Fair Credit Reporting Act Disclosures, 83749-83751 [2020-28409]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 247 / Wednesday, December 23, 2020 / Rules and Regulations had assets of less than $1.322 billion. Intermediate small bank means a small bank with assets of at least $330 billion as of December 31 of both of the prior two calendar years and less than $1.322 billion as of December 31 of either of the prior two calendar years. * * * * * Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 12 CFR Chapter III For the reasons set forth in the common preamble, the Board of Directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation amends part 345 of chapter III of title 12 of the Code of Federal Regulations to read as follows: PART 345—COMMUNITY REINVESTMENT 3. The authority citation for part 345 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 12 U.S.C. 1814–1817, 1819– 1820, 1828, 1831u and 2901–2908, 3103– 3104, and 3108(a). 4. Section 345.12 is amended by revising paragraph (u)(1) to read as follows: ■ § 345.12 Definitions. * * * * * (u) * * * (1) Definition. Small bank means a bank that, as of December 31 of either of the prior two calendar years, had assets of less than $1.322 billion. Intermediate small bank means a small bank with assets of at least $330 million as of December 31 of both of the prior two calendar years and less than $1.322 billion as of December 31 of either of the prior two calendar years. * * * * * By order of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, acting through the Secretary of the Board under delegated authority. Ann E. Misback, Secretary of the Board. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. By order of the Board of Directors. Dated at Washington, DC, on December 15, 2020. James P. Sheesley, Assistant Executive Secretary. [FR Doc. 2020–28116 Filed 12–22–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6210–01–P; 4810–33–P; 6714–01–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:46 Dec 22, 2020 12 CFR Part 615 Dated: December 7, 2020. Dale Aultman, Secretary, Farm Credit Administration Board. RIN 3052–AD35 [FR Doc. 2020–27144 Filed 12–22–20; 8:45 am] FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION BILLING CODE 6705–01–P Organization; Funding and Fiscal Affairs, Loan Policies and Operations, and Funding Operations; Investment Eligibility Jkt 253001 Farm Credit Administration. Notification of effective date. AGENCY: ACTION: Authority and Issuance 83749 SUMMARY: The Farm Credit Administration (FCA or we) issued a final rule that amends its investment regulations to authorize Farm Credit System (FCS or System) associations to purchase in the secondary market and hold as investments, portions of loans that non-FCS lenders originate, and that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) fully and unconditionally guarantees or insures as to the timely payment of principal and interest. In accordance with statute, the effective date of the final rule is no earlier than 30 days from the date of publication in the Federal Register during which either or both House of Congress are in session. DATES: The final rule regulation amending 12 CFR part 615 published on October 6, 2020 (85 FR 62945), and corrected on November 6, 2020 (85 FR 62949), is effective as of December 23, 2020. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Technical information: David J. Lewandrowski, Senior Policy Analyst, Finance & Capital Market Team, Office of Regulatory Policy, (703) 883–4414, TTY (703) 883–4056, lewandrowskid@ fca.gov. Legal information: Richard A. Katz, Senior Counsel, Office of General Counsel, (703) 883–4020, TTY (703) 883–4056, katzr@fca.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On August 13, 2020, the FCA issued a final rule that amended § 615.5140(b) so FCS associations are authorized to purchase in the secondary market and hold as investments, portions of loans that nonSystem lenders originate, and the USDA fully and unconditionally guarantees as to the payment of principal and interest. The final rule was published in the Federal Register on October 6, 2020. In accordance with 12 U.S.C. 2252(c)(1), the effective date of the final rule is no earlier than 30 days from the date of publication in the Federal Register during which either or both Houses of Congress are in session. Based on the records of the sessions of Congress, the effective date of the regulation is December 23, 2020. PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION 12 CFR Part 1022 Fair Credit Reporting Act Disclosures Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. ACTION: Final rule; official interpretation. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau) is issuing this final rule amending an appendix for Regulation V, which implements the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). The Bureau is required to calculate annually the dollar amount of the maximum allowable charge for disclosures by a consumer reporting agency to a consumer pursuant to FCRA section 609; this final rule establishes the maximum allowable charge for the 2021 calendar year. DATES: This final rule is effective January 1, 2021. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Willie Williams, Paralegal Specialist; Rachel Ross, Attorney-Advisor; Office of Regulations, at (202) 435–7700. If you require this document in an alternative electronic format, please contact CFPB_ Accessibility@cfpb.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Bureau is amending appendix O for Regulation V, which implements the FCRA, to establish the maximum allowable charge for disclosures by a consumer reporting agency to a consumer for 2021. The maximum allowable charge will be $13.00 for 2021. I. Background Under section 609 of the FCRA, a consumer reporting agency must, upon a consumer’s request, disclose to the consumer information in the consumer’s file.1 Section 612(a) of the FCRA gives consumers the right to a free file disclosure upon request once every 12 months from the nationwide consumer reporting agencies and nationwide specialty consumer reporting agencies.2 Section 612 of the FCRA also gives consumers the right to a free file disclosure under certain other, specified 1 15 2 15 E:\FR\FM\23DER1.SGM U.S.C. 1681g. U.S.C. 1681j(a). 