Electrification and the Grid of the Future; Supplemental Notice of Technical Conference, 23713-23715 [2021-09358]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 4, 2021 / Notices obtain copies of the application directly from the applicant. m. Individuals desiring to be included on the Commission’s mailing list should so indicate by writing to the Secretary of the Commission. n. Comments, Protests, or Motions to Intervene: Anyone may submit comments, a protest, or a motion to intervene in accordance with the requirements of Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.210, .211, .214, respectively. In determining the appropriate action to take, the Commission will consider all protests or other comments filed, but only those who file a motion to intervene in accordance with the Commission’s Rules may become a party to the proceeding. Any comments, protests, or motions to intervene must be received on or before the specified comment date for the particular application. o. Filing and Service of Documents: Any filing must (1) bear in all capital letters the title ‘‘COMMENTS’’, ‘‘PROTEST’’, or ‘‘MOTION TO INTERVENE’’ as applicable; (2) set forth in the heading the name of the applicant and the project number of the application to which the filing responds; (3) furnish the name, address, and telephone number of the person commenting, protesting or intervening; and (4) otherwise comply with the requirements of 18 CFR 385.2001 through 385.2005. All comments, motions to intervene, or protests must set forth their evidentiary basis. Any filing made by an intervenor must be accompanied by proof of service on all persons listed in the service list prepared by the Commission in this proceeding, in accordance with 18 CFR 385.2010. Dated: April 29, 2021. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2021–09346 Filed 5–3–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717–01–P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES [Docket No. RP21–751–000] ConocoPhillips Company, Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC, Exelon Corporation, NextEra Energy Marketing, LLC v. Panhandle Eastern Pipe Line Company, LP; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on April 23, 2021, pursuant to section 5 of the Natural Gas Act, 15 U.S.C. 717d (2018), and Rule VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:13 May 03, 2021 Jkt 253001 206 of the Rules of Practice and Procedures of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206 (2021), ConocoPhillips Company, Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC, Exelon Corporation, and NextEra Energy Marketing, LLC (Complainants) filed a formal complaint against Panhandle Eastern Pipe Line Company, LP (Respondent), alleging that Respondent’s failure to waive operational flow order penalties incurred after February 15, 2021 is unduly discriminatory, inconsistent with Commission policy and precedent, and inconsistent with Respondent’s tariff, all as more fully explained in the complaint. The Complainants certify that copies of the complaint were served on the contacts listed for Respondent in the Commission’s list of Corporate Officials. Any person desiring to intervene or to protest this filing must file in accordance with Rules 211 and 214 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (18 CFR 385.211, 385.214). Protests will be considered by the Commission in determining the appropriate action to be taken, but will not serve to make protestants parties to the proceeding. Any person wishing to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to intervene, as appropriate. The Respondent’s answer and all interventions, or protests must be filed on or before the comment date. The Respondent’s answer, motions to intervene, and protests must be served on the Complainants. The Commission strongly encourages electronic filings of comments, protests and interventions in lieu of paper using the ‘‘eFiling’’ link at http:// www.ferc.gov. Persons unable to file electronically may mail similar pleadings to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20426. Hand delivered submissions in docketed proceedings should be delivered to Health and Human Services, 12225 Wilkins Avenue, Rockville, Maryland 20852. In addition to publishing the full text of this document in the Federal Register, the Commission provides all interested persons an opportunity to view and/or print the contents of this document via the internet through the Commission’s Home Page (http:// ferc.gov) using the ‘‘eLibrary’’ link. Enter the docket number excluding the last three digits in the docket number field to access the document. At this time, the Commission has suspended access to the Commission’s Public Reference Room, due to the proclamation declaring a National PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 23713 Emergency concerning the Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID–19), issued by the President on March 13, 2020. For assistance, contact FERC at FERCOnlineSupport@ferc.gov or call toll-free, (886) 208–3676 or TYY, (202) 502–8659. Comment Date: 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on May 13, 2021. Dated: April 29, 2021. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2021–09357 Filed 5–3–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717–01–P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. AD21–12–000] Electrification and the Grid of the Future; Supplemental Notice of Technical Conference As first announced in the Notice of Technical Conference issued in this proceeding on March 2, 2021, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) will convene a Commissioner-led technical conference in the above-referenced proceeding on Thursday, April 29, 2021, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Eastern Time. The conference will be held electronically. Attached to this Supplemental Notice is an agenda for the technical conference, which includes the final conference program. Discussions at the conference may involve issues raised in proceedings that are currently pending before the Commission. These proceedings include, but are not limited to: Michigan Electric Transmission Company, LLC, Docket No. ER21–424; Participation of Distributed Energy Resource Aggregations in Markets Operated by Regional Transmission Organizations and Independent System Operators, Docket No. RM18– 9. The conference will be open for the public to attend electronically. There is no fee for attendance. Registration for the conference is not required. Information on this technical conference, including a link to the webcast, will be posted on the conference’s event page on the Commission’s website, https:// www.ferc.gov/news-events/events/ technical-conference-discusselectrification-and-grid-future04292021, prior to the event. The conference will be transcribed. Transcripts of the conference will be E:\FR\FM\04MYN1.SGM 04MYN1 23714 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 4, 2021 / Notices available for a fee from Ace-Federal Reporters, Inc. (202) 347–3700. Commission conferences are accessible under section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. For accessibility accommodations, please send an email to accessibility@ferc.gov, call toll free (866) 208–3372 (voice) or (202) 208–8659 (TTY) or send a fax to (202) 208–2106 with the required accommodations. For more information about this technical conference, please contact: Michael Hill (Technical Information), Office of Energy Policy and Innovation, (202) 502–8703, Michael.Hill@ferc.gov Sarah Greenberg (Legal Information), Office of General Counsel, (202) 502– 6230, Sarah.Greenberg@ferc.gov Sarah McKinley (Logistical Information), Office of External Affairs, (202) 502–8004, Sarah.Mckinley@ferc.gov Dated: April 29, 2021. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. Panelists Technical Conference on Electrification and the Grid of the Future Docket No. AD21–12–000 April 29, 2021 Agenda and Speakers khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES 10:00 a.m.–10:15 a.m.: Welcome and Opening Remarks 10:15 a.m.–11:45 a.m.: Panel 1: Projections, Drivers, and Risks of Electrification This panel will explore the future and current state of electrification in the United States. Panelists will discuss how electrification could unfold, including the major drivers of electrification, the sectors and key technologies implicated, and the likelihood and magnitude of change to electricity demand under various electrification scenarios. Panelists will also discuss the environmental justice considerations and cybersecurity risks associated with electrification. The panel may include a discussion of the following questions: 1. What are the main drivers of electrification? Is the shift from using non-electric sources of energy to using electricity more pronounced in certain sectors or industries? How might public policy, energy costs, and technology drive electrification in the future? 2. What technologies are commercially available and currently being deployed to electrify different sectors or industries? What sectors and industries are driving the implementation of these technologies VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:13 May 03, 2021 and how are they implementing them? How quickly are these technologies being deployed, and are there regional differences in the scope and rate of deployment? 3. How is electrification expected to affect electricity demand growth in the short term and the long term? How might electrification change electricity demand in the future in terms of daily and seasonal demand patterns, absolute magnitude of electricity demand on average, and during peak periods? 4. How might electrification affect marginalized communities? What are the environmental justice considerations associated with electrification? 5. What are the cybersecurity, reliability, and operational risks and/or benefits associated with specific technologies and industrial processes solely dependent on electricity and the corresponding change in electricity demand? Jkt 253001 • Rob Chapman, Senior Vice President for Energy Delivery and Customer Solutions, Electric Power Research Institute • Katherine Hamilton, Chair, 38 North Solutions; Executive Director, Advanced Energy Management Alliance; and Co-Chair, World Economic Forum Global Future Council on Clean Electrification • Jeff Dennis, General Counsel and Managing Director, Advanced Energy Economy • Matthew Tisdale, Executive Director, Gridworks • Adrienne Mouton-Henderson, Deputy Director, Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance (REBA) • Carlos Casablanca, Managing Director, Distribution Planning and Analysis, American Electric Power • Ella Zhou, Senior Modeling Engineer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) • Glenn Blackmon, Manager, Energy Policy Office, Washington State Department of Commerce 11:45 a.m.