Notice of Inventory Completion: San Bernardino County Museum, Redlands, CA, 22262-22265 [2021-08774]

Download as PDF 22262 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 79 / Tuesday, April 27, 2021 / Notices specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Anne Amati, University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, 2000 E Asbury Ave, Sturm Hall 146, Denver, CO 80208, telephone (303) 871–2687, email anne.amati@du.edu, by May 27, 2021. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado may proceed. The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology is responsible for notifying the Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado that this notice has been published. Dated: April 19, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–08766 Filed 4–26–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0031784; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: San Bernardino County Museum, Redlands, CA National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The San Bernardino County Museum (SBCM) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects, and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:52 Apr 26, 2021 Jkt 253001 of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the San Bernardino County Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the San Bernardino County Museum at the address in this notice by May 27, 2021. ADDRESSES: Tamara Serrao-Leiva, San Bernardino County Museum, 2024 Orange Tree Lane, Redlands, CA 92374, telephone (909) 798–8623, email tserrao-leiva@sbcm.sbcounty.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the San Bernardino County Museum, Redlands, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from San Bernardino County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the San Bernardino County Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians of the Agua Caliente Indian Reservation, California; Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, California; Cahuilla Band of Indians [previously listed as Cahuilla Band of Mission Indians of the Cahuilla Reservation, California]; Morongo Band of Mission Indians, California [previously listed as Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Morongo Reservation]; San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California PO 00000 Frm 00133 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 [previously listed as San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation]; Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Indians, California [previously listed as Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Santa Rosa Reservation]; Twenty-Nine Palms Band of Mission Indians of California; and the Mission Creek Band of Mission Indians, a non-federally recognized Indian group. In addition, the Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians, California [previously listed as Augustine Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Augustine Reservation]; Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeno Indians, California [previously listed as Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla & Cupeno Indians of the Los Coyotes Reservation]; Ramona Band of Cahuilla, California [previously listed as Ramona Band or Village of Cahuilla Mission Indians of California]; and the Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians, California [previously listed as Torres-Martinez Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of California] were invited to consult, but did not participate. Hereafter, all the Indian Tribes and groups listed above are referred to as ‘‘The Consulted and Invited Tribes and Groups.’’ History and Description of the Remains In 1947, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Yucaipat (SBCM–1, CA– SBR–1000) in San Bernardino County, CA. The human remains belong to an individual of unknown age and sex, and include six teeth identified by a label reading ‘‘IMi-3, Indian Burial, Simpson Ranch, Yucaipa, CA, LBM 1949’’; three toe bones identified by a label reading ‘‘IMi-4 Indian Burial, Simpson Ranch, Yucaipa, Calif., LBM 1949’’; one lot of bone fragments identified by a label reading ‘‘SBCM–1, SBR–1000, Cultural Level ‘B’ N5Y, 120–130 cm’’; and one tooth identified by a label reading ‘‘#121 Human tooth, #122 YT1–76 Bone tool Q8, 3′ to 6.’’ No known individual was identified. The four associated funerary objects are one lot of shell, one lot of fragmented faunal bone, one lot of stone tools, and one lot of bone tools. These human remains are identified by a label reading ‘‘Yucaipa, SBCM–1, SBR–1000.’’ SBCM–1 has two loci, A and B. SBCM–1 (A) was officially recorded in 1947 by Gerald Smith of the San Bernardino Museum, who identified it as a ‘‘mourning ceremonial site’’ containing ‘‘flexed burials at depth of 2-to-3 feet—also possible cremation.’’ Site SBCM 1 (B) was recorded in 1933, also by G. Smith, who reported ‘‘three known burials—all flexed.’’ Excavations at Yucaipat were led by G. Smith in 1947, and by G. Becker of the University E:\FR\FM\27APN1.SGM 27APN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 79 / Tuesday, April 27, 2021 / Notices of Redlands in 1948–49. Both excavators noted that the site had been disturbed by pothunters. On December 28, 1962, G. Smith updated the site record. In 1976, additional excavations were conducted at the site on behalf of the Yucaipa Valley Water District by P. Martz, who provided a catalog of the collected objects. A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the human remains are Native American, based on the artifactual context and skeletal taphonomy. Ethnohistoric evidence indicates that the area around Yucaipa, CA, was occupied by the Serrano Tribe during the Protohistoric period. In 1918, Serrano consultants identified the town of Yucaipa, where site CA–SBR–1000 is located, as the site of the Serrano village of Yucaipat. Sometime prior to 2019, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Muscupiabit, Camp Cajon Site (SBCM– 2; CA–SBR–425) in San Bernardino County, CA. The Camp Cajon Site was owned by the San Bernardino