Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 47514-47516 [2021-18273]

Download as PDF 47514 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 162 / Wednesday, August 25, 2021 / Notices Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians; Quapaw Nation [previously listed as The Quapaw Tribe of Indians]; The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; and The Osage Nation [previously listed as Osage Tribe] (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains On June 11, 2020, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual was removed from Hancock County, MS. The individual was discovered during maintenance dredging of the navigation channel at the mouth of Bayou Cadet, which flows into the Bay of Saint Louis. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which oversaw the dredging, retained control of the human remains until May of 2021, when it transferred them to the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The Mississippi Department of Archives and History has determined that the remains of this individual are Native American through the geographical and archeological circumstances of their discovery, as well as through the observance of biological markers that are consistent with Native American ancestry. According to the geographical and archeological evidence, the individual was removed within 500 feet of the Lakeshore Midden Site (22HA502), which dates within the Woodland Period (A.D. 1000). Evaluation of the skeletal elements by the Mississippi State Medical Examiner’s office concluded that they bore biological markers consistent with Native American ancestry. The presentday Indian Tribes affiliated with the earlier group connected to these human remains include The Tribes. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History Officials of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and The Tribes. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:54 Aug 24, 2021 Jkt 253001 Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Meg Cook, Director of Archaeology Collections, Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Museum Division, 222 North Street, P.O. Box 571, Jackson, MS 39205, telephone (601) 576–6927, email mcook@mdah.ms.gov, by September 24, 2021. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to The Tribes may proceed. The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: August 11, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–18271 Filed 8–24–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0032471; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the University of Michigan. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00046 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Michigan at the address in this notice by September 24, 2021. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from the Riverside Cemetery site (20ME1), Menominee County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Michigan Museum of Anthropological Archaeology (UMMAA) professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Match-ebe-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Mille Lacs Band); Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan [previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.]; and the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). The Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana [previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana]; E:\FR\FM\25AUN1.SGM 25AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 162 / Wednesday, August 25, 2021 / Notices khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; White Earth Band); Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation [previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas]; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; and the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota were invited to consult but did not participate (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Invited Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains In 1956–57, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were removed from the Riverside Cemetery site (20ME1) in Menominee County, MI, by UMMAA archeologist A.C. Spaulding. Spaulding excavated the multi-component site, and it was later excavated by others on multiple occasions (the UMMAA does not possess all of the human remains and items excavated from the Riverside Cemetery site. The human remains belong to one child 5–9 years old, of indeterminate sex; one cremated young adult 17–19 years old, of indeterminate sex; one adult male 30+ years old; one adult of indeterminate sex; one cremated infant; and four cremated adults of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 25 associated funerary objects are one lot of small, white perforated flat beads; one lot of conical copper points; one lot of small, flat, and irregular-shaped copper fragments; one lot of faunal bone fragments and charcoal; one lot of shouldered projectile points; one lot of copper points/cones; one lot of small, heavy copper fragments; one lot of projectile point tip fragments; one lot of faunal bone fragments, bark fragments, and red ochre; one lot of large, red ochre-stained obsidian cores; one lot of copper beads and bark fragments; one lot of red ochre-stained flint scrapers and flakes; one lot of red ochre-stained rounded whetstones; one lot of copper awls; one lot of socketed copper spears; one lot of flat-stemmed or fish-tailed copper projectile points; one lot of red ochre-covered chert projectile points; VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:54 Aug 24, 2021 Jkt 253001 one lot of wood fragments; one lot of red ochre-covered beaver tooth fragments; one lot of red ochre-coated wood and bone fragments; one lot of red ochreand copper-stained faunal bone fragments; one lot of dog cranium fragments with vials of red ochre; one lot of red ochre-stained and perforated lynx scapula fragments; one lot of flatstemmed copper projectile points and wood fragments; and one lot of red ochre-stained faunal scapulae. The Riverside Cemetery site has evidence of occupation dating from the Late Archaic (2550–300 B.C.) through the Late Woodland Period (A.D. 