Information Collection: Urban Forest Engagement in Atlanta, GA, 51111-51112 [2021-19766]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 175 / Tuesday, September 14, 2021 / Notices FNS will utilize these comments to adjust the information collection as necessary. Cynthia Long, Acting Administrator, Food and Nutrition Service. [FR Doc. 2021–19764 Filed 9–13–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–30–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection: Urban Forest Engagement in Atlanta, GA Forest Service, Agriculture (USDA). ACTION: Notice; request for comment. AGENCY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the USDA Forest Service is seeking comments from all interested individuals and organizations on the extension with revisions of a currently approved information collection, Urban Forest Engagement in Atlanta, Georgia. DATES: Comments must be received in writing on or before November 15, 2021 to be assured of consideration. Comments received after that date will be considered to the extent practicable. ADDRESSES: Commenters are encouraged to submit comments by email, if possible. You may submit comments by any of the following methods: • Email: cassandra.johnson@ usda.gov. • Mail: Cassandra Johnson Gaither, Forestry Sciences Lab, 320 Green Street, Athens, GA 30602. • Hand Delivery/Courier: Cassandra Johnson Gaither, Forestry Sciences Lab, 320 Green Street, Athens, GA 30602. • Facsimile: (706) 559–4266. The public may inspect comments received at Forestry Sciences Lab, 320 Green Street, Athens, GA 30602, during normal business hours. Visitors are encouraged to call ahead to (706) 559– 4270 to facilitate entry to the building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cassandra Johnson Gaither, USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, by phone at (706) 559–4270 or email at cassandra.johnson@usda.gov. Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the hearing-impaired (TDD) may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1–800–877–8339 twenty-four hours a day, every day of the year, including holidays. tkelley on DSK125TN23PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Urban Forest Engagement in Atlanta, GA. OMB Number: 0596–0237. VerDate Sep<11>2014 21:55 Sep 13, 2021 Jkt 253001 Expiration Date of Approval: February 28, 2022. Type of Request: Extension with revisions of a currently approved information collection. Abstract: This information collection will continue to gather data on City of Atlanta residents’ interest in and engagement with the urban forest in the city. This information collection focuses more narrowly on urban forest patches, a collection or stand of trees, in public spaces. Engagement is defined as residents’ interest in and awareness of urban forest patches and resident participation in decisions about how the patches should be maintained or repurposed. The information collection also gathers data on social factors such as neighborhood transiency and perception of neighborhood conditions, conceptualized as collective efficacy and social cohesion. The neighborhood conditions data provides information on the broader context from which people make decisions about engaging with urban forest patches. If neighborhood transiency (i.e., frequent involuntary moving of people in and out of neighborhoods) is problematic in communities or people lack basic needs such as access to healthy foods or safe neighborhoods, it is unlikely that they would demonstrate a high degree of engagement with the city’s urban forest. This collection extends the existing information collection effort by examining the environmental justice implications of neighborhood-level decision making about the forest patches. Prior door-to-door data collection in south Atlanta neighborhoods revealed the presence of forest patches on vacant properties. However, there is little to no data on how residents perceive of these spaces or how residents might contribute to decision processes about the outcome of these spaces. This is an important question given the sites are providing ecological benefits such as stormwater mitigation. For the proposed data collection, survey questions were included on people’s awareness of forest patches on vacant properties near their neighborhoods and on potential barriers residents might face in contributing to decision making processes about the patches. Many contextual factors constrain people’s ability to engage in local-level environmental decision making, the procedural component of environmental justice. The data collected via this effort will provide important input on factors that might facilitate or constrain engagement and will inform the USDA Forest Service’s efforts to address Executive Order PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 