County Museum Association until 2019, when it was transferred to San Manuel Band of Mission Indians. The human remains consist of a skull fragment belonging to an adult individual of unknown sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Although these human remains are identified by a label reading ‘‘Muscupiabit, Camp Cajon, SBCM–2, SBR–425,’’ and are described as having been ‘‘pulled from the excavations at Muscipiabit in the Cajon Pass,’’ no date is listed for their removal, and no burials at the site have ever been reported. The first documented excavations at Muscupiabit were undertaken by the Archaeological Survey Association (ASA) in 1949 and 1951, under the direction of G. Smith; a catalog of the finds was compiled by P. Jertberg in 1975. During 1976–79, excavations resumed, first under G. Becker (University of Redlands) and then under R. Baty. During 1983–84, systematic tests were conducted at the site by T. Blackburn (Cal Poly Pomona), followed by a Cal Poly student survey directed by R. Morehouse (1984–1985). In 1987–1988, R. Baty conducted a formal survey of the site. In 1988, D. Grenda (under Baty’s supervision) performed additional excavations. In 2008, Calnev Pipeline, LLC entered the property to conduct environmental and cultural surveys. A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the human remains are Native American, based on the artifactual context and skeletal taphonomy. Ethnohistoric VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:52 Apr 26, 2021 Jkt 253001 evidence indicates that the area around the Cajon Pass was occupied by the Serrano Tribe during the prehistoric and protohistoric period. This area has traditionally been identified as Serrano ancestral territory. When interviewed by John P. Harrington in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel (namesake of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians), called this area of Cajon Pass ’’amutskupiat’’ (a Serrano space). CA–SBR–425 is the archeological site associated with the Serrano village known today as Muscupiabit. Sometime prior to 2019, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Horse Thief Canyon, Las Flores Ranch, Guapiabit (SBCM–13; CA–SBR–93, CA– SBR–1913, CA–SBR–1673, CA–SBR– 1675/H, P36–0093) in San Bernardino County, CA. The age and sex of the individual are unknown. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site CA–SBR–93 was recorded in 1938 by G. Smith, who reported cremations and circular depressions on the Musgrove family-owned ranch. In 1949, an ASA survey uncovered basket mortars, manos, metates, ‘‘killed’’ mortars, and ‘‘many deer bones.’’ In 1961, students under SBCM’s supervision mapped 142 depressions and excavated one of them. In 1969, ASA did another survey for a pipeline project to Cedar Springs Dam. In 1990, Sutton and Schneider recorded the eastern part of the site as CA–SBR–1913, –1673, and –1675/H. Sutton curated 17 artifacts at the museum in 1990, following the Phase I archeological survey conducted by SAIC (formerly URS). The Chambers Group found human remains at SBR–1913, as did Sutton (in test pit JS–1). (The Chambers Group, Inc. has a report on file written by Judy Suchey in 1990, and entitled, ‘‘Analysis of Cremains (SBR–1913, Burial 1) Originated from Las Flores Ranch, San Bernardino, CA.’’) A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the human remains are Native American, based on the artifactual context and skeletal taphonomy, as determined by physical anthropologists Wesley Niewoehner (CSUSB) and Karimah Richardson (UCR). Ethnohistoric and artifactual evidence indicates that the area around the Las Flores Ranch was occupied by the Serrano Tribe during the protohistoric and historic periods. This area has traditionally and historically been identified as Serrano ancestral territory. When interviewed by John P. Harrington in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel PO 00000 Frm 00134 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 22263 called the area of Summit Valley ‘‘wa’peat’’ (a Serrano space). CA–SBR– 93 is one of many archeological sites located within the Serrano village known today as Guapiabit. In 1938, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Slover Mountain (SBCM– 40, CA–SBR–1576) in San Bernardino County, CA. G. Smith found and collected tooth crowns, shells, and flakes by in 1938 on Slover Mountain, which was owned by the Portland Cement Company. The site record completed by G. Smith in 1938 lists a campsite, sand dunes, and some historic buildings. The age and sex of the individual are unknown. No known individual was identified. The two associated funerary objects are one lot of shells and one lot of stone flakes. There is little information to establish a time-period for these human remains. The presence of an atlatl led G. Smith to believe the site was at least 3000 years old from. That date was later confirmed by URS consultants, who dated a charcoal stain on the upper terrace to 2790 +/¥80 RCYBP. Artifacts represent the remnants of a Late Prehistoric habitation site intermixed with remains from multiple, shorterduration site use as early as the Late Millingstone Horizon. A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the human remains are Native American, based on the artifactual context. While geographic evidence indicates this site falls within both Serrano and Cahuilla traditional territory, ethnohistoric evidence indicates that both Hurupit and Arhangk were Serrano Villages. A circa 1970 report by an unknown author states that the Serrano were ‘‘claiming ownership of the cement plant lands’’ during G. Smith’s excavations. The San Manuel Band of Mission Indians identifies SBR–1576 as the Serrano village of Jurupet. The village is inclusive of the La Loma Hills, this portion of the Santa Ana River, and the area north to CA–SBR–1576. Located southwest of the Serrano village of Junubabit (where Interstate 215 and Interstate 10 intersect), Jurupet is the southernmost Serrano village along the Santa Ana River. In 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from Hesperia (SBCM–47, CA– SBR–117) in