status, or designated critical habitat of the San Francisco Peaks ragwort. Texas Snowbells On October 12, 1984, we listed Texas snowbells (Styrax texana) as endangered, without critical habitat(49 FR 40036). V.L. Cory described Styrax texana in 1943, which he distinguished from S. platanifolia and S. youngae based on differences in the trichomes (epidermal structures) of leaves and floral parts. Gonsoulin (1974) revised the genus Styrax in North America, Central America, and the Caribbean. In Texas and Northeast Mexico, this treatment recognized S. texana, S. youngae, and S. platanifolia with two varieties, platanifolia and stellata. Fritsch’s subsequent revision (Fritsch 1997) of the Styrax of West Texas, Mexico, and Mesoamerica recognized 19 species and 24 taxa, including 7 geographically and morphologically distinct subspecies of two species. Morphological, isozyme, and DNA sequence data indicated that five taxa of Texas and Northern Mexico are more closely related to each other than to other Styrax taxa and belong to a single species, S. platanifolius; following Nicolson and Steyskal (1976), Fritsch adopted the masculine gender for Styrax. This revision recognized five subspecies of S. platanifolius, distinguished by distinct regional differences in the morphology and abundance of trichomes: platanifolius, mollis, stellatus, texanus, and youngiae. This treatment is currently recognized by the Flora of North America (Fritsch 2009), the ITIS (2018), Missouri Botanical Garden (Tropicos 2014), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Plants Database (Natural Resources Conservation Service 2014). In consideration of the broad acceptance of this most recent revision of American Styrax, we also recognize Texas snowbells as Styrax platanifolius ssp. texanus. This revision does not affect the species’ range or endangered status. White Bladderpod and Zapata Bladderpod In 1987, we listed white bladderpod (Lesquerella pallida) as endangered (52 PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 67357 FR 7424; March 11, 1987). In 1999, we listed Zapata bladderpod (Lesquerella thamnophila) as endangered (64 FR 63745; November 22, 1999). Critical habitat was designated for Zapata bladderpod on December 22, 2000 (65 FR 81182); no critical habitat was designated for white bladderpod. In 2002, Al-Shehbaz and O’Kane transferred 91 taxa of Lesquerella to the genus Physaria, including the species pallida and thamnophila, based on molecular, morphological, cytological, biogeographic, and ecological data. Genetic analyses, based on DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA and length variation of inter-simple sequence repeat regions, revealed that Physaria, as previously recognized, was nested within and evolved more than once from Lesquerella. The former genus was polyphyletic, and the latter was paraphyletic. These authors united the two into a single monophyletic genus, conserving the earlier-published name of Physaria. These taxonomic revisions are supported by the Flora of North America (O’Kane 2010), the ITIS (2015), and the Tropicos database (Tropicos 2015). Thus, the Service recognizes the white bladderpod and Zapata bladderpod as Physaria pallida and Physaria thamnophila, respectively. These changes do not affect the range or endangered status of white bladderpod or Zapata bladderpod, or, for Zapata bladderpod, its designated critical habitat. Required Determinations National Environmental Policy Act We have determined that environmental assessments and environmental impact statements, as defined under the authority of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), need not be prepared in connection with regulations issued pursuant to section 4(a) of the ESA. We published a notice outlining our reasons for this determination in the Federal Register on October 25, 1983 (43 FR 49244). Even if NEPA were to apply, this amendment of the regulations is purely administrative in nature, and therefore is categorically excluded under the Department of the Interior’s NEPA procedures in 43 CFR 46.210(i); no exceptional circumstances apply. Clarity of the Rule We are required by Executive Orders 12866 and 12988 and by the Presidential Memorandum of June 1, 1998, to write all rules in plain E:\FR\FM\26NOR1.SGM 26NOR1 67358 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 225 / Friday, November 26, 2021 / Rules and Regulations language. This means that each rule we publish must: (a) Be logically organized; (b) Use the active voice to address readers directly; (c) Use clear language rather than jargon; (d) Be divided into short sections and sentences; and (e) Use lists and tables wherever possible. If you feel that we have not met these requirements, send us comments by one of the methods listed in ADDRESSES. To help us to revise this rule, your comments should be as specific as possible. References Cited A list of the references cited in this direct final rule is provided in Docket No. FWS–R2–ES–2021–0044 at https:// www.regulations.gov or upon request from the appropriate contact person (see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT). List of Subjects in 50 CFR Part 17 Endangered and threatened species, Exports, Imports, Reporting and Common name recordkeeping requirements, Transportation. c. Under Amphibians, by revising the entries for ‘‘Salamander, Sonoran tiger’’ and ‘‘Salamander, Texas blind’’; ■ d. Under Fishes, by revising the entry for ‘‘Minnow, loach’’; ■ e. Under Snails, by revising the entry for ‘‘Springsnail, Koster’s’’; ■ f. Under Insects, by revising the entries for ‘‘Beetle, Helotes mold’’, ‘‘Beetle, (no common name) [Rhadine exilis]’’, and ‘‘Beetle, (no common name) [Rhadine infernalis]’’; and ■ g. Under Arachnids, by revising the entry for ‘‘Harvestman, Cokendolpher cave’’, ‘‘Meshweaver, Braken Bat Cave’’, ‘‘Meshweaver, Government Canyon Bat Cave’’, ‘‘Meshweaver, Madla Cave’’, ‘‘Meshweaver, Robber Baron Cave’’, ‘‘Spider, Government Canyon Bat Cave’’, and ‘‘Spider, Tooth Cave’’. The revisions and addition read as follows: ■ Regulation Promulgation For the reasons given in the preamble, we amend part 17, subchapter B of chapter I, title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations, as set forth below: PART 17—ENDANGERED AND THREATENED WILDLIFE AND PLANTS 1. The authority citation for part 17 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 16 U.S.C. 1361–1407; 1531– 1544; and 4201–4245, unless otherwise noted. 2. Amend § 17.11(h), the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife: ■ a. Under Mammals, by revising the entries for ‘‘Jaguarundi, Gulf Coast’’, ‘‘Jaguarundi, Sinaloan’’, and ‘‘Squirrel, Mount Graham red’’; ■ b. Under Birds, by: ■ i. Removing the entry for ‘‘Rail, Yuma Clapper’’ and adding in its place an entry for ‘‘Rail, Yuma Ridgway’s’’; and ■ ii. Revising the entry for ‘‘Warbler (wood), golden-cheeked’’; ■ § 17.11 Endangered and threatened wildlife. * * * (h) * * * Scientific name Where listed Status * Jaguarundi, Gulf Coast ..................... * * Puma yagouaroundi cacomitli .......... * * Wherever found ................................ E * Jaguarundi, Sinaloan ........................ * * Puma yagouaroundi tolteca ............. * * Wherever found ................................ E * Squirrel, Mount Graham red ............. * * Tamiasciurus fremonti grahamensis * * Wherever found ................................ E * * Listing citations and applicable rules MAMMALS * BIRDS * * * * Rail, Yuma Ridgway’s ...................... * * Rallus obsoletus yumanensis ........... * * U.S.A. only ....................................... E * Warbler (wood), golden-cheeked ..... * * Setophaga chrysoparia .................... * * Wherever found ................................ E * AMPHIBIANS * Salamander, Sonoran tiger .............. Salamander, Texas blind .................. * FISHES * Minnow, loach ................................... jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 * * SNAILS * Springsnail, Koster’s ......................... VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:31 Nov 24, 2021 * * * * * Ambystoma mavortium stebbinsi ..... Eurycea rathbuni .............................. * * * PO 00000 Frm 00058 * * Wherever found ................................ Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\26NOR1.SGM * * 41 FR 24062, 6/14/1976. * * 52 FR 20994, 6/3/1987; 50 CFR 17.95(a).CH * * * * 32 FR 4001, 3/11/1967. * * 55 FR 18844, 5/4/1990; 55 FR 53153, 12/27/1990. * E E E * * 62 FR 665, 1/6/1977. 32 FR 4001, 3/11/1967. * * * * 51 FR 39468, 10/28/1986; 77 FR 10810, 2/23/2012; 50 CFR 17.95(e).CH * * * * 76 FR 33036, 6/7/2011; 50 CFR 17.95(f).CH E * * * Wherever found ................................ * 41 FR 24062, 6/14/1976. * * * * * Juturnia kosteri ................................. Jkt 256001 * * Wherever found ................................ Wherever found ................................ * * * Tiaroga cobitis .................................. * * * 26NOR1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 225 / Friday, November 26, 2021 / Rules and Regulations Common name * INSECTS Scientific name * Where listed * * * * Beetle, Helotes mold ........................ * * Batrisodes venyivi ............................ * * Wherever found ................................ E * Beetle, (no common name) .............. * * Rhadine exilis ................................... * * Wherever found ................................ E Beetle, (no common name) .............. Rhadine infernalis ............................. Wherever found ................................ E * ARACHNIDS * * * * * * Texella cokendolpheri ...................... * * Wherever found ................................ E Meshweaver, Braken Bat Cave ........ Cicurina venii .................................... Wherever found ................................ E Meshweaver, Government Canyon Bat Cave. Meshweaver, Madla Cave ................ Cicurina vespera .............................. Wherever found ................................ E Cicurina madla ................................. Wherever found ................................ E Meshweaver, Robber Baron Cave ... Cicurina baronia ............................... Wherever found ................................ E * Spider, Government Canyon Bat Cave. * * Tayshaneta microps ......................... * * Wherever found ................................ E * Spider, Tooth Cave .......................... * * Tayshaneta myopica ........................ * * Wherever found ................................ E * * 3. Amend § 17.12(h), the List of Endangered and Threatened Plants, under Flowering Plants, by: ■ a. Removing the entry for ‘‘Coryphantha minima’’; ■ b. Adding, in alphabetical order, an entry for ‘‘Echinocereus arizonicus ssp. arizonicus’’; ■ c. Removing the entries for ‘‘Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. arizonicus’’ and ‘‘Echinomastus mariposensis’’; ■ d. Adding, in alphabetical order, an entry for ‘‘Escobaria minima’’; ■ Scientific name * e. Removing the entries for ‘‘Lesquerella pallida’’ and ‘‘Lesquerella thamnophila’’; ■ f. Adding, in alphabetical order, an entry for ‘‘Packera franciscana’’; ■ g. Removing the first entry for ‘‘Pediocactus peeblesianus var. fickeiseniae’’; ■ h. Removing the remaining entry for ‘‘Pediocactus peeblesianus var. fickeiseniae’’ and adding the entry ‘‘Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. fickeiseniae’’ in its place; ■ i. Adding, in alphabetical order, entries for ‘‘Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. peeblesianus’’, ‘‘Physaria pallida’’, * * 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(i).CH * * 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(i).CH 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(i).CH * * * ■ * * * Harvestman, Cokendolpher cave ..... * Listing citations and applicable rules Status * 67359 65 FR 81419, 17.95(g).CH 65 FR 81419, 17.95(g).CH 65 FR 81419, 17.95(g).CH 65 FR 81419, 17.95(g).CH 65 FR 81419, 17.95(g).CH * 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 12/26/2000; 50 CFR * * 65 FR 81419, 12/26/2000; 50 CFR 17.95(g).CH * * 53 FR 36029, 9/16/1988. * * ‘‘Physaria thamnophila’’, and ‘‘Sclerocactus mariposensis’’; ■ j. Removing the entry for ‘‘Senecio franciscanus’’; ■ k. Adding, in alphabetical order, an entry for ‘‘Styrax platanifolius ssp. texanus’’; ■ l. Removing the entry for ‘‘Styrax texanus’’. The additions read as follows: § 17.12 plants. * Endangered and threatened * * (h) * * * Common name Where listed Status * Echinocereus arizonicus ssp. arizonicus. * * Arizona hedgehog cactus ................. * * Wherever found ................................ E * Escobaria minima ............................. * * Nellie’s cory cactus .......................... * * Wherever found ................................ E * Packera franciscana ......................... * * San Francisco Peaks ragwort .......... * * Wherever found ................................ T * Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. fickeiseniae. Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. peeblesianus. * * Fickeisen plains cactus .................... * * Wherever found ................................ E Peebles Navajo cactus ..................... Wherever found ................................ E * * Listing citations and applicable rules jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 FLOWERING PLANTS VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:31 Nov 24, 2021 Jkt 256001 PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\26NOR1.SGM * * 44 FR 61556, 10/25/1979. * * 44 FR 64738, 11/7/1979. * * 48 FR 52743, 11/22/1983; 50 CFR CH 17.96(a). * * 78 FR 60607, 10/1/2013; 50 CFR CH 17.96(a). 44 FR 61922, 10/26/1979. 26NOR1 67360 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 225 / Friday, November 26, 2021 / Rules and Regulations Scientific name Common name Where listed Status * Physaria pallida ................................ Physaria thamnophila ....................... * * White bladderpod ............................. Zapata bladderpod ........................... * * Wherever found ................................ Wherever found ................................ E E * Sclerocactus mariposensis ............... * * Lloyd’s mariposa cactus ................... * * Wherever found ................................ T * Styrax platanifolius ssp. texanus ...... * * Texas snowbells ............................... * * Wherever found ................................ E * § 17.95 * * [Amended] Critical habitat—plants. (a) * * * Family Asteraceae: Packera franciscana (San Francisco Peaks ragwort) * * * * * jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 Note: The reference to ‘‘groundsel’’ on the map is equivalent to ‘‘ragwort.’’ Map follows: * * * * * Martha Williams, Principal Deputy Director, Exercising the Delegated Authority of the Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2021–25549 Filed 11–24–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 * DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 4. Amend § 17.95 by: a. In paragraph (a), removing the heading ‘‘Mount Graham Red Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis)’’ and adding ‘‘Mount Graham red squirrel (Tamiasciurus fremonti grahamensis)’’ in its place; and ■ b. In paragraph (g), removing the heading ‘‘Government Canyon Bat Cave Spider (Neoleptoneta microps)’’ and adding ‘‘Government Canyon Bat Cave Spider (Tayshaneta microps)’’ in its place. ■ 5. Amend § 17.96, paragraph (a), by: ■ a. Removing the heading ‘‘Family Asteraceae: Senecio franciscanus (San Francisco Peaks groundsel)’’ and adding in its place the heading ‘‘Family Asteraceae: Packera franciscana (San Francisco Peaks ragwort)’’; ■ b. In the entry ‘‘Family Asteraceae: Packera franciscana (San Francisco Peaks ragwort)’’, revising the note; ■ c. Removing the heading ‘‘Family Brassicaceae: Lesquerella thamnophila (Zapata bladderpod)’’ and adding in its place the heading ‘‘Family Brassicaceae: Physaria thamnophila (Zapata bladderpod)’’; and ■ d. Removing the heading ‘‘Family Cactaceae: Pediocactus peeblesianus var. fickeiseniae (Fickeisen plains cactus)’’ and adding in its place the heading ‘‘Family Cactaceae: Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. fickeiseniae (Fickeisen plains cactus)’’. The revision reads as follows: ■ ■ § 17.96 * 16:31 Nov 24, 2021 Jkt 256001 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 [RTID 0648–XB608] Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Summer Flounder Fishery; Quota Transfers From VA to CT and NC to RI National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notification of quota transfer. AGENCY: NMFS announces that the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina are transferring a portion of their 2021 commercial summer flounder quota to the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island, respectively. This adjustment to the 2021 fishing year quota is necessary to comply with the Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass Fishery Management Plan quota transfer provisions. This announcement informs the public of the revised 2021 commercial quotas for Virginia, North Carolina, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. SUMMARY: Effective November 22, 2021 through December 31, 2021. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laura Hansen, Fishery Management Specialist, (978) 281–9225. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Regulations governing the summer flounder fishery are found in 50 CFR 648.100 through 648.110. These regulations require annual specification of a commercial quota that is apportioned among the coastal states from Maine through North Carolina. The process to set the annual commercial quota and the percent allocated to each state is described in § 648.102 and final 2021 allocations were published on December 21, 2020 (85 FR 82946). DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Listing citations and applicable rules * * 52 FR 7424, 3/11/1987. 64 FR 63745, 11/22/1999; 50 CFR 17.96(a).CH * * 44 FR 64247, 11/6/1979. * * 49 FR 40035, 10/12/1984. * * The final rule implementing Amendment 5 to the Summer Flounder Fishery Management Plan (FMP), as published in the Federal Register on December 17, 1993 (58 FR 65936), provided a mechanism for transferring summer flounder commercial quota from one state to another. Two or more states, under mutual agreement and with the concurrence of the NMFS Greater Atlantic Regional Administrator, can transfer or combine summer flounder commercial quota under § 648.102(c)(2). The Regional Administrator is required to consider three criteria in the evaluation of requests for quota transfers or combinations: The transfer or combinations would not preclude the overall annual quota from being fully harvested; the transfer addresses an unforeseen variation or contingency in the fishery; and the transfer is consistent with the objectives of the FMP and the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. The Regional Administrator has determined these three criteria have been met for the transfers approved in this notification. Virginia is transferring 30,000 lb (13,608 kg) of summer flounder to Connecticut through mutual agreement of the states. This transfer was requested so that Connecticut would not exceed its 2021 commercial quota. North Carolina is transferring 22,158 lb (10,051 kg) to Rhode Island to repay landings made by a North Carolinapermitted vessel under a safe harbor agreement. The revised summer flounder quotas for 2021 are: Virginia, 2,359,776 lb (1,070,376 kg); Connecticut, 629,376 lb (285,480 kg); North Carolina, 2,952,765 lb (1,339,352 kg); and Rhode Island, 1,883,708 lb (854,436 kg). Classification NMFS issues this action pursuant to section 305(d) of the Magnuson-Stevens Act. This action is required by 50 CFR 648.162(e)(1)(i) through (iii), which was issued pursuant to section 304(b), and is E:\FR\FM\26NOR1.SGM 26NOR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 225 (Friday, November 26, 2021)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 67352-67360]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-25549]



