Airworthiness Directives; Bell Textron Canada Limited (Type Certificate Previously Held by Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited) Helicopters, 33091-33094 [2021-13193]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 119 / Thursday, June 24, 2021 / Rules and Regulations within 30 days after the effective date of this AD. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES (i) Credit for Previous Actions This paragraph provides credit for actions required by paragraph (g) of this AD, if those actions were performed before the effective date of this AD using the applicable service information in paragraphs (i)(1) through (6) of this AD. (1) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700– 1A11–27–041, dated July 23, 2020. (2) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–27– 083, dated July 23, 2020. (3) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–27– 5012, dated July 23, 2020. (4) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–27– 5503, dated July 23, 2020. (5) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–27– 6012, dated July 23, 2020. (6) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–27– 6503, dated July 23, 2020. (j) Other FAA AD Provisions The following provisions also apply to this AD: (1) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs): The Manager, New York ACO Branch, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or responsible Flight Standards Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the manager of the certification office, send it to ATTN: Program Manager, Continuing Operational Safety, FAA, New York ACO Branch, 1600 Stewart Avenue, Suite 410, Westbury, NY 11590; telephone 516–228–7300; fax 516–794–5531. Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the responsible Flight Standards Office. (2) Contacting the Manufacturer: For any requirement in this AD to obtain instructions from a manufacturer, the instructions must be accomplished using a method approved by the Manager, New York ACO Branch, FAA; or Transport Canada Civil Aviation (TCCA); or Bombardier Inc.’s TCCA Design Approval Organization (DAO). If approved by the DAO, the approval must include the DAO-authorized signature. (3) Reporting Requirements: A federal agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, nor shall a person be subject to a penalty for failure to comply with a collection of information subject to the requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act unless that collection of information displays a current valid OMB Control Number. The OMB Control Number for this information collection is 2120–0056. Public reporting for this collection of information is estimated to be approximately 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. All responses to this collection of information are mandatory as required by this AD. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:01 Jun 23, 2021 Jkt 253001 33091 collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to Information Collection Clearance Officer, Federal Aviation Administration, 10101 Hillwood Parkway, Fort Worth, TX 76177– 1524. Issued on April 27, 2021. Gaetano A. Sciortino, Deputy Director for Strategic Initiatives, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, Aircraft Certification Service. (k) Related Information BILLING CODE 4910–13–P (1) Refer to Mandatory Continuing Airworthiness Information (MCAI) TCCA AD CF–2020–29, dated August 21, 2020, for related information. This MCAI may be found in the AD docket on the internet at https://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2021–0093. (2) For more information about this AD, contact Siddeeq Bacchus, Aerospace Engineer, Mechanical Systems and Administrative Services Section, FAA, New York ACO Branch, 1600 Stewart Avenue, Suite 410, Westbury, NY 11590; telephone 516–228–7362; fax 516–794–5531; email 9avs-nyaco-cos@faa.gov. (3) Service information identified in this AD that is not incorporated by reference is available at the addresses specified in paragraphs (l)(3) and (4) of this AD. (l) Material Incorporated by Reference (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference (IBR) of the service information listed in this paragraph under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) You must use this service information as applicable to do the actions required by this AD, unless this AD specifies otherwise. (i) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–1A11– 27–041, Revision 1, dated December 7, 2020. (ii) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–27– 083, Revision 1, dated December 7, 2020. (iii) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–27– 5012, Revision 1, dated December 7, 2020. (iv) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–27– 5503, Revision 1, dated December 7, 2020. (v) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–27– 6012, Revision 1, dated December 7, 2020. (vi) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700–27– 6503, Revision 1, dated December 7, 2020. (3) For service information identified in this AD, contact Bombardier, Inc., 200 CoˆteVertu Road West, Dorval, Que´bec H4S 2A3, Canada; North America toll-free telephone 1– 866–538–1247 or direct-dial telephone 1– 514–855–2999; email ac.yul@ aero.bombardier.com; internet https:// www.bombardier.com. (4) You may view this service information at the FAA, Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 206–231–3195. (5) You may view this service information that is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, email