51111 14008, Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad, and Executive Order 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low Income Populations. Data collection will center on south Atlanta neighborhoods adjacent to vacant land with forest patches. These neighborhoods are overwhelmingly African American, with poverty rates ranging from roughly 30 percent to 64 percent. The neighborhoods are also near multiple transportation companies, the activities of which compromise air quality. The survey will be conducted at the household, using proportionate-guided random sampling where the survey is left for the appropriate respondent to complete and is picked up later by a survey administrator. This methodology limits contact between the surveyor and the household but provides the inperson contact that is helpful for increasing response rates which are considerably lower in minority communities. Survey administrators will include USDA Forest Service social scientists, neighborhood residents trained in door-to-door data collection methods, and university college students. Researchers with USDA Forest Service Research & Development staff will analyze the data. If the information proposed herein is not collected, the opportunity to address environmental justice from a procedural perspective will be missed. The information collection also will assist the Agency in better understanding how urban green spaces in southern cities impact residents’ quality of life. Comparatively fewer Forest Service led studies have examined this topic for these populations. Type of Respondents: City of Atlanta residents. Estimated Annual Number of Respondents: 600. Estimated Annual Number of Responses per Respondent: 1. Estimated Total Annual Burden on Respondents: 120 hours. Comment Is Invited: Comment is invited on: (1) Whether this collection of information is necessary for the stated purposes and the proper performance of the functions of the Agency, including whether the information will have practical or scientific utility; (2) the accuracy of the Agency’s estimate of the burden of the collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information E:\FR\FM\14SEN1.SGM 14SEN1 51112 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 175 / Tuesday, September 14, 2021 / Notices on respondents, including the use of automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology. All comments received in response to this notice, including names and addresses when provided, will be a matter of public record. Comments will be summarized and included in the submission request for Office of Management and Budget approval. Dated: September 9, 2021. Alexander L. Friend, Deputy Chief, Research & Development. [FR Doc. 2021–19766 Filed 9–13–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3411–15–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE I. Abstract Census Bureau Since its founding, the U.S. Census Bureau has balanced the demands of a growing country requiring information about its people and economy, with concerns for respondents’ confidentiality and the time and effort it takes respondents to answer questions. Beginning with the 1810 Census, Congress added questions to support a range of public concerns and uses, and over the course of a century, federal agencies requested to add questions about agriculture, industry, and commerce, as well as individuals’ occupation, ancestry, marital status, disabilities, place of birth and other topics. In 1940, the Census Bureau introduced the long-form census in order to ask more detailed questions to only a sample of the public. In the early 1990s, the demand for current, nationally consistent data from a wide variety of users led federal government policymakers to consider the feasibility of collecting social, economic, and housing data continuously throughout the decade. The benefits of providing current data, along with the anticipated decennial census benefits in cost savings, planning, improved census coverage, and more efficient operations, led the Census Bureau to plan the implementation of the continuous measurement survey, later called the American Community Survey (ACS). After years of testing, the ACS replaced the long form in 2005. The ACS is conducted throughout the United States and in Puerto Rico, where it is called the Puerto Rico Community Survey (PRCS). Each year a sample of approximately 3.5 million households and about 170,000 persons living in group quarters (GQ) in the United States are selected to participate in the ACS and PRCS. Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for Review and Approval; Comment Request; American Community Survey Census Bureau, Commerce. Notice of information collection, request for comment. AGENCY: ACTION: The Department of Commerce, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995, invites the general public and other Federal agencies to comment on proposed, and continuing information collections, which helps us assess the impact of our information collection requirements and minimize the public’s reporting burden. The purpose of this notice is to allow for 60 days of public comment on the proposed extension of the American Community Survey, prior to the submission of the information collection request (ICR) to OMB for approval. SUMMARY: To ensure consideration, comments regarding this proposed information collection must be received on or before November 15, 2021. ADDRESSES: Interested persons are invited to submit written comments by email to acso.pra@census.gov. Please reference the American Community Survey in the subject line of your comments. You may also submit comments, identified by Docket Number USBC–2021–0019, to the Federal eRulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov. All comments received are part of the public record. No comments will be posted to http:// www.regulations.gov for public viewing until after the comment period has closed. Comments will generally be DATES: tkelley on DSK125TN23PROD with NOTICES posted without change. All Personally Identifiable Information (for example, name and address) voluntarily submitted by the commenter may be publicly accessible. Do not submit Confidential Business Information or otherwise sensitive or protected information. You may submit attachments to electronic comments in Microsoft Word, Excel, or Adobe PDF file formats. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information or specific questions related to collection activities should be directed to Dameka Reese, U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey Office, 301–763– 3804, dameka.m.reese@census.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Sep<11>2014 21:55 Sep 13, 2021 Jkt 253001 PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 II. Method of Collection To encourage self-response in the ACS, the Census Bureau sends up to five mailings to housing units selected to be in the sample. The first mailing, sent to all mailable addresses in the sample, includes an invitation to participate in the ACS online and states that a paper questionnaire will be sent in a few weeks to those unable to respond online. The second mailing is a letter that reminds respondents to complete the survey online, thanks them if they have already done so, and informs them that a paper form will be sent at a later date if we do not receive their response. In a third mailing, the questionnaire package is sent only to those sample addresses that have not completed the online questionnaire within two weeks. The fourth mailing is a postcard that reminds respondents to respond and informs them that an interviewer may contact them if they do not complete the survey. A fifth mailing is sent to respondents who have not completed the survey within five weeks. This letter provides a due date and reminds the respondents to return their questionnaires to be removed from future contact. The Census Bureau will ask those who fill out the survey online to provide an email address, which will be used to send an email reminder to households that did not complete the online form. The reminder asks them to log back in to finish responding to the survey. If the Census Bureau does not receive a response or if the household refuses to participate, the address may be selected for computer-assisted personal interviewing (CAPI). Some addresses are deemed unmailable because the address is incomplete or directs mail only to a post office box. The Census Bureau currently collects data for these housing units using both online and CAPI. For sample housing units in the Puerto Rico Community Survey (PRCS), a different mail strategy is employed. The Census Bureau continues to use the previously used mail strategy with no references to an internet response option. The Census Bureau sends up to five mailings to a Puerto Rico address selected to be in the sample. The first mailing includes a prenotice letter. The second and fourth mailings include the paper survey. The third and fifth mailings serve as a reminder to respond to the survey. Puerto Rico addresses deemed unmailable because the address is incomplete or directs mail only to a post office box are collected by CAPI. The Census Bureau employs a different strategy to collect data from GQs. The Census Bureau defines GQs as E:\FR\FM\14SEN1.SGM 14SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 175 (Tuesday, September 14, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 51111-51112]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-19766]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Forest Service