[[Page 67352]]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

50 CFR Part 17

[Docket No. FWS-R2-ES-2021-0044; FXES11130200000-212-FF02ENEH00]
RIN 1018-BE47


Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Technical 
Corrections for 18 Southwestern United States Species Found in Arizona, 
New Mexico, and Texas

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Direct final rule.

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SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the 
revised taxonomy of nine wildlife and nine plant species under the 
Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA). We are revising the 
List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and the List of Endangered 
and Threatened Plants (``the Lists'') to reflect the current 
scientifically accepted taxonomy and nomenclature for these species 
that occur in the southwestern United States. We are also correcting 
errors in the Lists made in previous publications. The taxonomic 
revisions and correction of publication errors are editorial in nature 
and involve no substantive changes to the Lists or any applicable 
regulations.

DATES: This rule is effective February 24, 2022 without further action, 
unless significant adverse comment is received by December 27, 2021. If 
significant adverse comment is received, we will publish a timely 
withdrawal of the relevant portions of the rule in the Federal 
Register.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments by one of the following methods:
     Electronically: Go to the Federal eRulemaking Portal: 
https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting 
comments to FWS-R2-ES-2021-0044, which is the docket number for this 
rulemaking.
     By hard copy: Submit comments by U.S. mail to: Public 
Comments Processing, Attn: FWS-R2-ES-2021-0044, U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service, MS: PRB/3W, 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041-3803.
    See Public Comments, below, for more information about submitting 
comments.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: 

------------------------------------------------------------------------
         Common name                         Contact person
------------------------------------------------------------------------
golden-cheeked warbler.......  Adam Zerrenner, 512-490-0057 (phone), or
Government Canyon Bat Cave      [email protected] (email).
 spider..
Texas blind salamander.......
Tooth Cave spider............
Nellie's cory cactus.........
Lloyd's Mariposa cactus......
white bladderpod.............
Zapata bladderpod............
Texas snowbells..............
Gulf Coast jaguarundi........  Chuck Ardizzone, 281-286-8282 (phone), or
                                [email protected] (email).
Yuma clapper rail (=Yuma       Jeff Humphrey, 602-242-0210 (phone) or
 Ridgway's rail).               [email protected] (email).
Arizona hedgehog cactus......
Fickeisen plains cactus......
Peebles Navajo cactus........
Sinaloan jaguarundi..........  Julie McIntyre, 520-670-6150 (phone), or
Sonoran tiger salamander.....   [email protected] (email).
Mount Graham red squirrel....
San Francisco Peaks ragwort..  Shaula Hedwall, 928-556-2118 (phone), or
                                [email protected] (email).
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Individuals who are hearing impaired or speech impaired may call 
the Federal Relay Service at 800-877-8337 for TTY (telephone typewriter 
or teletypewriter) assistance 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Public Comments

    You may submit your comments and materials regarding the taxonomic 
revisions, identified below in Table 1, by one of the methods listed in 
ADDRESSES. Please include sufficient information with your comments 
that will allow us to verify any scientific or commercial information 
you include. We will not consider comments sent by email or fax, or to 
an address not listed in ADDRESSES.
    We will post all comments on https://www.regulations.gov. Before 
including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal 
information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire 
comment--including your personal identifying information--may be made 
publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to 
withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we 
cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.
    Comments and materials we receive, as well as supporting 
documentation we used in preparing this direct final rule, will be 
available for public inspection on the internet at https://www.regulations.gov. Please note that comments posted to https://www.regulations.gov are not immediately viewable. When you submit a 
comment, the system receives it immediately. However, the comment will 
not be publicly viewable until we post it, which might not occur until 
several days after submission. Information regarding this rule is 
available in alternative formats upon request (see FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION CONTACT).

Background

    The List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and the List of 
Endangered and Threatened Plants (``the Lists''), set forth in title 50 
of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Sec. Sec.  17.11 and 17.12, 
respectively, contain the names of endangered species and threatened 
species federally listed pursuant to the ESA (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.).
    The regulations at 50 CFR 17.11(c) and 17.12(b) direct us to use 
the most recently accepted scientific name of any wildlife or plant 
species, respectively, that we have determined to be an endangered or 
threatened species.

Purpose of Direct Final Rule and Final Action

    The purpose of this direct final rule is to notify the public that 
we are

[[Page 67353]]

revising the Lists at 50 CFR 17.11(h) and 17.12(h) to reflect the 
scientifically accepted taxonomy and nomenclature of nine wildlife 
species and nine plant species listed under section 4 of the ESA. These 
revisions reflect the most recently accepted scientific nomenclature in 
accordance with 50 CFR 17.11(c) and 17.12(b).
    We are publishing this rule without a prior proposal because this 
is a noncontroversial action that is in the best interest of the public 
and should be undertaken in as timely a manner as possible. For the 
taxonomic revisions provided below in Table 1, this rule will be 
effective, as published in this document, on the effective date 
specified in DATES, unless we receive significant adverse comments on 
or before the comment due date specified in DATES. Significant adverse 
comments are comments that provide strong justification as to why this 
rule should not be adopted or why it should be changed.
    If we receive significant adverse comments regarding the taxonomic 
changes for any of the species included in Table 1, below, we will 
publish a document in the Federal Register withdrawing this rule for 
the appropriate species before the effective date, and we will publish 
a proposed rule to initiate promulgation of those changes to 50 CFR 
17.11(h) and/or 17.12(h).
    In addition, we are notifying the public that we have identified 
editorial errors in the Lists, and they will be corrected on the 
effective date of this rule (see DATES, above). The identified errors 
are provided below in Table 2. While you may submit comments by one of 
the methods listed in ADDRESSES on the corrections provided below in 
Table 2, we consider these corrections purely administrative, and we 
intend to make these editorial corrections on the effective date of 
this rule.
    None of these changes are regulatory in nature; they are for 
accuracy and clarity. These revisions do not alter species' protections 
or status in any way. Any actions altering a species' protection or 
status would require a separate rulemaking action following the 
procedures of 50 CFR part 424.

Summary Tables of Taxonomic Changes and Editorial Corrections

    Table 1 provides taxonomic changes we are making to reflect the 
scientifically accepted taxonomy and nomenclature of nine wildlife and 
nine plant species listed under section 4 of the ESA. These changes 
reflect the most recently accepted scientific nomenclature in 
accordance with 50 CFR 17.11(c) and 17.12(b).