fedreg.legal@nara.gov, or go to: https:// www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibrlocations.html. PO 00000 Frm 00011 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 [FR Doc. 2021–13118 Filed 6–23–21; 8:45 am] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2021–0267; Project Identifier 2017–SW–110–AD; Amendment 39–21620; AD 2021–13–15] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Bell Textron Canada Limited (Type Certificate Previously Held by Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited) Helicopters Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Bell Textron Canada Limited (type certificate previously held by Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited) (Bell) Model 429 helicopters. This AD was prompted by the identification of certain parts needing life limits and certification maintenance requirement (CMR) tasks. This AD requires establishing life limits and CMR tasks for various parts. Depending on the results of the CMR tasks, this AD requires corrective action. The FAA is issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products. DATES: This AD is effective July 29, 2021. SUMMARY: For service information identified in this final rule, contact Bell Textron Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l’Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J 1R4, Canada; telephone 1–450–437–2862 or 1–800–363–8023; fax 1–450–433–0272; email productsupport@bellflight.com; or at https://www.bellflight.com/support/ contact-support. You may view the referenced service information at the FAA, Office of the Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N–321, Fort Worth, TX 76177. ADDRESSES: Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket at https://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2021–0267; or in person at Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this E:\FR\FM\24JNR1.SGM 24JNR1 33092 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 119 / Thursday, June 24, 2021 / Rules and Regulations final rule, the Transport Canada AD, any comments received, and other information. The street address for Docket Operations is U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Matt Fuller, AD Program Manager, General Aviation & Rotorcraft Unit, Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, FAA, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone (817) 222–5110; email matthew.fuller@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES The FAA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR part 39 by adding an AD that would apply to Bell Model 429 helicopters, serial numbers 57001 and subsequent. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on April 8, 2021 (86 FR 18218). In the NPRM, the FAA proposed to require establishing a life limit for certain part-numbered tail rotor outboard flapping bearings and a certain part-numbered hoist kit cable cutter cartridge. The NPRM also proposed to require establishing recurring CMR tasks for a certain part-numbered wheeled landing gear system, float/life raft kit, and hoist kit, and depending on the results of the CMR tasks, corrective action. The NPRM was prompted by Canadian AD CF–2017–16, dated May 17, 2017, issued by Transport Canada, which is the aviation authority of Canada, to correct an unsafe condition for Bell Model 429 helicopters, serial numbers 57001 and subsequent. Transport Canada advises that Bell has established life limits and CMR tasks for various parts and accordingly revised Chapter 4—Airworthiness Limitations Schedule of Bell Helicopter 429 Maintenance Manual BHT–429–MM–1 to Revision 26, dated September 9, 2016 (BHT–429–MM–1). Transport Canada states that failure to replace life-limited parts or perform CMR tasks as specified could result in an unsafe condition. Accordingly, the Transport Canada AD requires updating the maintenance schedule for the parts affected with the airworthiness life limits and CMR tasks in Revision 26 of BHT–429–MM–1. Discussion of Final Airworthiness Directive Comments The FAA received comments from one commenter. The commenter was Bell. The following presents the VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:01 Jun 23, 2021 Jkt 253001 comments received on the NPRM and the FAA’s response to each comment. Request To Change the Compliance Time of the Hoist Cable Anti-Foul Assembly Operational Check Bell requested changing the compliance time of the hoist cable antifoul assembly operational check from before the first flight of the day involving a hoist operation to after the last flight of the day. Bell requested this change to avoid the potential to suspend critical operations in order to accomplish the check and any required corrective maintenance because according to Bell, hoist equipment serves an essential service and may be required for critical missions with minimal notice. Bell further stated that this task was established based on the system safety assessment for the Bell Model 429 helicopter hoist installation and exposure based on a daily check after the last flight was considered in that assessment to conservatively meet acceptable reliability targets for its Major hazard classification. The FAA disagrees with the request to change the compliance time to after the last flight of the day. The compliance time of before the first flight of the day is standard practice in rotorcraft AD actions for enforceability purposes. However, this wording does not imply that the operational check and corrective action must be done on the same calendar day as the