Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and Pueblo Grande Museum, City of Phoenix, AZ, 47510-47512 [2021-18268]

Download as PDF 47510 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 162 / Wednesday, August 25, 2021 / Notices USCIS may request that applicants who reside within the United States attend an appointment at a USCIS Application Support Center to have a photograph taken. USCIS may also require applicants to submit additional biometrics under 8 CFR 103.2(b)(9). (5) An estimate of the total number of respondents and the amount of time estimated for an average respondent to respond: The estimated total number of respondents for the information collection N–600 (paper filing) is 27,500 and the estimated hour burden per response is 1.5 hours; the estimated total number of respondents for the information collection N–600 (online filing) is 27,500 and the estimated hour burden per response is 0.75 hours; the estimated total number of respondents for the information collection biometrics submission is 36,500 and the estimated hour burden per response is 1.17 hours. (6) An estimate of the total public burden (in hours) associated with the collection: The total estimated annual hour burden associated with this collection is 104,580 hours. (7) An estimate of the total public burden (in cost) associated with the collection: The estimated total annual cost burden associated with this collection of information is $7,081,250. Dated: August 19, 2021. Samantha L. Deshommes, Chief, Regulatory Coordination Division, Office of Policy and Strategy, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security. [FR Doc. 2021–18221 Filed 8–24–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–97–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0032456; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and Pueblo Grande Museum, City of Phoenix, AZ National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), assisted by the Pueblo Grande Museum (PGM), has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:54 Aug 24, 2021 Jkt 253001 and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the BIA through the PGM. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the BIA through the PGM at the address in this notice by September 24, 2021. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lindsey Vogel-Teeter, Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E Washington Street, Phoenix, AZ 85034, telephone (602) 534–1572, email lindsey.vogel-teeter@ phoenix.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and in the physical custody of the Pueblo Grande Museum, City of Phoenix, AZ. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from locations within the boundaries of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Maricopa and Pinal Counties, AZ, and the Salt River Reservation, Maricopa County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by BIA and PGM professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Gila River Indian PO 00000 Frm 00042 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; and the Salt River PimaMaricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona. History and Description of the Remains In December of 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed from site AZ T:12:3(PGM)/AZ T:12:9(ASM)/SRVSS Site 6/Villa Buena, located within the boundaries of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Maricopa County, AZ, by personnel from the Salt River Valley Stratigraphic Survey (SRVSS) working out of PGM. These excavations were permitted by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The human remains have been housed in the collections of PGM since they were excavated. Some of them were not identified until 2018, when they were encountered during a review of the faunal collection. The human remains represent two inhumations and five cremations. The decedents range in age from child to adult and all are of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 16 associated funerary objects are one miniature red-on-buff jar, one palette, one shell bracelet fragment, two turquoise fragments, one burnt daub fragment, one burnt insect nest, two lots of faunal bone, six lots of shell and/or botanicals, and one lot of stone and shell. Site AZ T:12:3(PGM)/AZ T:12:9(ASM)/SRVSS Site 6/Villa Buena contained ballcourts, house mounds, and a compound. Based on ceramic types and architectural forms present, the site was likely occupied during the Sweetwater-Civano phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 550– 1450). In October of 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from site AZ U:9:15(PGM)/AZ U:9:13(ASM)/SRVSS Site 23, located within the boundaries of the Salt River Indian Reservation, Maricopa County, AZ, by personnel from the SRVSS working out of PGM. These excavations were permitted by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The human remains have been housed in the collections of PGM since they were excavated. The human remains represent two inhumations and one cremation. The decedents range in age from adolescent to old adult and all are of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 10 associated funerary objects are two shell ornaments, one lot of shell fragments, two lots of faunal bones, one polishing stone, and four lots containing plainware and buffware sherds. E:\FR\FM\25AUN1.SGM 25AUN1 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 162 / Wednesday, August 25, 2021 / Notices Site AZ U:9:15(PGM)/AZ U:9:13(ASM)/SRVSS Site 23 contained trash mounds, burials, and a canal. Based on ceramic types present, the site was likely occupied during the EstrellaCivano phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 450–1450). In November of 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site AZ U:9:16(PGM)/SRVSS Site 24, located within the boundaries of the Salt River Indian Reservation, Maricopa County, AZ, by personnel from the SRVSS working out of PGM. These excavations were permitted by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The human remains have