–12:00 p.m.: Break 12:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.: Panel 2: Infrastructure Requirements of Electrification This panel will focus on how transmission owners and system operators in both regional transmission organization (RTO) and independent system operator (ISO) regions and nonRTO/ISO regions are planning to costeffectively and reliably integrate changes in electricity demand due to electrification and whether there are any PO 00000 Frm 00045 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 existing challenges in transmission, interconnection, and resource adequacy planning processes that need to be addressed. Beyond planning, the panel will explore the types of infrastructure investments electrification may require, including additional generation; local, regional, and interregional transmission; and distribution investments. The panel may include a discussion of the following questions: 1. What type of infrastructure investments are required to address the respective challenges of electrification (i.e., additional generation, local, regional or interregional transmission, and distribution investments)? 2. What approaches are transmission owners and system operators taking to cost-effectively meet the infrastructure requirements of projected electrification in the current transmission, interconnection, and resource adequacy planning processes? How do these approaches consider reliability, and what impacts do those considerations have on the need for infrastructure investment for electrification? 3. What measures are being taken to identify and align the costs of investments needed for electrification with the beneficiaries? 4. What, if any, existing regulatory and/or tariff requirements act as barriers to, or otherwise do not consider, electrification and its associated growth in demand? For example, does the scenario modeling in current regional transmission planning processes reflect increased demand due to electrification driven by market trends and public policies? Panelists • Pedro Pizarro, Vice Chairman, Edison Electric Institute; President and CEO, Edison International • Jordan Bakke, Senior Manager of Policy Studies, Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc. • Rachel Huang, Director of Energy Strategy, Research & Development, Sacramento Municipal Utility District • Dr. Asa Hopkins, Vice President, Synapse Energy Economics • Ric O’Connell, Executive Director, Gridlab • Larry Gasteiger, Executive Director, WIRES • Gary Rackliffe, Vice President of Market Development and Innovation, Hitachi ABB Power Grids • Roger Kranenburg, Vice President of Energy Strategy & Policy, Eversource Energy E:\FR\FM\04MYN1.SGM 04MYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 84 / Tuesday, May 4, 2021 / Notices 1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m.: Lunch 2:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.: Panel 3: Transmission and Distribution System Services Provided by Flexible Demand This panel will explore transmission and distribution grid services that can be provided by newly electrified resources (e.g., electric vehicles, smart thermostats, heat pumps, etc.) and the technology required for these resources to provide grid services. It will also discuss whether any barriers exist to these resources providing grid services they are technically capable of providing. The panel may include a discussion of the following questions: 1. What grid services can newly electrified resources provide or otherwise facilitate? a. For example, what grid services can consumer electric vehicles or electric vehicle fleets most effectively provide today? What is the current state of development for vehicle-to-grid technologies, and will further advancements enable consumer electric vehicles or electric vehicle fleets to provide additional grid services in the future? b. What other types of newly electrified resources can currently provide grid services, and what grid services can they most effectively provide? For example, can gridinteractive buildings be meaningful sources of flexible demand? c. What, if any, newly electrified resources cannot currently provide grid services, but may be able to in the future? What barriers must be overcome for that to occur? 2. What technological capabilities (e.g., interoperability) 1 are required for newly electrified resources to provide grid services? What is the current state of development for these capabilities? What could speed up or slow down such development? 3. What challenges exist to deploying newly electrified resources to provide grid services in the RTO/ISO and nonRTO/ISO regions? 4. What barriers, if any, exist to newly electrified resources providing grid services in wholesale or retail markets? khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Panelists • Adrianne Collins, Senior Vice President of Power Delivery, Southern Company 1 Interoperability refers to ‘‘the capability of two or more networks, systems, devices, applications, or components to work together, and to exchange and readily use information—securely, effectively, and with little or no inconvenience to the user.’’ See National Institute of Standards and Technology, Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. Spec. Publ. 1108r4, at 3 (2021). VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:13 May 03, 2021 Jkt 253001 • Pamela MacDougall, Senior Manager of Grid Modernization, Environmental Defense Fund • Maria Bocanegra, Commissioner, Illinois Commerce Commission; Chair, NARUC EV Working Group • Garrett Fitzgerald, Principal of Electrification, Smart Electric Power Alliance • Peter Klauer, Senior Advisor Smart Grid Technology, California Independent System Operator Corporation • Anne Smart, Vice President of Public Policy, ChargePoint • Jeff Deason, Program Manager in Electricity Markets and Policy Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory • David Nemtzow, Director of the Building Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy 4:00 p.m.–4:15 p.m.: Break 4:15 p.m.–5:45 p.m.: Panel 4: Local, State, and Federal Coordination This panel will explore the roles of local, state, and federal governmental entities, with regard to electrification moving forward. This panel will focus on how local, state, and federal governmental entities can coordinate to ensure the grid is prepared to handle additional load from electrification and to ensure that newly electrified sources of energy demand provide the grid services they are technically capable of providing. The panel may include a discussion of the following questions: 1. What role can coordination among local, state, and federal governmental entities play with regard to electrification? 2. What planning and coordination among local, state, and federal governmental entities is necessary to facilitate the provision of grid services by newly electrified resources in a way that maximizes benefits to the grid while decreasing the potential reliability, operational, and cybersecurity risks that electrification could pose? 3. Regional initiatives and multi-state cooperation efforts have formed in recent years to coordinate EV charging infrastructure deployment. What can we learn from those efforts and what role, if any, does the federal government play in supporting those efforts? 4. How can interoperability protocols and standards be coordinated across local, state, and federal jurisdictions? 5. What coordination efforts among local, state, and federal governmental entities have been most effective in addressing electrification? How could those coordination efforts be improved? PO 00000 Frm 00046 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 23715 Panelists • Norman C. Bay, Partner, Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP • Ann Rendahl, Commissioner, Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission; Chair, NARUC Committee on Electricity • Bob Ethier, Vice President of System Planning, ISO-New England Inc. • John Williams, Vice President of Policy and Regulatory Affairs, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) • Emeka Anyanwu, Officer, Energy Innovation & Resources Business Unit, Seattle City Light • Phil Jones, Executive Director, Alliance for Transportation Electrification • Sara Baldwin, Director of Electrification Policy, Energy Innovation • Abigail Anthony, Commissioner, Rhode Island Public Utility Commission 5:45 p.m.–6:00 p.m.: Closing Remarks [FR Doc. 2021–09358 Filed 5–3–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717–01–P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL21–69–000] Dairyland Power Cooperative; Notice of Request for Partial Waiver Take notice that on April 27, 2021, pursuant to section 292.402 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (Commission) regulations, 18 CFR 292.402, Dairyland Power Cooperative (Dairyland), on behalf of itself and on behalf of 24 rural electric cooperative member-owners (collectively, the Participating Members),1 submitted a request for partial waiver of certain obligations imposed on the Participating Members and on Dairyland through the 1 Dairyland’s Participating Member-owners joining in this petition are Barron Electric Cooperative, Bayfield Electric Cooperative, Chippewa Valley Electric Cooperative, Clark Electric Cooperative, Dunn Energy Cooperative, Eau Claire Energy Cooperative, Jackson Electric Cooperative, Jump River Electric Cooperative, Oakdale Electric Cooperative, Pierce Pepin Cooperative Services, Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, Price Electric Cooperative, Inc., Richland Electric Cooperative, Riverland Energy Cooperative, St. Croix Electric Cooperative, Scenic Rivers Energy Cooperative, Taylor Electric Cooperative, Vernon Electric Cooperative, Allamakee-Clayton Electric Cooperative, Inc., Heartland Power Cooperative, Freeborn-Mower Cooperative Services, People’s Energy Cooperative, MiEnergy Cooperative, and Jo-Carroll Energy. E:\FR\FM\04MYN1.SGM 04MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 84 (Tuesday, May 4, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 23713-23715]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-09358]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