23DER1 83750 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 247 / Wednesday, December 23, 2020 / Rules and Regulations circumstances.3 Where the consumer is not entitled to a free file disclosure, section 612(f)(1)(A) of the FCRA provides that a consumer reporting agency may impose a reasonable charge on a consumer for making a file disclosure. Section 612(f)(1)(A) of the FCRA provides that the charge for such a disclosure shall not exceed $8.00 and shall be indicated to the consumer before making the file disclosure.4 Section 612(f)(2) of the FCRA also states that the $8.00 maximum amount shall increase on January 1 of each year, based proportionally on changes in the Consumer Price Index, with fractional changes rounded to the nearest fifty cents.5 Such increases are based on the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI–U), which is the most general Consumer Price Index and covers all urban consumers and all items. II. Adjustment jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES For 2021, the ceiling on allowable charges under section 612(f) of the FCRA will be $13.00, an increase of fifty cents from 2020. The Bureau is using the $8.00 amount set forth in section 612(f)(1)(A)(i) of the FCRA as the baseline for its calculation of the increase in the ceiling on reasonable charges for certain disclosures made under section 609 of the FCRA. Since the effective date of section 612(a) was September 30, 1997, the Bureau calculated the proportional increase in the CPI–U from September 1997 to September 2020. The Bureau then determined what modification, if any, from the original base of $8.00 should be made effective for 2021, given the requirement that fractional changes be rounded to the nearest fifty cents. Between September 1997 and September 2020, the CPI–U increased by 61.464 percent from an index value of 161.2 in September 1997 to a value of 260.28 in September 2020. An increase of 61.464 percent in the $8.00 base figure would lead to a figure of $12.92. However, because the statute directs that the resulting figure be rounded to the nearest $0.50, the maximum allowable charge is $13.00. The Bureau therefore determines that the maximum allowable charge for the year 2021 will increase to $13.00. 3 15 U.S.C. 1681j(b)-(d). The maximum allowable charge announced by the Bureau does not apply to requests made under section 612(a)–(d) of the FCRA. The charge does apply when a consumer who orders a file disclosure has already received a free annual file disclosure and does not otherwise qualify for an additional free file disclosure. 4 15 U.S.C. 1681j(f)(1)(A). 5 15 U.S.C. 1681j(f)(2). VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:31 Dec 22, 2020 Jkt 253001 III. Procedural Requirements A. Administrative Procedure Act Under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), notice and opportunity for public comment are not required if the Bureau finds that notice and public comment are impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest.6 Pursuant to this final rule, in Regulation V, appendix O is amended to update the maximum allowable charge for 2021 under section 612(f). The amendments in this final rule are technical and non-discretionary, as they merely apply the method previously established in Regulation V for determining adjustments to the thresholds. For these reasons, the Bureau has determined that publishing a notice of proposed rulemaking and providing opportunity for public comment are unnecessary. The amendments therefore are adopted in final form. Section 553(d) of the APA generally requires publication of a final rule not less than 30 days before its effective date, except (1) a substantive rule which grants or recognizes an exemption or relieves a restriction; (2) interpretive rules and statements of policy; or (3) as otherwise provided by the agency for good cause found and published with the rule. 5 U.S.C. 553(d). At a minimum, the Bureau believes the amendments made by this rule fall under the third exception to section 553(d). The Bureau finds that there is good cause to make this rule effective on January 1, 2021. The amendments made by this rule are technical and non-discretionary, and apply the method previously established in the Bureau’s regulations for automatic adjustments to the threshold. B. Regulatory Flexibility Act Because no notice of proposed rulemaking is required, the Regulatory Flexibility Act does not require an initial or final regulatory flexibility analysis.7 C. Paperwork Reduction Act In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995,8 the Bureau reviewed this final rule. No collections of information pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act are contained in the final rule. D. Congressional Review Act Pursuant to the Congressional Review Act (5 U.S.C. 801 et seq.), the Bureau 65 U.S.C. 553(b)(B). U.S.C. 603(a), 604(a). 8 44 U.S.C. 3506; 5 CFR part 1320. 75 PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 will submit a report containing this rule and other required information to the United States Senate, the United States House of Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior to the rule taking effect. The Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) has designated this rule as not a ‘‘major rule’’ as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2). IV. Signing Authority The Acting Associate Director for Research, Markets and Regulations, Dan S. Sokolov, having reviewed and approved this document, is delegating the authority to electronically sign this document to Grace Feola, a Bureau Federal Register Liaison, for purposes of publication in the Federal Register. List of Subjects in 12 CFR Part 1022 Banks, banking, Consumer protection, Credit unions, Holding companies, National banks, Privacy, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Savings associations. Authority and Issuance For the reasons set forth in the preamble, the Bureau amends Regulation V, 12 CFR part 1022, as set forth below: PART 1022—FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V) 1. The authority citation for part 1022 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 12 U.S.C. 5512, 5581; 15 U.S.C. 1681a, 1681b, 1681c, 1681c–1, 1681e, 1681g, 1681i, 1681j, 1681m, 1681s, 1681s–2, 1681s– 3, and 1681t; Sec. 214, Pub. L. 108–159, 117 Stat. 1952. 