    Table 1--Taxonomic Revisions to the Lists Reflecting the Current
   Scientifically Accepted Taxonomy and Nomenclature for These Species
------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Species name as currently listed          Corrected species name
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Common name (scientific name)            Common name (scientific name)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Sec.   17.11 Endangered and threatened wildlife
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                 Mammals
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gulf Coast jaguarundi (Herpailurus       Gulf Coast jaguarundi (Puma
 (=Felis) yagouaroundi cacomitli).        yagouaroundi cacomitli).
Sinaloan jaguarundi (Herpailurus         Sinaloan jaguarundi (Puma
 (=Felis) yagouaroundi tolteca).          yagouaroundi tolteca).
Mount Graham red squirrel (Tamiasciurus  Mount Graham red squirrel
 hudsonicus grahamensis).                 (Tamiasciurus fremonti
                                          grahamensis).
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  Birds
------------------------------------------------------------------------
golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica        golden-cheeked warbler
 chrysoparia).                            (Setophaga chrysoparia).
Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris   Yuma Ridgway's rail (Rallus
 yumanensis).                             obsoletus yumanensis).
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                               Amphibians
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sonoran tiger salamander (Ambystoma      Sonoran tiger salamander
 tigrinum stebbinsi).                     (Ambystoma mavortium
                                          stebbinsi).
Texas blind salamander (Typhlomolge      Texas blind salamander (Eurycea
 rathbuni).                               rathbuni).
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Arachnids
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Government Canyon Bat Cave spider        Government Canyon Bat Cave
 (Neoleptoneta microps).                  spider (Tayshaneta microps).
Tooth Cave spider (Neoleptoneta          Tooth Cave spider (Tayshaneta
 myopica).                                myopica).
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Scientific name (common name)            Scientific name (common name)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Sec.   17.12 Endangered and threatened plants
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Flowering Plants
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Coryphantha minima (Nellie's cory        Escobaria minima (Nellie's cory
 cactus).                                 cactus).
Echinomastus mariposensis (Lloyd's       Sclerocactus mariposensis
 Mariposa cactus).                        (Lloyd's Mariposa cactus).
Echinocereus triglochidiatus var.        Echinocereus arizonicus ssp.
 arizonicus (Arizona hedgehog cactus).    arizonicus (Arizona hedgehog
                                          cactus).
Lesquerella pallida (white bladderpod).  Physaria pallida (white
                                          bladderpod).
Lesquerella thamnophila (Zapata          Physaria thamnophila (Zapata
 bladderpod).                             bladderpod).
Pediocactus peeblesianus var.            Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp.
 fickeiseniae (Fickeisen plains cactus).  fickeiseniae (Fickeisen plains
                                          cactus).
Pediocactus peeblesianus var.            Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp.
 peeblesianus (Peebles Navajo cactus).    peeblesianus (Peebles Navajo
                                          cactus).
Senecio franciscanus (San Francisco      Packera franciscana (San
 Peaks ragwort).                          Francisco Peaks ragwort).
Styrax texanus (Texas snowbells).......  Styrax platanifolius ssp.
                                          texanus (Texas snowbells).
------------------------------------------------------------------------


[[Page 67354]]

    Table 2 identifies the editorial corrections we are making in this 
rule. Where Table 2 (and text) refers to the ``2016 Reformatting'' that 
means an August 24, 2016, final rule (81 FR 51550) that the Service 
published to update the format of the Lists. The purpose of the 2016 
Reformatting was to make the Lists easier to understand by changing the 
format to reflect current practices and standards, to correct 
identified errors in entries such as footnotes and spelling, and to 
update common names, among other changes. Following publication of the 
2016 Reformatting we identified editorial errors in the updated Lists. 
Where Table 2 refers to ``68 FR 17156'' that is the citation for the 
final rule designating critical habitat for seven Bexar County, Texas, 
invertebrates (68 FR 17156; April 8, 2003), which contained a spelling 
error and listing citation error.

               Table 2--Editorial Corrections to the Lists
------------------------------------------------------------------------
     Current listed name          Error: Action          Correction
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wildlife:
Beetle, (no common name)      Error in 2016         65 FR 81419, 12/26/
 [Rhadine exilis].             Reformatting:         2000; 50 CFR
                               Correct listing       17.95(i).CH
                               citation.
Beetle, (no common name)      Error in 2016         65 FR 81419, 12/26/
 [Rhadine infernalis].         Reformatting:         2000; 50 CFR
                               Correct listing       17.95(i).CH
                               citation.
Helotes mold beetle           Error in 2016         65 FR 81419, 12/26/
 (Batrisodes venyivi).         Reformatting:         2000; 50 CFR
                               Correct listing       17.95(i).CH
                               citation.
Braken Bat Cave meshweaver    Error in 68 FR        Cicurina venii 65 FR
 (Circurina venii).            17156: Correct        81419, 12/26/2000;
                               spelling error;       50 CFR 17.95(g).CH
                               error in 2016
                               Reformatting:
                               Correct listing
                               citation.
Cokendolpher cave harvestman  Error in 2016         65 FR 81419, 12/26/
 (Texella cokendolpheri).      Reformatting:         2000; 50 CFR
                               Correct listing       17.95(g).CH
                               citation.
Government Canyon Bat Cave    Error in 2016         Cicurina vespera 65
 meshweaver (Circurina         Reformatting:         FR 81419, 12/26/
 vespera).                     Correct spelling      2000; 50 CFR
                               error and listing     17.95(g).CH
                               citation.
Government Canyon Bat Cave    Error in 2016         65 FR 81419, 12/26/
 spider (Neoleptoneta          Reformatting:         2000; 50 CFR
 microps).                     Correct listing       17.95(g).CH
                               citation.
Koster's springsnail          Error in 2016         Juturnia kosteri.
 (Juturnia kosteria).          Reformatting:
                               Correct spelling
                               error.
Loach minnow (Rhinichthys     Error in 2016         Tiaroga cobitis.
 cobitis).                     Reformatting:
                               Reflect correct
                               taxonomic name.
Madla Cave meshweaver         Error in 2016         65 FR 81419, 12/26/
 (Cicurina madla).             Reformatting:         2000; 50 CFR
                               Correct listing       17.95(g).CH
                               citation.
Robber Baron Cave meshweaver  Error in 2016         65 FR 81419, 12/26/
 (Cicurina baronia).           Reformatting:         2000; 50 CFR
                               Correct listing       17.95(g).CH
                               citation.
Yuma clapper rail (Rallus     Update common name..  Yuma Ridgway's rail.
 longirostris yumanensis).
Plants:
Fickeisen plains cactus       Error in 2016         Remove duplicate
 (Pediocactus peeblesianus     Reformatting:         entry from the
 var. fickeiseniae).           Remove duplicate      List.
                               entry.
Peebles Navajo cactus         Error in 2016         Restore omitted
 (Pediocactus peeblesianus     Reformatting: Add     species entry to
 var. peeblesianus).           omitted entry.        the List.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Description of Taxonomic Revisions and Editorial Corrections

    Using the best available scientific information, this direct final 
rule documents taxonomic changes of the scientific names to three 
entries under ``Mammals,'' two entries under ``Birds,'' two entries 
under ``Amphibians,'' and two entries under ``Arachnids'' on the 
current List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife (50 CFR 17.11(h)) 
and to nine entries under ``Flowering Plants'' on the current List of 
Endangered and Threatened Plants (50 CFR 17.12(h)). The basis for these 
taxonomic changes is supported by published studies in peer-reviewed 
journals. Accordingly, we revise the scientific names of these species 
under section 4 of the ESA and in accordance with 50 CFR 17.11(c) and 
17.12(b).
    Of the species that are the subjects of the taxonomic revisions in 
this rule, Mount Graham red squirrel, Government Canyon Bat Cave 
spider, San Francisco Peaks ragwort, Zapata bladderpod, and Fickeisen 
plains cactus have designated critical habitat. For clarity and 
consistency, in this direct final rule, we are revising the headings of 
the critical habitat designations to reflect the corrected scientific 
names for the following species: Mount Graham red squirrel at 50 CFR 
17.95(a), Government Canyon Bat Cave spider at 50 CFR 17.95(g), and for 
the San Francisco Peaks ragwort, Zapata bladderpod, and Fickeisen 
plains cactus at 50 CFR 17.96(a).
    Additionally, we are correcting errors noted in species' scientific 
names and Federal Register citations, updating common names, and 
correcting a duplication and an omission (see Table 2, above). These 
corrections are not regulatory in nature; they are administrative and 
for the purpose of clarity. The corrections do not alter species' 
protections or status; an action changing a species' protection or 
status would require a separate rulemaking following the procedures set 
forth at 50 CFR part 424.