[Docket No. AD21-12-000]


Electrification and the Grid of the Future; Supplemental Notice 
of Technical Conference

    As first announced in the Notice of Technical Conference issued in 
this proceeding on March 2, 2021, the Federal Energy Regulatory 
Commission (Commission) will convene a Commissioner-led technical 
conference in the above-referenced proceeding on Thursday, April 29, 
2021, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Eastern Time. The conference will be 
held electronically. Attached to this Supplemental Notice is an agenda 
for the technical conference, which includes the final conference 
program.
    Discussions at the conference may involve issues raised in 
proceedings that are currently pending before the Commission. These 
proceedings include, but are not limited to:

Michigan Electric Transmission Company, LLC, Docket No. ER21-424; 
Participation of Distributed Energy Resource Aggregations in Markets 
Operated by Regional Transmission Organizations and Independent System 
Operators, Docket No. RM18-9.

    The conference will be open for the public to attend 
electronically. There is no fee for attendance. Registration for the 
conference is not required. Information on this technical conference, 
including a link to the webcast, will be posted on the conference's 
event page on the Commission's website, https://www.ferc.gov/news-events/events/technical-conference-discuss-electrification-and-grid-future-04292021, prior to the event.
    The conference will be transcribed. Transcripts of the conference 
will be

[[Page 23714]]

available for a fee from Ace-Federal Reporters, Inc. (202) 347-3700.
    Commission conferences are accessible under section 508 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973. For accessibility accommodations, please 
send an email to [email protected], call toll free (866) 208-3372 
(voice) or (202) 208-8659 (TTY) or send a fax to (202) 208-2106 with 
the required accommodations.
    For more information about this technical conference, please 
contact:

Michael Hill (Technical Information), Office of Energy Policy and 
Innovation, (202) 502-8703, [email protected]
Sarah Greenberg (Legal Information), Office of General Counsel, (202) 
502-6230, [email protected]
Sarah McKinley (Logistical Information), Office of External Affairs, 
(202) 502-8004, [email protected]

    Dated: April 29, 2021.
Kimberly D. Bose,
Secretary.

Technical Conference on Electrification and the Grid of the Future

Docket No. AD21-12-000

April 29, 2021

Agenda and Speakers

10:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.: Welcome and Opening Remarks

10:15 a.m.-11:45 a.m.: Panel 1: Projections, Drivers, and Risks of 
Electrification

    This panel will explore the future and current state of 
electrification in the United States. Panelists will discuss how 
electrification could unfold, including the major drivers of 
electrification, the sectors and key technologies implicated, and the 
likelihood and magnitude of change to electricity demand under various 
electrification scenarios. Panelists will also discuss the 
environmental justice considerations and cybersecurity risks associated 
with electrification. The panel may include a discussion of the 
following questions:
    1. What are the main drivers of electrification? Is the shift from 
using non-electric sources of energy to using electricity more 
pronounced in certain sectors or industries? How might public policy, 
energy costs, and technology drive electrification in the future?
    2. What technologies are commercially available and currently being 
deployed to electrify different sectors or industries? What sectors and 
industries are driving the implementation of these technologies and how 
are they implementing them? How quickly are these technologies being 
deployed, and are there regional differences in the scope and rate of 
deployment?
    3. How is electrification expected to affect electricity demand 
growth in the short term and the long term? How might electrification 
change electricity demand in the future in terms of daily and seasonal 
demand patterns, absolute magnitude of electricity demand on average, 
and during peak periods?
    4. How might electrification affect marginalized communities? What 
are the environmental justice considerations associated with 
electrification?
    5. What are the cybersecurity, reliability, and operational risks 
and/or benefits associated with specific technologies and industrial 
processes solely dependent on electricity and the corresponding change 
in electricity demand?
Panelists
 Rob Chapman, Senior Vice President for Energy Delivery and 
Customer Solutions, Electric Power Research Institute
 Katherine Hamilton, Chair, 38 North Solutions; Executive 
Director, Advanced Energy Management Alliance; and Co-Chair, World 
Economic Forum Global Future Council on Clean Electrification
 Jeff Dennis, General Counsel and Managing Director, Advanced 
Energy Economy
 Matthew Tisdale, Executive Director, Gridworks
 Adrienne Mouton-Henderson, Deputy Director, Renewable Energy 
Buyers Alliance (REBA)
 Carlos Casablanca, Managing Director, Distribution Planning 
and Analysis, American Electric Power
 Ella Zhou, Senior Modeling Engineer, National Renewable Energy 
Laboratory (NREL)
 Glenn Blackmon, Manager, Energy Policy Office, Washington 
State Department of Commerce

11:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m.: Break

12:00 p.m.-1:30 p.m.: Panel 2: Infrastructure Requirements of 
Electrification

    This panel will focus on how transmission owners and system 
operators in both regional transmission organization (RTO) and 
independent system operator (ISO) regions and non-RTO/ISO regions are 
planning to cost-effectively and reliably integrate changes in 
electricity demand due to electrification and whether there are any 
existing challenges in transmission, interconnection, and resource 
adequacy planning processes that need to be addressed. Beyond planning, 
the panel will explore the types of infrastructure investments 
electrification may require, including additional generation; local, 
regional, and interregional transmission; and distribution investments. 
The panel may include a discussion of the following questions:
    1. What type of infrastructure investments are required to address 
the respective challenges of electrification (i.e., additional 
generation, local, regional or interregional transmission, and 
distribution investments)?
    2. What approaches are transmission owners and system operators 
taking to cost-effectively meet the infrastructure requirements of 
projected electrification in the current transmission, interconnection, 
and resource adequacy planning processes? How do these approaches 
consider reliability, and what impacts do those considerations have on 
the need for infrastructure investment for electrification?
    3. What measures are being taken to identify and align the costs of 
investments needed for electrification with the beneficiaries?
    4. What, if any, existing regulatory and/or tariff requirements act 
as barriers to, or otherwise do not consider, electrification and its 
associated growth in demand? For example, does the scenario modeling in 
current regional transmission planning processes reflect increased 
demand due to electrification driven by market trends and public 
policies?
Panelists
 Pedro Pizarro, Vice Chairman, Edison Electric Institute; 
President and CEO, Edison International
 Jordan Bakke, Senior Manager of Policy Studies, Midcontinent 
Independent System Operator, Inc.
 Rachel Huang, Director of Energy Strategy, Research & 
Development, Sacramento Municipal Utility District
 Dr. Asa Hopkins, Vice President, Synapse Energy Economics
 Ric O'Connell, Executive Director, Gridlab
 Larry Gasteiger, Executive Director, WIRES
 Gary Rackliffe, Vice President of Market Development and 
Innovation, Hitachi ABB Power Grids
 Roger Kranenburg, Vice President of Energy Strategy & Policy, 
Eversource Energy

[[Page 23715]]

1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.: Lunch

2:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m.: Panel 3: Transmission and Distribution System 
Services Provided by Flexible Demand

