Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO, 15253-15255 [2021-05886]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 53 / Monday, March 22, 2021 / Notices CONTESTING RECORD PROCEDURES: DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR For records covered by the Privacy Act or covered JRA records, individuals may make a request for amendment or correction of a record of the Department about the individual by writing directly to the Department component that maintains the record, unless the record is not subject to amendment or correction. The request should identify each particular record in question, state the amendment or correction desired, and state why the individual believes that the record is not accurate, relevant, timely, or complete. The individual may submit any documentation that would be helpful. If the individual believes that the same record is in more than one system of records, the request should state that and be addressed to each component that maintains a system of records containing the record. NOTIFICATION PROCEDURES: See ‘‘Record Access Procedures’’ above. EXEMPTIONS PROMULGATED FOR THE SYSTEM: The Secretary of Homeland Security, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(j)(2), has exempted this system from the following provisions of the Privacy Act: 552a(c)(3), (c)(4); (d); (e)(1), (e)(2), (e)(3), (e)(4)(G), (e)(4)(H), (e)(4)(I), (e)(5), (e)(8); (f); and (g). Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(2), this system is exempt from the following provisions of the Privacy Act, subject to the limitations set forth in those subsections: 5 U.S.C. 552a(c)(3); (d); (e)(1), (e)(4)(G), (e)(4)(H); and (f). When an analytical system receives a record from another system exempted in that source system under 5 U.S.C. 552a(j)(2), ICE will claim the same exemptions for those records that are claimed for the original primary systems of records from which they originated and claims any additional exemptions set forth here. HISTORY: jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES DHS/ICE–005 Trade Transparency Analysis and Research, 79 FR 71112 (December 1, 2014); DHS/ICE–016 FALCON Search and Analysis, 82 FR 20905 (May 4, 2017). * * * * * James Holzer, Acting Chief Privacy Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. [FR Doc. 2021–05651 Filed 3–19–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9111–28–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:46 Mar 19, 2021 Jkt 253001 National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0031603; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO AGENCY: ACTION: National Park Service, Interior. Notice. Fort Lewis College, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice who wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to Fort Lewis College, via the NAGPRA Liaison. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. SUMMARY: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice who wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Fort Lewis College, via the NAGPRA Liaison at the address in this notice by April 21, 2021. DATES: Kathleen Fine-Dare, Ph.D., NAGPRA Liaison, Fort Lewis College, 1000 Rim Drive, Durango, CO 81301, telephone (970) 247–7438, email fine_ k@fortlewis.edu. ADDRESSES: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00071 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 15253 History and Description of the Cultural Items All 248 items in this notice were taken from Ancestral Puebloan burials located in La Plata County, CO (164 items), Montezuma County, CO (83 items), and Dolores County, CO (one item), and they belong to either the Homer Root Ledger Collection (89 items) or the Charles McClain Collection (159 items). (The Root and McClain collections also contain items from New Mexico and Arizona, but this notice only concerns objects located in the three Colorado counties.) Both collections are currently stored in the Fort Lewis College Center of Southwest Studies curation facility. The Homer Root Ledger Collection is comprised of items donated to or acquired by the Fort Lewis College Museum. Homer Emerson Root (1896– 1977) was a Michigan-born and Colorado-raised Methodist minister who was appointed Curator of the Fort Lewis College Museum after retiring from the ministry in 1953. From 1958–1968, he kept five detailed and elaborately detailed ledger books in which museum (and other) items were skillfully rendered in ink and oil color. These items were accompanied by catalog cards. A self-trained archeologist and artist, Root directed FLC archeological field schools in the 1960s. Root had strong connections with avocational archeologists in the region who often donated objects they had acquired to the College Museum. The items in the Charles McLain Collection were collected prior to 1970. They were accessioned in 2001 and 2008, following two donations from McClain’s daughters, Katherine McLain Bergfield and Margaret ‘‘Peggy’’ Fearing. The donations were accompanied by McLain’s personal, handwritten catalog cards, which usually included documentation on the funerary context of the vessels and vague locational information. Many of the items in the McLain collection were amassed through Charles McClain’s extensive collecting activities. Two of the items identified as unassociated funerary objects were acquired through a trade with ceramicist Norman ‘‘Ted’’ Oppelt. Homer Root Ledger Collection From La Plata County, CO (63 items) In 1960, one item was removed from a burial during the construction of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, located at 2611 Junction Street, Durango, CO. The one item is a jar. Around 1961, five items were removed from burials at multiple archeological sites on Ewing Mesa by E:\FR\FM\22MRN1.SGM 22MRN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 15254 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 53 / Monday, March 22, 2021 / Notices W.D. Ewing and Homer Root. The five items are three bowls and two jars. Around 1962, one item was removed (likely by Zeke Flora) from a burial at a site known as Ignacio 12:10, located just south of Animas City Mountain, Durango, CO. The one item is a bowl. Around 1962, one item was removed by Zeke Flora from the burial of a juvenile individual at a site recorded as Ignacio 12:23, whose exact location is unknown today. The one item is a bowl. Around 1964, two items were removed by J.C. Miller from an unidentified site near Indian Creek, located 10 miles south of Durango and west of the Animas River. The items were found lying near the cranium of an extended adult individual interred in a refuse midden. The two items are one jar and one ceramic pipe. Around 1964, one item was removed by J.C. Miller from an Ancestral Puebloan burial at an unidentified site located on a ridge west of Marvel. The one item is an olla. Sometime during 1964–65, 13 items were removed by J.C. Miller from burials at multiple archeological sites in the Blue Mesa area, located five miles south of Durango, CO. Some items were recorded originally as having been associated with additional items that were catalogued but have not yet been located. Others were associated with each other in extended burial sites that were covered by cobblestones and then by domestic refuse. The 13 items are six bowls, three jars, one ladle, one hammerstone, one knife, and one pitcher. In the summer of 1966, 27 cultural items were removed from burials at the Sacred Ridge site (5MT9399), southwest of Durango, CO, by Homer Root while directing a Fort Lewis College archeological field school. The site lay in Ridges Basin, a ranch owned by Mike Bodo where, for many years, the public could search for fossils, stones, and ‘‘Indian relics.’’ Those activities had resulted in the destruction of archeological graves, structures, and trash mounds. After 1966, the site was subject to multiple archeological testing activities. Today, it lies beneath Lake Nighthorse as a result of the Animas-La Plata project. The 27 items are one metate, 11 bowls, eight jars, six pitchers, and one effigy vessel. In 1967, 12 items were removed from burials at the Pasture Ruin sites (5LP177, 5LP179, and 5LP243) by Homer Root while directing a Fort Lewis College archeological field school conducting salvage work at the Bodo Ranch prior to plowing by landowner Mike Bodo. The 12 items are three bowls, four pitchers, three jars, one VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:46 Mar 19, 2021 Jkt 253001 ‘‘implement’’ made of non-human bone, and one sandstone burial slab. Charles McClain Collection From La Plata County, CO (101 items) Sometime before 1970, 65 items were collected from 17 burials located on Blue Mesa. The 65 items are 21 jars, 28 bowls, 14 pitchers, and two effigy vessels. Sometime before 1970, 31 items were collected from burials on the private property of C.A. Brown Wild Horse (Florida) Mesa, located in Durango, CO. The 31 items are seven pitchers, 12 bowls, eight jars, one seed jar, one effigy vessel, one lid, and one pipe. Sometime before 1970, four items were disinterred from adult burials located in the Marvel area of western La Plata County. The four items are two pipes and two bowls. Sometime before 1970, one item was disinterred from a burial at the Bodo Point site. The one item is a bowl. Homer Root Collection From Montezuma County, CO (25 items) Around September of 1936, three items were removed from adult burials at the Yellow Jacket complex (5MT5) by Homer Root. The three items are one mortuary slab and two bowls. At an unknown date (but recorded in 1961 and 1964), 17 items were removed by Homer Root from adult burials at an unidentified site within the Herren Farm Complex, located on Stanley Ranch. The 17 items are 10 stones (including hematite, copper ore, and agate), two shaped sandstones, one river cobble ground stone, three bowls, and one jar. At an unknown date (but recorded in 1964), four items were removed from adult burials at an unidentified site located on Stanley Ranch. The four items are two bowls, one jar, and one stone slab of river cobble. Around 1964, one item was removed by a rancher while plowing his field in the Goodman Point area. (Although the rancher found a second mug at the same time, the location of that mug is unknown.) The one item is a mug. Charles McClain Collection from Montezuma County, CO (58 items) Sometime before 1970, 53 items were removed from burials on the property of Warren Griffith, located at the head of Yellow Jacket Canyon. The 53 items are 23 bowls, nine ladles, one canteen, four mugs, 10 jars, four kiva jars, one effigy vessel, and one pitcher. Sometime before 1970, five items were removed from adult burials at the Herren Farms Site Complex (5MT2516). The site was situated on the property of PO 00000 Frm 00072 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Ed Herren, located at the head of Ruin Canyon, near Ackmen. The five items are two mugs, one bowl, one jar, and one canteen. Homer Root Collection From Dolores County, CO (1 item) In 1937, one item was removed by National Youth Administration workers from an Ancestral Puebloan adult burial located southeast of the Sago School site. The item was given to the Durango Public Library by Lola Sanders and was later donated to Fort Lewis College by Helen Sloan Daniels. The one item is a mug. The cultural affiliation of the unassociated funerary objects was determined through the following lines of evidence: geographical, biological (drawings were made of human remains found with the objects, but the whereabouts of the remains are unknown), kinship, archeological, folklore, oral tradition, historical, and expert opinion. This decision was informed by information gathered from multiple rounds of face-to-face and written tribal consultations that took place in 2018, 2019, and 2020; artifact analysis; provenance research; and a thorough review of archeological, ethnographic, and oral historical literature. Ancestral Puebloan ceramic typologies helped to identify technological traditions, as well as chronological and geographical attributes of ceramic manufacture. Determinations Made by Fort Lewis College Officials of the Fort Lewis College, have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 248 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from specific burial sites of Native American individuals. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice who wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Kathleen S. Fine-Dare, Ph.D., Tribal Liaison, Fort Lewis College, 1000 Rim E:\FR\FM\22MRN1.SGM 22MRN1 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 53 / Monday, March 22, 2021 / Notices Drive, Durango, CO 81301, telephone (970) 247–7438, email fine_k@ fortlewis.edu, by April 21, 2021. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico may proceed. Fort Lewis College, via the NAGPRA Liaison, is responsible for notifying the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: March 4, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–05886 Filed 3–19–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337–TA–1170] Certain Mobile Devices With Multifunction Emulators; Notice of Request for Submissions on the Public Interest U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Notice is hereby given that on March 16, 2021, the presiding administrative law judge (‘‘ALJ’’) issued an Initial Determination on Violation of Section 337. The ALJ also issued a Recommended Determination on remedy and bonding should a violation be found in the above-captioned investigation. The Commission is soliciting submissions on public interest issues raised by the recommended relief should the Commission find a violation. This notice is soliciting comments from the public only. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Panyin A. Hughes, Office of the General Counsel, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) 204–3042. Copies of non-confidential documents filed in connection with this investigation may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at https://edis.usitc.gov. For help accessing EDIS, please email EDIS3Help@usitc.gov. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its internet server at https://www.usitc.gov. Hearing-impaired persons are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on (202) 205–1810. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Parties are to file public interest submissions jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:46 Mar 19, 2021 Jkt 253001 pursuant to 19 CFR 210.50(a)(4). Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 provides that, if the Commission finds a violation, it shall exclude the articles concerned from the United States: unless, after considering the effect of such exclusion upon the public health and welfare, competitive conditions in the United States economy, the production of like or directly competitive articles in the United States, and United States consumers, it finds that such articles should not be excluded from entry. 19 U.S.C. 1337(d)(1). A similar provision applies to cease and desist orders. 19 U.S.C. 1337(f)(1). The Commission is soliciting submissions on public interest issues raised by the recommended relief should the Commission find a violation, specifically: a limited exclusion order directed to certain mobile devices with multifunction emulators imported, sold for importation, and/or sold after importation by respondents Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. and Samsung Electronics America, Inc. (collectively, Samsung); and cease and desist orders directed to Samsung. The Commission is interested in further development of the record on the public interest in this investigation. Accordingly, members of the public are invited to file submissions of no more than five (5) pages, inclusive of attachments, concerning the public interest in light of the ALJ’s Recommended Determination on Remedy and Bonding issued in this investigation on March 16, 2021. Comments should address whether issuance of the recommended remedial orders in this investigation, should the Commission find a violation, would affect the public health and welfare in the United States, competitive conditions in the United States economy, the production of like or directly competitive articles in the United States, or United States consumers. In particular, the Commission is interested in comments that: (i) Explain how the articles potentially subject to the recommended remedial orders are used in the United States; (ii) identify any public health, safety, or welfare concerns in the United States relating to the recommended orders; (iii) identify like or directly competitive articles that complainant, its licensees, or third parties make in the United States which could replace the subject articles if they were to be excluded; (iv) indicate whether complainant, complainant’s licensees, and/or thirdparty suppliers have the capacity to PO 00000 Frm 00073 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 15255 replace the volume of articles potentially subject to the recommended orders within a commercially reasonable time; and (v) explain how the recommended orders would impact consumers in the United States. Written submissions must be filed no later than by close of business on April 15, 2021. Persons filing written submissions must file the original document electronically on or before the deadlines stated above. The Commission’s paper filing requirements in 19 CFR 210.4(f) are currently waived. 85 FR 15798 (March 19, 2020). Submissions should refer to the investigation number (‘‘Inv. No. 337–TA–1170’’) in a prominent place on the cover page and/or the first page. (See Handbook for Electronic Filing Procedures, https:// www.usitc.gov/documents/handbook_ on_filing_procedures.pdf.). Persons with questions regarding filing should contact the Secretary (202–205–2000). Any person desiring to submit a document to the Commission in confidence must request confidential treatment. All such requests should be directed to the Secretary to the Commission and must include a full statement of the reasons why the Commission should grant such treatment. See 19 CFR 201.6. Documents for which confidential treatment by the Commission is properly sought will be treated accordingly. All information, including confidential business information and documents for which confidential treatment is properly sought, submitted to the Commission for purposes of this Investigation may be disclosed to and used: (i) By the Commission, its employees and Offices, and contract personnel (a) for developing or maintaining the records of this or a related proceeding, or (b) in internal investigations, audits, reviews, and evaluations relating to the programs, personnel, and operations of the Commission including under 5 U.S.C. Appendix 3; or (ii) by U.S. government employees and contract personnel, solely for cybersecurity purposes. All contract personnel will sign appropriate nondisclosure agreements. All nonconfidential written submissions will be available for public inspection on EDIS. This action is taken under the authority of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1337), and in Part 210 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR part 210). By order of the Commission. E:\FR\FM\22MRN1.SGM 22MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 53 (Monday, March 22, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Pages 15253-15255]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-05886]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0031603; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Fort Lewis 
College, Durango, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: Fort Lewis College, in consultation with the appropriate 
Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the 
cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of 
unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of 
any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this 
notice who wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written 
request to Fort Lewis College, via the NAGPRA Liaison. If no additional 
claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to 
the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations 
stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice who wish to 
claim these cultural items should submit a written request with 
information in support of the claim to Fort Lewis College, via the 
NAGPRA Liaison at the address in this notice by April 21, 2021.

