Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 44052-44053 [2021-17063]

Download as PDF 44052 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 152 / Wednesday, August 11, 2021 / Notices The ceramic pipe stem and ceramic pipe bowl fragment most likely date to the Late Woodland Period (A.D. 900–1500), as suggested by the decoration on the pipe bowl fragment. Consultation, oral tradition, archeological, and historical evidence indicates that the two mortars and two pestles are typically used as ‘‘paint pots’’ for applying pigment to the face of the deceased, a practice that persisted from at least the Late Woodland to the Historic Period and present day (A.D. post-900). In 1895, 15 cultural items were recovered from the Lowland site in Trenton, Mercer County, NJ, by Ernest Volk during a Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology expedition led by Mr. Volk. Five of the cultural items were accessioned into the Museum’s collection in 1895 but 10 of the cultural items were not accessioned into the Museum’s collection until 1952, as a gift of C.C. Abbott. The 15 unassociated funerary objects are nine lots of ceramic sherds, five projectile points, and one chipped stone. The cultural items most likely date to the Middle or Late Woodland Periods (A.D. 0– 1500), as suggested by the decoration and/or fabric of the ceramic sherds and the shapes of the projectile points. In the Federal Register (72 FR 41523, July 30, 2007), column 3, paragraph 4, sentence 1 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: Museum documentation indicates that the 63 cultural items described above were recovered from burial contexts. In the Federal Register (72 FR 41523, July 30, 2007), column 3, paragraph 5, sentence 1 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 63 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Patricia Capone, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617) 496–3702, email pcapone@ fas.harvard.edu, by September 10, 2021. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; VerDate Sep<11>2014 23:05 Aug 10, 2021 Jkt 253001 and the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin may proceed. The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University is responsible for notifying the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; and the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin that this notice has been published. Dated: July 28, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–17060 Filed 8–10–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0032397; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University (Peabody Museum) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary object and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary object should submit a written request to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary object should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at the address in this notice by September 10, 2021. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patricia Capone, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617) 496–3702, email pcapone@ fas.harvard.edu. Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and an associated funerary object under the control of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human remains and associated funerary object were removed from Mercer, Burlington, and Monmouth Counties, NJ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary object. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary object was made by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; and the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin. History and Description of the Remains In 1905, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Lalor Field in Mercer County, NJ, by Ernest Volk as part of a Peabody Museum expedition. Volk removed the human remains from an unknown provenience within Lalor Field. The human remains are fragmentary cranial remains of an adult of indeterminate sex and age. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between 1910 and 1912, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from an unknown location in Trenton in Mercer County, NJ, by Charles C. Abbott and his son Richard (Dick) M. Abbott. Charles C. Abbott donated the human remains to the Peabody Museum in 1912. The human remains are fragmentary postcranial remains of an adult of indeterminate sex and age. No known E:\FR\FM\11AUN1.SGM 11AUN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 152 / Wednesday, August 11, 2021 / Notices individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1882, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from a gravel deposit at an unknown location in Trenton in Mercer County, NJ, by Charles C. Abbott as part of a Peabody Museum expedition. The human remains are fragmentary cranial remains of an adult of indeterminate sex and age. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On April 18, 1884, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from a railroad cut in Trenton in Mercer County, NJ, by Charles C. Abbott as part of a Peabody Museum expedition. The human remains were originally encountered by workmen digging a cut for the railroad in Trenton. The workmen excavated the human remains and later reconstructed for Abbott the original location of the human remains. The human remains lay in either ‘‘ferruginous sand’’ or gravel 16 feet below the surface. The human remains are fragmentary cranial remains of an adult of indeterminate sex and age. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In April 1886, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from a railroad cut in Trenton in Mercer County, NJ, by Charles C. Abbott. Abbott donated the human remains to the Peabody Museum on May 6, 1886. The human remains were removed from the railroad cut east of the Pennsylvania Railroad passenger station, where they lay in gravel 11 feet below the surface. The human remains are fragmentary cranial remains of an adult of indeterminate sex and age. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On September 10, 1895, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Charles C. Abbott from the roadside southeast of his house in Mercer County, NJ. Abbott donated the human remains to the Peabody Museum on September 21, 1895. The human remains lay in gravel. The human remains are fragmentary cranial remains of an adult of indeterminate age who is probably male. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Around 1897, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from an unknown site on the ‘‘Assiscunk Creek’’ approximately three miles from Burlington in Burlington County, NJ, by Stacy Scott. Scott conveyed the human remains to Charles C. Abbott at an VerDate Sep<11>2014 23:05 Aug 10, 2021 Jkt 253001 44053 unknown date, and Abbott donated the human remains to the Peabody Museum in 1913. The human remains are the partial cranial remains of an adult male between the ages of 20 and 40 years old and the partial cranial remains of a subadult between the ages of 16 and 20 years old who is probably female. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between 1858 and 1887, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from ‘‘near Hornerstown’’ in Monmouth County, NJ, by Samuel Lockwood. Lockwood sold the human remains to the Peabody Museum in 1888. The human remains are the fragmentary cranial and postcranial remains of an adult of indeterminate sex and age. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a cornernotched biface. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary object should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Patricia Capone, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617) 496–3702, email pcapone@ fas.harvard.edu, by September 10, 2021. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary object to The Tribes may proceed. The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Determinations Made by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University Dated: July 28, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on osteological analysis, archeological context, and museum records. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of nine individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described in this notice is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary object and any present-day Indian Tribe. • Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary object were removed is the aboriginal land of the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; and the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary object may be to The Tribes. PO 00000 Frm 00066 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 [FR Doc. 2021–17063 Filed 8–10–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731–TA–1528 (Final)] Seamless Refined Copper Pipe and Tube From Vietnam Determination On the basis of the record 1 developed in the subject investigation, the United States International Trade Commission (‘‘Commission’’) determines, pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930 (‘‘the Act’’), that an industry in the United States is materially injured by reason of imports of seamless refined copper pipe and tube (‘‘SRC pipe and tube’’) from Vietnam, provided for in subheading 7411.10.10 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, that have been found by the U.S. Department of Commerce (‘‘Commerce’’) to be sold in the United States at less than fair value (‘‘LTFV’’).2 Background The Commission instituted this investigation effective June 30, 2020, following receipt of a petition filed with the Commission and Commerce by the American Copper Tube Coalition, consisting of the Mueller Group, Collierville, Tennessee, and Cerro Flow 1 The record is defined in § 207.2(f) of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR 207.2(f)). 2 86 FR 33228 (June 24, 2021). E:\FR\FM\11AUN1.SGM 11AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 152 (Wednesday, August 11, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 44052-44053]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-17063]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0032397; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and 
Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard 
University (Peabody Museum) has completed an inventory of human remains 
and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate 
Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that 
there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and 
associated funerary object and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary object should submit a written request to the Peabody Museum 
of Archaeology and Ethnology. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary object 
to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this 
notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
object should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at the 
address in this notice by September 10, 2021.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patricia Capone, Peabody Museum of 
Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, 
Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617) 496-3702, email 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and an 
associated funerary object under the control of the Peabody Museum of 
Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. The human 
remains and associated funerary object were removed from Mercer, 
Burlington, and Monmouth Counties, NJ.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
object. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
object was made by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Delaware 
Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; and the Stockbridge Munsee 
Community, Wisconsin.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1905, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Lalor Field in Mercer County, NJ, by Ernest Volk as 
part of a Peabody Museum expedition. Volk removed the human remains 
from an unknown provenience within Lalor Field. The human remains are 
fragmentary cranial remains of an adult of indeterminate sex and age. 
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Between 1910 and 1912, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from an unknown location in Trenton in Mercer 
County, NJ, by Charles C. Abbott and his son Richard (Dick) M. Abbott. 
Charles C. Abbott donated the human remains to the Peabody Museum in 
1912. The human remains are fragmentary postcranial remains of an adult 
of indeterminate sex and age. No known

