Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 44047-44051 [2021-17058]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 152 / Wednesday, August 11, 2021 / Notices the nominated properties under the National Register criteria for evaluation. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Nominations submitted by State or Tribal Historic Preservation Officers: ARIZONA Pima County DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Cameron County Essey, Lillian and George K. Aziz, House, 1205 West Elizabeth St., Brownsville, SG100006889 Windham County Brookline Baptist Church, (Religious Buildings, Sites and Structures in Vermont MPS), 632 Grassy Brook Rd., Brookline, MP100006892 WYOMING Johnson County Wold Rock Art District, Address Restricted, Barnum vicinity, SG100006877 ARIZONA Maricopa County DELAWARE New Castle County African Union Church and Cemetery of Iron Hill, 1578 Whittaker Rd., Newark vicinity, SG100006887 Willo Historic District (Additional Documentation), Roughly bounded by Central Ave., McDowell Rd., 7th Ave., and Thomas Rd., Phoenix, AD90002099 VERMONT Washington County MISSISSIPPI Roxbury Fish Hatchery (Additional Documentation), (Fish Culture Resources of Vermont MPS), West side VT 12A, about 1.0 mi. south of Roxbury, Roxbury vicinity, AD94000177 Hancock County William and Mary McGee House, 16634 Whites Rd., Pearlington, SG100006893 Neshoba County Nomination submitted by Federal Preservation Officer: The State Historic Preservation Officer reviewed the following nomination and responded to the Federal Preservation Officer within 45 days of receipt of the nomination and supports listing the properties in the National Register of Historic Places. Booker T. Washington High School, 234 Carver Ave., Philadelphia, SG100006878 MISSOURI Jackson County Rector House, 2008 East 12th St., Kansas City, SG100006890 Mason Building, 1110 Grand Blvd., Kansas City, SG100006891 PENNSYLVANIA OKLAHOMA Erie County Oklahoma County Mayer Building, 1501–1509 State St., Erie, SG100006881 Federal Building and United States Court House, 200 NW 4th St., Oklahoma City, SG100006876 Philadelphia County Bellevue Worsted Mills, 5115–5139 Belfield Ave., Philadelphia, SG100006880 SOUTH CAROLINA Authority: Section 60.13 of 36 CFR part 60 Aiken County Hospital, 828 Richland Ave. West, Aiken, SG100006888 Dated: August 3, 2021. Sherry A. Frear, Chief, National Register of Historic Places/ National Historic Landmarks Program. Florence County [FR Doc. 2021–17070 Filed 8–10–21; 8:45 am] Heiden, Philip C., House, 116 North Blanding St., Lake City, SG100006885 BILLING CODE 4312–52–P Aiken County Richland County Holman’s Barber Shop, (Segregation in Columbia, South Carolina MPS), 2128 Gervais St., Columbia, MP100006884 VerDate Sep<11>2014 23:05 Aug 10, 2021 Jkt 253001 PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0032392; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL VERMONT Additional documentation has been received for the following resources: American Smelting and Refining Company Southwestern Department Headquarters, 1150 North 7th Ave., Tucson, SG100006883 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES TEXAS 44047 Sfmt 4703 National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida (USF) has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida at the address in this notice by September 10, 2021. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Thomas J. Pluckhahn, Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, 4202 E Fowler Avenue, SOC 107, Tampa, FL 33620–8100, telephone (813) 549–9742, email tpluckhahn@ usf.edu. SUMMARY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL. The human remains were removed from various sites in Florida. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: E:\FR\FM\11AUN1.SGM 11AUN1 44048 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 152 / Wednesday, August 11, 2021 / Notices U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Seminole Tribe of Florida [previously listed as Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood, & Tampa Reservations)] and The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma. The Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas [previously listed as AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas]; AlabamaQuassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians; Kialegee Tribal Town; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians; Poarch Band of Creek Indians [previously known as the Poarch Band of Creeks, and as the Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; and the Thlopthlocco Tribal Town were invited to consult but did not participate. Hereafter, all Indian Tribes listed in this section are referred to as ‘‘The Consulted and Invited Tribes.’’ History and Description of the Remains In 1988 and 1999, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals were removed from the Corbin-Tucker site (8CA142) in Calhoun County, FL, by USF faculty member Dr. Nancy White. The site is associated with the Fort-Walton material culture complex (ca. A.D. 1440–1640). Radiocarbon dates on samples of the human remains indicate a date in the 1600s, perhaps associated with the early mission period in Florida. The human remains belong to one adult female and five individuals of undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The 2,550 associated funerary objects are one shell cup, 2,346 ceramic sherds, one lot of charcoal (277.6 g), 82 faunal remains, 49 floral remains, 25 flaked stone, and 46 soil samples. (A greenstone celt and two copper ornaments found in association with the burials and reported in publications were released to the private landowner.) In 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the McKinney Midden site (also referred to as the Land O’Lakes VerDate Sep<11>2014 23:05 Aug 10, 2021 Jkt 253001 site) (8CI127) in Citrus County, FL. The human remains were collected by an amateur archeologist and subsequently donated to the University of South Florida. McKinney Midden is a midden and possible mound site located along the shore of the Homosassa River. The Florida Master Site File lists the occupation of the site as ‘‘unspecified prehistoric,’’ but a brief report by the avocational archeologist who excavated the human remains suggests occupations dating from Late Archaic to Mississippian (ca. 1000 B.C. to A.D. 1500). The human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1980, human remains representing, at minimum, 28 individuals were excavated from the Gibsonton site (8HI26), in Hillsborough County, FL, by former USF faculty member Dr. Stephen Gluckman. The Gibsonton site is a prehistoric village and cemetery located along the south side of the Alafia River. Dr. Gluckman conducted salvage excavations on a portion of the site after removal of palm trees by county road workers led to the inadvertent discovery of human remains. The excavations were later summarized in an article for The Florida Anthropologist by Jeffrey Mitchem, who participated in the excavations as a graduate student. The Florida Master Site File lists components from ranging from Woodland (Manasota and Weeden Island I, 700 B.C. to A.D. 700) to Mississippian (Safety Harbor, A.D. 1000 to 1500) for the Gibsonton site. However, the excavation report indicates that the ceramic assemblage is most consistent with a late Weeden Island association (ca. A.D. 600 to 1000). The highly fragmentary human remains belong to nine adults (based on repetition of left ulnae) and 19 juveniles of multiple ages. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1974, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed from the Barley Barbor II site (8MT28), a small burial mound in Martin County, FL, by former USF faculty member Dr. Ray Williams. The excavations were conducted under a grant from the Florida Division of Archives, History, and Management in anticipation of the destruction of the mound by the construction of a Florida Power and Light reservoir and plant. The Florida Master Site File lists components on the site ranging from Woodland (Glades II, A.D. 750–1200) to Mississippian (Glades III, A.D. 1000– 1700); however, Williams reported the PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 main period of use of the mound as Glades I Early, based on the ceramic assemblage and a radiocarbon date of 2110 ± 50 BP (UM–370). The human remains belong to six adults of undetermined sex and one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The 63 associated funerary objects are one flaked stone; three shells; 20 unmodified rocks; one lot of charred botanicals (6.62 g); 31 faunal remains; four concretions; one lot of miscellaneous metals (25.97 g); one metal bolt; and one fulgurite. At unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals, were removed from the Weeden Island site (8PI1), in Pinellas County, FL. How these human remains were acquired is unknown. Some of them may have been obtained by donation from the St. Petersburg Museum of History. Tags included with some of the human remains suggest they were collected many years ago. Weeden Island, the type site for a ceramic type and phase of the same name, consists of a large shell midden and cemetery. The site was first described in print by S.T. Walker in 1880. Major excavations were led by Jesse Walter Fewkes for the Smithsonian Institution in 1923–1924. The Florida Master Site File lists components ranging from Late Archaic (Orange), Woodland (Manasota, Swift Creek, Weeden Island, 1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000), Mississippian (Safety Harbor, A.D. 1000–1500), to American (19th and 20th centuries). However, the most intensive pre-colonial settlement appears to have come in the Weeden Island and Safety Harbor periods, from around A.D. 100 to 1550. The human remains belong to eight individuals of undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were excavated from the Bay Pines site (8PI64), in Pinellas County, FL, by members of the Suncoast Archaeological Society, a chapter of the Florida Anthropological Society. Bay Pines was a prehistoric midden and cemetery first recorded by S.T. Walker in the late nineteenth century. The site was largely destroyed for a Veterans Administration hospital complex and other developments. The excavations by the Suncoast Archaeological Society were conducted in anticipation of the destruction of a portion of the site for the construction of a nursing home and were briefly reported by John Gallagher and Lyman Warren in The Florida Anthropologist (1975). The Florida Master Site File site form lists E:\FR\FM\11AUN1.SGM 11AUN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 152 / Wednesday, August 11, 2021 / Notices components dating from the Late Archaic (3000 to 1000 B.C.) to the Woodland (1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000) periods. The published report indicates an occupation dating mainly to the latter period, specifically the Perico Island, Deptford, and early Weeden Island phases. The human remains belong to four individuals of undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The 4,106 associated funerary objects are 110 ceramic sherds, two pieces of charcoal, 3,986 faunal remains, three flaked stones, one fossilized faunal, three shell columella, and one metal pop top. Sometime between 1952 and 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site 8HI50, located on MacDill Airforce Base, in Hillsborough County, FL. The human remains appear to have been removed by former USF faculty member Dr. Simon Messing. The Florida Master Site File lists the culture types represented on the site as Manasota and Weeden Island I and II, generalizable to the Woodland period (1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000). The human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At various dates, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed from the Cockroach Key/Indian Hill (8HI2) site, a mound complex on an anthropogenic island located along the eastern shore of Tampa Bay, in Hillsborough County, FL. The site was noted by S. T. Walker in the late 1800s. Excavations were later conducted by C.B. Moore. In the 1930s, Works Progress Administration (WPA) crews excavated much of the burial mound on the site, as later reported by Gordon Willey and Ripley Bullen. Some of the human remains appear to have been collected by Karlis Kaklins in 1964, while a tag identifies others as being excavated by pothunters in 1985. The Florida Master Site File lists the components on site 8HI2 as Woodland (Glades I, 1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000) and Mississippian (Glades II and III, A.D. 750 to 1700). The human remains belong to five individuals of undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The 23 associated funerary objects are four shells and 19 ceramics identified as coming from a provenience described as ‘‘Cockroach Key Burial Mound Material Karklins 10–31–64.’’ At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Little Cockroach Key site (8HI38), a shell midden and burial mound on an island VerDate Sep<11>2014 23:05 Aug 10, 2021 Jkt 253001 of the same name located on the eastern margin of Tampa Bay in Hillsborough County, FL. According to documents on file at the Florida Master Site File, archeologist John Goggin recorded the site in 1952, based on information provided by William Plowden. These human remains were acquired in 1977, but how or from whom they were acquired is unknown. The Florida Master Site File lists the site as dating to the Safety Harbor period (A.D. 1000– 1500). The human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known individual was identified. The three associated funerary objects are ceramic sherds. In 1980, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Briarwood Site, in Pasco County, FL. The human remains were excavated under the direction of Dr. Stephen Gluckman in advance of the construction of a housing development. The Briarwood site is dated primarily to the Safety Harbor period, ca. A.D. 1000 to 1550. A brief report by Jeffrey Mitchem, published in a 1985 issue of Florida Scientist, indicates that the remains of approximately 82 individuals were removed, and that most of them were sent to Florida Atlantic University for analysis. Mitchem also reported that most of excavated artifacts were sent to the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, FL. The human remains at the University of South Florida, which consist of very small fragments of bone that were recovered from flotation samples identified as coming from burial contexts, belong to one individual of unidentified age and sex. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is one lot of small charcoal fragments. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Buck Island site (8HI6), on the University of South Florida Forest Preserve in Hillsborough County, FL. Published sources, along with documents on file at the Florida Master Site File, indicate that Buck Island was occupied repeatedly from the Paleoindian through early Spanish periods, but the main use of the site seems to have fallen in the Weeden Island (A.D. 100 to 1000) and Safety Harbor (A.D. 1000–1500) periods. Major excavations were conducted at Buck Island by WPA crews in the 1930s, when the land was part of the estate of Percy Rockefeller. The excavations, which were later described by Gordon Willey and Ripley Bullen, removed at least 28 burials. As the human remains at the University of South Florida are identified by a label reading ‘‘Site 1 PO 00000 Frm 00062 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 44049 [May 19 1970 Buck Island’’ and another reading ‘‘G. Smith Buck Island 8-Hi-6,’’ presumably, they were a donation from G. Smith. The human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sometime around 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from ‘‘Unknown Florida Site #1’’ located in Cockroach Bay Hillsborough County, FL. The human remains were donated to USF by the City of Tampa, Department of Public Works in 1984. Based on skeletal taphonomy, these human remains are determined to be Native American. The human remains belong to two individuals of undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from ‘‘Unknown Florida Site #2’’ but believed to be Safety Harbor, in Pinellas County, FL. The human remains, which appear to have been acquired by donation from the St. Petersburg Museum of History, are accompanied by a tag reading ‘‘Indian skull. Safety Harbor, Pinellas County, Florida.’’ They might be associated with the Safety Harbor site (8PI2), located on the western shore of Tampa Bay. If so, the human remains probably date to the Safety Harbor period, ca. A.D. 1000 to 1550. The human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known individual was identified. The 13 associated funerary objects are eight pottery fragments, one lightning whelk shell, one fossilized faunal bone, two flaked stones, and one possible groundstone. Sometime in 1943 or earlier, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from ‘‘Unknown Florida Site #3’’ believed to be in Pinellas County, FL. The remains were acquired from the St. Petersburg Historical Museum at an unknown date. They can be broadly traced to Pinellas County based on their identification as ‘‘Piece of Human Bone From Maximo Point 1943 Gift of Louis Poole.’’ Maximo Point is a toponym that may refer to one of several archeological sites on the southern tip of the Pinellas County peninsula. The human remains belong to one adult of undetermined sex and one juvenile of undetermined sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from E:\FR\FM\11AUN1.SGM 11AUN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 44050 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 152 / Wednesday, August 11, 2021 / Notices ‘‘Unknown Florida Site #4’’ believed to be in Pinellas County, FL. The remains were obtained by donation from an unknown individual around 2011. Based on their identification as coming from the ‘‘Park Street Mound,’’ these human remains are likely associated with one of two mound sites along the western side of Park Street in St. Petersburg, Pinellas County—the Abercrombie Park complex (sites 8PI58 and 8PI10650) or the Jungle Prada site complex (site 8PI54). Components on these sites range from Late Archaic to Woodland to Safety Harbor (from 3000 B.C. to A.D. 1500), according the Florida Master Site File. The human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from ‘‘Unknown Florida Site #5’’ believed to be in Pinellas County, FL. These human remains can be reasonably traced to Pinellas County based on their identification as coming from ‘‘Burial Mound near Seminole Bridge (US Rte #6), St. Petersburg, Florida.’’ ‘‘Seminole Bridge’’ was the original link to Clearwater Beach from the Pinellas County mainland; it was completed in 1917 and replaced by a causeway in 1926. Although there are several known sites in the vicinity, none match the description of a burial mound. The human remains belong to three adults of undetermined sex and one juvenile of undetermined sex. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are one fragment of groundstone and one faunal remain. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from ‘‘Unknown Florida Site #6’’ believed to be in Pinellas County, FL. These human remains can be broadly associated with Pinellas County because of their identification as part of the Walter Fuller collection. H. Walter Fuller and his son Walter P. Fuller were prominent developers in St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, in the early and middle twentieth century. The USF Library curates the papers associated with Walter P. Fuller, and the human remains in our collection were acquired by transfer from the library in 2000. The human remains belong to one adult of indeterminate sex and one juvenile of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, five VerDate Sep<11>2014 23:05 Aug 10, 2021 Jkt 253001 individuals were removed from ‘‘Unknown Florida Site #7’’ believed to be in Pinellas County, FL. These human remains can be broadly associated with Pinellas County based on a box label reading ‘‘Snell Island.’’ Snell Island is a toponym in Pinellas County. (An addendum to our previous NAGPRA inventory indicates these human remains were acquired in 1978, but we have no documentation to substantiate this or to indicate the circumstances under which they were acquired.) The human remains belong to five individuals of undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from ‘‘Unknown Florida Site #8’’ believed to be in Pinellas County, FL. USF might have acquired them from the St. Petersburg Museum of History. These human remains can be broadly associated with Pinellas County based accompanying documentation that identifies them as part of a ‘‘mounted museum exhibit’’ and a museum label that describes them as ‘‘remains of an Indian who lived in this section many years ago . . . Capt. Barnett Harris, Florida Anthropological Society.’’ The human remains likely were exhibited at a now defunct museum—the SeaOrama—that Harris operated in Clearwater, Pinellas County, from around 1952 to 1968. The human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 15 individuals were removed from ‘‘Unknown Florida Site #9’’ believed to be in Citrus County, FL. These human remains can be broadly associated to Citrus County based on an accompanying tag reading ‘‘Ozella, FLA.’’ Ozello is an unincorporated community in Citrus County. These human remains appear to have been acquired as part of a larger donation from the former Hillsborough County Museum between 1967 (when the museum took this name) and 1980 (when it became the Museum of Science and Industry, or MOSI). The human remains belong to 12 adults of undetermined sex and three juveniles of undetermined sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from ‘‘Unknown Florida Site #10’’ believed to PO 00000 Frm 00063 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 be in Lee County, FL. The human remains were part of a larger acquisition from the former Hillsborough County Museum (now MOSI), probably between 1967 and 1980. These human remains can be reasonably traced to Lee County, in southwestern Florida, based on an accompanying tag that reads ‘‘Pine Island near Boca Grande.’’ Pine Island and Boca Grande are islands near Cape Coral, Lee County. The human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Determinations Made by the Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida Officials of the Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 97 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 6,761 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Seminole Tribe of Florida [previously listed as Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood, & Tampa Reservations)] and The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Thomas J. Pluckhahn, Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, 4202 E Fowler Avenue, SOC 107, Tampa, FL 33620–8100, telephone (813) 549–9742, email tpluckhahn@ usf.edu, by September 10, 2021. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to The Tribes may proceed. The Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida is responsible for notifying The Tribes and The Invited Tribes that this notice has been published. E:\FR\FM\11AUN1.SGM 11AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 152 / Wednesday, August 11, 2021 / Notices Dated: July 28, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–17058 Filed 8–10–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0032396; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University has corrected a Notice of Intent to Repatriate published in the Federal Register on July 30, 2007. This notice corrects the number of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at the address in this notice by September 10, 2021. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patricia Capone, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 11 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138, telephone (617) 496–3702, email pcapone@ fas.harvard.edu. SUMMARY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Sep<11>2014 23:05 Aug 10, 2021 Jkt 253001 This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects the number of unassociated funerary objects published in a Notice of Intent to Repatriate in the Federal Register (72 FR 41522–41524, July 30, 2007). [The cultural affiliation determinations made in this Notice of Intent to Repatriate were subsequently corrected in the Federal Register (73 FR 58619–58620, October 7, 2008, and 77 FR 46114, August 2, 2012)]. Further consultation and inventory review with the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; and the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin, yielded additional evidence of cultural affiliation for several unassociated funerary objects. A detailed re-inventory of cultural items from New Jersey held by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology revealed additional unassociated funerary objects, produced more specific site information for some unassociated funerary objects, and showed that two previously reported cultural items did not meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Transfer of control of the items in this correction notice has not occurred. Correction In the Federal Register (72 FR 41523, July 30, 2007), column 1, paragraph 2 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: The 63 cultural items are stone effigy pendants, glass and shell beads, ceramic sherds, projectile points, bone fragments, metal bells, one worked stone, one ceramic pipe, and one pipe stem fragment. 