2. Appendix O is revised to read as follows: ■ Appendix O to Part 1022—Reasonable Charges for Certain Disclosures Section 612(f) of the FCRA, 15 U.S.C. 1681j(f), directs the Bureau to increase the maximum allowable charge a consumer reporting agency may impose for making a disclosure to the consumer pursuant to section 609 of the FCRA, 15 U.S.C. 1681g, on January 1 of each year, based proportionally on changes in the Consumer Price Index, with fractional changes rounded to the nearest fifty cents. The Bureau will publish notice of the maximum allowable charge each year by amending this appendix. For calendar year 2021, the maximum allowable charge is $13.00. For historical purposes: 1. For calendar year 2012, the maximum allowable disclosure charge was $11.50. 2. For calendar year 2013, the maximum allowable disclosure charge was $11.50. 3. For calendar year 2014, the maximum allowable disclosure charge was $11.50. 4. For calendar year 2015, the maximum allowable disclosure charge was $12.00. E:\FR\FM\23DER1.SGM 23DER1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 247 / Wednesday, December 23, 2020 / Rules and Regulations 5. For calendar year 2016, the maximum allowable disclosure charge was $12.00. 6. For calendar year 2017, the maximum allowable disclosure charge was $12.00. 7. For calendar year 2018, the maximum allowable disclosure charge was $12.00. 8. For calendar year 2019, the maximum allowable disclosure charge was $12.50. 9. For calendar year 2020, the maximum allowable disclosure charge was $12.50. 10. For calendar year 2021, the maximum allowable disclosure charge is $13.00. Dated: December 18, 2020. Grace Feola, Federal Register Liaison, Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. [FR Doc. 2020–28409 Filed 12–22–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4810–AM–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2020–0841; Product Identifier 2020–NM–087–AD; Amendment 39–21366; AD 2020–26–11] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus SAS Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus SAS Model A300 F4–605R airplanes and Model A310–324 airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report that certain emergency locator transmitter (ELT) lithium batteries lack protection against current injection. This AD requires modification of the airplane circuit connecting the ELT battery, as specified in a European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) AD, which is incorporated by reference. The FAA is issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products. DATES: This AD is effective January 27, 2021. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of a certain publication listed in this AD as of January 27, 2021. 83751 ADDRESSES: For material incorporated by reference (IBR) in this AD, contact the EASA, Konrad-Adenauer-Ufer 3, 50668 Cologne, Germany; phone: +49 221 8999 000; email: ADs@ easa.europa.eu; internet: www.easa.europa.eu. You may find this IBR material on the EASA website at https://ad.easa.europa.eu. You may view this IBR material at the FAA, Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 206–231–3195. It is also available in the AD docket on the internet at https:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020– 0841. part 39 by adding an AD that would apply to certain Airbus SAS Model A300 F4–605R airplanes and Model A310–324 airplanes. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on September 16, 2020 (85 FR 57802). The NPRM was prompted by a report that certain ELT lithium batteries lack protection against current injection. The NPRM proposed to require modification of the airplane circuit connecting the ELT battery, as specified in a EASA AD. The FAA is issuing this AD to address ELT lithium batteries lacking protection against current injection, which could induce a local battery fire, even after a significant delay, and could result in damage to the airplane and injury to occupants. See the MCAI for additional background information. Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the internet at https:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020– 0841; or in person at Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this final rule, any comments received, and other information. The address for Docket Operations is U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M– 30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dan Rodina, Aerospace Engineer, Large Aircraft Section, International Validation Branch, FAA, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA 98198; phone and fax: 206–231–3225; email: dan.rodina@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Discussion The EASA, which is the Technical Agent for the Member States of the European Union, has issued EASA AD 2020–0108, dated May 14, 2020 (EASA AD 2020–0108) (also referred to as the Mandatory Continuing Airworthiness Information, or the MCAI), to correct an unsafe condition for certain Airbus SAS Model A300–600 series airplanes and Model A310 series airplanes. The FAA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR The FAA gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing this final rule. The FAA received no comments on the NPRM or on the determination of the cost to the public. Conclusion The FAA reviewed the relevant data and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting this final rule as proposed, except for minor editorial changes. The FAA has determined that these minor changes: • Are consistent with the intent that was proposed in the NPRM for addressing the unsafe condition; and • Do not add any additional burden upon the public than was already proposed in the NPRM. Related Service Information Under 1 CFR Part 51 EASA AD 2020–0108 describes procedures for modification of the airplane circuit connecting the ELT battery by installing a diode. This material is reasonably available because the interested parties have access to it through their normal course of business or by the means identified in the ADDRESSES section. Costs of Compliance The FAA estimates that this AD affects 6 airplanes of U.S. registry. The FAA estimates the following costs to comply with this AD: jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES ESTIMATED COSTS FOR REQUIRED ACTIONS Labor cost Parts cost Cost per product Cost on U.S. operators 2 work-hours × $85 per hour = $170 .......................................................................................... $50 $220 $1,320 VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:31 Dec 22, 2020 Jkt 253001 PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\23DER1.SGM 23DER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 247 (Wednesday, December 23, 2020)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 83749-83751]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-28409]