first flight of the day involving a hoist operation. In light of this, the FAA has made no changes based on this request. Conclusion These helicopters have been approved by the aviation authority of Canada and are approved for operation in the United States. Pursuant to the FAA’s bilateral agreement with Canada, Transport Canada has notified the FAA about the unsafe condition described in its AD. The FAA reviewed the relevant data, considered the comments received, and determined that air safety requires adopting this AD as proposed. Accordingly, the FAA is issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these helicopters. Except, since issuance of the NPRM, Bell has updated its contact information to obtain service documentation by changing its website address and adding an email address. This final rule reflects those changes and this AD is otherwise adopted as proposed in the NPRM. None of the changes increase the economic burden on any operator. PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Related Service Information The FAA reviewed Chapter 4— Airworthiness Limitations Schedule of BHT–429–MM–1. This service information specifies airworthiness life limits, inspection intervals, and CMR requirements for parts installed on Model 429 helicopters. Revision 26 of this service information establishes life limits for a certain part-numbered tail rotor flapping outboard bearing and hoist kit cartridge cable cutter and CMR requirements for a certain partnumbered wheeled landing gear system, float/life raft kit, and hoist kit. Additionally, the FAA reviewed Chapter 96–47—600-Pound External Hoist Electrical System—Operational Check, of Bell 429 Maintenance Manual Supplement For 600-Pound External Hoist Kit, BHT–429–MMS–4, Revision 1, dated March 14, 2014. This service information specifies inspection procedures and corrective action for various components of the hoist system. Lastly, the FAA reviewed Testing and Fault Isolation, pages 101–117/118, Cleaning, pages 401–405/406, and Scheduled Maintenance, pages 609– 611/612, of Goodrich Rescue Hoist System Component Maintenance Manual 25–00–38–1, dated July 15, 2009, for rescue hoist assembly part number 44316–12–102. This service information specifies maintenance procedures and lists replacement parts for this part-numbered Goodrich rescue hoist assembly. Differences Between This AD and the Transport Canada AD This AD requires corrective action for failed CMR tasks, whereas the Transport Canada AD does not. The Transport Canada AD requires accomplishing an operational check of the hoist cable antifoul assembly daily after the last flight, whereas this AD requires this action before the first flight of the day involving a hoist operation instead. Costs of Compliance The FAA estimates that this AD affects 110 helicopters of U.S. Registry. Labor rates are estimated at $85 per work-hour. Based on these numbers, the FAA estimates the following costs to comply with this AD. Replacing a tail rotor outboard flapping bearing takes about 4 workhours and parts cost about $7,500 for an estimated cost of $7,840 per helicopter and $862,400 for the U.S. fleet, per replacement cycle. Replacing a hoist kit cable cutter cartridge takes about 3 work-hours and parts cost about $5,200 for an estimated cost of $5,455 per helicopter and $600,050 for the U.S. fleet, per replacement cycle. E:\FR\FM\24JNR1.SGM 24JNR1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 119 / Thursday, June 24, 2021 / Rules and Regulations khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES Performing a functional check of the wheeled landing gear system takes about 4 work-hours for an estimated cost of $340 per helicopter and $37,400 for the U.S. fleet, per cycle. Performing a functional check of the float/life raft kit takes about 2 work-hours for an estimated cost of $170 per helicopter and $18,700 for the U.S. fleet, per cycle. Performing an operational check of the hoist kit cable anti-foul assembly takes about 2 work-hours for an estimated cost of $170 per helicopter and $18,700 for the U.S. fleet, per cycle. Cleaning, visually inspecting, and lubricating the rescue hoist cable takes about 2 work-hours for an estimated cost of $170 per helicopter and $18,700 for the U.S. fleet, per cycle. Performing an operational check of the hoist kit speed limit switches and the electrical system takes about 0.5 work-hour for an estimated cost of $43 per helicopter and $4,730 for the U.S. fleet, per cycle. Performing a functional check of the cable cutter cartridge electrical system takes about 3 work-hours for an estimated cost of $255 per helicopter and $28,050 for the U.S. fleet, per cycle. The FAA has no way of determining the estimated costs to do allowable repairs based on the results of the CMR tasks. If required, replacing the float/life raft takes about 2 work-hours and parts cost about $5,000 for an estimated cost of $5,170 per float/life raft. Replacing the anti-foul assembly takes about 3 work-hours and parts cost about $1,500 for an estimated cost of $1,755 per antifoul assembly. Replacing a rescue hoist cable takes about 3 work-hours and parts cost about $3,150 for an estimated cost of $3,405 per rescue hoist cable. Overhauling a rescue hoist assembly costs about $83,000 and it takes about 8 work-hours to remove and reinstall the hoist for a labor cost of $680, for a total estimated cost of $83,680 per helicopter, per overhaul cycle. Alternatively, replacing a hoist takes about 8 work-hours and parts cost about $200,000 for an estimated cost of $200,680 per helicopter, per replacement cycle. Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. The FAA is issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: General requirements. Under that section, Congress charges the FAA VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:01 Jun 23, 2021 Jkt 253001 with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on helicopters identified in this rulemaking action. Regulatory Findings This AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866, (2) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. The Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive: ■ 2021–13–15 Bell Textron Canada Limited (Type Certificate Previously Held by Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited): Amendment 39–21620; Docket No. FAA–2021–0267; Project Identifier 2017–SW–110–AD. (a) Effective Date This airworthiness directive (AD) is effective July 29, 2021. (b) Affected ADs None. PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 33093 (c) Applicability This AD applies to Bell Textron Canada Limited (type certificate previously held by Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited) Model 429 helicopters, certificated in any category, serial numbers 57001 and subsequent. (d) Subject Joint Aircraft Service Component (JASC) Code: 3200, Landing Gear Systems, and 2560, Emergency Equipment. (e) Unsafe Condition This AD was prompted by parts remaining in service beyond their fatigue life or beyond maintenance intervals required by the certification maintenance requirements (CMRs) of the Instructions for Continued Airworthiness. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent failure of a part, which could result in loss of control of the helicopter. (f) Compliance Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, unless already done. (g) Required Actions (1) Before further flight after the effective date of this AD, remove from service any part that has reached or exceeded its life limit as follows. Thereafter, remove from service each part on or before reaching its life limit as follows: (i) Tail rotor outboard flapping bearing part number (P/N) 429–312–103–117 and 429– 312–103–119: 15,000 total hours time-inservice (TIS). (ii) Hoist kit cable cutter cartridge P/N 42315–281: 5 years since date of manufacture. (2) Before further flight after the effective date of this AD, perform the following CMR tasks for any part that has reached or exceeded its CMR interval as follows. Thereafter, perform the following CMR tasks for each part on or before reaching its CMR interval as follows: Note 1 to paragraph (g)(2): Chapter 4— Airworthiness Limitations Schedule of Bell Helicopter 429 Maintenance Manual BHT– 429–MM–1 to Revision 26, dated September 9, 2016, contains additional information about the CMR tasks. (i) Wheeled Landing Gear System P/N 429– 705–001–101: 800 hours TIS or 1 year, whichever occurs first, perform a functional check of the Emergency Gear Release. If the functional check fails, before further flight, repair in accordance with FAA-approved procedures. (ii) Float/Life Raft Kit P/N 429–706–069– 101: 1,600 hours TIS, perform a functional check of the float/life raft kit electrical system to determine if there are any dormant failures including: Manual inflation switch, water immersion switch, auto-activation relay, manual activation relay, raft activation relay, test activation relay, and the fuse disc elements. If there is a failure, before next flight over water, replace the float/life raft. (iii) Hoist Kit P/N 429–706–001–101: (A) Before the first flight of the day involving a hoist operation, perform an operational check of the hoist cable anti-foul E:\FR\FM\24JNR1.SGM 24JNR1 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES 33094 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 119 / Thursday, June 24, 2021 / Rules and Regulations assembly. If the operational check fails, before next flight involving a hoist operation, repair or replace the anti-foul assembly. (B) 3 hoist operating hours, clean, visually inspect the rescue hoist cable for damage, which may be indicated by a broken wire, kink, bird caging, flattened area, abrasion, or necking. If there is any damage, before further flight, replace the rescue hoist cable. If there is no damage, before further flight, lubricate the rescue hoist cable. For purposes of this AD, hoist operating hours are counted anytime the hoist motor is operating. Note 2 to paragraph (g)(2)(iii)(B): Bell Helicopter service information refers to hoist operating hours as hoisting hours. (C) 800 hours TIS or 1 year, whichever occurs first, perform an operational check of the speed limit switches and perform an operational check of the 600-pound external hoist electrical system to inspect operation of the HOIST HOT caution light. If an operational check fails, before next flight involving a hoist operation, repair in accordance with FAA-approved procedures or replace the hoist. (D) 2,200 hours TIS or 111 hoist operating hours, whichever occurs first, perform a functional check of the cable cutter cartridge electrical system to inspect for correct functioning of the cable cutter switches (hoist pendant, pilot cyclic, and copilot cyclic) and associated wiring. If a functional check fails, before next flight involving a hoist operation, repair in accordance with FAA-approved procedures or replace the hoist. (E) 111 hoist operating hours, overhaul or replace the hoist. Limited, 12,800 Rue de l’Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J 1R4, Canada; telephone 1–450– 437–2862 or 1–800–363–8023; fax 1–450– 433–0272; email productsupport@ bellflight.com; or at https:// www.bellflight.com/support/contact-support. You may view this referenced service information at the FAA, Office of the Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N–321, Fort Worth, TX 76177. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call (817) 222– 5110. (3) The subject of this AD is addressed in Transport Canada AD CF–2017–16, dated May 17, 2017. You may view the Transport Canada AD at https://www.regulations.gov in Docket No. FAA–2021–0267. (h) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (1) The Manager, International Validation Branch, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the manager of the International Validation Branch, send it to the attention of the person identified in paragraph (i)(1) of this AD. Information may be emailed to: 9-AVS-AIR730-AMOC@faa.gov. (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office/ certificate holding district office. RIN 2120–AA64 (i) Related Information (1) For more information about this AD, contact Matt Fuller, AD Program Manager, General Aviation & Rotorcraft Unit, Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, FAA, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone (817) 222– 5110; email matthew.fuller@faa.gov. (2) Chapter 4—Airworthiness Limitations Schedule of Bell Helicopter 429 Maintenance Manual BHT–429–MM–1 to Revision 26, dated September 9, 2016, which is not incorporated by reference, contains additional information about the subject of this AD. For service information identified in this AD, contact Bell Textron Canada VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:01 Jun 23, 2021 Jkt 253001 Issued on June 17, 2021. Gaetano A. Sciortino, Deputy Director for Strategic Initiatives, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2021–13193 Filed 6–23–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P This AD is effective July 29, 2021. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of a certain publication listed in this AD as of July 29, 2021. ADDRESSES: For material incorporated by reference (IBR) in this AD, contact EASA, Konrad-Adenauer-Ufer 3, 50668 Cologne, Germany; telephone +49 221 8999 000; email ADs@easa.europa.eu; internet www.easa.europa.eu. You may find this IBR material on the EASA website at https://ad.easa.europa.eu. You may view this IBR material at the FAA, Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 206–231–3195. It is also available in the AD docket on the internet at https:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020– 1178. DATES: DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Examining the AD Docket Federal Aviation Administration You may examine the AD docket on the internet at https:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020– 1178; or in person at Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this final rule, any comments received, and other information. The address for Docket Operations is U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kathleen Arrigotti, Aerospace Engineer, Large Aircraft Section, International Validation Branch, FAA, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA 98198; telephone and fax 206–231–3218. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2020–1178; Project Identifier MCAI–2020–01325–T; Amendment 39–21545; AD 2021–10–12] Airworthiness Directives; Airbus SAS Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The FAA is superseding Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2020–09– 14, which applied to certain Airbus SAS Model A350–941 and –1041 airplanes. AD 2020–09–14 required revising the existing airplane flight manual (AFM) to define a liquid-prohibited zone on the flight deck and provide procedures following liquid spillage on the center pedestal. AD 2020–09–14 also required installing a removable integrated control panel (ICP) cover on the flight deck and further revising the AFM to include instructions for ICP cover use. This AD requires installing a new, water-resistant ICP, which allows removing the ICP protective cover and the AFM revisions, as specified in a European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) AD, which is incorporated by reference. This AD was prompted by development of a new, water-resistant ICP. The FAA is issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Background EASA, which is the Technical Agent for the Member States of the European Union, has issued EASA AD 2020–0203, dated September 23, 2020 (EASA AD 2020–0203) (also referred to as the Mandatory Continuing Airworthiness Information, or the MCAI), to correct an unsafe condition for certain Airbus SAS Model A350–941 and –1041 airplanes. The FAA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR part 39 to supersede AD 2020–09–14, Amendment 39–19910 (85 FR 30601, May 20, 2020) (AD 2020–09–14). AD 2020–09–14 applied to certain Airbus SAS Model A350–941 and –1041 airplanes. The NPRM published in the E:\FR\FM\24JNR1.SGM 24JNR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 119 (Thursday, June 24, 2021)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 33091-33094]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-13193]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2021-0267; Project Identifier 2017-SW-110-AD; Amendment 
39-21620; AD 2021-13-15]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Bell Textron Canada Limited (Type 
Certificate Previously Held by Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited) 
Helicopters