been housed in the collections of PGM since they were excavated. They were not identified until 2018, when they were encountered during a review of the faunal collection. The fragmentary remains belong to a middle-aged adult of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site AZ U:9:16(PGM)/SRVSS Site 24 contained a compound, a house mound, trash mounds, and a burial area. Based on material culture and architectural forms present, the site was likely occupied during the Estrella-Civano phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 450–1450). There is also evidence for later occupation during historic times (A.D. 1800–1939). In March of 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from site AZ U:9:14(ASM)/SRVSS Site 25, located within the boundaries of the Salt River Indian Reservation, Maricopa County, AZ, by personnel from the SRVSS working out of PGM. These excavations were permitted by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The human remains have been housed in the collections of PGM since they were excavated. They were not identified until 2021, when they were encountered during a review of the faunal collection. The fragmentary remains belong to a child and an adult; both are of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site AZ U:9:14(ASM)/SRVSS Site 25 contained a compound, a house mound, a trash mound, and burial areas. Based on ceramic types and architectural forms present, the site was likely occupied during the Santa Cruz-Civano phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 800–1450). In May of 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site AZ U:9:28(PGM)/SRVSS Site 62, located within the boundaries of the Salt River Indian Reservation, AZ, by personnel VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:54 Aug 24, 2021 Jkt 253001 from the SRVSS working out of PGM. These excavations were permitted by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The human remains have been housed in the collections of PGM since they were excavated. They were not identified until 2018, when they were encountered during a review of the faunal collection. The individual fragmentary remains belong to an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site AZ U:9:28(PGM)/SRVSS Site 62 contained house mounds, trash mounds, and possibly a ballcourt. Based on ceramic types present, the site was likely occupied during the Santa CruzSacaton phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 800–1150). In January of 1940, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site AZ U:9:35(PGM)/SRVSS Site 95, located within the boundaries of the Gila River Indian Reservation, AZ, by personnel from the SRVSS working out of PGM. These excavations were permitted by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The human remains have been housed in the collections of PGM since they were excavated. They were not identified until 2021, when they were encountered during a review of the faunal collection. The fragmentary remains belong to an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. The two associated funerary objects are one palette and one figurine. Site AZ U:9:35(PGM)/SRVSS Site 95 contained trash mounds and cremation areas. Based on ceramic types present, the site was likely occupied during the Sweetwater-Sacaton phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 550– 1150). In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by a citizen from the ‘‘Snaketown area,’’ which most likely is site AZ U:13:1(ASM), located within the boundaries of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Maricopa County, AZ. The human remains and an associated funerary object were transferred to PGM sometime prior to 1995. The human remains have been housed in the collections of PGM since they were excavated. They were not identified until 2018, when they were encountered during a review of the faunal collection. The fragmentary remains belong to an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is one lot of mixed shell and lithics. Site AZ U:13:1(ASM) was a large village containing canals, plazas, ballcourts, house groups, and a calichecapped mound. Based on ceramic types, PO 00000 Frm 00043 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 47511 architectural forms, and other material culture attributes present, the site was likely occupied during the SnaketownSacaton phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 600–1150). The Ak-Chin Indian Community [previously listed as Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona]; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona comprise one cultural group known as the O’odham. Cultural continuity between the prehistoric Hohokam archeological culture and present-day O’odham peoples is supported by continuities in settlement pattern, architectural technologies, basketry, textiles, ceramic technology, and ritual practices. Oral traditions that are documented for the Ak-Chin Indian Community [previously listed as Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona]; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona support their cultural affiliation with Hohokam archeological sites in central and southern Arizona. The Hopi Tribe of Arizona considers all of Arizona to be within traditional Hopi lands or within areas where Hopi clans migrated in the past. Oral traditions and material culture that are documented for the Hopi Tribe support their cultural affiliation with Hohokam sites in central and southern Arizona. Several Hopi clans and religious societies are derived from ancestors who migrated from the south, and likely identified with the Hohokam archeological culture. Migration from portions of the Southwest to present-day Zuni are documented in the oral traditions of kivas, priesthoods, and medicine societies of the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. These traditions support their affiliation with the central and southern Arizona Hohokam archeological culture. Historical linguistic analysis also suggests interaction between ancestral Zuni and Uto-Aztecan speakers during the late Hohokam period. Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Joined by the Pueblo Grande Museum, City of Phoenix Officials of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, joined E:\FR\FM\25AUN1.SGM 25AUN1 47512 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 162 / Wednesday, August 25, 2021 / Notices by Pueblo Grande Museum, have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 16 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 29 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Ak-Chin Indian Community [previously listed as Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona]; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Lindsey Vogel-Teeter, Pueblo Grande Museum, 4619 E Washington Street, Phoenix, AZ 85034, telephone (602) 534–1572, email lindsey.vogel-teeter@phoenix.gov, by September 24, 2021. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, assisted by the Pueblo Grande Museum, is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: August 11, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–18268 Filed 8–24–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:54 Aug 24, 2021 Jkt 253001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, and the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District, San Francisco, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: The University of California, Berkeley and the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District have jointly completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the University of California, Berkeley or the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of California, Berkeley or the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District at the address in this notice by September 24, 2021. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Thomas Torma, NAGPRA Liaison, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, 119 California Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720–1500, telephone (512) 672– 5388, email t.torma@berkeley.edu and/ or Kathleen Ungvarsky, M.A., RPA, United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District, 450 Golden Gate Avenue, Suite 4–201, San Francisco, CA 94103–1001, telephone (415) 503–6842, SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the University of California, Berkeley; Berkeley, CA, and the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District, San Francisco, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from around Humboldt Bay, Humboldt County, CA, and they are presently located at the University of California, Berkeley. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0032449; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] ACTION: email kathleen.ungvarsky@ usace.army.mil. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of California, Berkeley and the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Wiyot Tribe, California [previously listed as Table Bluff Reservation—Wiyot Tribe]. History and Description of the Remains In October 1953, human remains representing, at minimum, 20 individuals were removed from CA– HUM–112 in Humboldt County, CA, by Albert B. Elsasser and James Allan Bennyhoff. The human remains had been discovered by F. Hodgkinson, the night editor for the Humboldt Times. The remains likely were exposed as a result of a United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District (USACE) project nearby, but whether they were removed from USACEcontrolled property is unclear. Some museum records suggest that they were under the control of the USACE, while others suggest that they were under the jurisdiction of the Humboldt County Sheriff. Because the matter of control is unclear, this notice is being submitted jointly by the University of California, Berkeley and the United States Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District. As most of the human remains were sorted by skeletal element, the age and the sex of the individuals were not E:\FR\FM\25AUN1.SGM 25AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 162 (Wednesday, August 25, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 47510-47512]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-18268]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0032456; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, 
Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and Pueblo Grande Museum, 
City of Phoenix, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs 
(BIA), assisted by the Pueblo Grande Museum (PGM), has completed an 
inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in 
consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation 
between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-
day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants 
or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request to the BIA through the PGM. If no additional requestors 
come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native 
Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the BIA through the PGM at the address in 
this notice by September 24, 2021.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lindsey Vogel-Teeter, Pueblo Grande 
Museum, 4619 E Washington Street, Phoenix, AZ 85034, telephone (602) 
534-1572, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the U.S. Department of 
the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and in the 
physical custody of the Pueblo Grande Museum, City of Phoenix, AZ. The 
human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from 
locations within the boundaries of the Gila River Indian Reservation, 
Maricopa and Pinal Counties, AZ, and the Salt River Reservation, 
Maricopa County, AZ.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by BIA and PGM 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Gila 
River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; 
Hopi Tribe of Arizona; and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian 
Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona.