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BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION

12 CFR Part 1022


Fair Credit Reporting Act Disclosures

AGENCY: Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection.

ACTION: Final rule; official interpretation.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau) is 
issuing this final rule amending an appendix for Regulation V, which 
implements the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). The Bureau is required 
to calculate annually the dollar amount of the maximum allowable charge 
for disclosures by a consumer reporting agency to a consumer pursuant 
to FCRA section 609; this final rule establishes the maximum allowable 
charge for the 2021 calendar year.

DATES: This final rule is effective January 1, 2021.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Willie Williams, Paralegal Specialist; 
Rachel Ross, Attorney-Advisor; Office of Regulations, at (202) 435-
7700. If you require this document in an alternative electronic format, 
please contact [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Bureau is amending appendix O for 
Regulation V, which implements the FCRA, to establish the maximum 
allowable charge for disclosures by a consumer reporting agency to a 
consumer for 2021. The maximum allowable charge will be $13.00 for 
2021.

I. Background

    Under section 609 of the FCRA, a consumer reporting agency must, 
upon a consumer's request, disclose to the consumer information in the 
consumer's file.\1\ Section 612(a) of the FCRA gives consumers the 
right to a free file disclosure upon request once every 12 months from 
the nationwide consumer reporting agencies and nationwide specialty 
consumer reporting agencies.\2\ Section 612 of the FCRA also gives 
consumers the right to a free file disclosure under certain other, 
specified

[[Page 83750]]

circumstances.\3\ Where the consumer is not entitled to a free file 
disclosure, section 612(f)(1)(A) of the FCRA provides that a consumer 
reporting agency may impose a reasonable charge on a consumer for 
making a file disclosure. Section 612(f)(1)(A) of the FCRA provides 
that the charge for such a disclosure shall not exceed $8.00 and shall 
be indicated to the consumer before making the file disclosure.\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ 15 U.S.C. 1681g.
    \2\ 15 U.S.C. 1681j(a).
    \3\ 15 U.S.C. 1681j(b)-(d). The maximum allowable charge 
announced by the Bureau does not apply to requests made under 
section 612(a)-(d) of the FCRA. The charge does apply when a 
consumer who orders a file disclosure has already received a free 
annual file disclosure and does not otherwise qualify for an 
additional free file disclosure.
    \4\ 15 U.S.C. 1681j(f)(1)(A).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Section 612(f)(2) of the FCRA also states that the $8.00 maximum 
amount shall increase on January 1 of each year, based proportionally 
on changes in the Consumer Price Index, with fractional changes rounded 
to the nearest fifty cents.\5\ Such increases are based on the Consumer 
Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U), which is the most general 
Consumer Price Index and covers all urban consumers and all items.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \5\ 15 U.S.C. 1681j(f)(2).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