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for 
Bell Textron Canada Limited (type certificate previously held by Bell 
Helicopter Textron Canada Limited) (Bell) Model 429 helicopters. This 
AD was prompted by the identification of certain parts needing life 
limits and certification maintenance requirement (CMR) tasks. This AD 
requires establishing life limits and CMR tasks for various parts. 
Depending on the results of the CMR tasks, this AD requires corrective 
action. The FAA is issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on 
these products.

DATES: This AD is effective July 29, 2021.

ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this final rule, 
contact Bell Textron Canada Limited, 12,800 Rue de l'Avenir, Mirabel, 
Quebec J7J 1R4, Canada; telephone 1-450-437-2862 or 1-800-363-8023; fax 
1-450-433-0272; email [email protected]; or at https://www.bellflight.com/support/contact-support. You may view the referenced 
service information at the FAA, Office of the Regional Counsel, 
Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N-321, Fort Worth, TX 
76177.

Examining the AD Docket

    You may examine the AD docket at https://www.regulations.gov by 
searching for and locating Docket No. FAA-2021-0267; or in person at 
Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this

[[Page 33092]]

final rule, the Transport Canada AD, any comments received, and other 
information. The street address for Docket Operations is U.S. 
Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M-30, West Building 
Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 
20590.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Matt Fuller, AD Program Manager, 
General Aviation & Rotorcraft Unit, Airworthiness Products Section, 
Operational Safety Branch, FAA, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 
76177; telephone (817) 222-5110; email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    The FAA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 
CFR part 39 by adding an AD that would apply to Bell Model 429 
helicopters, serial numbers 57001 and subsequent. The NPRM published in 
the Federal Register on April 8, 2021 (86 FR 18218). In the NPRM, the 
FAA proposed to require establishing a life limit for certain part-
numbered tail rotor outboard flapping bearings and a certain part-
numbered hoist kit cable cutter cartridge. The NPRM also proposed to 
require establishing recurring CMR tasks for a certain part-numbered 
wheeled landing gear system, float/life raft kit, and hoist kit, and 
depending on the results of the CMR tasks, corrective action. The NPRM 
was prompted by Canadian AD CF-2017-16, dated May 17, 2017, issued by 
Transport Canada, which is the aviation authority of Canada, to correct 
an unsafe condition for Bell Model 429 helicopters, serial numbers 
57001 and subsequent. Transport Canada advises that Bell has 
established life limits and CMR tasks for various parts and accordingly 
revised Chapter 4--Airworthiness Limitations Schedule of Bell 
Helicopter 429 Maintenance Manual BHT-429-MM-1 to Revision 26, dated 
September 9, 2016 (BHT-429-MM-1). Transport Canada states that failure 
to replace life-limited parts or perform CMR tasks as specified could 
result in an unsafe condition.
    Accordingly, the Transport Canada AD requires updating the 
maintenance schedule for the parts affected with the airworthiness life 
limits and CMR tasks in Revision 26 of BHT-429-MM-1.

Discussion of Final Airworthiness Directive

Comments

    The FAA received comments from one commenter. The commenter was 
Bell. The following presents the comments received on the NPRM and the 
FAA's response to each comment.

Request To Change the Compliance Time of the Hoist Cable Anti-Foul 
Assembly Operational Check

    Bell requested changing the compliance time of the hoist cable 
anti-foul assembly operational check from before the first flight of 
the day involving a hoist operation to after the last flight of the 
day. Bell requested this change to avoid the potential to suspend 
critical operations in order to accomplish the check and any required 
corrective maintenance because according to Bell, hoist equipment 
serves an essential service and may be required for critical missions 
with minimal notice. Bell further stated that this task was established 
based on the system safety assessment for the Bell Model 429 helicopter 
hoist installation and exposure based on a daily check after the last 
flight was considered in that assessment to conservatively meet 
acceptable reliability targets for its Major hazard classification.
    The FAA disagrees with the request to change the compliance time to 
after the last flight of the day. The compliance time of before the 
first flight of the day is standard practice in rotorcraft AD actions 
for enforceability purposes. However, this wording does not imply that 
the operational check and corrective action must be done on the same 
calendar day as the first flight of the day involving a hoist 
operation. In light of this, the FAA has made no changes based on this 
request.

Conclusion

    These helicopters have been approved by the aviation authority of 
Canada and are approved for operation in the United States. Pursuant to 
the FAA's bilateral agreement with Canada, Transport Canada has 
notified the FAA about the unsafe condition described in its AD. The 
FAA reviewed the relevant data, considered the comments received, and 
determined that air safety requires adopting this AD as proposed. 
Accordingly, the FAA is issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition 
on these helicopters. Except, since issuance of the NPRM, Bell has 
updated its contact information to obtain service documentation by 
changing its website address and adding an email address. This final 
rule reflects those changes and this AD is otherwise adopted as 
proposed in the NPRM. None of the changes increase the economic burden 
on any operator.

Related Service Information

    The FAA reviewed Chapter 4--Airworthiness Limitations Schedule of 
BHT-429-MM-1. This service information specifies airworthiness life 
limits, inspection intervals, and CMR requirements for parts installed 
on Model 429 helicopters. Revision 26 of this service information 
establishes life limits for a certain part-numbered tail rotor flapping 
outboard bearing and hoist kit cartridge cable cutter and CMR 
requirements for a certain part-numbered wheeled landing gear system, 
float/life raft kit, and hoist kit.
    Additionally, the FAA reviewed Chapter 96-47--600-Pound External 
Hoist Electrical System--Operational Check, of Bell 429 Maintenance 
Manual Supplement For 600-Pound External Hoist Kit, BHT-429-MMS-4, 
Revision 1, dated March 14, 2014. This service information specifies 
inspection procedures and corrective action for various components of 
the hoist system.
    Lastly, the FAA reviewed Testing and Fault Isolation, pages 101-
117/118, Cleaning, pages 401-405/406, and Scheduled Maintenance, pages 
609-611/612, of Goodrich Rescue Hoist System Component Maintenance 
Manual 25-00-38-1, dated July 15, 2009, for rescue hoist assembly part 
number 44316-12-102. This service information specifies maintenance 
procedures and lists replacement parts for this part-numbered Goodrich 
rescue hoist assembly.

Differences Between This AD and the Transport Canada AD

    This AD requires corrective action for failed CMR tasks, whereas 
the Transport Canada AD does not. The Transport Canada AD requires 
accomplishing an operational check of the hoist cable anti-foul 
assembly daily after the last flight, whereas this AD requires this 
action before the first flight of the day involving a hoist operation 
instead.