Taxonomic Classification

Gulf Coast and Sinaloan Jaguarundi

    The Gulf Coast jaguarundi (Herpailurus (=Felis) yagouaroundi 
cacomitli) and the Sinaloan jaguarundi (Herpailurus (=Felis) 
yagouaroundi tolteca), subspecies of the jaguarundi, a small cat 
ranging from Texas to Argentina, were listed as endangered in 1976 
(June 14, 1976; 41 FR 24062). The jaguarundi was originally included in 
the genus Felis, and the Gulf Coast jaguarundi and the Sinaloan 
jaguarundi were originally listed under the ESA as Felis yagouaroundi 
cacomitli and Felis yagouaroundi tolteca, respectively (June 14, 1976; 
41 FR 24062).
    Later, genus classification was changed from Felis to Herpailurus 
(Wozencraft 1993, p. 291), and this widely accepted change was 
subsequently made to the ESA listing (August 4, 2016; 81 FR 51550). 
Thus, these subspecies are currently listed under the ESA as 
Herpailurus (=Felis) yagouaroundi cacomitli and Herpailurus (=Felis) 
yagouaroundi tolteca.
    However, more recent genetic work assigns the jaguarundi to the 
genus Puma (Johnson and O'Brien 1997, pp. S110-S111; Johnson et al. 
2006, p. 74), and this has become the generally accepted nomenclature 
(Wozencraft 2005, p. 545). The Service recognizes the Gulf coast 
jaguarundi and Sinaloan jaguarundi name changes to Puma yagouaroundi 
cacomitli and Puma yagouaroundi tolteca. respectively. This taxonomic 
change does not affect the range or endangered status of either the 
Gulf coast jaguarundi or Sinaloan jaguarundi.

Mount Graham Red Squirrel

    The Mount Graham red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis) 
was listed as endangered on June 3, 1987 (52 FR 20994) and was 
considered a subspecies of the pine squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus; 
Steele 1998,

[[Page 67355]]

p. 1). This subspecies occurs only in the highest elevations of the 
Pinale[ntilde]o Mountains in southeastern Arizona.
    Hope et al. (2016, p. 173) indicates that regional differences in 
evolutionary dynamics and continental gradients of complexity are 
reflected in three species of Tamiasciurus: T. douglasii, T. 
hudsonicus, and T. fremonti. Southwestern red squirrels, including the 
Mount Graham red squirrel, were assigned to a new species of red 
squirrel, T. fremonti (Hope et al. 2016, pp. 173, 179). Beginning in 
2016, scientists researching the Mount Graham red squirrel acknowledged 
this new designation (e.g., Merrick and Koprowski 2016, p. 2) and began 
referring to the Mount Graham red squirrel as T. fremonti grahamensis 
(e.g., Gwinn and Koprowski 2016, p. 1). Tamiasciurus fremonti 
grahamensis is now the accepted species and subspecies name for the 
Mount Graham red squirrel by NatureServe (see https://explorer.natureserve.org/Taxon/ELEMENT_GLOBAL.2.101915/Tamiasciurus_fremonti_grahamensis), an organization that works with 
approximately 100 network organizations and over 1,000 conservation 
scientists to collect, aggregate, and standardize biodiversity 
statistics. The validity of the recognized T. fremonti grahamensis 
subspecies is not in question (Hope et al. 2016, entire).
    Therefore, the Service recognizes the scientific name change for 
the Mount Graham red squirrel from Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis 
to Tamiasciurus fremonti grahamensis. These changes remain consistent 
with the latest scientific literature on or referencing the subspecies 
(e.g., Lynch 2018, p. 2; Goldstein et al. 2018, p. 67; Merrick et al. 
2021, p. 2). This taxonomic change does not affect the range of, 
endangered status of, or critical habitat designation for the Mount 
Graham red squirrel.

Golden-Cheeked Warbler

    The golden-cheeked warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) was emergency 
listed as endangered, due to habitat destruction, on May 4, 1990 (55 FR 
18844), and we published a final rule to list the golden-cheeked 
warbler as endangered on December 27, 1990 (55 FR 53153).
    In 2011, the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) adopted a new 
classification of the family Parulidae based on a phylogenetic analysis 
by Lovette et al. (2010, p. 763) that resulted in all Dendroica species 
being placed into a single clade for which the generic name Setophaga 
has taxonomic priority (Chesser et al. 2011, p. 608). The golden-
cheeked warbler is now placed in the family Parulidae (new world 
warblers; wood-warblers) and the genus Setophaga (redstarts). 
Hereafter, the Service recognizes the golden-cheeked warbler as 
Setophaga chrysoparia, formerly placed in the genus Dendroica. This 
taxonomic change does not affect the range or endangered status of the 
golden-cheeked warbler.

Yuma Clapper Rail

    The Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) was listed 
as endangered on March 11, 1967 (32 FR 4001) and was considered a 
subspecies of the clapper rail (Rallus longirostris). This subspecies 
occurs in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Mexico.
    Maley and Brumfield (2013, p. 318) better distinguished the 
phylogenetic relationships in the Rallus longirostris and Rallus 
elegans complexes using mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences. Their 
results indicate that the Rallus elegans and Rallus longirostris 
complexes are paraphyletic, and the complex could be split into five 
morphologically and genetically distinct species, including Rallus 
obsoletus, Rallus tenuirostris, Rallus elegans, and Rallus crepitans 
(Maley and Brumfield 2013, p. 326). In 2014, the AOU accepted this 
proposed change, reorganizing the clapper rail (R. longirostris) and 
king rail (R. elegans) species complex and creating five distinct 
subspecies (Chesser et al. 2014, p. CSv). Under the new accepted 
taxonomy, the Yuma clapper rail became the Yuma Ridgway's rail (R. 
obsoletus yumanensis). The validity of the five currently recognized R. 
obsoletus subspecies is not in question (Maley and Brumfield 2013, 
entire; Chesser et al. 2014, p. CSv).
    Therefore, the Service recognizes the scientific (and common name) 
change from Yuma clapper rail (Rallus longirostris yumanensis) to Yuma 
Ridgway's rail (R. obsoletus yumanensis). This taxonomic change does 
not affect the range or endangered status of this subspecies.

Sonoran Tiger Salamander

    The Sonoran tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum stebbinsi) was 
listed as endangered on January 6, 1997 (62 FR 665). This subspecies 
occurs in southern Arizona in the United States and in northern Sonora, 
Mexico.
    Shaffer and McKnight (1996, Evolution 50: pp. 417-433) provided 
molecular phylogenetic data indicating that the eastern and western 
tiger salamanders should be regarded as distinct species and treated 
the western forms as subspecies of Ambystoma mavortium. Hallock (2005, 
in Jones, L.L.C., et al., pp. 30-33) placed northwestern populations in 
A. tigrinum. As a result, in 2008, the Society for the Study of 
Amphibians and Reptiles (SSAR) adopted a new scientific and common name 
for the species in Scientific and Common Names for Amphibians and 
Reptiles of North America North of M[eacute]xico (SSAR 2008, pp. 1-84). 
The SSAR list is the most widely recognized standard for nomenclature 
of North American amphibians and reptiles.
    Therefore, the Service recognizes the scientific name change from 
Ambystoma tigrinum stebbinsi to Ambystoma mavortium stebbinsi. This 
change remains consistent with the latest SSAR list of standard names 
(Crother, B.I. (ed.). 2017) and does not affect the range or endangered 
status of the Sonoran tiger salamander.

Texas Blind Salamander

    The Texas blind salamander (Typhlomolge rathbuni) was listed as 
endangered on March 11, 1967 (32 FR 4001). This species occurs in the 
Edwards Aquifer near San Marcos, Texas. The taxonomic classification of 
Texas blind salamander in the genus Typhlomolge has been widely 
discussed and controversial (Mitchell and Reddell 1965, pp. 24-26; 
Potter and Sweet 1981, entire; Lombard and Wake 1986, entire; 
Chippindale et al. 2000, entire).
    The Typhlomolge genus is characterized by extreme cave-associated 
morphologies (tiny non-functional vestiges of eyes, loss of 
pigmentation, long slender legs, and broad flattened head). Some 
researchers support that the Texas blind salamander is best related to 
species of Eurycea, which exhibit extreme troglobitic morphologies 
(Mitchell and Reddell 1965, pp. 24-26; Petraka 1998, pp. 272-273). 
Other scientists have suggested that members of Typhlomolge are 
sufficiently distinct from Edwards Plateau Eurycea to warrant 
recognition of the Typhlomolge genus (Wake 1966, pp. 51, 73-99; Potter 
and Sweet 1981, pp. 65-73). However, Chippindale's (1995, entire) more 
recent molecular phylogenetic evidence supports that the recognition of 
the genus Typhlomolge is not warranted. Further, the results of 
allozyme and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) testing of Texas blind 
salamander by Chippindale et al. (2000, pp. 20, 23-24) supports the 
taxonomic revision from the genus Typhlomolge to the genus Eurycea. 
Therefore, the Service recognizes the scientific name change from 
Typhlomolge rathbuni to Eurycea rathbuni. This taxonomic

[[Page 67356]]

change does not affect the range or endangered status of this species.