[[Page 44053]]

individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1882, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from a gravel deposit at an unknown location in Trenton in 
Mercer County, NJ, by Charles C. Abbott as part of a Peabody Museum 
expedition. The human remains are fragmentary cranial remains of an 
adult of indeterminate sex and age. No known individual was identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    On April 18, 1884, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from a railroad cut in Trenton in Mercer 
County, NJ, by Charles C. Abbott as part of a Peabody Museum 
expedition. The human remains were originally encountered by workmen 
digging a cut for the railroad in Trenton. The workmen excavated the 
human remains and later reconstructed for Abbott the original location 
of the human remains. The human remains lay in either ``ferruginous 
sand'' or gravel 16 feet below the surface. The human remains are 
fragmentary cranial remains of an adult of indeterminate sex and age. 
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In April 1886, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from a railroad cut in Trenton in Mercer 
County, NJ, by Charles C. Abbott. Abbott donated the human remains to 
the Peabody Museum on May 6, 1886. The human remains were removed from 
the railroad cut east of the Pennsylvania Railroad passenger station, 
where they lay in gravel 11 feet below the surface. The human remains 
are fragmentary cranial remains of an adult of indeterminate sex and 
age. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    On September 10, 1895, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed by Charles C. Abbott from the roadside 
southeast of his house in Mercer County, NJ. Abbott donated the human 
remains to the Peabody Museum on September 21, 1895. The human remains 
lay in gravel. The human remains are fragmentary cranial remains of an 
adult of indeterminate age who is probably male. No known individual 
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Around 1897, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from an unknown site on the ``Assiscunk 
Creek'' approximately three miles from Burlington in Burlington County, 
NJ, by Stacy Scott. Scott conveyed the human remains to Charles C. 
Abbott at an unknown date, and Abbott donated the human remains to the 
Peabody Museum in 1913. The human remains are the partial cranial 
remains of an adult male between the ages of 20 and 40 years old and 
the partial cranial remains of a subadult between the ages of 16 and 20 
years old who is probably female. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    Between 1858 and 1887, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from ``near Hornerstown'' in Monmouth County, 
NJ, by Samuel Lockwood. Lockwood sold the human remains to the Peabody 
Museum in 1888. The human remains are the fragmentary cranial and 
postcranial remains of an adult of indeterminate sex and age. No known 
individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a 
corner-notched biface.

Determinations Made by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, 
Harvard University

    Officials of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, 
Harvard University have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on osteological analysis, 
archeological context, and museum records.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of nine individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described 
in this notice is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary object and any present-day Indian 
Tribe.
     Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate 
that the land from which the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary object were removed is the aboriginal land of the 
Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; and the 
Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin (hereafter referred to as ``The 
Tribes'').
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains and associated funerary object may be to The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary object should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Patricia 
Capone, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard 
University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617) 
496-3702, email [email protected], by September 10, 2021. After 
that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary object to The 
Tribes may proceed.
    The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University 
is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: July 28, 2021.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2021-17063 Filed 8-10-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P