Title IV-E Prevention Services Clearinghouse Handbook of Standards and Procedures, 37332-37334 [2021-15065]

Download as PDF 37332 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 133 / Thursday, July 15, 2021 / Notices analyze future trends related to the diversity of the boards of directors of the Banks and the Office of Finance and to assess the effectiveness of the strategies developed by the Banks and the Office of Finance for promoting, developing, and retaining diverse board talent. B. Burden Estimate FHFA estimates the total annual hour burden imposed upon respondents by this information collection to be 20.5 hours. This is based on estimates that 205 Bank and Office of Finance Directors will respond annually, with each response taking an average of 0.1 hours (6 minutes) (205 respondents × 0.1 hours = 20.5 hours). C. Comments Request FHFA requests written comments on the following: (1) Whether the collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of FHFA functions, including whether the information has practical utility; (2) the accuracy of FHFA’s estimate of the burden of the collection of information; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Kevin Smith, Chief Information Officer, Federal Housing Finance Agency. [FR Doc. 2021–15091 Filed 7–14–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8070–01–P FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE [Docket No.: FMCS–2021–2] Availability of Draft Strategic Plan and Request for Public Comment Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (FMCS). ACTION: Notice of availability of Draft Strategic Plan; request for comments. AGENCY: The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service (FMCS) announces the availability of its draft Strategic Plan for 2022–2026. The Government Performance and Results Act of 1993, as amended by the GPRA Modernization Act of 2010, requires that Federal Agencies solicit input from interested stakeholders when developing their Strategic Plans. Therefore, FMCS invites the general public and other Federal Agencies to take this opportunity to comment on FMCS’s draft Strategic Plan. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:11 Jul 14, 2021 Jkt 253001 DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before August 16, 2021. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION You may send comments, identified by FMCS–2021–2, by any of the following methods: • Mail: Office of Budget, FMCS, Floor 7, One Independence Square, 250 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20427. • Email: WShields@fmcs.gov. Include FMCS–2021–2 on the subject line of the message. Please note that at this time, the FMCS office is not open for visitors and mail is not checked daily. Therefore, we encourage emailed comments. [Notice–PBS–2021–03; Docket No. 2021– 0002; Sequence No. 13] ADDRESSES: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Will Shields, 202–606–3635, WShields@ fmcs.gov. FMCS’s mission is to: • Promote the development of sound and stable labor management relationships; • Prevent or minimize work stoppages by assisting labor and management to settle their disputes through mediation; • Advocate collective bargaining, mediation and voluntary arbitration as the preferred processes for settling issues between employers and representatives of employees; • Develop and advocate the art, science and practice of conflict resolution through the use of ADR; • Assist parties in conflict through the provision of conflict resolution services; and • Foster the establishment and maintenance of constructive joint processes to improve labor-management relationships, employment security and organizational effectiveness. The draft Strategic Plan sets out how FMCS will pursue its strategic goals and is available at https://www.fmcs.gov/wpcontent/uploads/2021/07/2022-2026FMCS-Strategic-Plan-v02.pdf. FMCS anticipates publishing its 2022–2026 Strategic Plan in February 2022 and making it available on the FMCS website, www.fmcs.gov, at that time. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Dated: July 9, 2021. William H. Shields, Budget Director. [FR Doc. 2021–15016 Filed 7–14–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6732–01–P PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Federal Management Regulation; Designation of Federal Building Public Buildings Service (PBS), General Services Administration (GSA). ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: This bulletin announces the designation of a Federal building. DATES: This bulletin expires January 17, 2022. The building designation remains in effect until canceled or superseded by another bulletin. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: General Services Administration, Public Buildings Service (PBS), Office of Portfolio Management, Attn: Chandra Kelley, 77 Forsyth Street SW, Atlanta, GA 30303, at 404–562–2763, or by email at chandra.kelley@gsa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This bulletin announces the designation of a Federal building. Public Law 109–331, dated October 12, 2006, designated Building No. SC0017ZZ, located at 250 E North Street in Greenville, SC, as the ‘‘Carroll A. Campbell Jr. United States Courthouse.’’ SUMMARY: Katy Kale, Acting Administrator. [FR Doc. 2021–15090 Filed 7–14–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6820–Y1–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Title IV–E Prevention Services Clearinghouse Handbook of Standards and Procedures Administration for Children and Families, HHS. ACTION: Request for public comment. AGENCY: The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), established the Title IV–E Prevention Services Clearinghouse (hereafter, the Clearinghouse; https:// preventionservices.abtsites.com). This Federal Register Notice (FRN) seeks comments by August 16, 2021 on the Clearinghouse’s Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Version 1.0. Responses to this FRN will inform potential updates and clarifications to existing standards and procedures. Readers are referred to the full version of the SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\15JYN1.SGM 15JYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 133 / Thursday, July 15, 2021 / Notices khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Version 1.0 on the Clearinghouse website (https:// preventionservices.abtsites.com/reviewprocess). Specifically, feedback is invited on each of the steps and operational procedures of the Prevention Services Clearinghouse systematic review process. DATES: The deadline for comments on this notice is August 16, 2021. ADDRESSES: Interested parties may submit written questions, comments, and supplementary documents by email to preventionservices@abtassoc.com with ‘‘Title IV–E PSC FRN comment’’ in the subject line. To ensure that your comments have maximum effect, please identify clearly the section of the Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Version 1.0 (https:// preventionservices.abtsites.com/reviewprocess) that your comment addresses. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 1.0 Background and Legislative Context The Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA) was signed into law as part of the Bipartisan Budget Act (H.R. 1892) on February 9, 2018. FFPSA amended the Social Security Act (the Act) to enable use of Federal funds available under parts B and E of title IV of the Social Security Act to provide enhanced support to children and families and prevent foster care placements through the provision of evidence-based mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment services, in-home parent skill-based programs, and kinship navigator services. As described in the statutory language, these services and programs are intended ‘‘for children who are candidates for foster care or who are pregnant or parenting foster youth and the parents or kin caregivers of the children.’’ The Act requires an independent systematic review of evidence to designate programs and services as ‘‘promising,’’ ‘‘supported,’’ and ‘‘well supported’’ practices, defined as follows in section 471(e)(4)(C): • Promising Practice: ‘‘A practice shall be considered to be a ‘promising practice’ if the practice is superior to an appropriate comparison practice using conventional standards of statistical significance (in terms of demonstrated meaningful improvements in validated measures of important child and parent outcomes, such as mental health, substance abuse, and child safety and well-being), as established by the results or outcomes of at least one study that— (1) was rated by an independent systematic review for the quality of the VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:11 Jul 14, 2021 Jkt 253001 study design and execution and determined to be well-designed and well-executed; and (2) utilized some form of control (such as an untreated group, a placebo group, or a wait list study).’’ • Supported Practice: ‘‘A practice shall be considered to be a ‘supported practice’ if (I) the practice is superior to an appropriate comparison practice using conventional standards of statistical significance (in terms of demonstrated meaningful improvements in validated measures of important child and parent outcomes, such as mental health, substance abuse, and child safety and well-being), as established by the results or outcomes of at least one study that—(aa) was rated by an independent systematic review for the quality of the study design and execution and determined to be welldesigned and well-executed; (bb) was a rigorous random-controlled trial (or, if not available, a study using a rigorous quasi-experimental research design); and (cc) was carried out in a usual care or practice setting; and (II) the study described in sub-clause (I) established that the practice has a sustained effect (when compared to a control group) for at least 6 months beyond the end of treatment.’’ • Well-supported Practice: ‘‘A practice shall be considered to be a ‘well-supported practice’ if (I) the practice is superior to an appropriate comparison practice using conventional standards of statistical significance (in terms of demonstrated meaningful improvements in validated measures of important child and parent outcomes, such as mental health, substance abuse, and child safety and well-being), as established by the results or outcomes of at least two studies that—(aa) were rated by an independent systematic review for the quality of the study design and execution and determined to be welldesigned and well-executed; and (bb) were rigorous random-controlled trials (or, if not available, studies using a rigorous quasi-experimental research design); and (cc) were carried out in a usual care or practice setting; and (II) at least one of the studies described in subclause (I) established that the practice has a sustained effect (when compared to a control group) for at least 1 year beyond the end of treatment.’’ In accordance with the statute, practices must also meet the following requirements: • Book or manual: The practice has a book, manual, or other available writings that specify the components of the practice protocol and describe how to administer the practice. PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 37333 • No empirical risk of harm: There is no empirical basis suggesting that, compared to its likely benefits, the practice constitutes a risk of harm to those receiving it. • Weight of evidence supports benefits: If multiple outcome studies have been conducted, the overall weight of evidence supports the benefits of the practice. • Reliable and valid outcome measures: Outcome measures are reliable and valid, and are administrated consistently and accurately across all those receiving the practice. • No case data for severe or frequent risk of harm: There is no case data suggesting a risk of harm that was probably caused by the treatment and that was severe or frequent (section 471(e)(4)(C)(ii) of the Act). In order to meet these requirements, ACF established the Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse carries out a systematic review process implemented by trained reviewers using consistent, transparent standards and procedures. The Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Version 1.0 (https://prevention services.abtsites.com/review-process) provides a detailed description of the standards used to identify and review programs and services for the Clearinghouse and the procedures followed by the Clearinghouse staff. The Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Version 1.0 was informed by public comments submitted in response to Federal Register Notice 83 FR 29122 (https://www.federalregister.gov/ documents/2018/06/22/2018-13420/ decisions-related-to-the-development-ofa-clearinghouse-of-evidence-basedpractices-in-accordance), consultations with research and practice experts, and the review processes developed and used by other prominent evidence clearinghouses. 2.0 Request for Information (RFI) Through this FRN, ACF invites feedback on the Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Version 1.0 (https:// preventionservices.abtsites.com/reviewprocess). Specifically, feedback is invited on each of the steps of the Prevention Services Clearinghouse systematic review process: 1. Identify programs and services for review. Candidate programs and services relevant to the mission of the Clearinghouse are identified using an inclusive process that invites recommendations from stakeholders, including states, to ensure broad coverage across program or service areas (Chapter 1). 2. Select and prioritize programs and services for review. Candidate programs E:\FR\FM\15JYN1.SGM 15JYN1 37334 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 133 / Thursday, July 15, 2021 / Notices khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES and services are evaluated against the program or service eligibility criteria and prioritized for review (Chapter 2). 3. Literature search. Clearinghouse staff conduct comprehensive literature searches to locate available and relevant research on the prioritized programs and services (Chapter 3). 4. Study eligibility screening and prioritization. Studies identified in the literature searches are screened against the study eligibility criteria. Studies determined to be eligible for review are considered against prioritization criteria to determine the order and depth of their review (Chapter 4). 5. Evidence review. All eligible studies are reviewed by trained reviewers using the Clearinghouse design and execution standards. Study authors may be queried to request information deemed necessary to assign a rating. One of three ratings is assigned to prioritized studies: High, moderate, or low support of causal evidence (Chapter 5). 6. Program and service ratings. Studies that are rated as high or moderate support of causal evidence are considered in assigning each program or service one of four ratings: Wellsupported, supported, promising, or does not currently meet criteria (Chapter 6). These ratings also take into consideration any evidence of risk of harm. Feedback is also invited on the operational procedures for reviewing programs and services (Chapter 7). Responses to this FRN will inform ongoing discussion about potential updates and clarifications to existing standards and procedures. Consistent with the practice of other prominent federal evidence reviews, standards and procedures may be revised over time as research methods evolve, the needs of the field change, and lessons are learned during the review