Government Canyon Bat Cave Spider and Tooth Cave Spider

    The Government Canyon Bat Cave spider (Neoleptoneta microps) is a 
small, troglobitic spider that inhabits caves and mesocaverns in Bexar 
County, Texas, and was listed as endangered on December 26, 2000 (65 FR 
81419). In the original listing the Government Canyon Bat Cave spider 
was listed as the Government Canyon cave spider; although the common 
name was revised to the Government Canyon Bat Cave spider on April 8, 
2003 (68 FR 17156). In addition, critical habitat was designated for 
the Government Canyon Bat Cave spider and Government Canyon Bat Cave 
meshweaver on February 14, 2012 (77 FR 8450).
    The Tooth Cave spider (Neoleptoneta myopica) is a small, 
troglobitic spider that inhabits caves and mesocaverns in Travis and 
Williamson Counties, Texas. It was listed as endangered on September 
16, 1988 (53 FR 36029). The Tooth Cave spider does not have designated 
critical habitat.
    The Government Canyon Bat Cave spider and Tooth Cave spider were 
originally described as Leptoneta microps and Leptoneta myopica, 
respectively Gertsch (1974, pp. 168-169, 172-173). They were later 
reassigned to Neoleptoneta following Brignoli (1977, p. 216) and 
Platnick (1986, p. 15).
    In a phylogenetic assessment, Ledford et al. (2011, entire) limited 
the genus Neoleptoneta to only include seven species restricted to 
central Mexico. The remaining species were placed in three new genera: 
(1) Chisoneta, (2) Ozarkia, and (3) Tayshaneta. The Government Canyon 
Bat Cave spider and Tooth Cave spider were transferred to Tayshaneta 
(Ledford et al. 2011, pp. 375-385). These taxonomic changes have been 
recognized by the World Spider Catalog (2019).
    Therefore, we recognize the scientific names of the Government 
Canyon Bat Cave spider and Tooth Cave spider as Tayshaneta microps and 
Tayshaneta myopica, respectively. This does not affect the range or 
endangered status of these species, or the designated critical habitat 
of the Government Canyon Bat Cave spider.

Arizona Hedgehog Cactus

    The Arizona hedgehog cactus (Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. 
arizonicus) was listed as endangered on November 26, 1979 (44 FR 
61556). At that time, E. triglochidiatus included all red-flowered 
hedgehog cacti in the United States, resulting in a large group of 
highly morphologically variable species (Benson 1969, 1982; Taylor 1985 
pp. 68-73). Since then, cytological (i.e., the study of chromosome 
numbers for classification) and morphological studies within E. 
triglochidiatus have led to separations of taxa based on ploidy levels 
(i.e., the number of copies of the complete genetic information; 
Parfitt and Christy 1992; Cota and Philbrick 1994; Baker 2006). The 
tetraploids (four homologous copies of each chromosome (4n)) are now 
recognized as E. coccineus Engelmann, and diploids (two homologous 
copies of each chromosome (2n)) are now recognized as either E. 
triglochidiatus or E. arizonicus Rose ex Orcutt (Blum et al. 1998, pp. 
357-423; Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003, p. 168). In 1998, the Arizona 
hedgehog cactus was recognized as Echinocereus arizonicus subsp. 
arizonicus (Rose ex. Orcutt), formalizing E. arizonicus as an 
independent species separate from E. triglochidiatus and E. coccineus 
based on chromosome numbers, elevational range, and geographic 
distribution (Blum et al. 1998, p. 367-369; Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003, 
p. 168). This taxonomic treatment has been adopted by the Flora of 
North America (Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003, p. 168).
    The Service recognizes the scientific name change of the Arizona 
hedgehog cactus to Echinocereus arizonicus ssp. arizonicus. This 
taxonomic change does not affect the range or endangered status of the 
Arizona hedgehog cactus.

Fickeisen Plains Cactus and Peebles Navajo Cactus

    The Peebles Navajo cactus (Pediocactus peeblesianus var. 
peeblesianus) and Fickeisen plains cactus (Pediocactus peeblesianus 
var. fickeiseniae) are small, mostly solitary, spherical cacti endemic 
to northern Arizona. Both were classified as ``varieties'' when listed 
as endangered in 1979 (44 FR 61922; October 26, 1979) and 2013 (78 FR 
60608; October 1, 2013), respectively.
    In our 2013 listing rule, we acknowledged that the Flora of North 
America treated the Fickeisen plains cactus as a subspecies of 
Pediocactus peeblesianus, finding that the name ``Pediocactus 
peeblesianus var. fickeiseniae'' was not validly published by Lyman D. 
Benson (Heil and Porter 2003, p. 213). However, at that time, we and 
taxonomic organizations such as the Integrated Taxonomic Information 
Systems (ITIS) continued to treat the taxon as a variety, but we 
recognized the need for future taxonomic review.
    More recently, the Flora of North America (Heil and Porter 2001, 
pp. 10-11; 2003, p. 213), ITIS (2019), and the broader botanical 
scientific community (Tropicos 2019) accepted subspecies rank for both 
Peebles Navajo cactus (Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. peeblesianus) and 
Fickeisen plains cactus (Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. fickeiseniae 
[=Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. fickeiseniorum]; L[uuml]thy 1999; ITIS 
2019).
    Because of the agreement throughout the scientific community, we 
recognize the Peebles Navajo cactus as Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. 
peeblesianus and the Fickeisen plains cactus as Pediocactus 
peeblesianus ssp. fickeiseniae. These changes in nomenclature do not 
affect the range or endangered status of either cactus, or, for the 
Fickeisen plains cactus, its designated critical habitat.

Lloyd's Mariposa Cactus

    On November 6, 1979, we listed Lloyd's mariposa cactus (Neolloydia 
mariposensis) as threatened, without critical habitat (44 FR 64247). 
Hester (1940) described this small cactus as a new species, 
Echinomastus mariposensis, based on specimens he collected near the 
Mariposa quicksilver mine, in Brewster County, Texas.
    Botanists continue to recognize Lloyd's mariposa cactus as a 
distinct, valid species, but based on evolving phylogenetic 
interpretations have disagreed on the genera placement. Benson (1969) 
assigned species mariposensis to the genus Neolloydia; Glass and Foster 
(1975), Anderson (1986, 2001), Zimmerman (1985) and the Flora of North 
America (Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003) returned it to Echinomastus. 
Additional published classifications include Echinocactus (Weniger 
1979), Sclerocactus (Taylor 1987), and Pediocactus (Halda 1998). 
However, more recently, Porter and Prince (2011) constructed a 
molecular phylogeny of a narrowly defined Sclerocactus, and related 
taxa, based on chloroplast DNA sequences using data from five 
independent investigations (Porter et al. 2000; Butterworth et al. 
2002; Crozier 2005; Hernandez et al. 2011; Butterworth and Porter (in 
prep.)).
    Although these studies examined different regions of chloroplast 
DNA, the results were completely congruent. On this basis, Porter and 
Prince (2011) recognized a monophyletic, though polymorphic, clade, in 
which Ancistrocactus, Echinomastus, and Toumeya are included in a 
broadly defined Sclerocactus genus; Echinomastus, as defined in the 
Flora of North America (Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003), is paraphyletic. 
Lloyd's mariposa cactus was assigned to Sclerocactus

[[Page 67357]]

mariposensis in Section Andersonianus (Porter and Prince 2011, pp. 36-
37, 58-59). We concur with this classification, which has also been 
accepted by the ITIS (2018) and Tropicos (2018). This revision does not 
affect the species' range or threatened status.

Nellie's Cory Cactus

    On November 7, 1979, we listed Nellie's cory cactus (Coryphantha 
minima) as endangered, without critical habitat (44 FR 64738). Although 
botanists continue to recognize Nellie's cory cactus as a distinct, 
valid species, differing phylogenetic interpretations retain it in the 
genus Coryphantha, or place it in another closely related genus, 
Escobaria.
    First described by Britton and Rose (1919-1923), Escobaria is 
distinguished from Coryphantha by pitted seed coats, fringed perianth 
parts, areoles that lack nectaries, and flowers that are not yellow 
(Anderson 2001); since Nellie's cory cactus has these characteristics, 
it belongs in the Escobaria group. Zimmerman (1985) and the Flora of 
North America (Zimmerman and Parfitt 2003) recognized Escobaria as a 
subgenus of Coryphantha that included C. minima. Conversely, Anderson 
(2001), the International Cactaceae Systematics Group (2006), the ITIS 
(2011), and Natural Resources Conservation Service (2011) recognized 
Escobaria as a full genus.
    More recent phylogenetic studies based on DNA sequences 
(Butterworth 2010; V[aacute]zquez-S[aacute]nchez et al. 2013) indicate 
that Coryphantha sensu lato is not monophyletic. Although more data are 
needed to circumscribe Coryphantha and Escobaria, Nellie's cory cactus 
is more appropriately classified as Escobaria minima, based on the 
above described morphological characteristics. Thus, we recognize 
Nellie's cory cactus as Escobaria minima. This change does not affect 
the species' range or endangered status.

