Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO, 38760-38761 [2021-15570]

Download as PDF lotter on DSK11XQN23PROD with NOTICES1 38760 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 138 / Thursday, July 22, 2021 / Notices known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sometime prior to 1839, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual [catalog number 97–606–418] were found near the bank of the Delaware River in New Jersey, about four miles above Burlington. According to historical, published information, the decedent had been buried in a seated position together with other individuals and associated objects. By 1839, Dr. Edward Swain (d. 1839) had transferred the human remains to Dr. Morton, who accessioned them into his collection. The human remains belong to a female about 50 years of age. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sometime prior to 1852, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals [catalog numbers 97–606– 205 and 97–606–206] were removed from an unidentified street in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA, by Dr. George P. Olivier [b. 1824–d. 1884]. The human remains were transferred to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia (today the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University) on November 9, 1852, where they were added to Dr. Samuel G. Morton’s collection. The human remains belong to female between 25 and 35 years of age and female about 50 years of age. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1853, Dr. Morton’s collection, including the human remains of the seven above listed individuals, was purchased from his estate and formally presented to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. Sometime prior to 1857, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals [catalog numbers 97– 606–115, 97–606–118, and 97–606– 1265] were removed from unknown locations by unidentified individuals. The human remains belong to a female individual between 25 and 30 years of age, a female individual about 50 years of age, and a female individual between 40 and 50 years of age. By 1857, the human remains had been transferred to the Academy of Natural Sciences and added to the Morton collection. In 1966, the Morton collection, including the human remains of all ten above listed individuals, was loaned to the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. In 1997, it was formally gifted to the University of Pennsylvania. The human remains have been identified as Native American based on specific cultural and geographic attributions contained in the museum’s VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:10 Jul 21, 2021 Jkt 253001 records. Collector records, museum documentation, and published sources (Morton 1839, 1840, 1844, 1849; Meigs 1857) all identify the human remains as Lenape or Delaware. The Lenape (Delaware) are represented by The Tribes. Determinations Made by the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Officials of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 10 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Christopher Woods, Williams Director, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 3260 South Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104–6324, telephone (215) 898–4050, email director@pennmuseum.org, by August 23, 2021. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to The Tribes may proceed. The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: July 14, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–15564 Filed 7–21–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACTION: Notice. The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology at the address in this notice by August 23, 2021. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anne Amati, University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, 2000 E Asbury Avenue, Sturm Hall 146, Denver, CO 80208, telephone (303) 871– 2687, email anne.amati@du.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUMMARY: National Park Service History and Description of the Cultural Items [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0032326; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] At an unknown date, one cultural item was removed from an unknown site in Arizona. At an unknown date, the item came into the possession of the Fred Harvey Company, a Native American art collector and dealer headquartered in Santa Fe, NM. At an Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: PO 00000 National Park Service, Interior. Frm 00086 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\22JYN1.SGM 22JYN1 lotter on DSK11XQN23PROD with NOTICES1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 138 / Thursday, July 22, 2021 / Notices unknown date, the item was transferred to Kohlberg’s Antique Store in Denver, Colorado, where, at an unknown date, the item was purchased by Fallis F. Rees. In 1967, Mr. Rees donated the item to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. The one unassociated funerary object is a cremation bowl cap (DU# 3886) identified as belonging to the Gila Plain pottery style. Gila Plain pottery was produced between A.D. 200 to 1450, which encompasses the Hohokam sequence. Museum records indicate the object was from a cremation. At an unknown date, one cultural item was removed from an unknown site near Gila Bend in Maricopa County, AZ. At an unknown date, the item came into the possession of Fallis Reese who, in 1967, donated the item to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. The one unassociated funerary object is an effigy paint mortar (DU# 3990) identified as belonging to the Santa Cruz style. Santa Cruz pottery was produced between A.D. 800–900, which encompasses the Hohokam sequence. Museum records indicate the object was removed from a cremation. At an unknown date, one cultural item was removed from ‘‘Middle Verde’’ in Arizona. Based on archival research, museum, staff believes that ‘‘Middle Verde’’ could refer to the Verde River, which runs through Yavapai and Maricopa Counties. The river is divided into three designated areas—the upper, middle, and lower. At an unknown date, the item came into the possession of Omar Turney, a Phoenix archeologist and engineer who studied prehistoric irrigation canals in the Salt River Valley and in 1901, wrote the report ‘‘Water Supply and Irrigation on the Verde River and Tributaries.’’ At an unknown date, Turney transferred the item to Fallis Reese who, in 1967, donated the item to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. The one unassociated funerary object is a blade (DU# 3910). During recent excavations at sites along the Middle Gila Valley, a similar blade form has been found placed over the face in Hohokam burials. At an unknown date, one cultural item was removed from Snaketown in Pinal County, AZ. At an unknown date, the item came into the possession of Fallis Reese who, in 1967, donated the item to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. The one unassociated funerary object is a shell bracelet fragment (DU# misc. coll. 18– RE49–3). The item is burnt, signifying it is from a cremation context. Shell bracelets are consistent with the Hohokam cultural group. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:10 Jul 21, 2021 Jkt 253001 At an unknown date, one cultural item was removed from Pinal County, AZ, by E.B. Renaud, during an archeological expedition sponsored by the University of Denver. The one unassociated funerary object is a lot of ceramic sherds (DU# AZ37). The sherds are consistent with the material type and manufacture techniques of the Hohokam cultural group. At unknown dates, two cultural items were removed from unknown sites either near the Gila River or in the Gila Valley, in southwestern Arizona. At unknown dates, the items came into the possession of Fallis Reese who, in 1967, donated them to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. The two unassociated funerary objects are two shells (DU# 3931c&d). The items are burnt, signifying they are from a cremation context. Shells are consistent with the Hohokam cultural group. At unknown dates, two cultural items were removed from unknown sites. On March 26, 1972, the items were included in a box of objects anonymously left at the door of the University of Denver Anthropology Laboratory. The objects were later accessioned into the University of Denver Museum collection. The two unassociated funerary objects are shell bracelets (DU# 5740a–b). Shell bracelets of this type have been found in Hohokam burials of infants, children, and adults. The Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona, and the Salt River PimaMaricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona, have requested the repatriation of the cultural items described above as follows: The Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona, has requested DU#s 3886, 3990, 3931c–d, misc. coll. 18–RE49–3, and misc. coll. AZ37; and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona, has requested DU#s 3910 and 5740a–b. Determinations Bade by the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology Officials of the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the nine cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. PO 00000 Frm 00087 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 38761 • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Reservation, Arizona and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Anne Amati, University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, 2000 E Asbury Avenue, Sturm Hall 146, Denver, CO 80208, telephone (303) 871– 2687, email anne.amati@du.edu, by August 23, 2021. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects The Tribes may proceed. The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: July 14, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–15570 Filed 7–21–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0032325; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of an object of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural item to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\22JYN1.SGM 22JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 138 (Thursday, July 22, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 38760-38761]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-15570]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0032326; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of 
Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, in 
consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this 
notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal 
descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these 
cultural items should submit a written request to the University of 
Denver Museum of Anthropology. If no additional claimants come forward, 
transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, 
Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
claim these cultural items should submit a written request with 
information in support of the claim to the University of Denver Museum 
of Anthropology at the address in this notice by August 23, 2021.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anne Amati, University of Denver 
Museum of Anthropology, 2000 E Asbury Avenue, Sturm Hall 146, Denver, 
CO 80208, telephone (303) 871-2687, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the 
control of the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO, 
that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 
U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    At an unknown date, one cultural item was removed from an unknown 
site in Arizona. At an unknown date, the item came into the possession 
of the Fred Harvey Company, a Native American art collector and dealer 
headquartered in Santa Fe, NM. At an