500– 1100). Two components—Features 6 and 14—are associated with burials belonging to the Old Copper Culture of the Late Archaic/Early Woodland Period, based on diagnostic artifacts. Three different burial treatments were noted at the site: Cremations, burial in red ochre, and burial without ochre. Feature 6 contained a flexed burial with red ochre and copper points. The cranium of a dog was found near the pelvis of the individual. Ochre covered the entire skeleton, but was thicker over the head and legs, in a lens suggesting the body was wrapped in a skin or bark. A bundle was found with flints, beaver teeth, antler shaft wrench, copper points, flint points, wood, animal bone, and a smoothing stone. Feature 2, which was located near Feature 6, was identified by red ochre staining. Cremated human remains were present that were disturbed and incomplete. Above this cremation were several cordmarked pottery sherds as well as a fluted axe however the association between these objects and the burial is described as uncertain due to the distance of the objects from the human remains. Excavation Unit 4 was reported as badly disintegrated bone. The human remains were cremated and calcined. Feature 13, a disturbed pit containing calcined bones, contained no artifacts. Feature 14 contained ochre-stained sand in a pit. At the bottom of the pit was a large block of obsidian resting on strands of heavy copper beads which were wrapped in bark. Beneath the obsidian and copper beads was a pile of crushed cremated bones deposited on top of bark which lined the bottom of the pit. The bark was noted by the fibrous structures in organic material; however, it was too fragile to collect. The strands of copper beads appeared to loop back and forth upon the cremated bones. Features 11 and 12 were two pits that came together, both containing red ochre and small fragments of human bone and a conical copper point. The human remains have been determined to be Native American PO 00000 Frm 00047 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 47515 based on dental traits, mortuary treatment, diagnostic artifacts, and archeological context. A relationship of shared group identity can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains from this site and the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. Menominee tribal experts provided evidence for cultural affiliation based on their long-standing presence in the Menominee River Valley, which they believe establishes ties of territorial ethnicity to these burials. Museum experts believe the burials are associated with Old Copper Culture which geographically includes, but reaches beyond, the Menominee River Valley. However, tribal experts also provided information that suggests there were regional variations within Old Copper Culture, and this pattern points toward an association between these particular burials and the Menominee traditional homelands. After considering the best available information, and in light of the preponderance of the evidence threshold required under the law and regulations, the determination was made that the totality of the various lines of evidence suggest the Menominee are culturally affiliated with these particular burials. Determinations Made by the University of Michigan Officials of the University of Michigan have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of nine individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 25 objects described in this notice is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson E:\FR\FM\25AUN1.SGM 25AUN1 47516 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 162 / Wednesday, August 25, 2021 / Notices Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, email bsecunda@umich.edu, by September 24, 2021. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin may proceed. The University of Michigan is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes and The Invited Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: August 18, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–18273 Filed 8–24–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–NERO–CHHO–32133; PPNCCHOHS0– PPMPSPD1Z.YM0000] Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park Commission Request for Nominations National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Request for nominations. AGENCY: The National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, is requesting nominations for qualified persons to serve as members of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park Commission (Commission). SUMMARY: Written nominations must be received by October 25, 2021. ADDRESSES: Send nominations to: Mackensie Henn, Assistant to the Superintendent, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, 142 W Potomac Street, Williamsport, Maryland 21795, or by email choh_information@ nps.gov. DATES: khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mackensie Henn, by email choh_ information@nps.gov or telephone at (240) 520–3135. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Commission was established by section 6 of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Development Act (16 U.S.C. 410y–4) and terminated January 8, 2011. The Commission has been extended by Public Law 113–178 and the new termination date is September 26, 2024. The purpose of the Commission is to meet and consult with the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary), or the Secretary’s designee, on general policies and specific matters related to the administration and development of the VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:54 Aug 24, 2021 Jkt 253001 Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park. The Commission shall be composed of 19 members appointed by the Secretary for 5-year terms as follows: (1) Eight members to be appointed from recommendations submitted by the boards of commissioners or the county councils, as the case may be, of Montgomery, Frederick, Washington, and Allegany Counties, Maryland, of which two members shall be appointed from recommendations submitted by each such board or council, as the case may be; (2) Eight members to be appointed from recommendations submitted by the Governor of the