process. Potential revisions to the Clearinghouse’s standards and procedures may affect which programs and services are eligible or prioritized for review, which studies of programs and services are eligible or prioritized for review, which studies of programs and services meet design and execution ratings, and program or service ratings. ACF especially welcomes comments on how the standards and procedures might be revised to better reflect the goals and requirements of the Executive Order on Advancing Racial Equity and Support for Underserved Communities Through the Federal Government (https:// www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/ presidential-actions/2021/01/20/ executive-order-advancing-racialequity-and-support-for-underservedcommunities-through-the-federalgovernment/) and the President’s Memorandum on Restoring Trust in Government Through Scientific Integrity and Evidence-Based Policymaking (https:// www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/ presidential-actions/2021/01/27/ memorandum-on-restoring-trust-ingovernment-through-scientific-integrityand-evidence-based-policymaking/). Through this FRN, ACF is soliciting information from a broad array of stakeholders. This FRN is one way to ensure that activities associated with the Title IV–E Prevention Services Clearinghouse are transparent and build from the existing knowledge of states, federal agencies, researchers, evaluators, program and service developers, key stakeholders and experts, and the general public. The public will have an opportunity to comment on specific revisions to the Clearinghouse’s standards and procedures through a future FRN. To facilitate the review of submissions, please identify the chapter, section, and/or page number of the Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Version 1.0 (https:// preventionservices.abtsites.com/reviewprocess) that your comments address. This RFI is for information and planning purposes only and should not be construed as a solicitation or as an obligation on the part of ACF or HHS. For more information about the Prevention Services Clearinghouse, visit: https://preventionservices.abtsites. com. Naomi Goldstein, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Planning, Research, and Evaluation. [FR Doc. 2021–15065 Filed 7–14–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4184–01–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Community Living Intent To Award 54 Single-Source Supplements for Current Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) State Grantees Announcing the intent to award 54 single-source supplements for current Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) state grantees. ACTION: The Administration for Community Living (ACL) announces the intent to award 54 administrative supplements in the form of cooperative agreements to existing SMP project grantees to support the expansion and enhancement of virtual capacity of the program. This effort will benefit the SMP programs in each state, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The purpose of existing grantees’ work is to empower and assist Medicare beneficiaries, their families, and caregivers to prevent, detect, and report health care fraud, errors, and abuse through outreach, counseling, and education with an emphasis on reaching Medicare beneficiaries with limited income and those residing in rural areas. As a result of the COVID–19 pandemic and related travel and congregation limitations and public health concerns, it has been identified that focus on expansion of virtual capacity is crucial at this time. The administrative supplements for FY 2021 will be distributed at a flat rate of $18,000 to each of the existing 54 state grantees, bringing the total for the supplement awards to $972,000. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information or comments regarding this program supplement, contact Marissa Whitehouse, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, Center for Integrated Programs, Office of Healthcare Information and Counseling; telephone (202) 795–7425; email Marissa.Whitehouse@acl.hhs.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Program Name: Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP). Recipient: 54 current SMP grantees. SUMMARY: Current grantee State Alabama Dept of Senior Services ................................................................................................. Alaska Department of Health and Social Services ....................................................................... Arizona Department of Economic Security ................................................................................... Arkansas Department of Human Services .................................................................................... Alabama ................................... Alaska ...................................... Arizona ..................................... Arkansas .................................. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:11 Jul 14, 2021 Jkt 253001 PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\15JYN1.SGM 15JYN1 FY21 ACL recommended supplement amount $18,000 18,000 18,000 18,000