San Bernardino County, CA. Located on the west side of the Mojave River, the site was recorded by G. Smith on June 23, 1939. The human remains belong to a 12-year-old male and an adult female approximately 21 years old. No known individuals were identified. The six associated funerary E:\FR\FM\27APN1.SGM 27APN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 22264 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 79 / Tuesday, April 27, 2021 / Notices objects are one round metal tin, one chert point, one lot of mixed bone, one lot of ochre, one quartz flake, and one stone pendant. There is little information to establish a time-period for these human remains. A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the human remains are Native American, based on the artifactual context and skeletal taphonomy, as determined by physical anthropologist Karimah Richardson (UCR). Ethnohistoric and artifactual evidence indicates that the area around the Victor Valley and Hesperia was occupied by the Serrano Tribe during the prehistoric and historic periods. This area has traditionally and historically been identified as Serrano ancestral territory. When interviewed by John P. Harrington in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel called the area of Summit Valley ‘‘wa’peat’’ (a Serrano space). CA–SBR– 177 is located just north of the Serrano village of known today as Guapiabit and south of the Serrano village of Atongaibit. From 1977–1978, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Oro Grande Site (SBCM–616, CA–SBR–72, CA–SBR–53, CA–SBR–61, CA–SBR–69) in San Bernardino County, CA. The Oro Grande site was originally recorded by G. Smith of the San Bernardino Museum, who identified it as a large late-period village. Between 1977–1979, the site was investigated by the Archaeological Research Unit (ARU) at the University of California, Riverside (Rector et al. 1983). No human remains were recorded, but in July 2019, during a routine inventory, Curator of Anthropology Tamara Serrao-Leiva found four bags of bones marked ‘‘Homo’’ (two bags with teeth fragments, and two bags of maxila fragments). The human remains (excavation unit 74N 160E Level 43 below datum 8–26–78), consisting of a burned humorous fragment, two small mandible pieces, and tooth fragments, belong to a child of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 12 associated funerary objects are: Four lots of shell beads, three lots of burned faunal fragments, one lot of stone tool fragments, one lot of charcoal, one grooved metal fragment (possibly a bullet), one lot of red paint stones, and one lot of pendants. A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the individuals are Native American, based on the artifactual context and skeletal taphonomy, as determined by physical anthropologist Karimah Richardson (UCR). Chronological seriation of shell VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:52 Apr 26, 2021 Jkt 253001 and stone bead artifacts suggest occupation at the Oro Grande site could date as early as 2500 B.P. to as late as 500 B.P. Ethnohistoric and artifactual evidence indicate that the area around the Footprint/Oro Grande Site was occupied by the Serrano Tribe during Middle Holocene to Historic periods, with the height of occupation around 1000 B.P. Located near the Serrano village of Topipabit, this area has traditionally been identified as Serrano ancestral territory. When interviewed by John P. Harrington in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel called this portion of the Mojave River by the Serrano name Tamapiat. In October 1974, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Lenwood Dunes (SBCM–3176, CA–SBR–1549) in San Bernardino County, CA, by Robert Reynolds. A flexed burial was found on the P.J. Vogel Ranch at the Lenwood Dunes, located in the Mojave Desert on the Mojave River terrace. According to the site record, the human remains were aligned along a northwest axis. The burial was located within a prehistoric camp containing cremations; a similar flexed burial was found nearby, at CA– SBR–189 (BLM). The human remains were collected using the common paleontological technique of ‘‘jacketing.’’ In the spring of 1993, the skeleton was excavated from the jacket. Osteological analysis revealed that individual was probably a male, about 55 years of age. No known individual was identified. The two associated funerary objects are one lot of faunal fragments and one desert side-notched projectile point. The point dates between 1000 and 1300 A.D. A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the individual is Native American, based on the archeological context, position of individual, and presence of in situ artifacts. Ethnohistoric and artifactual evidence indicates that the area around the Lenwood Dunes was occupied by the Serrano Tribe, often called the Vanyume or Desert Serrano. This area has traditionally been identified as Serrano ancestral territory. CA–SBR– 1549 is one of many sites located within the Serrano village of Sisugenat. When interviewed by John P. Harrington in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel called this portion of the Mojave River by the Serrano name Maviat. In the fall of 1979, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Daggett Solar Site (SBCM–4072, CA–SBR–3427) in San Bernardino County, CA. In the course of performing a paleontological PO 00000 Frm 00135 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 monitoring and salvaging project during construction of the Ten Megawatt Solar Generating Pilot Plant at Daggett, the San Bernardino County Museum Association excavated a human skeleton located 5.5 feet below the surface. The excavators associated the human remains stratigraphically with Pleistocene fauna, while nearby subsurface artifacts reflected an occupation of the site during the late prehistoric period (2090 years B.P.). In April 1980, a charcoal sample that had been stratigraphically associated with the human remains was C–14 dated to 7350+/¥ 115 years B.P. No known individual was identified. The three associated funerary objects are one lot of flakes, one lot of hammer stones, and one lot of pottery. A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the individual is Native American, based on artifactual context. Ethnohistoric and artifactual evidence indicates that the area around Daggett Solar Site was occupied by the Serrano Tribe, often called the Vanyume or Desert Serrano. This area has traditionally been identified as Serrano ancestral territory. When interviewed by John P. Harrington in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel identified the area northeast of this section of the Mojave River (which he called Maviat) as the Serrano village of Tutupiat, Sometime prior to 2017, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Manix Site (UCR 3209, Locality 28–3) in San Bernardino County, CA. The human remains belong to an individual of indeterminate sex and age. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. There is little evidence to establish a time-period for these human remains. A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the individual is Native American, based on the ethnographic context of the larger site and area. Ethnohistoric evidence indicates that the area around Manix Lake—east of the mountains known to the Serrano as Pavakupat and northeast of the Serrano village of Tutupiat—was occupied by the Serrano Tribe, often called the Vanyume or Desert Serrano. Determinations Made by the San Bernardino County Museum Personnel of the San Bernardino County Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 10 individuals of Native American ancestry. E:\FR\FM\27APN1.SGM 27APN1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 79 / Tuesday, April 27, 2021 / Notices • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 29 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Morongo Band of Mission Indians, California [previously listed as Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Morongo Reservation]; and the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California [previously listed as San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation] (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Affiliated Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Tamara Serrao-Leiva, San Bernardino County Museum, 2024 Orange Tree Lane, Redlands, CA 92373, telephone (909) 798–8623, email tserrao-leiva@sbcm.sbcounty.gov, by May 27, 2021. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Affiliated Tribes may proceed. The San Bernardino County Museum is responsible for notifying The Consulted and Invited Tribes and Groups that this notice has been published. Dated: April 14, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–08774 Filed 4–26–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES [Investigation Nos. 731–TA–1560–1564 (Preliminary)] Raw Honey From Argentina, Brazil, India, Ukraine, and Vietnam; Institution of Antidumping Duty Investigations and Scheduling of Preliminary Phase Investigations United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:52 Apr 26, 2021 Jkt 253001 The Commission hereby gives notice of the institution of investigations and commencement of preliminary phase antidumping duty investigation Nos. 731–TA–1560–1564 (Preliminary) pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930 (‘‘the Act’’) to determine whether there is a reasonable indication that an industry in the United States is materially injured or threatened with material injury, or the establishment of an industry in the United States is materially retarded, by reason of imports of raw honey from Argentina, Brazil, India, Ukraine, and Vietnam, provided for in heading 0409.00 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, that are alleged to be sold in the United States at less than fair value. Unless the Department of Commerce (‘‘Commerce’’) extends the time for initiation, the Commission must reach a preliminary determination in antidumping duty investigations in 45 days, or in this case by June 7, 2021. The Commission’s views must be transmitted to Commerce within five business days thereafter, or by June 14, 2021. DATES: April 21, 2021. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andres Andrade (202) 205–2078 or Charles Cummings (202) 708–1666, Office of Investigations, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20436. Hearing-impaired persons can obtain information on this matter by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on 202– 205–1810. Persons with mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should contact the Office of the Secretary at 202–205–2000. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its internet server (https:// www.usitc.gov). The public record for these investigations may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at https://edis.usitc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background.—These investigations are being instituted, pursuant to section 733(a) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1673b(a)), in response to a petition filed on April 21, 2021, by the American Honey Producers Association (‘‘AHPA’’), Bruce, South Dakota and the Sioux Honey Association (‘‘SHA’’), Sioux City, Iowa. For further information concerning the conduct of these investigations and rules of general application, consult the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure, part 201, subparts A and B (19 CFR part 201), and part 207, subparts A and B (19 CFR part 207). SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00136 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 22265 Participation in the investigation and public service list.—Persons (other than petitioners) wishing to participate in the investigations as parties must file an entry of appearance with the Secretary to the Commission, as provided in §§ 201.11 and 207.10 of the Commission’s rules, not later than seven days after publication of this notice in the Federal Register. Industrial users and (if the merchandise under investigation is sold at the retail level) representative consumer organizations have the right to appear as parties in Commission antidumping duty investigations. The Secretary will prepare a public service list containing the names and addresses of all persons, or their representatives, who are parties to these investigations upon the expiration of the period for filing entries of appearance. Limited disclosure of business proprietary information (BPI) under an administrative protective order (APO) and BPI service list.