History and Description of the Remains

    In December of 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, seven 
individuals were removed from site AZ T:12:3(PGM)/AZ T:12:9(ASM)/SRVSS 
Site 6/Villa Buena, located within the boundaries of the Gila River 
Indian Reservation, Maricopa County, AZ, by personnel from the Salt 
River Valley Stratigraphic Survey (SRVSS) working out of PGM. These 
excavations were permitted by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The 
human remains have been housed in the collections of PGM since they 
were excavated. Some of them were not identified until 2018, when they 
were encountered during a review of the faunal collection. The human 
remains represent two inhumations and five cremations. The decedents 
range in age from child to adult and all are of indeterminate sex. No 
known individuals were identified. The 16 associated funerary objects 
are one miniature red-on-buff jar, one palette, one shell bracelet 
fragment, two turquoise fragments, one burnt daub fragment, one burnt 
insect nest, two lots of faunal bone, six lots of shell and/or 
botanicals, and one lot of stone and shell.
    Site AZ T:12:3(PGM)/AZ T:12:9(ASM)/SRVSS Site 6/Villa Buena 
contained ballcourts, house mounds, and a compound. Based on ceramic 
types and architectural forms present, the site was likely occupied 
during the Sweetwater-Civano phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence 
(A.D. 550-1450).
    In October of 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from site AZ U:9:15(PGM)/AZ U:9:13(ASM)/SRVSS 
Site 23, located within the boundaries of the Salt River Indian 
Reservation, Maricopa County, AZ, by personnel from the SRVSS working 
out of PGM. These excavations were permitted by the U.S. Department of 
the Interior. The human remains have been housed in the collections of 
PGM since they were excavated. The human remains represent two 
inhumations and one cremation. The decedents range in age from 
adolescent to old adult and all are of indeterminate sex. No known 
individuals were identified. The 10 associated funerary objects are two 
shell ornaments, one lot of shell fragments, two lots of faunal bones, 
one polishing stone, and four lots containing plainware and buffware 
sherds.

[[Page 47511]]