State of Maryland, the Governor of the State of West Virginia, the Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the Mayor of the District of Columbia, of which two members shall be appointed from recommendations submitted by each such Governor or Mayor, as the case may be; and (3) Three members to be appointed by the Secretary, one of whom shall be designated Chairman of the Commission and two of who shall be members of regularly constituted conservation organizations. We are currently seeking members to represent all categories. Some members may be appointed as special Government employees (SGEs). Please be aware that members selected to serve as SGEs will be required, prior to appointment, to file a Confidential Financial Disclosure Report in order to avoid involvement in real or apparent conflicts of interest. You may find a copy of the Confidential Financial Disclosure Report at the following website: https://www.doi.gov/ethics/ special-government-employees/ financial-disclosure. Additionally, after appointment, members appointed as SGEs will be required to meet applicable financial disclosure and ethics training requirements. Please contact (202) 208–7960 or DOI_Ethics@ sol.doi.gov with any questions about the ethics requirements for members appointed as SGEs. Nominations should be typed and should include a resume providing an adequate description of the nominee’s qualifications, including information that would enable the Department of the Interior to make an informed decision regarding meeting the membership requirements of the Commission and permit the Department to contact a potential member. All documentation, including letters of recommendation, must be compiled and submitted in one complete package. All those interested in membership, including current members whose terms are expiring, must follow the same nomination PO 00000 Frm 00048 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 process. Members may not appoint deputies or alternates. Members of the Commission serve without compensation. However, while away from their homes or regular places of business in the performance of services for the Commission as approved by the NPS, members may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, in the same manner as persons employed intermittently in Government service are allowed such expenses under section 5703 of title 5 of the United States Code. (Authority: 5 U.S.C. Appendix 2) Alma Ripps, Chief, Office of Policy. [FR Doc. 2021–18328 Filed 8–24–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–NERO–CEBE–32331; PPNECEBE00, PPMPSPD1Z.Y00000] Request for Nominations for the Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park Advisory Commission National Park Service, Interior. Request for nominations. AGENCY: ACTION: The National Park Service (NPS), U.S. Department of the Interior, is requesting nominations for qualified persons to serve as members on the Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park Advisory Commission (Commission). SUMMARY: Written nominations must be received by September 24, 2021. ADDRESSES: Nominations or requests for further information should be sent to Karen Beck-Herzog, Site Manager, Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park, P.O. Box 700, Middletown, Virginia 22645, or via email karen_beck-herzog@nps.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karen Beck-Herzog, via telephone (540) 868–0938. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park Advisory Commission was established in accordance with the Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park Act of 2002 (16 U.S.C. 410iii–7). The Commission was designated by Congress to provide advice to the Secretary of the Interior on the preparation and implementation of the park’s general management plan and in the identification of sites of significance outside the park boundary. DATES: E:\FR\FM\25AUN1.SGM 25AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 162 (Wednesday, August 25, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 47514-47516]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-18273]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0032471; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human 
remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes 
or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives 
of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in 
this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human 
remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request 
to the University of Michigan. If no additional requestors come 
forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native 
Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the University of Michigan at the address in 
this notice by September 24, 2021.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project 
Manager, University of Michigan, Office of Research, 4080 Fleming 
Building, 503 Thompson Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone 
(734) 647-9085, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the University of 
Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from the Riverside Cemetery site (20ME1), 
Menominee County, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
University of Michigan Museum of Anthropological Archaeology (UMMAA) 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, 
Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
Michigan; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Match-e-
be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Menominee 
Indian Tribe of Wisconsin; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Mille 
Lacs Band); Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan 
[previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.]; and the Pokagon Band of 
Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana (hereafter referred to as 
``The Consulted Tribes'').
    The Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians 
of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Chippewa Cree Indians of the 
Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana [previously listed as Chippewa-Cree 
Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana];