—Pursuant to § 207.7(a) of the Commission’s rules, the Secretary will make BPI gathered in these investigations available to authorized applicants representing interested parties (as defined in 19 U.S.C. 1677(9)) who are parties to the investigations under the APO issued in the investigations, provided that the application is made not later than seven days after the publication of this notice in the Federal Register. A separate service list will be maintained by the Secretary for those parties authorized to receive BPI under the APO. Conference.—In light of the restrictions on access to the Commission building due to the COVID–19 pandemic, the Commission is conducting the staff conference through video conferencing on Wednesday, May 12, 2021. Requests to appear at the conference should be emailed to preliminaryconferences@usitc.gov (DO NOT FILE ON EDIS) on or before Monday, May 10, 2021. Please provide an email address for each conference participant in the email. Information on conference procedures will be provided separately and guidance on joining the video conference will be available on the Commission’s Daily Calendar. A nonparty who has testimony that may aid the Commission’s deliberations may request permission to participate by submitting a short statement. Please note the Secretary’s Office will accept only electronic filings during this time. Filings must be made through the Commission’s Electronic Document Information System (EDIS, https:// edis.usitc.gov). No in-person paperbased filings or paper copies of any E:\FR\FM\27APN1.SGM 27APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 79 (Tuesday, April 27, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 22262-22265]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-08774]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0031784; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: San Bernardino County Museum, 
Redlands, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The San Bernardino County Museum (SBCM) has completed an 
inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in 
consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation 
between the human remains and associated funerary objects, and present-
day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants 
or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request to the San Bernardino County Museum. If no additional 
requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and 
associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, 
or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the San Bernardino County Museum at the 
address in this notice by May 27, 2021.

ADDRESSES: Tamara Serrao-Leiva, San Bernardino County Museum, 2024 
Orange Tree Lane, Redlands, CA 92374, telephone (909) 798-8623, email 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the San Bernardino 
County Museum, Redlands, CA. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from San Bernardino County, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the San 
Bernardino County Museum professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians of the 
Agua Caliente Indian Reservation, California; Cabazon Band of Mission 
Indians, California; Cahuilla Band of Indians [previously listed as 
Cahuilla Band of Mission Indians of the Cahuilla Reservation, 
California]; Morongo Band of Mission Indians, California [previously 
listed as Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Morongo 
Reservation]; San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California 
[previously listed as San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the 
San Manual Reservation]; Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Indians, 
California [previously listed as Santa Rosa Band of Cahuilla Mission 
Indians of the Santa Rosa Reservation]; Twenty-Nine Palms Band of 
Mission Indians of California; and the Mission Creek Band of Mission 
Indians, a non-federally recognized Indian group. In addition, the 
Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians, California [previously listed as 
Augustine Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Augustine 
Reservation]; Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla and Cupeno Indians, 
California [previously listed as Los Coyotes Band of Cahuilla & Cupeno 
Indians of the Los Coyotes Reservation]; Ramona Band of Cahuilla, 
California [previously listed as Ramona Band or Village of Cahuilla 
Mission Indians of California]; and the Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla 
Indians, California [previously listed as Torres-Martinez Band of 
Cahuilla Mission Indians of California] were invited to consult, but 
did not participate. Hereafter, all the Indian Tribes and groups listed 
above are referred to as ``The Consulted and Invited Tribes and 
Groups.''

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1947, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Yucaipat (SBCM-1, CA-SBR-1000) in San Bernardino 
County, CA. The human remains belong to an individual of unknown age 
and sex, and include six teeth identified by a label reading ``IMi-3, 
Indian Burial, Simpson Ranch, Yucaipa, CA, LBM 1949''; three toe bones 
identified by a label reading ``IMi-4 Indian Burial, Simpson Ranch, 
Yucaipa, Calif., LBM 1949''; one lot of bone fragments identified by a 
label reading ``SBCM-1, SBR-1000, Cultural Level `B' N5Y, 120-130 cm''; 
and one tooth identified by a label reading ``#121 Human tooth, #122 
YT1-76 Bone tool Q8, 3' to 6.'' No known individual was identified. The 
four associated funerary objects are one lot of shell, one lot of 
fragmented faunal bone, one lot of stone tools, and one lot of bone 
tools.