44051 corrected by substituting the following paragraph: In 1909, 22 cultural items were recovered from the A.K. Rowan Farm site and ‘‘burial place near old house’’ in Trenton, Mercer County, NJ, by Ernest Volk and R.E. Merwin during a Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology expedition led by Mr. Volk and Mr. Merwin. The 22 unassociated funerary objects are six projectile points, one stone scraper, one set of glass beads, five lots of ceramic sherds, two worked bone fragments, three metal bells, one worked stone, one stone effigy pendant depicting a face, one kaolin pipe stem fragment, and one ground stone pendant. In the Federal Register (72 FR 41523, July 30, 2007), column 2, paragraph 6, sentence 1 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: In 1911, 10 cultural items were recovered from an ‘‘Indian Burying Ground’’ south of the Riverview Cemetery, on the south shore of the Delaware River, in Trenton, Mercer County, NJ, by Frank Wachter. In the Federal Register (72 FR 41523, July 30, 2007), column 2, paragraph 6, sentence 3 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: The 10 unassociated funerary objects are one set of glass beads, one kaolin pipe, five shell bird effigy ornaments, one shell bead, one worked wood fragment, and one lot of metal bracelet fragments. In the Federal Register (72 FR 41523, July 30, 2007), column 3, paragraph 1 is corrected by deleting the following paragraph: Between 1888 and 1917, three cultural items were recovered from the Lalor Field site in Trenton, Mercer County, NJ, by C.C. Abbott and Ernest Volk. They were donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology by Mr. Abbott at an unknown date and accessioned into the Museum’s collection in 1952. The three unassociated funerary objects are three lots of ceramic sherds. In the Federal Register (72 FR 41523, July 30, 2007), column 3, paragraph 3 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: In the Federal Register (72 FR 41523, July 30, 2007), column 2, paragraph 2 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: The cultural item most likely dates to the Middle or Late Woodland Periods (A.D. 0– 1500), as suggested by the decoration and/or fabric of the sherds. In 1895, four cultural items were recovered from the Lalor Field site in Trenton, Mercer County, NJ, by Ernest Volk during a Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology expedition led by Mr. Volk. Three of the cultural items were accessioned into the Museum’s collection in 1895 but one of the cultural items was not accessioned into the Museum’s collection until 1952, as a gift of C.C. Abbott. The four unassociated funerary objects are three lots of ceramic sherds and one ceramic pot base. In the Federal Register (72 FR 41523, July 30, 2007), column 3, paragraph 3, the following paragraphs are added to the end of paragraph 3: In the Federal Register (72 FR 41523, July 30, 2007), column 2, paragraph 4 is PO 00000 Frm 00064 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In 1872, six cultural items were recovered from graves in Trenton, Mercer County, NJ, by C.C. Abbott and F.W. Putnam. They were donated to the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology by the Peabody Museum Salem (now the Peabody Essex Museum) through Ernest Dodge in 1952. The unassociated funerary objects are one ceramic pipe stem, one ceramic pipe bowl fragment, two mortars, and two pestles. E:\FR\FM\11AUN1.SGM 11AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 152 (Wednesday, August 11, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 44047-44051]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-17058]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0032392; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology, 
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida 
(USF) has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with 
the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has 
determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. 
Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request to the Department of Anthropology, University of South 
Florida. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control 
of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or 
Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to the 
Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida at the address 
in this notice by September 10, 2021.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Thomas J. Pluckhahn, Department of 
Anthropology, University of South Florida, 4202 E Fowler Avenue, SOC 
107, Tampa, FL 33620-8100, telephone (813) 549-9742, email 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the Department of Anthropology, University of South 
Florida, Tampa, FL. The human remains were removed from various sites 
in Florida.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25

[[Page 44048]]

U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service 
is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida professional 
staff in consultation with representatives of the Seminole Tribe of 
Florida [previously listed as Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big 
Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood, & Tampa Reservations)] and The Seminole 
Nation of Oklahoma.
    The Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas [previously listed as Alabama-
Coushatta Tribes of Texas]; Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta 
Tribe of Louisiana; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians; Kialegee Tribal Town; 
Miccosukee Tribe of Indians; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians; 
Poarch Band of Creek Indians [previously known as the Poarch Band of 
Creeks, and as the Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); The 
Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; and the 
Thlopthlocco Tribal Town were invited to consult but did not 
participate.
    Hereafter, all Indian Tribes listed in this section are referred to 
as ``The Consulted and Invited Tribes.''

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1988 and 1999, human remains representing, at minimum, six 
individuals were removed from the Corbin-Tucker site (8CA142) in 
Calhoun County, FL, by USF faculty member Dr. Nancy White. The site is 
associated with the Fort-Walton material culture complex (ca. A.D. 
1440-1640). Radiocarbon dates on samples of the human remains indicate 
a date in the 1600s, perhaps associated with the early mission period 
in Florida. The human remains belong to one adult female and five 
individuals of undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were 
identified. The 2,550 associated funerary objects are one shell cup, 
2,346 ceramic sherds, one lot of charcoal (277.6 g), 82 faunal remains, 
49 floral remains, 25 flaked stone, and 46 soil samples. (A greenstone 
celt and two copper ornaments found in association with the burials and 
reported in publications were released to the private landowner.)