ADDRESSES: Kathleen Fine-Dare, Ph.D., NAGPRA Liaison, Fort Lewis 
College, 1000 Rim Drive, Durango, CO 81301, telephone (970) 247-7438, 
email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the 
control of Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO, that meet the definition of 
unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    All 248 items in this notice were taken from Ancestral Puebloan 
burials located in La Plata County, CO (164 items), Montezuma County, 
CO (83 items), and Dolores County, CO (one item), and they belong to 
either the Homer Root Ledger Collection (89 items) or the Charles 
McClain Collection (159 items). (The Root and McClain collections also 
contain items from New Mexico and Arizona, but this notice only 
concerns objects located in the three Colorado counties.) Both 
collections are currently stored in the Fort Lewis College Center of 
Southwest Studies curation facility.
    The Homer Root Ledger Collection is comprised of items donated to 
or acquired by the Fort Lewis College Museum. Homer Emerson Root (1896-
1977) was a Michigan-born and Colorado-raised Methodist minister who 
was appointed Curator of the Fort Lewis College Museum after retiring 
from the ministry in 1953. From 1958-1968, he kept five detailed and 
elaborately detailed ledger books in which museum (and other) items 
were skillfully rendered in ink and oil color. These items were 
accompanied by catalog cards. A self-trained archeologist and artist, 
Root directed FLC archeological field schools in the 1960s. Root had 
strong connections with avocational archeologists in the region who 
often donated objects they had acquired to the College Museum.
    The items in the Charles McLain Collection were collected prior to 
1970. They were accessioned in 2001 and 2008, following two donations 
from McClain's daughters, Katherine McLain Bergfield and Margaret 
``Peggy'' Fearing. The donations were accompanied by McLain's personal, 
handwritten catalog cards, which usually included documentation on the 
funerary context of the vessels and vague locational information. Many 
of the items in the McLain collection were amassed through Charles 
McClain's extensive collecting activities. Two of the items identified 
as unassociated funerary objects were acquired through a trade with 
ceramicist Norman ``Ted'' Oppelt.