    These human remains are identified by a label reading ``Yucaipa, 
SBCM-1, SBR-1000.'' SBCM-1 has two loci, A and B. SBCM-1 (A) was 
officially recorded in 1947 by Gerald Smith of the San Bernardino 
Museum, who identified it as a ``mourning ceremonial site'' containing 
``flexed burials at depth of 2-to-3 feet--also possible cremation.'' 
Site SBCM 1 (B) was recorded in 1933, also by G. Smith, who reported 
``three known burials--all flexed.'' Excavations at Yucaipat were led 
by G. Smith in 1947, and by G. Becker of the University

[[Page 22263]]

of Redlands in 1948-49. Both excavators noted that the site had been 
disturbed by pothunters. On December 28, 1962, G. Smith updated the 
site record. In 1976, additional excavations were conducted at the site 
on behalf of the Yucaipa Valley Water District by P. Martz, who 
provided a catalog of the collected objects.
    A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the 
human remains are Native American, based on the artifactual context and 
skeletal taphonomy. Ethnohistoric evidence indicates that the area 
around Yucaipa, CA, was occupied by the Serrano Tribe during the 
Protohistoric period. In 1918, Serrano consultants identified the town 
of Yucaipa, where site CA-SBR-1000 is located, as the site of the 
Serrano village of Yucaipat.
    Sometime prior to 2019, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Muscupiabit, Camp Cajon Site (SBCM-2; CA-
SBR-425) in San Bernardino County, CA. The Camp Cajon Site was owned by 
the San Bernardino County Museum Association until 2019, when it was 
transferred to San Manuel Band of Mission Indians. The human remains 
consist of a skull fragment belonging to an adult individual of unknown 
sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    Although these human remains are identified by a label reading 
``Muscupiabit, Camp Cajon, SBCM-2, SBR-425,'' and are described as 
having been ``pulled from the excavations at Muscipiabit in the Cajon 
Pass,'' no date is listed for their removal, and no burials at the site 
have ever been reported. The first documented excavations at 
Muscupiabit were undertaken by the Archaeological Survey Association 
(ASA) in 1949 and 1951, under the direction of G. Smith; a catalog of 
the finds was compiled by P. Jertberg in 1975. During 1976-79, 
excavations resumed, first under G. Becker (University of Redlands) and 
then under R. Baty. During 1983-84, systematic tests were conducted at 
the site by T. Blackburn (Cal Poly Pomona), followed by a Cal Poly 
student survey directed by R. Morehouse (1984-1985). In 1987-1988, R. 
Baty conducted a formal survey of the site. In 1988, D. Grenda (under 
Baty's supervision) performed additional excavations. In 2008, Calnev 
Pipeline, LLC entered the property to conduct environmental and 
cultural surveys.
    A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the 
human remains are Native American, based on the artifactual context and 
skeletal taphonomy. Ethnohistoric evidence indicates that the area 
around the Cajon Pass was occupied by the Serrano Tribe during the 
prehistoric and protohistoric period. This area has traditionally been 
identified as Serrano ancestral territory. When interviewed by John P. 
Harrington in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel 
(namesake of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians), called this area 
of Cajon Pass ''amutskupiat'' (a Serrano space). CA-SBR-425 is the 
archeological site associated with the Serrano village known today as 
Muscupiabit.
    Sometime prior to 2019, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Horse Thief Canyon, Las Flores Ranch, 
Guapiabit (SBCM-13; CA-SBR-93, CA-SBR-1913, CA-SBR-1673, CA-SBR-1675/H, 
P36-0093) in San Bernardino County, CA. The age and sex of the 
individual are unknown. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Site CA-SBR-93 was recorded in 1938 by G. Smith, who reported 
cremations and circular depressions on the Musgrove family-owned ranch. 
In 1949, an ASA survey uncovered basket mortars, manos, metates, 
``killed'' mortars, and ``many deer bones.'' In 1961, students under 
SBCM's supervision mapped 142 depressions and excavated one of them. In 
1969, ASA did another survey for a pipeline project to Cedar Springs 
Dam. In 1990, Sutton and Schneider recorded the eastern part of the 
site as CA-SBR-1913, -1673, and -1675/H. Sutton curated 17 artifacts at 
the museum in 1990, following the Phase I archeological survey 
conducted by SAIC (formerly URS). The Chambers Group found human 
remains at SBR-1913, as did Sutton (in test pit JS-1). (The Chambers 
Group, Inc. has a report on file written by Judy Suchey in 1990, and 
entitled, ``Analysis of Cremains (SBR-1913, Burial 1) Originated from 
Las Flores Ranch, San Bernardino, CA.'')