San Francisco Peaks Ragwort

    San Francisco Peaks ragwort (Senecio franciscanus),was listed as 
threatened on November 22, 1983 (48 FR 52743), and is a dwarf alpine 
plant in the sunflower family that is found only on the talus slopes in 
the alpine zone on the San Francisco Peaks, north of Flagstaff. Based 
on morphological and cytological evidence, plants formerly described as 
Senecio that have pendant heads, branched and nonfleshy roots, and few 
teeth on the leaves are now described as the genus Packera, (Weber, WA 
and [Aacute]. L[ouml]ve 1981). Weber and L[ouml]ve (1981) are following 
the European botanists' generic circumscription of Senecio and the 
segregates.
    The scientific name change from ``Senecio franciscanus'' to 
``Packera franciscana'' is widely accepted by professionals and is the 
accepted name at the Deaver Herbarium at Northern Arizona University 
(Ayers 2007, pers. comm.). The Service recognizes the San Francisco 
Peaks ragwort as Packera franciscana. This taxonomic change does not 
affect the range, endangered status, or designated critical habitat of 
the San Francisco Peaks ragwort.

Texas Snowbells

    On October 12, 1984, we listed Texas snowbells (Styrax texana) as 
endangered, without critical habitat(49 FR 40036). V.L. Cory described 
Styrax texana in 1943, which he distinguished from S. platanifolia and 
S. youngae based on differences in the trichomes (epidermal structures) 
of leaves and floral parts.
    Gonsoulin (1974) revised the genus Styrax in North America, Central 
America, and the Caribbean. In Texas and Northeast Mexico, this 
treatment recognized S. texana, S. youngae, and S. platanifolia with 
two varieties, platanifolia and stellata. Fritsch's subsequent revision 
(Fritsch 1997) of the Styrax of West Texas, Mexico, and Mesoamerica 
recognized 19 species and 24 taxa, including 7 geographically and 
morphologically distinct subspecies of two species. Morphological, 
isozyme, and DNA sequence data indicated that five taxa of Texas and 
Northern Mexico are more closely related to each other than to other 
Styrax taxa and belong to a single species, S. platanifolius; following 
Nicolson and Steyskal (1976), Fritsch adopted the masculine gender for 
Styrax. This revision recognized five subspecies of S. platanifolius, 
distinguished by distinct regional differences in the morphology and 
abundance of trichomes: platanifolius, mollis, stellatus, texanus, and 
youngiae.
    This treatment is currently recognized by the Flora of North 
America (Fritsch 2009), the ITIS (2018), Missouri Botanical Garden 
(Tropicos 2014), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Plants 
Database (Natural Resources Conservation Service 2014). In 
consideration of the broad acceptance of this most recent revision of 
American Styrax, we also recognize Texas snowbells as Styrax 
platanifolius ssp. texanus. This revision does not affect the species' 
range or endangered status.

White Bladderpod and Zapata Bladderpod

    In 1987, we listed white bladderpod (Lesquerella pallida) as 
endangered (52 FR 7424; March 11, 1987). In 1999, we listed Zapata 
bladderpod (Lesquerella thamnophila) as endangered (64 FR 63745; 
November 22, 1999). Critical habitat was designated for Zapata 
bladderpod on December 22, 2000 (65 FR 81182); no critical habitat was 
designated for white bladderpod.
    In 2002, Al-Shehbaz and O'Kane transferred 91 taxa of Lesquerella 
to the genus Physaria, including the species pallida and thamnophila, 
based on molecular, morphological, cytological, biogeographic, and 
ecological data. Genetic analyses, based on DNA sequences of the 
internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA and length 
variation of inter-simple sequence repeat regions, revealed that 
Physaria, as previously recognized, was nested within and evolved more 
than once from Lesquerella. The former genus was polyphyletic, and the 
latter was paraphyletic. These authors united the two into a single 
monophyletic genus, conserving the earlier-published name of Physaria.
    These taxonomic revisions are supported by the Flora of North 
America (O'Kane 2010), the ITIS (2015), and the Tropicos database 
(Tropicos 2015). Thus, the Service recognizes the white bladderpod and 
Zapata bladderpod as Physaria pallida and Physaria thamnophila, 
respectively. These changes do not affect the range or endangered 
status of white bladderpod or Zapata bladderpod, or, for Zapata 
bladderpod, its designated critical habitat.

Required Determinations

National Environmental Policy Act

    We have determined that environmental assessments and environmental 
impact statements, as defined under the authority of the National 
Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), need not be 
prepared in connection with regulations issued pursuant to section 4(a) 
of the ESA. We published a notice outlining our reasons for this 
determination in the Federal Register on October 25, 1983 (43 FR 
49244). Even if NEPA were to apply, this amendment of the regulations 
is purely administrative in nature, and therefore is categorically 
excluded under the Department of the Interior's NEPA procedures in 43 
CFR 46.210(i); no exceptional circumstances apply.

Clarity of the Rule

    We are required by Executive Orders 12866 and 12988 and by the 
Presidential Memorandum of June 1, 1998, to write all rules in plain

[[Page 67358]]

language. This means that each rule we publish must:
    (a) Be logically organized;
    (b) Use the active voice to address readers directly;
    (c) Use clear language rather than jargon;
    (d) Be divided into short sections and sentences; and
    (e) Use lists and tables wherever possible.
    If you feel that we have not met these requirements, send us 
comments by one of the methods listed in ADDRESSES. To help us to 
revise this rule, your comments should be as specific as possible.

References Cited

    A list of the references cited in this direct final rule is 
provided in Docket No. FWS-R2-ES-2021-0044 at https://www.regulations.gov or upon request from the appropriate contact person 
(see FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT).

List of Subjects in 50 CFR Part 17

    Endangered and threatened species, Exports, Imports, Reporting and 
recordkeeping requirements, Transportation.

Regulation Promulgation

    For the reasons given in the preamble, we amend part 17, subchapter 
B of chapter I, title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations, as set 
forth below:

PART 17--ENDANGERED AND THREATENED WILDLIFE AND PLANTS

0
1. The authority citation for part 17 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 16 U.S.C. 1361-1407; 1531-1544; and 4201-4245, unless 
otherwise noted.


0
2. Amend Sec.  17.11(h), the List of Endangered and Threatened 
Wildlife:
0
a. Under Mammals, by revising the entries for ``Jaguarundi, Gulf 
Coast'', ``Jaguarundi, Sinaloan'', and ``Squirrel, Mount Graham red'';
0
b. Under Birds, by:
0
i. Removing the entry for ``Rail, Yuma Clapper'' and adding in its 
place an entry for ``Rail, Yuma Ridgway's''; and
0
ii. Revising the entry for ``Warbler (wood), golden-cheeked'';
0
c. Under Amphibians, by revising the entries for ``Salamander, Sonoran 
tiger'' and ``Salamander, Texas blind'';
0
d. Under Fishes, by revising the entry for ``Minnow, loach'';
0
e. Under Snails, by revising the entry for ``Springsnail, Koster's'';
0
f. Under Insects, by revising the entries for ``Beetle, Helotes mold'', 
``Beetle, (no common name) [Rhadine exilis]'', and ``Beetle, (no common 
name) [Rhadine infernalis]''; and
0
g. Under Arachnids, by revising the entry for ``Harvestman, 
Cokendolpher cave'', ``Meshweaver, Braken Bat Cave'', ``Meshweaver, 
Government Canyon Bat Cave'', ``Meshweaver, Madla Cave'', ``Meshweaver, 
Robber Baron Cave'', ``Spider, Government Canyon Bat Cave'', and 
``Spider, Tooth Cave''.
    The revisions and addition read as follows:


Sec.  17.11  Endangered and threatened wildlife.