Homer Root Ledger Collection From La Plata County, CO (63 items)

    In 1960, one item was removed from a burial during the construction 
of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, located at 2611 Junction Street, 
Durango, CO. The one item is a jar.
    Around 1961, five items were removed from burials at multiple 
archeological sites on Ewing Mesa by

[[Page 15254]]

W.D. Ewing and Homer Root. The five items are three bowls and two jars.
    Around 1962, one item was removed (likely by Zeke Flora) from a 
burial at a site known as Ignacio 12:10, located just south of Animas 
City Mountain, Durango, CO. The one item is a bowl.
    Around 1962, one item was removed by Zeke Flora from the burial of 
a juvenile individual at a site recorded as Ignacio 12:23, whose exact 
location is unknown today. The one item is a bowl.
    Around 1964, two items were removed by J.C. Miller from an 
unidentified site near Indian Creek, located 10 miles south of Durango 
and west of the Animas River. The items were found lying near the 
cranium of an extended adult individual interred in a refuse midden. 
The two items are one jar and one ceramic pipe.
    Around 1964, one item was removed by J.C. Miller from an Ancestral 
Puebloan burial at an unidentified site located on a ridge west of 
Marvel. The one item is an olla.
    Sometime during 1964-65, 13 items were removed by J.C. Miller from 
burials at multiple archeological sites in the Blue Mesa area, located 
five miles south of Durango, CO. Some items were recorded originally as 
having been associated with additional items that were catalogued but 
have not yet been located. Others were associated with each other in 
extended burial sites that were covered by cobblestones and then by 
domestic refuse. The 13 items are six bowls, three jars, one ladle, one 
hammerstone, one knife, and one pitcher.
    In the summer of 1966, 27 cultural items were removed from burials 
at the Sacred Ridge site (5MT9399), southwest of Durango, CO, by Homer 
Root while directing a Fort Lewis College archeological field school. 
The site lay in Ridges Basin, a ranch owned by Mike Bodo where, for 
many years, the public could search for fossils, stones, and ``Indian 
relics.'' Those activities had resulted in the destruction of 
archeological graves, structures, and trash mounds. After 1966, the 
site was subject to multiple archeological testing activities. Today, 
it lies beneath Lake Nighthorse as a result of the Animas-La Plata 
project. The 27 items are one metate, 11 bowls, eight jars, six 
pitchers, and one effigy vessel.
    In 1967, 12 items were removed from burials at the Pasture Ruin 
sites (5LP177, 5LP179, and 5LP243) by Homer Root while directing a Fort 
Lewis College archeological field school conducting salvage work at the 
Bodo Ranch prior to plowing by landowner Mike Bodo. The 12 items are 
three bowls, four pitchers, three jars, one ``implement'' made of non-
human bone, and one sandstone burial slab.

