Uruguay Beef Imports Approved for the Electronic Certification System (eCERT), 47127-47128 [2021-18009]

Download as PDF jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 160 / Monday, August 23, 2021 / Notices vessels of over 200 gross registered tons (GRT) is authorized to serve as master on inspected vessels of less than 100 GRT within any restrictions on their merchant mariner credential (MMC). The Coast Guard will use the Policy Letter ‘‘Issuance of Endorsements for Master of Self-Propelled Vessels of Less Than 100 GRT to Mariners Holding Endorsements as Mate of Self-Propelled Vessels of 200 GRT or More’’ and 46 CFR 15.901 in issuing endorsements for mariners to serve as a master on vessels less than 100 GRT. The Coast Guard issued this policy letter to clarify the process for the issuance of national officer endorsements for master of selfpropelled vessels of less than 100 GRT for mariners who hold national endorsements for mate of inspected selfpropelled vessels of 200 GRT or more. For mariners holding a MMC endorsement that authorizes service as mate on inspected self-propelled vessels of 200 GRT or more, the Coast Guard may include in the mariner’s MMC a national endorsement as master of selfpropelled vessels of less than 100 GRT. This will apply to the following national endorsements: (1) Chief Mate of Self-Propelled Vessels of Unlimited Tonnage; (2) Second Mate of Self-Propelled Vessels of Unlimited Tonnage; (3) Third Mate of Self-Propelled Vessels of Unlimited Tonnage; (4) Mate of Self-Propelled Vessels of Less Than 1,600 GRT; (5) Mate of Self-Propelled Vessels of Less Than 500 GRT; (6) Chief Mate (OSV); (7) Mate (OSV); and (8) Mate (Pilot) of Towing Vessels. Mariners holding one of the endorsements above authorizing service on either near-coastal waters or oceans will be issued an endorsement as Master of Near Coastal Self-Propelled Vessels of Less Than 100 GRT. Mariners holding one of the endorsements above for inland waters or for Great Lakes and inland waters will be issued a master less than 100 GRT endorsement with the same route as their mate endorsement. Mariners holding endorsements as Chief Mate (OSV) and Mate (OSV) will be issued endorsements as master of less than 100 GRT that are not restricted to offshore supply vessels. Mariners holding endorsements as Mate (Pilot) of Towing Vessels will be issued endorsements as master of less than 100 GRT that are not restricted to towing vessels. All other restrictions on the mariner’s mate endorsement will apply to the endorsement for master for less than 100 GRT. Mariners seeking to add the master less than 100 GRT endorsement to their VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:11 Aug 20, 2021 Jkt 253001 MMCs, must specifically apply for it in order for the Coast Guard to add the endorsement to their credential. However, mariners holding one of the endorsements listed in above are not required to have the endorsement as master in their MMC in order to serve as master on an inspected vessel of less than 100 GRT. As specified in 46 CFR 15.901(a), any mariner holding an endorsement authorizing service as mate on an inspected vessel of 200 GRT or more may serve as master on a vessel of less than 100 GRT on the same route as their equivalent mate endorsement. This notice is issued under authority of 5 U.S.C. 552(a). Dated: August 18, 2021. J.G. Lantz, U.S. Coast Guard, Director of Commercial Regulations and Standards. [FR Doc. 2021–18090 Filed 8–20–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110–04–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Uruguay Beef Imports Approved for the Electronic Certification System (eCERT) U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. AGENCY: ACTION: General notice. This document announces that the export certification requirement for certain imports of beef from the Oriental Republic of Uruguay (Uruguay) subject to a tariff-rate quota will be accomplished through the Electronic Certification System (eCERT). All imports of beef from Uruguay that are subject to the tariff-rate quota must have a valid export certificate with a corresponding eCERT transmission at the time of entry, or withdrawal from warehouse, for consumption. The United States Government (USG) has approved the request from Uruguay to transition, from the way the USG currently receives export certificates from Uruguay, to eCERT as the method of transmission. The transition to eCERT will not change the tariff-rate quota filing process or requirements. Importers will continue to provide the export certificate numbers from Uruguay in the same manner as when currently filing entry summaries with U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The format of the export certificate numbers will remain the same for the corresponding eCERT transmissions. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 47127 The use of the eCERT process for certain Uruguayan beef importations subject to a tariff-rate quota will be effective for beef entered, or withdrawn from a warehouse, for consumption on or after August 30, 2021. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Julia Peterson, Chief, Quota and Agriculture Branch, Trade Policy and Programs, Office of Trade, (202) 384–8905, or HQQUOTA@cbp.dhs.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: DATES: Background There is an existing tariff-rate quota on certain beef from the Oriental Republic of Uruguay (Uruguay) pursuant to Additional U.S. Note 3 of Chapter 2 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS). The tariff-rate quota for beef from Uruguay was established by section 6 of the Presidential Proclamation No. 6763 (December 23, 1994), as a result of the Uruguay Round Agreements, approved by Congress in section 101 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3511(a), Pub. L. 103–465, 108 Stat. 4814). Tariff-rate quotas permit a specified quantity of merchandise to be entered or withdrawn for consumption at a reduced duty rate during a specified period. Furthermore, section 2012.3 of title 15 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) states that beef may only be entered as a product of an eligible country for a tariff-rate quota if the importer makes a declaration to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) that a valid export certificate is in effect with respect to the beef. In addition, the CBP regulations, at 19 CFR 132.15, set forth provisions relating to the requirement that an importer must possess a valid export certificate at the time of entry, or withdrawal from warehouse, for consumption, to claim the in-quota tariff rate of duty on entries of beef subject to the tariff-rate quota. The Electronic Certification System (eCERT) is a system developed by CBP that uses electronic data transmissions of information normally associated with a required export document, such as a license or certificate, to facilitate the administration of quotas and ensure that the proper restraint levels are charged without being exceeded. Uruguay currently submits export certificates to CBP via email, and in the administration of the quota, CBP validates these certificates with the certificate numbers provided by importers on their entry summaries. Uruguay requested to participate in the eCERT process to comply with the United States’ tariff-rate quota for beef exported from Uruguay for importation E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1 47128 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 160 / Monday, August 23, 2021 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES into the United States. CBP has coordinated with Uruguay to implement the eCERT process, and now Uruguay is ready to participate in this process by transmitting its export certificates to CBP via eCERT. Foreign countries participating in eCERT transmit information via a global network service provider, which allows connectivity to CBP’s automated electronic system for commercial trade processing, the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE). Specific data elements are transmitted to CBP by the importer of record (or an authorized customs broker) when filing an entry summary with CBP, and those data elements must match eCERT data from the foreign country before an importer may claim any applicable in-quota tariff rate of duty. An importer may claim an in-quota tariff rate when merchandise is entered, or withdrawn from warehouse, for consumption, only if the information transmitted by the importer matches the information transmitted by the foreign government. If there is no transmission by the foreign government upon entry, an importer must claim the higher overquota tariff rate.1 An importer may subsequently claim the in-quota tariff rate under certain limited conditions.2 This document announces that Uruguay will be implementing the eCERT process for transmitting export certificates for beef entries subject to the tariff-rate quota. Imported merchandise that is entered, or withdrawn from warehouse, for consumption on or after August 30, 2021, must match the eCERT transmission of an export certificate from Uruguay in order for an importer to claim the in-tariff quota rate. The transition to eCERT will not change the tariff-rate quota filing process or requirements. Importers will continue to provide the export certificate numbers from Uruguay in the same manner as when currently filing entry summaries with CBP. The format of the export certificate numbers will not change as a result of the transition to eCERT. CBP 1 If there is no associated foreign government eCERT transmission available upon entry of the merchandise, an importer may enter the merchandise for consumption subject to the overquota tariff rate or opt not to enter the merchandise for consumption at that time (e.g., transfer the merchandise to a Customs bonded warehouse or foreign trade zone or export or destroy the merchandise). 