Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Buffalo History Museum, Buffalo, NY, 8802 [2021-02611]

Download as PDF 8802 Federal Register / Vol. 86, No. 25 / Tuesday, February 9, 2021 / Notices aboriginal land of The Chickasaw Nation. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1)(ii), the disposition of the human remains may be to The Chickasaw Nation. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(4), the Tennessee Valley Authority has agreed to transfer control of the associated funerary objects to The Chickasaw Nation. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632– 7458, email tomaher@tva.gov, by March 11, 2021. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Chickasaw Nation may proceed. The Tennessee Valley Authority is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: January 15, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–02609 Filed 2–8–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P History and Description of the Cultural Item DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR In 1898, the Buffalo Historical Society (now known as The Buffalo History Museum), purchased a peace medal (commonly known as the Red Jacket Peace Medal) that was once owned by the Seneca chief and orator Red Jacket, a member of the Wolf Clan. The peace medal was presented to Red Jacket by President Washington in Philadelphia, in 1792, when representatives of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy had gathered, at President Washington’s request, to discuss future relationships between the United States and the Six Nations. Upon Red Jacket’s death, the medal passed to his nephew, James Johnson. When Johnson died, the medal passed to Ely S. Parker. Parker was the last Seneca to have possession of the medal. In 1898, the Society purchased the medal from Ely S. Parker’s widow, Minnie Parker. Based on consultation with the Seneca Nation of Indians, the Buffalo Historical Society has determined that, as the Red Jacket Peace Medal was gifted as a symbol of peace, friendship, and enduring relationship between the National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0031402; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Buffalo History Museum, Buffalo, NY National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Buffalo History Museum (previously known as the Buffalo Historical Society), in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request to the Buffalo History Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural item to the lineal descendants, SUMMARY: khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Buffalo History Museum at the address in this notice by March 11, 2021. ADDRESSES: Walter Mayer, Sr. Director of Collections, Buffalo History Museum, 1 Museum Court, Buffalo, NY 14216, telephone (716) 873–9644 Ext. 402, email wmayer@buffalohistory.org. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the control of the Buffalo History Museum, Buffalo, NY, that meets the definition of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:07 Feb 08, 2021 Jkt 253001 PO 00000 Frm 00051 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 United States and the Seneca Nation, it is an object of cultural patrimony. Determinations Made by the Buffalo History Museum Officials of the Buffalo History Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the one cultural item described above has ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the object of cultural patrimony and the Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as Seneca Nation of New York). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Walter Mayer, Sr. Director of Museum Collections, Buffalo History Museum, 1 Museum Court, Buffalo, NY 14216, telephone (716) 873–9644 Ext. 402, email wmayer@buffalohistory.org, by March 11, 2021. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the object of cultural patrimony to the Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as Seneca Nation of New York) may proceed. The Buffalo History Museum is responsible for notifying the Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as Seneca Nation of New York) that this notice has been published. Dated: January 15, 2021. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2021–02611 Filed 2–8–21; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE [OMB No. 1121–NEW] Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed eCollection eComments Requested; New Collection: National Prisoner Statistics Program: Coronavirus Pandemic Supplement Bureau of Justice Statistics, Department of Justice. ACTION: 30-Day notice. AGENCY: The Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs, SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\09FEN1.SGM 09FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 86, Number 25 (Tuesday, February 9, 2021)]
[Notices]
[Page 8802]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2021-02611]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0031402; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Buffalo History 
Museum, Buffalo, NY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Buffalo History Museum (previously known as the Buffalo 
Historical Society), in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes 
or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural item 
listed in this notice meets the definition of cultural patrimony. 
Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim 
this cultural item should submit a written request to the Buffalo 
History Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of 
control of the cultural item to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, 
or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
claim this cultural item should submit a written request with 
information in support of the claim to the Buffalo History Museum at 
the address in this notice by March 11, 2021.

ADDRESSES: Walter Mayer, Sr. Director of Collections, Buffalo History 
Museum, 1 Museum Court, Buffalo, NY 14216, telephone (716) 873-9644 
Ext. 402, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the 
control of the Buffalo History Museum, Buffalo, NY, that meets the 
definition of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Item

    In 1898, the Buffalo Historical Society (now known as The Buffalo 
History Museum), purchased a peace medal (commonly known as the Red 
Jacket Peace Medal) that was once owned by the Seneca chief and orator 
Red Jacket, a member of the Wolf Clan. The peace medal was presented to 
Red Jacket by President Washington in Philadelphia, in 1792, when 
representatives of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy had 
gathered, at President Washington's request, to discuss future 
relationships between the United States and the Six Nations. Upon Red 
Jacket's death, the medal passed to his nephew, James Johnson. When 
Johnson died, the medal passed to Ely S. Parker. Parker was the last 
Seneca to have possession of the medal. In 1898, the Society purchased 
the medal from Ely S. Parker's widow, Minnie Parker.
    Based on consultation with the Seneca Nation of Indians, the 
Buffalo Historical Society has determined that, as the Red Jacket Peace 
Medal was gifted as a symbol of peace, friendship, and enduring 
relationship between the United States and the Seneca Nation, it is an 
object of cultural patrimony.

Determinations Made by the Buffalo History Museum

    Officials of the Buffalo History Museum have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the one cultural item 
described above has ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural 
importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, 
rather than property owned by an individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the object 
of cultural patrimony and the Seneca Nation of Indians (previously 
listed as Seneca Nation of New York).

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim 
this cultural item should submit a written request with information in 
support of the claim to Walter Mayer, Sr. Director of Museum 
Collections, Buffalo History Museum, 1 Museum Court, Buffalo, NY 14216, 
telephone (716) 873-9644 Ext. 402, email [email protected], by 
March 11, 2021. After that date, if no additional claimants have come 
forward, transfer of control of the object of cultural patrimony to the 
Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as Seneca Nation of New 
York) may proceed.
    The Buffalo History Museum is responsible for notifying the Seneca 
Nation of Indians (previously listed as Seneca Nation of New York) that 
this notice has been published.

    Dated: January 15, 2021.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2021-02611 Filed 2-8-21; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P