Charles McClain Collection From La Plata County, CO (101 items)

    Sometime before 1970, 65 items were collected from 17 burials 
located on Blue Mesa. The 65 items are 21 jars, 28 bowls, 14 pitchers, 
and two effigy vessels.
    Sometime before 1970, 31 items were collected from burials on the 
private property of C.A. Brown Wild Horse (Florida) Mesa, located in 
Durango, CO. The 31 items are seven pitchers, 12 bowls, eight jars, one 
seed jar, one effigy vessel, one lid, and one pipe.
    Sometime before 1970, four items were disinterred from adult 
burials located in the Marvel area of western La Plata County. The four 
items are two pipes and two bowls.
    Sometime before 1970, one item was disinterred from a burial at the 
Bodo Point site. The one item is a bowl.

Homer Root Collection From Montezuma County, CO (25 items)

    Around September of 1936, three items were removed from adult 
burials at the Yellow Jacket complex (5MT5) by Homer Root. The three 
items are one mortuary slab and two bowls.
    At an unknown date (but recorded in 1961 and 1964), 17 items were 
removed by Homer Root from adult burials at an unidentified site within 
the Herren Farm Complex, located on Stanley Ranch. The 17 items are 10 
stones (including hematite, copper ore, and agate), two shaped 
sandstones, one river cobble ground stone, three bowls, and one jar.
    At an unknown date (but recorded in 1964), four items were removed 
from adult burials at an unidentified site located on Stanley Ranch. 
The four items are two bowls, one jar, and one stone slab of river 
cobble.
    Around 1964, one item was removed by a rancher while plowing his 
field in the Goodman Point area. (Although the rancher found a second 
mug at the same time, the location of that mug is unknown.) The one 
item is a mug.

Charles McClain Collection from Montezuma County, CO (58 items)

    Sometime before 1970, 53 items were removed from burials on the 
property of Warren Griffith, located at the head of Yellow Jacket 
Canyon. The 53 items are 23 bowls, nine ladles, one canteen, four mugs, 
10 jars, four kiva jars, one effigy vessel, and one pitcher.
    Sometime before 1970, five items were removed from adult burials at 
the Herren Farms Site Complex (5MT2516). The site was situated on the 
property of Ed Herren, located at the head of Ruin Canyon, near Ackmen. 
The five items are two mugs, one bowl, one jar, and one canteen.

Homer Root Collection From Dolores County, CO (1 item)

    In 1937, one item was removed by National Youth Administration 
workers from an Ancestral Puebloan adult burial located southeast of 
the Sago School site. The item was given to the Durango Public Library 
by Lola Sanders and was later donated to Fort Lewis College by Helen 
Sloan Daniels. The one item is a mug.
    The cultural affiliation of the unassociated funerary objects was 
determined through the following lines of evidence: geographical, 
biological (drawings were made of human remains found with the objects, 
but the whereabouts of the remains are unknown), kinship, 
archeological, folklore, oral tradition, historical, and expert 
opinion. This decision was informed by information gathered from 
multiple rounds of face-to-face and written tribal consultations that 
took place in 2018, 2019, and 2020; artifact analysis; provenance 
research; and a thorough review of archeological, ethnographic, and 
oral historical literature. Ancestral Puebloan ceramic typologies 
helped to identify technological traditions, as well as chronological 
and geographical attributes of ceramic manufacture.

Determinations Made by Fort Lewis College

    Officials of the Fort Lewis College, have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 248 cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from specific burial sites of Native 
American individuals.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
unassociated funerary objects and the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice who wish to claim 
these cultural items should submit a written request with information 
in support of the claim to Kathleen S. Fine-Dare, Ph.D., Tribal 
Liaison, Fort Lewis College, 1000 Rim

[[Page 15255]]

Drive, Durango, CO 81301, telephone (970) 247-7438, email 
[email protected], by April 21, 2021. After that date, if no 
additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the 
unassociated funerary objects to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico may 
proceed.
    Fort Lewis College, via the NAGPRA Liaison, is responsible for 
notifying the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: March 4, 2021.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2021-05886 Filed 3-19-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P