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 133 (Thursday, July 15, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 37332-37334]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-15065]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Administration for Children and Families


Title IV-E Prevention Services Clearinghouse Handbook of 
Standards and Procedures

AGENCY: Administration for Children and Families, HHS.

ACTION: Request for public comment.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Administration for Children and Families (ACF), within the 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), established the 
Title IV-E Prevention Services Clearinghouse (hereafter, the 
Clearinghouse; https://preventionservices.abtsites.com). This Federal 
Register Notice (FRN) seeks comments by August 16, 2021 on the 
Clearinghouse's Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Version 1.0. 
Responses to this FRN will inform potential updates and clarifications 
to existing standards and procedures. Readers are referred to the full 
version of the

[[Page 37333]]

Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Version 1.0 on the Clearinghouse 
website (https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/review-process). 
Specifically, feedback is invited on each of the steps and operational 
procedures of the Prevention Services Clearinghouse systematic review 
process.

DATES: The deadline for comments on this notice is August 16, 2021.

ADDRESSES:  Interested parties may submit written questions, comments, 
and supplementary documents by email to [email protected] 
with ``Title IV-E PSC FRN comment'' in the subject line. To ensure that 
your comments have maximum effect, please identify clearly the section 
of the Handbook of Standards and Procedures, Version 1.0 (https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/review-process) that your comment 
addresses.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

1.0 Background and Legislative Context

    The Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA) was signed into 
law as part of the Bipartisan Budget Act (H.R. 1892) on February 9, 
2018. FFPSA amended the Social Security Act (the Act) to enable use of 
Federal funds available under parts B and E of title IV of the Social 
Security Act to provide enhanced support to children and families and 
prevent foster care placements through the provision of evidence-based 
mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment services, 
in-home parent skill-based programs, and kinship navigator services. As 
described in the statutory language, these services and programs are 
intended ``for children who are candidates for foster care or who are 
pregnant or parenting foster youth and the parents or kin caregivers of 
the children.''
    The Act requires an independent systematic review of evidence to 
designate programs and services as ``promising,'' ``supported,'' and 
``well supported'' practices, defined as follows in section 
471(e)(4)(C):
     Promising Practice: ``A practice shall be considered to be 
a `promising practice' if the practice is superior to an appropriate 
comparison practice using conventional standards of statistical 
significance (in terms of demonstrated meaningful improvements in 
validated measures of important child and parent outcomes, such as 
mental health, substance abuse, and child safety and well-being), as 
established by the results or outcomes of at least one study that--(1) 
was rated by an independent systematic review for the quality of the 
study design and execution and determined to be well-designed and well-
executed; and (2) utilized some form of control (such as an untreated 
group, a placebo group, or a wait list study).''
     Supported Practice: ``A practice shall be considered to be 
a `supported practice' if (I) the practice is superior to an 
appropriate comparison practice using conventional standards of 
statistical significance (in terms of demonstrated meaningful 
improvements in validated measures of important child and parent 
outcomes, such as mental health, substance abuse, and child safety and 
well-being), as established by the results or outcomes of at least one 
study that--(aa) was rated by an independent systematic review for the 
quality of the study design and execution and determined to be well-
designed and well-executed; (bb) was a rigorous random-controlled trial 
(or, if not available, a study using a rigorous quasi-experimental 
research design); and (cc) was carried out in a usual care or practice 
setting; and (II) the study described in sub-clause (I) established 
that the practice has a sustained effect (when compared to a control 
group) for at least 6 months beyond the end of treatment.''
     Well-supported Practice: ``A practice shall be considered 
to be a `well-supported practice' if (I) the practice is superior to an 
appropriate comparison practice using conventional standards of 
statistical significance (in terms of demonstrated meaningful 
improvements in validated measures of important child and parent 
outcomes, such as mental health, substance abuse, and child safety and 
well-being), as established by the results or outcomes of at least two 
studies that--(aa) were rated by an independent systematic review for 
the quality of the study design and execution and determined to be 
well-designed and well-executed; and (bb) were rigorous random-
controlled trials (or, if not available, studies using a rigorous 
quasi-experimental research design); and (cc) were carried out in a 
usual care or practice setting; and (II) at least one of the studies 
described in sub-clause (I) established that the practice has a 
sustained effect (when compared to a control group) for at least 1 year 
beyond the end of treatment.''
    In accordance with the statute, practices must also meet the 
following requirements:
     Book or manual: The practice has a book, manual, or other 
available writings that specify the components of the practice protocol 
and describe how to administer the practice.
     No empirical risk of harm: There is no empirical basis 
suggesting that, compared to its likely benefits, the practice 
constitutes a risk of harm to those receiving it.
     Weight of evidence supports benefits: If multiple outcome 
studies have been conducted, the overall weight of evidence supports 
the benefits of the practice.
     Reliable and valid outcome measures: Outcome measures are 
reliable and valid, and are administrated consistently and accurately 
across all those receiving the practice.
     No case data for severe or frequent risk of harm: There is 
no case data suggesting a risk of harm that was probably caused by the 
treatment and that was severe or frequent (section 471(e)(4)(C)(ii) of 
the Act).
    In order to meet these requirements, ACF established the 
Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse carries out a systematic review 
process implemented by trained reviewers using consistent, transparent 
standards and procedures. The Handbook of Standards and Procedures, 
Version 1.0 (https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/review-process) 
provides a detailed description of the standards used to identify and 
review programs and services for the Clearinghouse and the procedures 
followed by the Clearinghouse staff. The Handbook of Standards and 
Procedures, Version 1.0 was informed by public comments submitted in 
response to Federal Register Notice 83 FR 29122 (https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/06/22/2018-13420/decisions-related-to-the-development-of-a-clearinghouse-of-evidence-based-practices-in-accordance), consultations with research and practice 
experts, and the review processes developed and used by other prominent 
evidence clearinghouses.