[[Page 47515]]

Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi 
Community, Wisconsin; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; 
Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond 
du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; White Earth Band); 
Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation [previously listed as Prairie Band of 
Potawatomi Nation, Kansas]; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian 
Reservation, California & Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, 
Minnesota; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa 
Indians of Wisconsin; and the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians 
of North Dakota were invited to consult but did not participate 
(hereafter referred to as ``The Invited Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1956-57, human remains representing, at minimum, nine 
individuals were removed from the Riverside Cemetery site (20ME1) in 
Menominee County, MI, by UMMAA archeologist A.C. Spaulding. Spaulding 
excavated the multi-component site, and it was later excavated by 
others on multiple occasions (the UMMAA does not possess all of the 
human remains and items excavated from the Riverside Cemetery site. The 
human remains belong to one child 5-9 years old, of indeterminate sex; 
one cremated young adult 17-19 years old, of indeterminate sex; one 
adult male 30+ years old; one adult of indeterminate sex; one cremated 
infant; and four cremated adults of indeterminate sex. No known 
individuals were identified. The 25 associated funerary objects are one 
lot of small, white perforated flat beads; one lot of conical copper 
points; one lot of small, flat, and irregular-shaped copper fragments; 
one lot of faunal bone fragments and charcoal; one lot of shouldered 
projectile points; one lot of copper points/cones; one lot of small, 
heavy copper fragments; one lot of projectile point tip fragments; one 
lot of faunal bone fragments, bark fragments, and red ochre; one lot of 
large, red ochre-stained obsidian cores; one lot of copper beads and 
bark fragments; one lot of red ochre-stained flint scrapers and flakes; 
one lot of red ochre-stained rounded whetstones; one lot of copper 
awls; one lot of socketed copper spears; one lot of flat-stemmed or 
fish-tailed copper projectile points; one lot of red ochre-covered 
chert projectile points; one lot of wood fragments; one lot of red 
ochre-covered beaver tooth fragments; one lot of red ochre-coated wood 
and bone fragments; one lot of red ochre- and copper-stained faunal 
bone fragments; one lot of dog cranium fragments with vials of red 
ochre; one lot of red ochre-stained and perforated lynx scapula 
fragments; one lot of flat-stemmed copper projectile points and wood 
fragments; and one lot of red ochre-stained faunal scapulae.
    The Riverside Cemetery site has evidence of occupation dating from 
the Late Archaic (2550-300 B.C.) through the Late Woodland Period (A.D. 
500-1100). Two components--Features 6 and 14--are associated with 
burials belonging to the Old Copper Culture of the Late Archaic/Early 
Woodland Period, based on diagnostic artifacts. Three different burial 
treatments were noted at the site: Cremations, burial in red ochre, and 
burial without ochre. Feature 6 contained a flexed burial with red 
ochre and copper points. The cranium of a dog was found near the pelvis 
of the individual. Ochre covered the entire skeleton, but was thicker 
over the head and legs, in a lens suggesting the body was wrapped in a 
skin or bark. A bundle was found with flints, beaver teeth, antler 
shaft wrench, copper points, flint points, wood, animal bone, and a 
smoothing stone. Feature 2, which was located near Feature 6, was 
identified by red ochre staining. Cremated human remains were present 
that were disturbed and incomplete. Above this cremation were several 
cord-marked pottery sherds as well as a fluted axe however the 
association between these objects and the burial is described as 
uncertain due to the distance of the objects from the human remains. 
Excavation Unit 4 was reported as badly disintegrated bone. The human 
remains were cremated and calcined. Feature 13, a disturbed pit 
containing calcined bones, contained no artifacts. Feature 14 contained 
ochre-stained sand in a pit. At the bottom of the pit was a large block 
of obsidian resting on strands of heavy copper beads which were wrapped 
in bark. Beneath the obsidian and copper beads was a pile of crushed 
cremated bones deposited on top of bark which lined the bottom of the 
pit. The bark was noted by the fibrous structures in organic material; 
however, it was too fragile to collect. The strands of copper beads 
appeared to loop back and forth upon the cremated bones. Features 11 
and 12 were two pits that came together, both containing red ochre and 
small fragments of human bone and a conical copper point.
    The human remains have been determined to be Native American based 
on dental traits, mortuary treatment, diagnostic artifacts, and 
archeological context. A relationship of shared group identity can be 
reasonably traced between the Native American human remains from this 
site and the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. Menominee tribal 
experts provided evidence for cultural affiliation based on their long-
standing presence in the Menominee River Valley, which they believe 
establishes ties of territorial ethnicity to these burials. Museum 
experts believe the burials are associated with Old Copper Culture 
which geographically includes, but reaches beyond, the Menominee River 
Valley. However, tribal experts also provided information that suggests 
there were regional variations within Old Copper Culture, and this 
pattern points toward an association between these particular burials 
and the Menominee traditional homelands. After considering the best 
available information, and in light of the preponderance of the 
evidence threshold required under the law and regulations, the 
determination was made that the totality of the various lines of 
evidence suggest the Menominee are culturally affiliated with these 
particular burials.

Determinations Made by the University of Michigan

    Officials of the University of Michigan have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of nine individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 25 objects described 
in this notice is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the 
Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, 
University of Michigan, Office of Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 
Thompson

[[Page 47516]]

Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone (734) 647-9085, email 
[email protected], by September 24, 2021. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to the Menominee Indian 
Tribe of Wisconsin may proceed.
    The University of Michigan is responsible for notifying The 
Consulted Tribes and The Invited Tribes that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: August 18, 2021.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2021-18273 Filed 8-24-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P