2 If an importer enters the merchandise for consumption subject to the over-quota tariff rate and the associated foreign government eCERT transmission becomes available afterwards, an importer may claim the in-quota rate of duty by filing a post summary correction (before liquidation) or a protest under 19 CFR part 174 (after liquidation). In either event, the in-quota rate of duty is allowable only if there are still quota amounts available within the original quota period. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:11 Aug 20, 2021 Jkt 253001 will reject entry summaries that claim an in-quota tariff rate when filed without a valid export certificate in eCERT. Dated: August 16, 2021. AnnMarie R. Highsmith, Executive Assistant Commissioner, Office of Trade. [FR Doc. 2021–18009 Filed 8–20–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency [Docket ID: FEMA–2021–0021] Request for Information on the National Flood Insurance Program’s Community Rating System Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security (DHS). ACTION: Notice and request for information. AGENCY: The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is issuing this Request for Information (RFI) to receive input from the public on transforming the Community Rating System (CRS) under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) to better align with the current understanding of flood risk and flood risk approaches and to incentivize communities to not only manage but also lower their flood risk through floodplain management initiatives. The NFIP’s CRS program is a voluntary incentive program that recognizes and encourages community floodplain management practices that exceed the minimum requirements of the NFIP for floodplain management. As FEMA undertakes a series of initiatives that will transform the NFIP, the agency is evaluating the CRS program and its potential to support FEMA, State, local, Tribal, and Territorial community goals and needs. DATES: Written comments are requested on or before September 22, 2021. Latefiled comments will be considered to the extent practicable. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by Docket ID: FEMA–2021– 0021, through the Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Please note that this RFI period is not rulemaking and the Federal Rulemaking Portal is being utilized only as a mechanism for receiving comments. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rachel Sears, Supervisory Emergency Management Specialist, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA-CRS-Next@ fema.dhs.gov, 202–212–3800. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Public Participation Interested persons are invited to comment on this notice by submitting written data, views, or arguments using the method identified in the ADDRESSES section. Instructions: All submissions must include the agency name and Docket ID for this notice. All comments received will be posted without change to http:// www.regulations.gov. Commenters are encouraged to identify the number of the specific question or questions to which they are responding. Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received, go to http:// www.regulations.gov and search for the Docket ID. II. Background Floods are the most common and most destructive natural disaster in the United States.1 Every year, flooding causes hundreds of millions of dollars in damage to homes and businesses around the United States.2 Anywhere it can rain, it can flood. With 99% of counties in the United States having experienced a flood 3 and when just one inch of water can cause $25,000 in damage in a home,4 communities across the country must make difficult decisions about protecting lives and property from flooding. Standard homeowners and commercial property insurance policies do not cover flood losses. To meet the need for this vital coverage, FEMA administers the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which offers reasonably priced flood insurance to all properties in communities that comply with minimum standards for floodplain 1 See Ready Campaign, Floods (updated Apr. 9, 2021) at http://www.ready.gov/floods (last accessed July 15, 2021). See also National Weather Service, Flood Related Hazards at http://www.weather.gov/ safety/flood-hazards (‘‘Approximately seventy-five percent of all Presidential disaster declarations are associated with flooding.’’) (last accessed July 15, 2021). 2 See Billion-Dollar Weather and Climate Disasters: Summary Stats, at http:// www.ncdc.noaa.gov/billions/summary-stats (last accessed July 7, 2021). 3 See Historical Flood Risk and Costs at http:// www.fema.gov/data-visualization/historical-floodrisk-and-costs (last accessed, July 9, 2021) 4 See Why Buy Flood Insurance at http:// www.floodsmart.gov/flood-insurance/why (last accessed July 1, 2021). E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 160 (Monday, August 23, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 47127-47128]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-18009]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