2.0 Request for Information (RFI)

    Through this FRN, ACF invites feedback on the Handbook of Standards 
and Procedures, Version 1.0 (https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/review-process). Specifically, feedback is invited on each of the steps 
of the Prevention Services Clearinghouse systematic review process:
    1. Identify programs and services for review. Candidate programs 
and services relevant to the mission of the Clearinghouse are 
identified using an inclusive process that invites recommendations from 
stakeholders, including states, to ensure broad coverage across program 
or service areas (Chapter 1).
    2. Select and prioritize programs and services for review. 
Candidate programs

[[Page 37334]]

and services are evaluated against the program or service eligibility 
criteria and prioritized for review (Chapter 2).
    3. Literature search. Clearinghouse staff conduct comprehensive 
literature searches to locate available and relevant research on the 
prioritized programs and services (Chapter 3).
    4. Study eligibility screening and prioritization. Studies 
identified in the literature searches are screened against the study 
eligibility criteria. Studies determined to be eligible for review are 
considered against prioritization criteria to determine the order and 
depth of their review (Chapter 4).
    5. Evidence review. All eligible studies are reviewed by trained 
reviewers using the Clearinghouse design and execution standards. Study 
authors may be queried to request information deemed necessary to 
assign a rating. One of three ratings is assigned to prioritized 
studies: High, moderate, or low support of causal evidence (Chapter 5).
    6. Program and service ratings. Studies that are rated as high or 
moderate support of causal evidence are considered in assigning each 
program or service one of four ratings: Well-supported, supported, 
promising, or does not currently meet criteria (Chapter 6). These 
ratings also take into consideration any evidence of risk of harm.
    Feedback is also invited on the operational procedures for 
reviewing programs and services (Chapter 7).
    Responses to this FRN will inform ongoing discussion about 
potential updates and clarifications to existing standards and 
procedures. Consistent with the practice of other prominent federal 
evidence reviews, standards and procedures may be revised over time as 
research methods evolve, the needs of the field change, and lessons are 
learned during the review process. Potential revisions to the 
Clearinghouse's standards and procedures may affect which programs and 
services are eligible or prioritized for review, which studies of 
programs and services are eligible or prioritized for review, which 
studies of programs and services meet design and execution ratings, and 
program or service ratings. ACF especially welcomes comments on how the 
standards and procedures might be revised to better reflect the goals 
and requirements of the Executive Order on Advancing Racial Equity and 
Support for Underserved Communities Through the Federal Government 
(https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/01/20/executive-order-advancing-racial-equity-and-support-for-underserved-communities-through-the-federal-government/) and the President's 
Memorandum on Restoring Trust in Government Through Scientific 
Integrity and Evidence-Based Policymaking (https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/01/27/memorandum-on-restoring-trust-in-government-through-scientific-integrity-and-evidence-based-policymaking/).
    Through this FRN, ACF is soliciting information from a broad array 
of stakeholders. This FRN is one way to ensure that activities 
associated with the Title IV-E Prevention Services Clearinghouse are 
transparent and build from the existing knowledge of states, federal 
agencies, researchers, evaluators, program and service developers, key 
stakeholders and experts, and the general public. The public will have 
an opportunity to comment on specific revisions to the Clearinghouse's 
standards and procedures through a future FRN.
    To facilitate the review of submissions, please identify the 
chapter, section, and/or page number of the Handbook of Standards and 
Procedures, Version 1.0 (https://preventionservices.abtsites.com/review-process) that your comments address.
    This RFI is for information and planning purposes only and should 
not be construed as a solicitation or as an obligation on the part of 
ACF or HHS.
    For more information about the Prevention Services Clearinghouse, 
visit: https://preventionservices.abtsites.com.

Naomi Goldstein,
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Planning, Research, and Evaluation.
[FR Doc. 2021-15065 Filed 7-14-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4184-01-P