    Site AZ U:9:15(PGM)/AZ U:9:13(ASM)/SRVSS Site 23 contained trash 
mounds, burials, and a canal. Based on ceramic types present, the site 
was likely occupied during the Estrella-Civano phases of the Hohokam 
cultural sequence (A.D. 450-1450).
    In November of 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from site AZ U:9:16(PGM)/SRVSS Site 24, located 
within the boundaries of the Salt River Indian Reservation, Maricopa 
County, AZ, by personnel from the SRVSS working out of PGM. These 
excavations were permitted by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The 
human remains have been housed in the collections of PGM since they 
were excavated. They were not identified until 2018, when they were 
encountered during a review of the faunal collection. The fragmentary 
remains belong to a middle-aged adult of indeterminate sex. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site AZ U:9:16(PGM)/SRVSS Site 24 contained a compound, a house 
mound, trash mounds, and a burial area. Based on material culture and 
architectural forms present, the site was likely occupied during the 
Estrella-Civano phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 450-
1450). There is also evidence for later occupation during historic 
times (A.D. 1800-1939).
    In March of 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from site AZ U:9:14(ASM)/SRVSS Site 25, 
located within the boundaries of the Salt River Indian Reservation, 
Maricopa County, AZ, by personnel from the SRVSS working out of PGM. 
These excavations were permitted by the U.S. Department of the 
Interior. The human remains have been housed in the collections of PGM 
since they were excavated. They were not identified until 2021, when 
they were encountered during a review of the faunal collection. The 
fragmentary remains belong to a child and an adult; both are of 
indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    Site AZ U:9:14(ASM)/SRVSS Site 25 contained a compound, a house 
mound, a trash mound, and burial areas. Based on ceramic types and 
architectural forms present, the site was likely occupied during the 
Santa Cruz-Civano phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 800-
1450).
    In May of 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from site AZ U:9:28(PGM)/SRVSS Site 62, located 
within the boundaries of the Salt River Indian Reservation, AZ, by 
personnel from the SRVSS working out of PGM. These excavations were 
permitted by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The human remains 
have been housed in the collections of PGM since they were excavated. 
They were not identified until 2018, when they were encountered during 
a review of the faunal collection. The individual fragmentary remains 
belong to an adult of indeterminate sex. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site AZ U:9:28(PGM)/SRVSS Site 62 contained house mounds, trash 
mounds, and possibly a ballcourt. Based on ceramic types present, the 
site was likely occupied during the Santa Cruz-Sacaton phases of the 
Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 800-1150).
    In January of 1940, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from site AZ U:9:35(PGM)/SRVSS Site 95, located 
within the boundaries of the Gila River Indian Reservation, AZ, by 
personnel from the SRVSS working out of PGM. These excavations were 
permitted by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The human remains 
have been housed in the collections of PGM since they were excavated. 
They were not identified until 2021, when they were encountered during 
a review of the faunal collection. The fragmentary remains belong to an 
adult of indeterminate sex. No known individual was identified. The two 
associated funerary objects are one palette and one figurine.
    Site AZ U:9:35(PGM)/SRVSS Site 95 contained trash mounds and 
cremation areas. Based on ceramic types present, the site was likely 
occupied during the Sweetwater-Sacaton phases of the Hohokam cultural 
sequence (A.D. 550-1150).
    In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by a citizen from the ``Snaketown area,'' which most 
likely is site AZ U:13:1(ASM), located within the boundaries of the 
Gila River Indian Reservation, Maricopa County, AZ. The human remains 
and an associated funerary object were transferred to PGM sometime 
prior to 1995. The human remains have been housed in the collections of 
PGM since they were excavated. They were not identified until 2018, 
when they were encountered during a review of the faunal collection. 
The fragmentary remains belong to an adult of indeterminate sex. No 
known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is 
one lot of mixed shell and lithics.
    Site AZ U:13:1(ASM) was a large village containing canals, plazas, 
ballcourts, house groups, and a caliche-capped mound. Based on ceramic 
types, architectural forms, and other material culture attributes 
present, the site was likely occupied during the Snaketown-Sacaton 
phases of the Hohokam cultural sequence (A.D. 600-1150).
    The Ak-Chin Indian Community [previously listed as Ak Chin Indian 
Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona]; Gila 
River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; 
Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River 
Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona comprise 
one cultural group known as the O'odham. Cultural continuity between 
the prehistoric Hohokam archeological culture and present-day O'odham 
peoples is supported by continuities in settlement pattern, 
architectural technologies, basketry, textiles, ceramic technology, and 
ritual practices. Oral traditions that are documented for the Ak-Chin 
Indian Community [previously listed as Ak Chin Indian Community of the 
Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona]; Gila River Indian 
Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River 
Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; 
and the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona support their cultural 
affiliation with Hohokam archeological sites in central and southern 
Arizona.
    The Hopi Tribe of Arizona considers all of Arizona to be within 
traditional Hopi lands or within areas where Hopi clans migrated in the 
past. Oral traditions and material culture that are documented for the 
Hopi Tribe support their cultural affiliation with Hohokam sites in 
central and southern Arizona. Several Hopi clans and religious 
societies are derived from ancestors who migrated from the south, and 
likely identified with the Hohokam archeological culture.
    Migration from portions of the Southwest to present-day Zuni are 
documented in the oral traditions of kivas, priesthoods, and medicine 
societies of the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. These 
traditions support their affiliation with the central and southern 
Arizona Hohokam archeological culture. Historical linguistic analysis 
also suggests interaction between ancestral Zuni and Uto-Aztecan 
speakers during the late Hohokam period.

Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of 
Indian Affairs, Joined by the Pueblo Grande Museum, City of Phoenix

    Officials of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian 
Affairs, joined

[[Page 47512]]

by Pueblo Grande Museum, have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 16 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 29 objects described 
in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Ak-Chin 
Indian Community [previously listed as Ak Chin Indian Community of the 
Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona]; Gila River Indian 
Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River 
Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and the Zuni 
Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as 
``The Tribes'').

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Lindsey Vogel-Teeter, Pueblo Grande Museum, 
4619 E Washington Street, Phoenix, AZ 85034, telephone (602) 534-1572, 
email [email protected], by September 24, 2021. After 
that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The 
Tribes may proceed.
    The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
assisted by the Pueblo Grande Museum, is responsible for notifying The 
Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: August 11, 2021.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2021-18268 Filed 8-24-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P