* * * * *
    (h) * * *

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                              Listing citations
            Common name                Scientific name        Where listed        Status    and applicable rules
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Mammals
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Jaguarundi, Gulf Coast............  Puma yagouaroundi     Wherever found......          E   41 FR 24062, 6/14/
                                     cacomitli.                                              1976.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Jaguarundi, Sinaloan..............  Puma yagouaroundi     Wherever found......          E   41 FR 24062, 6/14/
                                     tolteca.                                                1976.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Squirrel, Mount Graham red........  Tamiasciurus          Wherever found......          E   52 FR 20994, 6/3/
                                     fremonti                                                1987; 50 CFR
                                     grahamensis.                                            17.95(a).CH
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
               Birds
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Rail, Yuma Ridgway's..............  Rallus obsoletus      U.S.A. only.........          E   32 FR 4001, 3/11/
                                     yumanensis.                                             1967.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Warbler (wood), golden-cheeked....  Setophaga             Wherever found......          E   55 FR 18844, 5/4/
                                     chrysoparia.                                            1990; 55 FR 53153,
                                                                                             12/27/1990.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
            Amphibians
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Salamander, Sonoran tiger.........  Ambystoma mavortium   Wherever found......          E   62 FR 665, 1/6/1977.
                                     stebbinsi.
Salamander, Texas blind...........  Eurycea rathbuni....  Wherever found......          E   32 FR 4001, 3/11/
                                                                                             1967.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
              Fishes
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Minnow, loach.....................  Tiaroga cobitis.....  Wherever found......          E   51 FR 39468, 10/28/
                                                                                             1986; 77 FR 10810,
                                                                                             2/23/2012; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(e).CH
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
              Snails
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Springsnail, Koster's.............  Juturnia kosteri....  Wherever found......          E   76 FR 33036, 6/7/
                                                                                             2011; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(f).CH
 

[[Page 67359]]

 
                                                  * * * * * * *
              Insects
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Beetle, Helotes mold..............  Batrisodes venyivi..  Wherever found......          E   65 FR 81419, 12/26/
                                                                                             2000; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(i).CH
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Beetle, (no common name)..........  Rhadine exilis......  Wherever found......          E   65 FR 81419, 12/26/
                                                                                             2000; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(i).CH
Beetle, (no common name)..........  Rhadine infernalis..  Wherever found......          E   65 FR 81419, 12/26/
                                                                                             2000; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(i).CH
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
             Arachnids
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Harvestman, Cokendolpher cave.....  Texella               Wherever found......          E   65 FR 81419, 12/26/
                                     cokendolpheri.                                          2000; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(g).CH
Meshweaver, Braken Bat Cave.......  Cicurina venii......  Wherever found......          E   65 FR 81419, 12/26/
                                                                                             2000; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(g).CH
Meshweaver, Government Canyon Bat   Cicurina vespera....  Wherever found......          E   65 FR 81419, 12/26/
 Cave.                                                                                       2000; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(g).CH
Meshweaver, Madla Cave............  Cicurina madla......  Wherever found......          E   65 FR 81419, 12/26/
                                                                                             2000; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(g).CH
Meshweaver, Robber Baron Cave.....  Cicurina baronia....  Wherever found......          E   65 FR 81419, 12/26/
                                                                                             2000; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(g).CH
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Spider, Government Canyon Bat Cave  Tayshaneta microps..  Wherever found......          E   65 FR 81419, 12/26/
                                                                                             2000; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.95(g).CH
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Spider, Tooth Cave................  Tayshaneta myopica..  Wherever found......          E   53 FR 36029, 9/16/
                                                                                             1988.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


0
3. Amend Sec.  17.12(h), the List of Endangered and Threatened Plants, 
under Flowering Plants, by:
0
a. Removing the entry for ``Coryphantha minima'';
0
b. Adding, in alphabetical order, an entry for ``Echinocereus 
arizonicus ssp. arizonicus'';
0
c. Removing the entries for ``Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. 
arizonicus'' and ``Echinomastus mariposensis'';
0
d. Adding, in alphabetical order, an entry for ``Escobaria minima'';
0
e. Removing the entries for ``Lesquerella pallida'' and ``Lesquerella 
thamnophila'';
0
f. Adding, in alphabetical order, an entry for ``Packera franciscana'';
0
g. Removing the first entry for ``Pediocactus peeblesianus var. 
fickeiseniae'';
0
h. Removing the remaining entry for ``Pediocactus peeblesianus var. 
fickeiseniae'' and adding the entry ``Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. 
fickeiseniae'' in its place;
0
i. Adding, in alphabetical order, entries for ``Pediocactus 
peeblesianus ssp. peeblesianus'', ``Physaria pallida'', ``Physaria 
thamnophila'', and ``Sclerocactus mariposensis'';
0
j. Removing the entry for ``Senecio franciscanus'';
0
k. Adding, in alphabetical order, an entry for ``Styrax platanifolius 
ssp. texanus'';
0
l. Removing the entry for ``Styrax texanus''.
    The additions read as follows:


Sec.  17.12  Endangered and threatened plants.

* * * * *
    (h) * * *

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                              Listing citations
          Scientific name                Common name          Where listed        Status    and applicable rules
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
         Flowering Plants
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Echinocereus arizonicus ssp.        Arizona hedgehog      Wherever found......          E   44 FR 61556, 10/25/
 arizonicus.                         cactus.                                                 1979.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Escobaria minima..................  Nellie's cory cactus  Wherever found......          E   44 FR 64738, 11/7/
                                                                                             1979.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Packera franciscana...............  San Francisco Peaks   Wherever found......          T   48 FR 52743, 11/22/
                                     ragwort.                                                1983; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.96(a).CH
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp.       Fickeisen plains      Wherever found......          E   78 FR 60607, 10/1/
 fickeiseniae.                       cactus.                                                 2013; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.96(a).CH
Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp.       Peebles Navajo        Wherever found......          E   44 FR 61922, 10/26/
 peeblesianus.                       cactus.                                                 1979.
 

[[Page 67360]]

 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Physaria pallida..................  White bladderpod....  Wherever found......          E   52 FR 7424, 3/11/
                                                                                             1987.
Physaria thamnophila..............  Zapata bladderpod...  Wherever found......          E   64 FR 63745, 11/22/
                                                                                             1999; 50 CFR
                                                                                             17.96(a).CH
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sclerocactus mariposensis.........  Lloyd's mariposa      Wherever found......          T   44 FR 64247, 11/6/
                                     cactus.                                                 1979.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Styrax platanifolius ssp. texanus.  Texas snowbells.....  Wherever found......          E   49 FR 40035, 10/12/
                                                                                             1984.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec.  17.95  [Amended]

0
4. Amend Sec.  17.95 by:
0
a. In paragraph (a), removing the heading ``Mount Graham Red Squirrel 
(Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis)'' and adding ``Mount Graham red 
squirrel (Tamiasciurus fremonti grahamensis)'' in its place; and
0
b. In paragraph (g), removing the heading ``Government Canyon Bat Cave 
Spider (Neoleptoneta microps)'' and adding ``Government Canyon Bat Cave 
Spider (Tayshaneta microps)'' in its place.

0
5. Amend Sec.  17.96, paragraph (a), by:
0
a. Removing the heading ``Family Asteraceae: Senecio franciscanus (San 
Francisco Peaks groundsel)'' and adding in its place the heading 
``Family Asteraceae: Packera franciscana (San Francisco Peaks 
ragwort)'';
0
b. In the entry ``Family Asteraceae: Packera franciscana (San Francisco 
Peaks ragwort)'', revising the note;
0
c. Removing the heading ``Family Brassicaceae: Lesquerella thamnophila 
(Zapata bladderpod)'' and adding in its place the heading ``Family 
Brassicaceae: Physaria thamnophila (Zapata bladderpod)''; and
0
d. Removing the heading ``Family Cactaceae: Pediocactus peeblesianus 
var. fickeiseniae (Fickeisen plains cactus)'' and adding in its place 
the heading ``Family Cactaceae: Pediocactus peeblesianus ssp. 
fickeiseniae (Fickeisen plains cactus)''.
    The revision reads as follows:


Sec.  17.96  Critical habitat--plants.

    (a) * * *

Family Asteraceae: Packera franciscana (San Francisco Peaks ragwort)
* * * * *

    Note: The reference to ``groundsel'' on the map is equivalent to 
``ragwort.'' Map follows:

* * * * *

Martha Williams,
Principal Deputy Director, Exercising the Delegated Authority of the 
Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
[FR Doc. 2021-25549 Filed 11-24-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4333-15-P