Policy Statement for the Reported Geometric Altitude of the Control Station of a Standard Remote Identification Unmanned Aircraft, 66162-66163 [2021-25366]

Download as PDF 66162 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 222 / Monday, November 22, 2021 / Rules and Regulations any missing cadmium plating and apply a chromate conversion coating. (2) Within 50 hours TIS after completion of paragraph (g)(1) of this AD, and thereafter at intervals not to exceed 50 hours TIS: (i) Using a 10X magnifying glass, visually inspect the neck and threaded area of each M/R clevis for wear, corrosion, and damage, which for the purposes of this inspection may be indicated by distortion, bending, a crack, or damaged M/R clevis threads. Refer to Figure 3 of ASB 430–21–60 for a depiction of the area to inspect on each M/R clevis. If there is any wear, corrosion, or damage, before further flight, remove the affected M/ R clevis from service and replace with an airworthy part. (ii) Perform the actions required in paragraph (g)(1)(iv) of this AD for each M/R clevis. (3) Within 150 hours TIS after the completion of paragraph (g)(1) of this AD, and thereafter at intervals not to exceed 150 hours TIS, visually inspect and purge grease each universal bearing, by performing the actions as required in paragraphs (g)(1)(ii) and (iii) of this AD. (h) Special Flight Permits A special flight permit may be permitted provided that there are no passengers onboard. jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 (j) Related Information (1) For more information about this AD, contact Hal Jensen, Aerospace Engineer, Operational Safety Branch, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, FAA, 950 L’Enfant Plaza N SW, Washington, DC 20024; telephone (202) 267–9167; email hal.jensen@ faa.gov. (2) The subject of this AD is addressed in Transport Canada CF–2021–26 AD, dated July 26, 2021. You may view the Transport Canada AD at https://www.regulations.gov in Docket No. FAA–2021–1011. (k) Material Incorporated by Reference (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of the service information listed in this paragraph under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) You must use this service information as applicable to do the actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. 17:19 Nov 19, 2021 Jkt 256001 Issued on November 16, 2021. Ross Landes, Deputy Director for Regulatory Operations, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2021–25489 Filed 11–18–21; 11:15 am] (i) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (1) The Manager, International Validation Branch, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the manager of the International Validation Branch, send it to the attention of the person identified in paragraph (j)(1) of this AD. Information may be emailed to: 9-AVS-AIR730-AMOC@faa.gov. (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office/ certificate holding district office. VerDate Sep<11>2014 (i) Bell Alert Service Bulletin 430–21–60, dated July 13, 2021. (ii) [Reserved] (3) For service information identified in this AD, contact Bell Textron Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l’Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J 1R4, Canada; telephone 1–450– 437–2862 or 1–800–363–8023; fax 1–450– 433–0272; email productsupport@ bellflight.com; or at https:// www.bellflight.com/support/contact-support. (4) You may view this service information at the FAA, Office of the Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N–321, Fort Worth, TX 76177. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call (817) 222–5110. (5) You may view this service information that is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, email: fr.inspection@nara.gov, or go to: https://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ ibr-locations.html. BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 89 [Docket No.: FAA–2019–1100] Policy Statement for the Reported Geometric Altitude of the Control Station of a Standard Remote Identification Unmanned Aircraft Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Statement of policy. AGENCY: This action clarifies FAA policy regarding the existing accuracy requirements for the reported geometric altitude of the control station of a standard remote identification unmanned aircraft. The FAA describes one acceptable way producers of unmanned aircraft can meet the minimum performance requirement for the accuracy of the control station’s reported geometric altitude. The FAA determined that this action is necessary to inform developers of means of compliance of one potential pathway to meet the performance requirement for the control station’s reported geometric altitude. DATES: The effective date of this policy is November 22, 2021. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 For information on where to obtain copies of this statement of policy and other information related to this statement, see ‘‘Additional Information’’ in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul Siegmund, Policy and Innovation Division, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20591; telephone 1–844–FLY–MY–UA (1–844–359–6981); email: UAShelp@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: ADDRESSES: I. Overview A. Background On January 15, 2021, the FAA published a final rule titled ‘‘Remote Identification of Unmanned Aircraft’’ (Remote ID final rule) with an original effective date of March 16, 2021.1 2 The Remote ID final rule requires the remote identification of unmanned aircraft in the airspace of the United States. Remote identification is the capability of an unmanned aircraft, in flight, to provide certain identification, location, and performance information that people on the ground and other airspace users can receive. In addition to the operating requirements, the Remote ID final rule provides the design and production requirements for the production of remote identification unmanned aircraft or broadcast modules. These requirements describe the performance standards for remote identification without establishing a specific means or process for regulated entities to follow.3 A person designing or producing a standard remote identification unmanned aircraft or remote identification broadcast module must show that the unmanned aircraft or broadcast module meets the performance requirements of the rule by following an FAA-accepted means of compliance. A means of compliance submitted to the FAA for acceptance 1 Remote Identification of Unmanned Aircraft final rule, 86 FR 4390 (Jan. 15, 2021). 2 On March 10, 2021, the FAA published a correction to the Remote ID final rule in accordance with the memorandum titled Regulatory Freeze Pending Review (86 FR 7424, Jan 28, 2021), delaying the final rule’s effective date to April 21, 2021 (86 FR 13629). 3 A standard remote identification unmanned aircraft broadcasts identification, location, and performance information of the unmanned aircraft and control station. This unmanned aircraft broadcasts the remote identification message elements directly from the unmanned aircraft from takeoff to shutdown. A remote identification broadcast module broadcasts identification, location, and take-off information; the broadcast module may be a separate device that is attached to an unmanned aircraft, or a feature built into the aircraft. 86 FR 4391 (Jan. 15, 2021). E:\FR\FM\22NOR1.SGM 22NOR1 jspears on DSK121TN23PROD with RULES1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 222 / Monday, November 22, 2021 / Rules and Regulations must show that an unmanned aircraft or broadcast module produced using it would meet the performance requirements of title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 89 (14 CFR part 89). This policy statement only addresses the performance requirements and compliance path for the standard remote identification unmanned aircraft. Part 89 requires the following 8 message elements to be broadcast from a standard remote identification unmanned aircraft: (1) Unmanned aircraft unique identifier; (2) an indication of the control station’s latitude and longitude; (3) an indication of the control station’s altitude; (4) an indication of the unmanned aircraft’s latitude and longitude; (5) an indication of the unmanned aircraft’s altitude; (6) a time mark; (7) an indication of the emergency status of the unmanned aircraft system; and (8) velocity. Additionally, all standard remote identification unmanned aircraft must meet certain minimum requirements regarding the transmission of the message elements including the minimum performance requirements related to positional accuracy, geometric altitude accuracy, message latency, and message transmission rate. These minimum performance requirements for the message elements are design requirements; any specific test method for ensuring that the unmanned aircraft design meets this accuracy requirement will be reviewed and evaluated by the FAA as a part of the means of compliance acceptance process. Part 89 establishes the accuracy requirement for the reported geometric altitude for the control station of a standard remote identification unmanned aircraft. Specifically, § 89.310(h)(2) requires that the reported geometric altitude of the control station must be accurate to within 15 feet of the true geometric altitude, with 95 percent probability. The Remote ID final rule did not specify how a means of compliance should address this requirement. In order to guide producers to develop standard remote identification unmanned aircraft that meet the FAA’s standards, this policy statement informs developers of one potential means of compliance that would be acceptable to the FAA to demonstrate compliance with meeting the geometric altitude