Costs of Compliance

    The FAA estimates that this AD affects 110 helicopters of U.S. 
Registry. Labor rates are estimated at $85 per work-hour. Based on 
these numbers, the FAA estimates the following costs to comply with 
this AD.
    Replacing a tail rotor outboard flapping bearing takes about 4 
work-hours and parts cost about $7,500 for an estimated cost of $7,840 
per helicopter and $862,400 for the U.S. fleet, per replacement cycle. 
Replacing a hoist kit cable cutter cartridge takes about 3 work-hours 
and parts cost about $5,200 for an estimated cost of $5,455 per 
helicopter and $600,050 for the U.S. fleet, per replacement cycle.

[[Page 33093]]

    Performing a functional check of the wheeled landing gear system 
takes about 4 work-hours for an estimated cost of $340 per helicopter 
and $37,400 for the U.S. fleet, per cycle. Performing a functional 
check of the float/life raft kit takes about 2 work-hours for an 
estimated cost of $170 per helicopter and $18,700 for the U.S. fleet, 
per cycle.
    Performing an operational check of the hoist kit cable anti-foul 
assembly takes about 2 work-hours for an estimated cost of $170 per 
helicopter and $18,700 for the U.S. fleet, per cycle. Cleaning, 
visually inspecting, and lubricating the rescue hoist cable takes about 
2 work-hours for an estimated cost of $170 per helicopter and $18,700 
for the U.S. fleet, per cycle. Performing an operational check of the 
hoist kit speed limit switches and the electrical system takes about 
0.5 work-hour for an estimated cost of $43 per helicopter and $4,730 
for the U.S. fleet, per cycle. Performing a functional check of the 
cable cutter cartridge electrical system takes about 3 work-hours for 
an estimated cost of $255 per helicopter and $28,050 for the U.S. 
fleet, per cycle.
    The FAA has no way of determining the estimated costs to do 
allowable repairs based on the results of the CMR tasks. If required, 
replacing the float/life raft takes about 2 work-hours and parts cost 
about $5,000 for an estimated cost of $5,170 per float/life raft. 
Replacing the anti-foul assembly takes about 3 work-hours and parts 
cost about $1,500 for an estimated cost of $1,755 per anti-foul 
assembly. Replacing a rescue hoist cable takes about 3 work-hours and 
parts cost about $3,150 for an estimated cost of $3,405 per rescue 
hoist cable. Overhauling a rescue hoist assembly costs about $83,000 
and it takes about 8 work-hours to remove and reinstall the hoist for a 
labor cost of $680, for a total estimated cost of $83,680 per 
helicopter, per overhaul cycle. Alternatively, replacing a hoist takes 
about 8 work-hours and parts cost about $200,000 for an estimated cost 
of $200,680 per helicopter, per replacement cycle.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    The FAA is issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: General requirements. 
Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight 
of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for 
practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary 
for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that 
authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to 
exist or develop on helicopters identified in this rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    This AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 
13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, 
on the relationship between the national government and the States, or 
on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various 
levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
    (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive 
Order 12866,
    (2) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and
    (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

The Amendment

    Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the 
Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness 
directive:

2021-13-15 Bell Textron Canada Limited (Type Certificate Previously 
Held by Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited): Amendment 39-21620; 
Docket No. FAA-2021-0267; Project Identifier 2017-SW-110-AD.

(a) Effective Date

    This airworthiness directive (AD) is effective July 29, 2021.

(b) Affected ADs

    None.

(c) Applicability

    This AD applies to Bell Textron Canada Limited (type certificate 
previously held by Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Limited) Model 429 
helicopters, certificated in any category, serial numbers 57001 and 
subsequent.

(d) Subject

    Joint Aircraft Service Component (JASC) Code: 3200, Landing Gear 
Systems, and 2560, Emergency Equipment.

(e) Unsafe Condition

    This AD was prompted by parts remaining in service beyond their 
fatigue life or beyond maintenance intervals required by the 
certification maintenance requirements (CMRs) of the Instructions 
for Continued Airworthiness. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent 
failure of a part, which could result in loss of control of the 
helicopter.

(f) Compliance

    Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, 
unless already done.