Information Collection: Urban Forest Engagement in Atlanta, GA

AGENCY: Forest Service, Agriculture (USDA).

ACTION: Notice; request for comment.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the 
USDA Forest Service is seeking comments from all interested individuals 
and organizations on the extension with revisions of a currently 
approved information collection, Urban Forest Engagement in Atlanta, 
Georgia.

DATES: Comments must be received in writing on or before November 15, 
2021 to be assured of consideration. Comments received after that date 
will be considered to the extent practicable.

ADDRESSES: Commenters are encouraged to submit comments by email, if 
possible. You may submit comments by any of the following methods:
     Email: [email protected].
     Mail: Cassandra Johnson Gaither, Forestry Sciences Lab, 
320 Green Street, Athens, GA 30602.
     Hand Delivery/Courier: Cassandra Johnson Gaither, Forestry 
Sciences Lab, 320 Green Street, Athens, GA 30602.
     Facsimile: (706) 559-4266.
    The public may inspect comments received at Forestry Sciences Lab, 
320 Green Street, Athens, GA 30602, during normal business hours. 
Visitors are encouraged to call ahead to (706) 559-4270 to facilitate 
entry to the building.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cassandra Johnson Gaither, USDA Forest 
Service, Southern Research Station, by phone at (706) 559-4270 or email 
at [email protected]. Individuals who use telecommunication 
devices for the hearing-impaired (TDD) may call the Federal Relay 
Service (FRS) at 1-800-877-8339 twenty-four hours a day, every day of 
the year, including holidays.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    Title: Urban Forest Engagement in Atlanta, GA.
    OMB Number: 0596-0237.
    Expiration Date of Approval: February 28, 2022.
    Type of Request: Extension with revisions of a currently approved 
information collection.
    Abstract: This information collection will continue to gather data 
on City of Atlanta residents' interest in and engagement with the urban 
forest in the city. This information collection focuses more narrowly 
on urban forest patches, a collection or stand of trees, in public 
spaces. Engagement is defined as residents' interest in and awareness 
of urban forest patches and resident participation in decisions about 
how the patches should be maintained or repurposed. The information 
collection also gathers data on social factors such as neighborhood 
transiency and perception of neighborhood conditions, conceptualized as 
collective efficacy and social cohesion. The neighborhood conditions 
data provides information on the broader context from which people make 
decisions about engaging with urban forest patches. If neighborhood 
transiency (i.e., frequent involuntary moving of people in and out of 
neighborhoods) is problematic in communities or people lack basic needs 
such as access to healthy foods or safe neighborhoods, it is unlikely 
that they would demonstrate a high degree of engagement with the city's 
urban forest.
    This collection extends the existing information collection effort 
by examining the environmental justice implications of neighborhood-
level decision making about the forest patches. Prior door-to-door data 
collection in south Atlanta neighborhoods revealed the presence of 
forest patches on vacant properties. However, there is little to no 
data on how residents perceive of these spaces or how residents might 
contribute to decision processes about the outcome of these spaces. 
This is an important question given the sites are providing ecological 
benefits such as stormwater mitigation.
    For the proposed data collection, survey questions were included on 
people's awareness of forest patches on vacant properties near their 
neighborhoods and on potential barriers residents might face in 
contributing to decision making processes about the patches. Many 
contextual factors constrain people's ability to engage in local-level 
environmental decision making, the procedural component of 
environmental justice. The data collected via this effort will provide 
important input on factors that might facilitate or constrain 
engagement and will inform the USDA Forest Service's efforts to address 
Executive Order 14008, Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad, 
and Executive Order 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental 
Justice in Minority Populations and Low Income Populations.
    Data collection will center on south Atlanta neighborhoods adjacent 
to vacant land with forest patches. These neighborhoods are 
overwhelmingly African American, with poverty rates ranging from 
roughly 30 percent to 64 percent. The neighborhoods are also near 
multiple transportation companies, the activities of which compromise 
air quality.
    The survey will be conducted at the household, using proportionate-
guided random sampling where the survey is left for the appropriate 
respondent to complete and is picked up later by a survey 
administrator. This methodology limits contact between the surveyor and 
the household but provides the in-person contact that is helpful for 
increasing response rates which are considerably lower in minority 
communities. Survey administrators will include USDA Forest Service 
social scientists, neighborhood residents trained in door-to-door data 
collection methods, and university college students. Researchers with 
USDA Forest Service Research & Development staff will analyze the data.
    If the information proposed herein is not collected, the 
opportunity to address environmental justice from a procedural 
perspective will be missed. The information collection also will assist 
the Agency in better understanding how urban green spaces in southern 
cities impact residents' quality of life. Comparatively fewer Forest 
Service led studies have examined this topic for these populations.
    Type of Respondents: City of Atlanta residents.
    Estimated Annual Number of Respondents: 600.
    Estimated Annual Number of Responses per Respondent: 1.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden on Respondents: 120 hours.
    Comment Is Invited: Comment is invited on: (1) Whether this 
collection of information is necessary for the stated purposes and the 
proper performance of the functions of the Agency, including whether 
the information will have practical or scientific utility; (2) the 
accuracy of the Agency's estimate of the burden of the collection of 
information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions 
used; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden of the 
collection of information

[[Page 51112]]

on respondents, including the use of automated, electronic, mechanical, 
or other technological collection techniques or other forms of 
information technology.
    All comments received in response to this notice, including names 
and addresses when provided, will be a matter of public record. 
Comments will be summarized and included in the submission request for 
Office of Management and Budget approval.

    Dated: September 9, 2021.
Alexander L. Friend,
Deputy Chief, Research & Development.
[FR Doc. 2021-19766 Filed 9-13-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3411-15-P