    In 1975, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from the McKinney Midden site (also referred to as the 
Land O'Lakes site) (8CI127) in Citrus County, FL. The human remains 
were collected by an amateur archeologist and subsequently donated to 
the University of South Florida. McKinney Midden is a midden and 
possible mound site located along the shore of the Homosassa River. The 
Florida Master Site File lists the occupation of the site as 
``unspecified prehistoric,'' but a brief report by the avocational 
archeologist who excavated the human remains suggests occupations 
dating from Late Archaic to Mississippian (ca. 1000 B.C. to A.D. 1500). 
The human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. 
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1980, human remains representing, at minimum, 28 individuals 
were excavated from the Gibsonton site (8HI26), in Hillsborough County, 
FL, by former USF faculty member Dr. Stephen Gluckman. The Gibsonton 
site is a prehistoric village and cemetery located along the south side 
of the Alafia River. Dr. Gluckman conducted salvage excavations on a 
portion of the site after removal of palm trees by county road workers 
led to the inadvertent discovery of human remains. The excavations were 
later summarized in an article for The Florida Anthropologist by 
Jeffrey Mitchem, who participated in the excavations as a graduate 
student. The Florida Master Site File lists components from ranging 
from Woodland (Manasota and Weeden Island I, 700 B.C. to A.D. 700) to 
Mississippian (Safety Harbor, A.D. 1000 to 1500) for the Gibsonton 
site. However, the excavation report indicates that the ceramic 
assemblage is most consistent with a late Weeden Island association 
(ca. A.D. 600 to 1000). The highly fragmentary human remains belong to 
nine adults (based on repetition of left ulnae) and 19 juveniles of 
multiple ages. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1974, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals 
were removed from the Barley Barbor II site (8MT28), a small burial 
mound in Martin County, FL, by former USF faculty member Dr. Ray 
Williams. The excavations were conducted under a grant from the Florida 
Division of Archives, History, and Management in anticipation of the 
destruction of the mound by the construction of a Florida Power and 
Light reservoir and plant. The Florida Master Site File lists 
components on the site ranging from Woodland (Glades II, A.D. 750-1200) 
to Mississippian (Glades III, A.D. 1000-1700); however, Williams 
reported the main period of use of the mound as Glades I Early, based 
on the ceramic assemblage and a radiocarbon date of 2110  
50 BP (UM-370). The human remains belong to six adults of undetermined 
sex and one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known 
individuals were identified. The 63 associated funerary objects are one 
flaked stone; three shells; 20 unmodified rocks; one lot of charred 
botanicals (6.62 g); 31 faunal remains; four concretions; one lot of 
miscellaneous metals (25.97 g); one metal bolt; and one fulgurite.
    At unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, eight 
individuals, were removed from the Weeden Island site (8PI1), in 
Pinellas County, FL. How these human remains were acquired is unknown. 
Some of them may have been obtained by donation from the St. Petersburg 
Museum of History. Tags included with some of the human remains suggest 
they were collected many years ago. Weeden Island, the type site for a 
ceramic type and phase of the same name, consists of a large shell 
midden and cemetery. The site was first described in print by S.T. 
Walker in 1880. Major excavations were led by Jesse Walter Fewkes for 
the Smithsonian Institution in 1923-1924. The Florida Master Site File 
lists components ranging from Late Archaic (Orange), Woodland 
(Manasota, Swift Creek, Weeden Island, 1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000), 
Mississippian (Safety Harbor, A.D. 1000-1500), to American (19th and 
20th centuries). However, the most intensive pre-colonial settlement 
appears to have come in the Weeden Island and Safety Harbor periods, 
from around A.D. 100 to 1550. The human remains belong to eight 
individuals of undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals 
were excavated from the Bay Pines site (8PI64), in Pinellas County, FL, 
by members of the Suncoast Archaeological Society, a chapter of the 
Florida Anthropological Society. Bay Pines was a prehistoric midden and 
cemetery first recorded by S.T. Walker in the late nineteenth century. 
The site was largely destroyed for a Veterans Administration hospital 
complex and other developments. The excavations by the Suncoast 
Archaeological Society were conducted in anticipation of the 
destruction of a portion of the site for the construction of a nursing 
home and were briefly reported by John Gallagher and Lyman Warren in 
The Florida Anthropologist (1975). The Florida Master Site File site 
form lists

[[Page 44049]]

components dating from the Late Archaic (3000 to 1000 B.C.) to the 
Woodland (1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000) periods. The published report 
indicates an occupation dating mainly to the latter period, 
specifically the Perico Island, Deptford, and early Weeden Island 
phases. The human remains belong to four individuals of undetermined 
age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The 4,106 associated 
funerary objects are 110 ceramic sherds, two pieces of charcoal, 3,986 
faunal remains, three flaked stones, one fossilized faunal, three shell 
columella, and one metal pop top.