U.S. Customs and Border Protection


Uruguay Beef Imports Approved for the Electronic Certification 
System (eCERT)

AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland 
Security.

ACTION: General notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This document announces that the export certification 
requirement for certain imports of beef from the Oriental Republic of 
Uruguay (Uruguay) subject to a tariff-rate quota will be accomplished 
through the Electronic Certification System (eCERT). All imports of 
beef from Uruguay that are subject to the tariff-rate quota must have a 
valid export certificate with a corresponding eCERT transmission at the 
time of entry, or withdrawal from warehouse, for consumption. The 
United States Government (USG) has approved the request from Uruguay to 
transition, from the way the USG currently receives export certificates 
from Uruguay, to eCERT as the method of transmission. The transition to 
eCERT will not change the tariff-rate quota filing process or 
requirements. Importers will continue to provide the export certificate 
numbers from Uruguay in the same manner as when currently filing entry 
summaries with U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The format of the 
export certificate numbers will remain the same for the corresponding 
eCERT transmissions.

DATES: The use of the eCERT process for certain Uruguayan beef 
importations subject to a tariff-rate quota will be effective for beef 
entered, or withdrawn from a warehouse, for consumption on or after 
August 30, 2021.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Julia Peterson, Chief, Quota and 
Agriculture Branch, Trade Policy and Programs, Office of Trade, (202) 
384-8905, or [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

    There is an existing tariff-rate quota on certain beef from the 
Oriental Republic of Uruguay (Uruguay) pursuant to Additional U.S. Note 
3 of Chapter 2 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States 
(HTSUS). The tariff-rate quota for beef from Uruguay was established by 
section 6 of the Presidential Proclamation No. 6763 (December 23, 
1994), as a result of the Uruguay Round Agreements, approved by 
Congress in section 101 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 
3511(a), Pub. L. 103-465, 108 Stat. 4814). Tariff-rate quotas permit a 
specified quantity of merchandise to be entered or withdrawn for 
consumption at a reduced duty rate during a specified period. 
Furthermore, section 2012.3 of title 15 of the Code of Federal 
Regulations (CFR) states that beef may only be entered as a product of 
an eligible country for a tariff-rate quota if the importer makes a 
declaration to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) that a valid 
export certificate is in effect with respect to the beef. In addition, 
the CBP regulations, at 19 CFR 132.15, set forth provisions relating to 
the requirement that an importer must possess a valid export 
certificate at the time of entry, or withdrawal from warehouse, for 
consumption, to claim the in-quota tariff rate of duty on entries of 
beef subject to the tariff-rate quota.
    The Electronic Certification System (eCERT) is a system developed 
by CBP that uses electronic data transmissions of information normally 
associated with a required export document, such as a license or 
certificate, to facilitate the administration of quotas and ensure that 
the proper restraint levels are charged without being exceeded. Uruguay 
currently submits export certificates to CBP via email, and in the 
administration of the quota, CBP validates these certificates with the 
certificate numbers provided by importers on their entry summaries. 
Uruguay requested to participate in the eCERT process to comply with 
the United States' tariff-rate quota for beef exported from Uruguay for 
importation

[[Page 47128]]

into the United States. CBP has coordinated with Uruguay to implement 
the eCERT process, and now Uruguay is ready to participate in this 
process by transmitting its export certificates to CBP via eCERT.
    Foreign countries participating in eCERT transmit information via a 
global network service provider, which allows connectivity to CBP's 
automated electronic system for commercial trade processing, the 
Automated Commercial Environment (ACE). Specific data elements are 
transmitted to CBP by the importer of record (or an authorized customs 
broker) when filing an entry summary with CBP, and those data elements 
must match eCERT data from the foreign country before an importer may 
claim any applicable in-quota tariff rate of duty. An importer may 
claim an in-quota tariff rate when merchandise is entered, or withdrawn 
from warehouse, for consumption, only if the information transmitted by 
the importer matches the information transmitted by the foreign 
government. If there is no transmission by the foreign government upon 
entry, an importer must claim the higher over-quota tariff rate.\1\ An 
importer may subsequently claim the in-quota tariff rate under certain 
limited conditions.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ If there is no associated foreign government eCERT 
transmission available upon entry of the merchandise, an importer 
may enter the merchandise for consumption subject to the over-quota 
tariff rate or opt not to enter the merchandise for consumption at 
that time (e.g., transfer the merchandise to a Customs bonded 
warehouse or foreign trade zone or export or destroy the 
merchandise).
    \2\ If an importer enters the merchandise for consumption 
subject to the over-quota tariff rate and the associated foreign 
government eCERT transmission becomes available afterwards, an 
importer may claim the in-quota rate of duty by filing a post 
summary correction (before liquidation) or a protest under 19 CFR 
part 174 (after liquidation). In either event, the in-quota rate of 
duty is allowable only if there are still quota amounts available 
within the original quota period.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This document announces that Uruguay will be implementing the eCERT 
process for transmitting export certificates for beef entries subject 
to the tariff-rate quota. Imported merchandise that is entered, or 
withdrawn from warehouse, for consumption on or after August 30, 2021, 
must match the eCERT transmission of an export certificate from Uruguay 
in order for an importer to claim the in-tariff quota rate. The 
transition to eCERT will not change the tariff-rate quota filing 
process or requirements. Importers will continue to provide the export 
certificate numbers from Uruguay in the same manner as when currently 
filing entry summaries with CBP. The format of the export certificate 
numbers will not change as a result of the transition to eCERT. CBP 
will reject entry summaries that claim an in-quota tariff rate when 
filed without a valid export certificate in eCERT.

    Dated: August 16, 2021.
AnnMarie R. Highsmith,
Executive Assistant Commissioner, Office of Trade.
[FR Doc. 2021-18009 Filed 8-20-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P