requirement. Persons developing a means of compliance for a standard remote identification unmanned aircraft in accordance with 14 CFR part 89, subpart E, may incorporate the method described in this policy statement as part of their means of compliance. The VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:19 Nov 19, 2021 Jkt 256001 FAA emphasizes, however, that other ways of demonstrating compliance with § 89.310(h)(2) may be acceptable. B. Statement of Policy: Acceptable Method This statement of policy describes one acceptable way, but not the only way, that the accuracy requirements for the reported geometric altitude of the control station of a standard remote identification unmanned aircraft can meet the minimum performance requirement in § 89.310(h)(2). The FAA is not requiring developers of means of compliance to include the specific method provided in this statement of policy. A means of compliance that requires the unmanned aircraft system (UAS) control station position source to be a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receiver utilizing Global Positioning System (GPS) and Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) satellite signals to determine the geometric altitude of the control station would be an acceptable method for a means of compliance to demonstrate that the unmanned aircraft built according to its specifications would meet the accuracy requirement in § 89.310(h)(2). The WAAS Performance Analysis report from the second quarter of 2021 shows that GNSS receivers utilizing GPS with a satellite-based augmentation system indicates a worstsite 95% vertical accuracy of 5 feet for the continental United States.4 This report demonstrates that GNSS receivers utilizing GPS/WAAS can achieve the necessary vertical position accuracy across the National Airspace System to meet the reported geometric altitude requirement of § 89.310(h)(2). The FAA recognizes that UAS technology, which includes remote identification technology, is continually evolving and improving. Accordingly, the FAA expects that other methods may be available to meet this requirement other than the one mentioned in this policy statement, and nothing about this statement should preclude developers of means of compliance from including other technological methods of meeting the vertical accuracy requirements for the reported geometric altitude of the control station. This statement of policy solely addresses one method of demonstrating compliance with § 89.310(h)(2); note that any means of compliance submitted to the FAA must also adequately address the other requirements in part 89, subparts D and E, in order to be accepted by the FAA. II. Additional Information A. Electronic Access and Filing A copy of the Remote ID final rule as well as all background materials may be viewed online at https:// www.regulations.gov using the docket number listed above. A copy of this statement of policy will also be placed in the docket for that rule. Electronic retrieval help and guidelines are available on the website. It is available 24 hours each day, 365 days each year. An electronic copy of this document may also be downloaded from the Office of the Federal Register’s website at https://www.FederalRegister.gov and the Government Publishing Office’s website at https://www.GovInfo.gov. Copies may also be obtained by sending a request to the Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Rulemaking, ARM–1, 800 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591, or by calling (202) 267–9677. Requestors must identify the docket or amendment number of this rulemaking. B. Integration of This Policy Into FAA Orders and Publications As appropriate, the FAA will incorporate this policy into applicable FAA Orders and publications, such as Advisory Circulars, as they are updated. The agency will also continually review this policy in the interest of aviation safety. The FAA reserves the right to update this policy if the agency collects or receives additional information. This policy does not have the force and effect of law and is not meant to bind the public in any way, it is intended only to provide clarity to the public regarding existing requirements under the law or agency policies. Issued in Washington, DC, on or about November 16, 2021. Michael C. Romanowski, Aviation Safety Director, Policy and Innovation, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2021–25366 Filed 11–19–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P 4 https://www.nstb.tc.faa.gov/ DisplayArchive.htm. PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 9990 66163 E:\FR\FM\22NOR1.SGM 22NOR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 222 (Monday, November 22, 2021)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 66162-66163]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-25366]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 89