    Sometime between 1952 and 1965, human remains representing, at 
minimum, one individual were removed from site 8HI50, located on 
MacDill Airforce Base, in Hillsborough County, FL. The human remains 
appear to have been removed by former USF faculty member Dr. Simon 
Messing. The Florida Master Site File lists the culture types 
represented on the site as Manasota and Weeden Island I and II, 
generalizable to the Woodland period (1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000). The 
human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    At various dates, human remains representing, at minimum, five 
individuals were removed from the Cockroach Key/Indian Hill (8HI2) 
site, a mound complex on an anthropogenic island located along the 
eastern shore of Tampa Bay, in Hillsborough County, FL. The site was 
noted by S. T. Walker in the late 1800s. Excavations were later 
conducted by C.B. Moore. In the 1930s, Works Progress Administration 
(WPA) crews excavated much of the burial mound on the site, as later 
reported by Gordon Willey and Ripley Bullen. Some of the human remains 
appear to have been collected by Karlis Kaklins in 1964, while a tag 
identifies others as being excavated by pothunters in 1985. The Florida 
Master Site File lists the components on site 8HI2 as Woodland (Glades 
I, 1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000) and Mississippian (Glades II and III, A.D. 
750 to 1700). The human remains belong to five individuals of 
undetermined age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The 23 
associated funerary objects are four shells and 19 ceramics identified 
as coming from a provenience described as ``Cockroach Key Burial Mound 
Material Karklins 10-31-64.''
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from the Little Cockroach Key site (8HI38), a 
shell midden and burial mound on an island of the same name located on 
the eastern margin of Tampa Bay in Hillsborough County, FL. According 
to documents on file at the Florida Master Site File, archeologist John 
Goggin recorded the site in 1952, based on information provided by 
William Plowden. These human remains were acquired in 1977, but how or 
from whom they were acquired is unknown. The Florida Master Site File 
lists the site as dating to the Safety Harbor period (A.D. 1000-1500). 
The human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. 
No known individual was identified. The three associated funerary 
objects are ceramic sherds.
    In 1980, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from the Briarwood Site, in Pasco County, FL. The human 
remains were excavated under the direction of Dr. Stephen Gluckman in 
advance of the construction of a housing development. The Briarwood 
site is dated primarily to the Safety Harbor period, ca. A.D. 1000 to 
1550. A brief report by Jeffrey Mitchem, published in a 1985 issue of 
Florida Scientist, indicates that the remains of approximately 82 
individuals were removed, and that most of them were sent to Florida 
Atlantic University for analysis. Mitchem also reported that most of 
excavated artifacts were sent to the Florida Museum of Natural History 
in Gainesville, FL. The human remains at the University of South 
Florida, which consist of very small fragments of bone that were 
recovered from flotation samples identified as coming from burial 
contexts, belong to one individual of unidentified age and sex. No 
known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is 
one lot of small charcoal fragments.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from the Buck Island site (8HI6), on the 
University of South Florida Forest Preserve in Hillsborough County, FL. 
Published sources, along with documents on file at the Florida Master 
Site File, indicate that Buck Island was occupied repeatedly from the 
Paleoindian through early Spanish periods, but the main use of the site 
seems to have fallen in the Weeden Island (A.D. 100 to 1000) and Safety 
Harbor (A.D. 1000-1500) periods. Major excavations were conducted at 
Buck Island by WPA crews in the 1930s, when the land was part of the 
estate of Percy Rockefeller. The excavations, which were later 
described by Gordon Willey and Ripley Bullen, removed at least 28 
burials. As the human remains at the University of South Florida are 
identified by a label reading ``Site 1 [May 19 1970 Buck Island'' and 
another reading ``G. Smith Buck Island 8-Hi-6,'' presumably, they were 
a donation from G. Smith. The human remains belong to one individual of 
undetermined age and sex. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Sometime around 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from ``Unknown Florida Site #1'' located in 
Cockroach Bay Hillsborough County, FL. The human remains were donated 
to USF by the City of Tampa, Department of Public Works in 1984. Based 
on skeletal taphonomy, these human remains are determined to be Native 
American. The human remains belong to two individuals of undetermined 
age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from ``Unknown Florida Site #2'' but believed 
to be Safety Harbor, in Pinellas County, FL. The human remains, which 
appear to have been acquired by donation from the St. Petersburg Museum 
of History, are accompanied by a tag reading ``Indian skull. Safety 
Harbor, Pinellas County, Florida.'' They might be associated with the 
Safety Harbor site (8PI2), located on the western shore of Tampa Bay. 
If so, the human remains probably date to the Safety Harbor period, ca. 
A.D. 1000 to 1550. The human remains belong to one individual of 
undetermined age and sex. No known individual was identified. The 13 
associated funerary objects are eight pottery fragments, one lightning 
whelk shell, one fossilized faunal bone, two flaked stones, and one 
possible groundstone.
    Sometime in 1943 or earlier, human remains representing, at 
minimum, two individuals were removed from ``Unknown Florida Site #3'' 
believed to be in Pinellas County, FL. The remains were acquired from 
the St. Petersburg Historical Museum at an unknown date. They can be 
broadly traced to Pinellas County based on their identification as 
``Piece of Human Bone From Maximo Point 1943 Gift of Louis Poole.'' 