(g) Required Actions

    (1) Before further flight after the effective date of this AD, 
remove from service any part that has reached or exceeded its life 
limit as follows. Thereafter, remove from service each part on or 
before reaching its life limit as follows:
    (i) Tail rotor outboard flapping bearing part number (P/N) 429-
312-103-117 and 429-312-103-119: 15,000 total hours time-in-service 
(TIS).
    (ii) Hoist kit cable cutter cartridge P/N 42315-281: 5 years 
since date of manufacture.
    (2) Before further flight after the effective date of this AD, 
perform the following CMR tasks for any part that has reached or 
exceeded its CMR interval as follows. Thereafter, perform the 
following CMR tasks for each part on or before reaching its CMR 
interval as follows:
    Note 1 to paragraph (g)(2): Chapter 4--Airworthiness Limitations 
Schedule of Bell Helicopter 429 Maintenance Manual BHT-429-MM-1 to 
Revision 26, dated September 9, 2016, contains additional 
information about the CMR tasks.
    (i) Wheeled Landing Gear System P/N 429-705-001-101: 800 hours 
TIS or 1 year, whichever occurs first, perform a functional check of 
the Emergency Gear Release. If the functional check fails, before 
further flight, repair in accordance with FAA-approved procedures.
    (ii) Float/Life Raft Kit P/N 429-706-069-101: 1,600 hours TIS, 
perform a functional check of the float/life raft kit electrical 
system to determine if there are any dormant failures including: 
Manual inflation switch, water immersion switch, auto-activation 
relay, manual activation relay, raft activation relay, test 
activation relay, and the fuse disc elements. If there is a failure, 
before next flight over water, replace the float/life raft.
    (iii) Hoist Kit P/N 429-706-001-101:
    (A) Before the first flight of the day involving a hoist 
operation, perform an operational check of the hoist cable anti-foul

[[Page 33094]]

assembly. If the operational check fails, before next flight 
involving a hoist operation, repair or replace the anti-foul 
assembly.
    (B) 3 hoist operating hours, clean, visually inspect the rescue 
hoist cable for damage, which may be indicated by a broken wire, 
kink, bird caging, flattened area, abrasion, or necking. If there is 
any damage, before further flight, replace the rescue hoist cable. 
If there is no damage, before further flight, lubricate the rescue 
hoist cable. For purposes of this AD, hoist operating hours are 
counted anytime the hoist motor is operating.
    Note 2 to paragraph (g)(2)(iii)(B): Bell Helicopter service 
information refers to hoist operating hours as hoisting hours.
    (C) 800 hours TIS or 1 year, whichever occurs first, perform an 
operational check of the speed limit switches and perform an 
operational check of the 600-pound external hoist electrical system 
to inspect operation of the HOIST HOT caution light. If an 
operational check fails, before next flight involving a hoist 
operation, repair in accordance with FAA-approved procedures or 
replace the hoist.
    (D) 2,200 hours TIS or 111 hoist operating hours, whichever 
occurs first, perform a functional check of the cable cutter 
cartridge electrical system to inspect for correct functioning of 
the cable cutter switches (hoist pendant, pilot cyclic, and copilot 
cyclic) and associated wiring. If a functional check fails, before 
next flight involving a hoist operation, repair in accordance with 
FAA-approved procedures or replace the hoist.
    (E) 111 hoist operating hours, overhaul or replace the hoist.

(h) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

    (1) The Manager, International Validation Branch, FAA, has the 
authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the 
procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, 
send your request to your principal inspector or local Flight 
Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending information 
directly to the manager of the International Validation Branch, send 
it to the attention of the person identified in paragraph (i)(1) of 
this AD. Information may be emailed to: [email protected].
    (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate 
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager 
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding 
district office.

(i) Related Information

    (1) For more information about this AD, contact Matt Fuller, AD 
Program Manager, General Aviation & Rotorcraft Unit, Airworthiness 
Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, FAA, 10101 Hillwood 
Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone (817) 222-5110; email 
[email protected].
    (2) Chapter 4--Airworthiness Limitations Schedule of Bell 
Helicopter 429 Maintenance Manual BHT-429-MM-1 to Revision 26, dated 
September 9, 2016, which is not incorporated by reference, contains 
additional information about the subject of this AD. For service 
information identified in this AD, contact Bell Textron Canada 
Limited, 12,800 Rue de l'Avenir, Mirabel, Quebec J7J 1R4, Canada; 
telephone 1-450-437-2862 or 1-800-363-8023; fax 1-450-433-0272; 
email [email protected]; or at https://www.bellflight.com/support/contact-support. You may view this 
referenced service information at the FAA, Office of the Regional 
Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N-321, Fort 
Worth, TX 76177. For information on the availability of this 
material at the FAA, call (817) 222-5110.
    (3) The subject of this AD is addressed in Transport Canada AD 
CF-2017-16, dated May 17, 2017. You may view the Transport Canada AD 
at https://www.regulations.gov in Docket No. FAA-2021-0267.

    Issued on June 17, 2021.
Gaetano A. Sciortino,
Deputy Director for Strategic Initiatives, Compliance & Airworthiness 
Division, Aircraft Certification Service.
[FR Doc. 2021-13193 Filed 6-23-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P