    This panel will explore transmission and distribution grid services 
that can be provided by newly electrified resources (e.g., electric 
vehicles, smart thermostats, heat pumps, etc.) and the technology 
required for these resources to provide grid services. It will also 
discuss whether any barriers exist to these resources providing grid 
services they are technically capable of providing. The panel may 
include a discussion of the following questions:
    1. What grid services can newly electrified resources provide or 
otherwise facilitate?
    a. For example, what grid services can consumer electric vehicles 
or electric vehicle fleets most effectively provide today? What is the 
current state of development for vehicle-to-grid technologies, and will 
further advancements enable consumer electric vehicles or electric 
vehicle fleets to provide additional grid services in the future?
    b. What other types of newly electrified resources can currently 
provide grid services, and what grid services can they most effectively 
provide? For example, can grid-interactive buildings be meaningful 
sources of flexible demand?
    c. What, if any, newly electrified resources cannot currently 
provide grid services, but may be able to in the future? What barriers 
must be overcome for that to occur?
    2. What technological capabilities (e.g., interoperability) \1\ are 
required for newly electrified resources to provide grid services? What 
is the current state of development for these capabilities? What could 
speed up or slow down such development?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ Interoperability refers to ``the capability of two or more 
networks, systems, devices, applications, or components to work 
together, and to exchange and readily use information--securely, 
effectively, and with little or no inconvenience to the user.'' See 
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Natl. Inst. Stand. 
Technol. Spec. Publ. 1108r4, at 3 (2021).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    3. What challenges exist to deploying newly electrified resources 
to provide grid services in the RTO/ISO and non-RTO/ISO regions?
    4. What barriers, if any, exist to newly electrified resources 
providing grid services in wholesale or retail markets?
Panelists
 Adrianne Collins, Senior Vice President of Power Delivery, 
Southern Company
 Pamela MacDougall, Senior Manager of Grid Modernization, 
Environmental Defense Fund
 Maria Bocanegra, Commissioner, Illinois Commerce Commission; 
Chair, NARUC EV Working Group
 Garrett Fitzgerald, Principal of Electrification, Smart 
Electric Power Alliance
 Peter Klauer, Senior Advisor Smart Grid Technology, California 
Independent System Operator Corporation
 Anne Smart, Vice President of Public Policy, ChargePoint
 Jeff Deason, Program Manager in Electricity Markets and Policy 
Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
 David Nemtzow, Director of the Building Technologies Office, 
U.S. Department of Energy

4:00 p.m.-4:15 p.m.: Break

4:15 p.m.-5:45 p.m.: Panel 4: Local, State, and Federal Coordination

    This panel will explore the roles of local, state, and federal 
governmental entities, with regard to electrification moving forward. 
This panel will focus on how local, state, and federal governmental 
entities can coordinate to ensure the grid is prepared to handle 
additional load from electrification and to ensure that newly 
electrified sources of energy demand provide the grid services they are 
technically capable of providing. The panel may include a discussion of 
the following questions:
    1. What role can coordination among local, state, and federal 
governmental entities play with regard to electrification?
    2. What planning and coordination among local, state, and federal 
governmental entities is necessary to facilitate the provision of grid 
services by newly electrified resources in a way that maximizes 
benefits to the grid while decreasing the potential reliability, 
operational, and cybersecurity risks that electrification could pose?
    3. Regional initiatives and multi-state cooperation efforts have 
formed in recent years to coordinate EV charging infrastructure 
deployment. What can we learn from those efforts and what role, if any, 
does the federal government play in supporting those efforts?
    4. How can interoperability protocols and standards be coordinated 
across local, state, and federal jurisdictions?
    5. What coordination efforts among local, state, and federal 
governmental entities have been most effective in addressing 
electrification? How could those coordination efforts be improved?
Panelists
 Norman C. Bay, Partner, Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP
 Ann Rendahl, Commissioner, Washington Utilities and 
Transportation Commission; Chair, NARUC Committee on Electricity
 Bob Ethier, Vice President of System Planning, ISO-New England 
Inc.
 John Williams, Vice President of Policy and Regulatory 
Affairs, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority 
(NYSERDA)
 Emeka Anyanwu, Officer, Energy Innovation & Resources Business 
Unit, Seattle City Light
 Phil Jones, Executive Director, Alliance for Transportation 
Electrification
 Sara Baldwin, Director of Electrification Policy, Energy 
Innovation
 Abigail Anthony, Commissioner, Rhode Island Public Utility 
Commission

5:45 p.m.-6:00 p.m.: Closing Remarks

[FR Doc. 2021-09358 Filed 5-3-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6717-01-P