Maximo Point is a toponym that may refer to one of several 
archeological sites on the southern tip of the Pinellas County 
peninsula. The human remains belong to one adult of undetermined sex 
and one juvenile of undetermined sex. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from

[[Page 44050]]

``Unknown Florida Site #4'' believed to be in Pinellas County, FL. The 
remains were obtained by donation from an unknown individual around 
2011. Based on their identification as coming from the ``Park Street 
Mound,'' these human remains are likely associated with one of two 
mound sites along the western side of Park Street in St. Petersburg, 
Pinellas County--the Abercrombie Park complex (sites 8PI58 and 
8PI10650) or the Jungle Prada site complex (site 8PI54). Components on 
these sites range from Late Archaic to Woodland to Safety Harbor (from 
3000 B.C. to A.D. 1500), according the Florida Master Site File. The 
human remains belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, four 
individuals were removed from ``Unknown Florida Site #5'' believed to 
be in Pinellas County, FL. These human remains can be reasonably traced 
to Pinellas County based on their identification as coming from 
``Burial Mound near Seminole Bridge (US Rte #6), St. Petersburg, 
Florida.'' ``Seminole Bridge'' was the original link to Clearwater 
Beach from the Pinellas County mainland; it was completed in 1917 and 
replaced by a causeway in 1926. Although there are several known sites 
in the vicinity, none match the description of a burial mound. The 
human remains belong to three adults of undetermined sex and one 
juvenile of undetermined sex. No known individuals were identified. The 
two associated funerary objects are one fragment of groundstone and one 
faunal remain.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from ``Unknown Florida Site #6'' believed to 
be in Pinellas County, FL. These human remains can be broadly 
associated with Pinellas County because of their identification as part 
of the Walter Fuller collection. H. Walter Fuller and his son Walter P. 
Fuller were prominent developers in St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, in 
the early and middle twentieth century. The USF Library curates the 
papers associated with Walter P. Fuller, and the human remains in our 
collection were acquired by transfer from the library in 2000. The 
human remains belong to one adult of indeterminate sex and one juvenile 
of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, five 
individuals were removed from ``Unknown Florida Site #7'' believed to 
be in Pinellas County, FL. These human remains can be broadly 
associated with Pinellas County based on a box label reading ``Snell 
Island.'' Snell Island is a toponym in Pinellas County. (An addendum to 
our previous NAGPRA inventory indicates these human remains were 
acquired in 1978, but we have no documentation to substantiate this or 
to indicate the circumstances under which they were acquired.) The 
human remains belong to five individuals of undetermined age and sex. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from ``Unknown Florida Site #8'' believed to be 
in Pinellas County, FL. USF might have acquired them from the St. 
Petersburg Museum of History. These human remains can be broadly 
associated with Pinellas County based accompanying documentation that 
identifies them as part of a ``mounted museum exhibit'' and a museum 
label that describes them as ``remains of an Indian who lived in this 
section many years ago . . . Capt. Barnett Harris, Florida 
Anthropological Society.'' The human remains likely were exhibited at a 
now defunct museum--the Sea-Orama--that Harris operated in Clearwater, 
Pinellas County, from around 1952 to 1968. The human remains belong to 
one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 15 
individuals were removed from ``Unknown Florida Site #9'' believed to 
be in Citrus County, FL. These human remains can be broadly associated 
to Citrus County based on an accompanying tag reading ``Ozella, FLA.'' 
Ozello is an unincorporated community in Citrus County. These human 
remains appear to have been acquired as part of a larger donation from 
the former Hillsborough County Museum between 1967 (when the museum 
took this name) and 1980 (when it became the Museum of Science and 
Industry, or MOSI). The human remains belong to 12 adults of 
undetermined sex and three juveniles of undetermined sex. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from ``Unknown Florida Site #10'' believed to 
be in Lee County, FL. The human remains were part of a larger 
acquisition from the former Hillsborough County Museum (now MOSI), 
probably between 1967 and 1980. These human remains can be reasonably 
traced to Lee County, in southwestern Florida, based on an accompanying 
tag that reads ``Pine Island near Boca Grande.'' Pine Island and Boca 
Grande are islands near Cape Coral, Lee County. The human remains 
belong to one individual of undetermined age and sex. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.

Determinations Made by the Department of Anthropology, University of 
South Florida

    Officials of the Department of Anthropology, University of South 
Florida have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 97 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 6,761 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the Seminole Tribe of Florida [previously 
listed as Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, 
Hollywood, & Tampa Reservations)] and The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma 
(hereafter referred to as ``The Tribes'').

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Thomas J. 
Pluckhahn, Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida, 
4202 E Fowler Avenue, SOC 107, Tampa, FL 33620-8100, telephone (813) 
549-9742, email [email protected], by September 10, 2021. After that 
date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains to The Tribes may proceed.
    The Department of Anthropology, University of South Florida is 
responsible for notifying The Tribes and The Invited Tribes that this 
notice has been published.


[[Page 44051]]


    Dated: July 28, 2021.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2021-17058 Filed 8-10-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P