[[Page 38761]]

unknown date, the item was transferred to Kohlberg's Antique Store in 
Denver, Colorado, where, at an unknown date, the item was purchased by 
Fallis F. Rees. In 1967, Mr. Rees donated the item to the University of 
Denver Museum of Anthropology. The one unassociated funerary object is 
a cremation bowl cap (DU# 3886) identified as belonging to the Gila 
Plain pottery style. Gila Plain pottery was produced between A.D. 200 
to 1450, which encompasses the Hohokam sequence. Museum records 
indicate the object was from a cremation.
    At an unknown date, one cultural item was removed from an unknown 
site near Gila Bend in Maricopa County, AZ. At an unknown date, the 
item came into the possession of Fallis Reese who, in 1967, donated the 
item to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. The one 
unassociated funerary object is an effigy paint mortar (DU# 3990) 
identified as belonging to the Santa Cruz style. Santa Cruz pottery was 
produced between A.D. 800-900, which encompasses the Hohokam sequence. 
Museum records indicate the object was removed from a cremation.
    At an unknown date, one cultural item was removed from ``Middle 
Verde'' in Arizona. Based on archival research, museum, staff believes 
that ``Middle Verde'' could refer to the Verde River, which runs 
through Yavapai and Maricopa Counties. The river is divided into three 
designated areas--the upper, middle, and lower. At an unknown date, the 
item came into the possession of Omar Turney, a Phoenix archeologist 
and engineer who studied prehistoric irrigation canals in the Salt 
River Valley and in 1901, wrote the report ``Water Supply and 
Irrigation on the Verde River and Tributaries.'' At an unknown date, 
Turney transferred the item to Fallis Reese who, in 1967, donated the 
item to the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. The one 
unassociated funerary object is a blade (DU# 3910). During recent 
excavations at sites along the Middle Gila Valley, a similar blade form 
has been found placed over the face in Hohokam burials.
    At an unknown date, one cultural item was removed from Snaketown in 
Pinal County, AZ. At an unknown date, the item came into the possession 
of Fallis Reese who, in 1967, donated the item to the University of 
Denver Museum of Anthropology. The one unassociated funerary object is 
a shell bracelet fragment (DU# misc. coll. 18-RE49-3). The item is 
burnt, signifying it is from a cremation context. Shell bracelets are 
consistent with the Hohokam cultural group.
    At an unknown date, one cultural item was removed from Pinal 
County, AZ, by E.B. Renaud, during an archeological expedition 
sponsored by the University of Denver. The one unassociated funerary 
object is a lot of ceramic sherds (DU# AZ37). The sherds are consistent 
with the material type and manufacture techniques of the Hohokam 
cultural group.
    At unknown dates, two cultural items were removed from unknown 
sites either near the Gila River or in the Gila Valley, in southwestern 
Arizona. At unknown dates, the items came into the possession of Fallis 
Reese who, in 1967, donated them to the University of Denver Museum of 
Anthropology. The two unassociated funerary objects are two shells (DU# 
3931c&d). The items are burnt, signifying they are from a cremation 
context. Shells are consistent with the Hohokam cultural group.
    At unknown dates, two cultural items were removed from unknown 
sites. On March 26, 1972, the items were included in a box of objects 
anonymously left at the door of the University of Denver Anthropology 
Laboratory. The objects were later accessioned into the University of 
Denver Museum collection. The two unassociated funerary objects are 
shell bracelets (DU# 5740a-b). Shell bracelets of this type have been 
found in Hohokam burials of infants, children, and adults.
    The Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian 
Reservation, Arizona, and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community 
of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona, have requested the repatriation 
of the cultural items described above as follows: The Gila River Indian 
Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona, has requested 
DU#s 3886, 3990, 3931c-d, misc. coll. 18-RE49-3, and misc. coll. AZ37; 
and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River 
Reservation, Arizona, has requested DU#s 3910 and 5740a-b.

Determinations Bade by the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology

    Officials of the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the nine cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
unassociated funerary objects and the Gila River Indian Community of 
the Gila River Reservation, Arizona and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa 
Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona (hereafter 
referred to as ``The Tribes'').

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim 
these cultural items should submit a written request with information 
in support of the claim to Anne Amati, University of Denver Museum of 
Anthropology, 2000 E Asbury Avenue, Sturm Hall 146, Denver, CO 80208, 
telephone (303) 871-2687, email [email protected], by August 23, 2021. 
After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer 
of control of the unassociated funerary objects The Tribes may proceed.
    The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology is responsible for 
notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 14, 2021.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2021-15570 Filed 7-21-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P