    A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the 
human remains are Native American, based on the artifactual context and 
skeletal taphonomy, as determined by physical anthropologists Wesley 
Niewoehner (CSUSB) and Karimah Richardson (UCR). Ethnohistoric and 
artifactual evidence indicates that the area around the Las Flores 
Ranch was occupied by the Serrano Tribe during the protohistoric and 
historic periods. This area has traditionally and historically been 
identified as Serrano ancestral territory. When interviewed by John P. 
Harrington in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel 
called the area of Summit Valley ``wa'peat'' (a Serrano space). CA-SBR-
93 is one of many archeological sites located within the Serrano 
village known today as Guapiabit.
    In 1938, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from Slover Mountain (SBCM-40, CA-SBR-1576) in San 
Bernardino County, CA. G. Smith found and collected tooth crowns, 
shells, and flakes by in 1938 on Slover Mountain, which was owned by 
the Portland Cement Company. The site record completed by G. Smith in 
1938 lists a campsite, sand dunes, and some historic buildings. The age 
and sex of the individual are unknown. No known individual was 
identified. The two associated funerary objects are one lot of shells 
and one lot of stone flakes.
    There is little information to establish a time-period for these 
human remains. The presence of an atlatl led G. Smith to believe the 
site was at least 3000 years old from. That date was later confirmed by 
URS consultants, who dated a charcoal stain on the upper terrace to 
2790 +/-80 RCYBP. Artifacts represent the remnants of a Late 
Prehistoric habitation site intermixed with remains from multiple, 
shorter-duration site use as early as the Late Millingstone Horizon.
    A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the 
human remains are Native American, based on the artifactual context. 
While geographic evidence indicates this site falls within both Serrano 
and Cahuilla traditional territory, ethnohistoric evidence indicates 
that both Hurupit and Arhangk were Serrano Villages. A circa 1970 
report by an unknown author states that the Serrano were ``claiming 
ownership of the cement plant lands'' during G. Smith's excavations. 
The San Manuel Band of Mission Indians identifies SBR-1576 as the 
Serrano village of Jurupet. The village is inclusive of the La Loma 
Hills, this portion of the Santa Ana River, and the area north to CA-
SBR-1576. Located southwest of the Serrano village of Junubabit (where 
Interstate 215 and Interstate 10 intersect), Jurupet is the 
southernmost Serrano village along the Santa Ana River.
    In 1939, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from Hesperia (SBCM-47, CA-SBR-117) in San Bernardino 
County, CA. Located on the west side of the Mojave River, the site was 
recorded by G. Smith on June 23, 1939. The human remains belong to a 
12-year-old male and an adult female approximately 21 years old. No 
known individuals were identified. The six associated funerary

[[Page 22264]]

objects are one round metal tin, one chert point, one lot of mixed 
bone, one lot of ochre, one quartz flake, and one stone pendant.
    There is little information to establish a time-period for these 
human remains. A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination 
that the human remains are Native American, based on the artifactual 
context and skeletal taphonomy, as determined by physical 
anthropologist Karimah Richardson (UCR). Ethnohistoric and artifactual 
evidence indicates that the area around the Victor Valley and Hesperia 
was occupied by the Serrano Tribe during the prehistoric and historic 
periods. This area has traditionally and historically been identified 
as Serrano ancestral territory. When interviewed by John P. Harrington 
in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel called the area 
of Summit Valley ``wa'peat'' (a Serrano space). CA-SBR-177 is located 
just north of the Serrano village of known today as Guapiabit and south 
of the Serrano village of Atongaibit.
    From 1977-1978, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from the Oro Grande Site (SBCM-616, CA-SBR-72, 
CA-SBR-53, CA-SBR-61, CA-SBR-69) in San Bernardino County, CA. The Oro 
Grande site was originally recorded by G. Smith of the San Bernardino 
Museum, who identified it as a large late-period village. Between 1977-
1979, the site was investigated by the Archaeological Research Unit 
(ARU) at the University of California, Riverside (Rector et al. 1983). 
No human remains were recorded, but in July 2019, during a routine 
inventory, Curator of Anthropology Tamara Serrao-Leiva found four bags 
of bones marked ``Homo'' (two bags with teeth fragments, and two bags 
of maxila fragments). The human remains (excavation unit 74N 160E Level 
43 below datum 8-26-78), consisting of a burned humorous fragment, two 
small mandible pieces, and tooth fragments, belong to a child of 
indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 12 
associated funerary objects are: Four lots of shell beads, three lots 
of burned faunal fragments, one lot of stone tool fragments, one lot of 
charcoal, one grooved metal fragment (possibly a bullet), one lot of 
red paint stones, and one lot of pendants.