[Docket No.: FAA-2019-1100]


Policy Statement for the Reported Geometric Altitude of the 
Control Station of a Standard Remote Identification Unmanned Aircraft

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of 
Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Statement of policy.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This action clarifies FAA policy regarding the existing 
accuracy requirements for the reported geometric altitude of the 
control station of a standard remote identification unmanned aircraft. 
The FAA describes one acceptable way producers of unmanned aircraft can 
meet the minimum performance requirement for the accuracy of the 
control station's reported geometric altitude. The FAA determined that 
this action is necessary to inform developers of means of compliance of 
one potential pathway to meet the performance requirement for the 
control station's reported geometric altitude.

DATES: The effective date of this policy is November 22, 2021.

ADDRESSES: For information on where to obtain copies of this statement 
of policy and other information related to this statement, see 
``Additional Information'' in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of 
this document.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul Siegmund, Policy and Innovation 
Division, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Ave. SW, 
Washington, DC 20591; telephone 1-844-FLY-MY-UA (1-844-359-6981); 
email: [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Overview

A. Background

    On January 15, 2021, the FAA published a final rule titled ``Remote 
Identification of Unmanned Aircraft'' (Remote ID final rule) with an 
original effective date of March 16, 2021.\1\ \2\ The Remote ID final 
rule requires the remote identification of unmanned aircraft in the 
airspace of the United States. Remote identification is the capability 
of an unmanned aircraft, in flight, to provide certain identification, 
location, and performance information that people on the ground and 
other airspace users can receive.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ Remote Identification of Unmanned Aircraft final rule, 86 FR 
4390 (Jan. 15, 2021).
    \2\ On March 10, 2021, the FAA published a correction to the 
Remote ID final rule in accordance with the memorandum titled 
Regulatory Freeze Pending Review (86 FR 7424, Jan 28, 2021), 
delaying the final rule's effective date to April 21, 2021 (86 FR 
13629).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition to the operating requirements, the Remote ID final rule 
provides the design and production requirements for the production of 
remote identification unmanned aircraft or broadcast modules. These 
requirements describe the performance standards for remote 
identification without establishing a specific means or process for 
regulated entities to follow.\3\ A person designing or producing a 
standard remote identification unmanned aircraft or remote 
identification broadcast module must show that the unmanned aircraft or 
broadcast module meets the performance requirements of the rule by 
following an FAA-accepted means of compliance. A means of compliance 
submitted to the FAA for acceptance

[[Page 66163]]

must show that an unmanned aircraft or broadcast module produced using 
it would meet the performance requirements of title 14 of the Code of 
Federal Regulations part 89 (14 CFR part 89). This policy statement 
only addresses the performance requirements and compliance path for the 
standard remote identification unmanned aircraft.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \3\ A standard remote identification unmanned aircraft 
broadcasts identification, location, and performance information of 
the unmanned aircraft and control station. This unmanned aircraft 
broadcasts the remote identification message elements directly from 
the unmanned aircraft from takeoff to shutdown. A remote 
identification broadcast module broadcasts identification, location, 
and take-off information; the broadcast module may be a separate 
device that is attached to an unmanned aircraft, or a feature built 
into the aircraft. 86 FR 4391 (Jan. 15, 2021).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Part 89 requires the following 8 message elements to be broadcast 
from a standard remote identification unmanned aircraft: (1) Unmanned 
aircraft unique identifier; (2) an indication of the control station's 
latitude and longitude; (3) an indication of the control station's 
altitude; (4) an indication of the unmanned aircraft's latitude and 
longitude; (5) an indication of the unmanned aircraft's altitude; (6) a 
time mark; (7) an indication of the emergency status of the unmanned 
aircraft system; and (8) velocity. Additionally, all standard remote 
identification unmanned aircraft must meet certain minimum requirements 
regarding the transmission of the message elements including the 
minimum performance requirements related to positional accuracy, 
geometric altitude accuracy, message latency, and message transmission 
rate. These minimum performance requirements for the message elements 
are design requirements; any specific test method for ensuring that the 
unmanned aircraft design meets this accuracy requirement will be 
reviewed and evaluated by the FAA as a part of the means of compliance 
acceptance process.
    Part 89 establishes the accuracy requirement for the reported 
geometric altitude for the control station of a standard remote 
identification unmanned aircraft. Specifically, Sec.  89.310(h)(2) 
requires that the reported geometric altitude of the control station 
must be accurate to within 15 feet of the true geometric altitude, with 
95 percent probability. The Remote ID final rule did not specify how a 
means of compliance should address this requirement. In order to guide 
producers to develop standard remote identification unmanned aircraft 
that meet the FAA's standards, this policy statement informs developers 
of one potential means of compliance that would be acceptable to the 
FAA to demonstrate compliance with meeting the geometric altitude 
requirement. Persons developing a means of compliance for a standard 
remote identification unmanned aircraft in accordance with 14 CFR part 
89, subpart E, may incorporate the method described in this policy 
statement as part of their means of compliance. The FAA emphasizes, 
however, that other ways of demonstrating compliance with Sec.  
89.310(h)(2) may be acceptable.