    A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the 
individuals are Native American, based on the artifactual context and 
skeletal taphonomy, as determined by physical anthropologist Karimah 
Richardson (UCR). Chronological seriation of shell and stone bead 
artifacts suggest occupation at the Oro Grande site could date as early 
as 2500 B.P. to as late as 500 B.P. Ethnohistoric and artifactual 
evidence indicate that the area around the Footprint/Oro Grande Site 
was occupied by the Serrano Tribe during Middle Holocene to Historic 
periods, with the height of occupation around 1000 B.P. Located near 
the Serrano village of Topipabit, this area has traditionally been 
identified as Serrano ancestral territory. When interviewed by John P. 
Harrington in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel 
called this portion of the Mojave River by the Serrano name Tamapiat.
    In October 1974, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Lenwood Dunes (SBCM-3176, CA-SBR-1549) in 
San Bernardino County, CA, by Robert Reynolds. A flexed burial was 
found on the P.J. Vogel Ranch at the Lenwood Dunes, located in the 
Mojave Desert on the Mojave River terrace. According to the site 
record, the human remains were aligned along a northwest axis. The 
burial was located within a prehistoric camp containing cremations; a 
similar flexed burial was found nearby, at CA-SBR-189 (BLM). The human 
remains were collected using the common paleontological technique of 
``jacketing.'' In the spring of 1993, the skeleton was excavated from 
the jacket. Osteological analysis revealed that individual was probably 
a male, about 55 years of age. No known individual was identified. The 
two associated funerary objects are one lot of faunal fragments and one 
desert side-notched projectile point. The point dates between 1000 and 
1300 A.D.
    A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the 
individual is Native American, based on the archeological context, 
position of individual, and presence of in situ artifacts. 
Ethnohistoric and artifactual evidence indicates that the area around 
the Lenwood Dunes was occupied by the Serrano Tribe, often called the 
Vanyume or Desert Serrano. This area has traditionally been identified 
as Serrano ancestral territory. CA-SBR-1549 is one of many sites 
located within the Serrano village of Sisugenat. When interviewed by 
John P. Harrington in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos 
Manuel called this portion of the Mojave River by the Serrano name 
Maviat.
    In the fall of 1979, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Daggett Solar Site (SBCM-4072, CA-SBR-
3427) in San Bernardino County, CA. In the course of performing a 
paleontological monitoring and salvaging project during construction of 
the Ten Megawatt Solar Generating Pilot Plant at Daggett, the San 
Bernardino County Museum Association excavated a human skeleton located 
5.5 feet below the surface. The excavators associated the human remains 
stratigraphically with Pleistocene fauna, while nearby subsurface 
artifacts reflected an occupation of the site during the late 
prehistoric period (2090 years B.P.). In April 1980, a charcoal sample 
that had been stratigraphically associated with the human remains was 
C-14 dated to 7350+/- 115 years B.P. No known individual was 
identified. The three associated funerary objects are one lot of 
flakes, one lot of hammer stones, and one lot of pottery.
    A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that the 
individual is Native American, based on artifactual context. 
Ethnohistoric and artifactual evidence indicates that the area around 
Daggett Solar Site was occupied by the Serrano Tribe, often called the 
Vanyume or Desert Serrano. This area has traditionally been identified 
as Serrano ancestral territory. When interviewed by John P. Harrington 
in the early 1900s, Serrano tribal leader Santos Manuel identified the 
area northeast of this section of the Mojave River (which he called 
Maviat) as the Serrano village of Tutupiat,
    Sometime prior to 2017, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Manix Site (UCR 3209, Locality 28-3) in 
San Bernardino County, CA. The human remains belong to an individual of 
indeterminate sex and age. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    There is little evidence to establish a time-period for these human 
remains. A preponderance of the evidence supports a determination that 
the individual is Native American, based on the ethnographic context of 
the larger site and area. Ethnohistoric evidence indicates that the 
area around Manix Lake--east of the mountains known to the Serrano as 
Pavakupat and northeast of the Serrano village of Tutupiat--was 
occupied by the Serrano Tribe, often called the Vanyume or Desert 
Serrano.

Determinations Made by the San Bernardino County Museum

    Personnel of the San Bernardino County Museum have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 10 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.

[[Page 22265]]

     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 29 objects described 
in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Morongo 
Band of Mission Indians, California [previously listed as Morongo Band 
of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Morongo Reservation]; and the San 
Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California [previously listed as San 
Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation] 
(hereafter referred to as ``The Affiliated Tribes'').

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Tamara Serrao-Leiva, San Bernardino County 
Museum, 2024 Orange Tree Lane, Redlands, CA 92373, telephone (909) 798-
8623, email [email protected], by May 27, 2021. After 
that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The 
Affiliated Tribes may proceed.
    The San Bernardino County Museum is responsible for notifying The 
Consulted and Invited Tribes and Groups that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: April 14, 2021.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2021-08774 Filed 4-26-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P