B. Statement of Policy: Acceptable Method

    This statement of policy describes one acceptable way, but not the 
only way, that the accuracy requirements for the reported geometric 
altitude of the control station of a standard remote identification 
unmanned aircraft can meet the minimum performance requirement in Sec.  
89.310(h)(2). The FAA is not requiring developers of means of 
compliance to include the specific method provided in this statement of 
policy.
    A means of compliance that requires the unmanned aircraft system 
(UAS) control station position source to be a global navigation 
satellite system (GNSS) receiver utilizing Global Positioning System 
(GPS) and Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) satellite signals to 
determine the geometric altitude of the control station would be an 
acceptable method for a means of compliance to demonstrate that the 
unmanned aircraft built according to its specifications would meet the 
accuracy requirement in Sec.  89.310(h)(2). The WAAS Performance 
Analysis report from the second quarter of 2021 shows that GNSS 
receivers utilizing GPS with a satellite-based augmentation system 
indicates a worst-site 95% vertical accuracy of 5 feet for the 
continental United States.\4\ This report demonstrates that GNSS 
receivers utilizing GPS/WAAS can achieve the necessary vertical 
position accuracy across the National Airspace System to meet the 
reported geometric altitude requirement of Sec.  89.310(h)(2).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ https://www.nstb.tc.faa.gov/DisplayArchive.htm.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The FAA recognizes that UAS technology, which includes remote 
identification technology, is continually evolving and improving. 
Accordingly, the FAA expects that other methods may be available to 
meet this requirement other than the one mentioned in this policy 
statement, and nothing about this statement should preclude developers 
of means of compliance from including other technological methods of 
meeting the vertical accuracy requirements for the reported geometric 
altitude of the control station. This statement of policy solely 
addresses one method of demonstrating compliance with Sec.  
89.310(h)(2); note that any means of compliance submitted to the FAA 
must also adequately address the other requirements in part 89, 
subparts D and E, in order to be accepted by the FAA.

II. Additional Information

A. Electronic Access and Filing

    A copy of the Remote ID final rule as well as all background 
materials may be viewed online at https://www.regulations.gov using the 
docket number listed above. A copy of this statement of policy will 
also be placed in the docket for that rule. Electronic retrieval help 
and guidelines are available on the website. It is available 24 hours 
each day, 365 days each year. An electronic copy of this document may 
also be downloaded from the Office of the Federal Register's website at 
https://www.FederalRegister.gov and the Government Publishing Office's 
website at https://www.GovInfo.gov.
    Copies may also be obtained by sending a request to the Federal 
Aviation Administration, Office of Rulemaking, ARM-1, 800 Independence 
Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20591, or by calling (202) 267-9677. 
Requestors must identify the docket or amendment number of this 
rulemaking.

B. Integration of This Policy Into FAA Orders and Publications

    As appropriate, the FAA will incorporate this policy into 
applicable FAA Orders and publications, such as Advisory Circulars, as 
they are updated. The agency will also continually review this policy 
in the interest of aviation safety. The FAA reserves the right to 
update this policy if the agency collects or receives additional 
information.
    This policy does not have the force and effect of law and is not 
meant to bind the public in any way, it is intended only to provide 
clarity to the public regarding existing requirements under the law or 
agency policies.

    Issued in Washington, DC, on or about November 16, 2021.
Michael C. Romanowski,
Aviation Safety Director, Policy and Innovation, Aircraft Certification 
Service.
[FR Doc. 2021-25366 Filed 11-19-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P