II. Adjustment

    For 2021, the ceiling on allowable charges under section 612(f) of 
the FCRA will be $13.00, an increase of fifty cents from 2020. The 
Bureau is using the $8.00 amount set forth in section 612(f)(1)(A)(i) 
of the FCRA as the baseline for its calculation of the increase in the 
ceiling on reasonable charges for certain disclosures made under 
section 609 of the FCRA. Since the effective date of section 612(a) was 
September 30, 1997, the Bureau calculated the proportional increase in 
the CPI-U from September 1997 to September 2020. The Bureau then 
determined what modification, if any, from the original base of $8.00 
should be made effective for 2021, given the requirement that 
fractional changes be rounded to the nearest fifty cents.
    Between September 1997 and September 2020, the CPI-U increased by 
61.464 percent from an index value of 161.2 in September 1997 to a 
value of 260.28 in September 2020. An increase of 61.464 percent in the 
$8.00 base figure would lead to a figure of $12.92. However, because 
the statute directs that the resulting figure be rounded to the nearest 
$0.50, the maximum allowable charge is $13.00. The Bureau therefore 
determines that the maximum allowable charge for the year 2021 will 
increase to $13.00.

III. Procedural Requirements

A. Administrative Procedure Act

    Under the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), notice and 
opportunity for public comment are not required if the Bureau finds 
that notice and public comment are impracticable, unnecessary, or 
contrary to the public interest.\6\ Pursuant to this final rule, in 
Regulation V, appendix O is amended to update the maximum allowable 
charge for 2021 under section 612(f). The amendments in this final rule 
are technical and non-discretionary, as they merely apply the method 
previously established in Regulation V for determining adjustments to 
the thresholds. For these reasons, the Bureau has determined that 
publishing a notice of proposed rulemaking and providing opportunity 
for public comment are unnecessary. The amendments therefore are 
adopted in final form.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \6\ 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Section 553(d) of the APA generally requires publication of a final 
rule not less than 30 days before its effective date, except (1) a 
substantive rule which grants or recognizes an exemption or relieves a 
restriction; (2) interpretive rules and statements of policy; or (3) as 
otherwise provided by the agency for good cause found and published 
with the rule. 5 U.S.C. 553(d). At a minimum, the Bureau believes the 
amendments made by this rule fall under the third exception to section 
553(d). The Bureau finds that there is good cause to make this rule 
effective on January 1, 2021. The amendments made by this rule are 
technical and non-discretionary, and apply the method previously 
established in the Bureau's regulations for automatic adjustments to 
the threshold.

B. Regulatory Flexibility Act

    Because no notice of proposed rulemaking is required, the 
Regulatory Flexibility Act does not require an initial or final 
regulatory flexibility analysis.\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \7\ 5 U.S.C. 603(a), 604(a).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

C. Paperwork Reduction Act

    In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995,\8\ the 
Bureau reviewed this final rule. No collections of information pursuant 
to the Paperwork Reduction Act are contained in the final rule.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \8\ 44 U.S.C. 3506; 5 CFR part 1320.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

D. Congressional Review Act

    Pursuant to the Congressional Review Act (5 U.S.C. 801 et seq.), 
the Bureau will submit a report containing this rule and other required 
information to the United States Senate, the United States House of 
Representatives, and the Comptroller General of the United States prior 
to the rule taking effect. The Office of Information and Regulatory 
Affairs (OIRA) has designated this rule as not a ``major rule'' as 
defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2).

IV. Signing Authority

    The Acting Associate Director for Research, Markets and 
Regulations, Dan S. Sokolov, having reviewed and approved this 
document, is delegating the authority to electronically sign this 
document to Grace Feola, a Bureau Federal Register Liaison, for 
purposes of publication in the Federal Register.

List of Subjects in 12 CFR Part 1022

    Banks, banking, Consumer protection, Credit unions, Holding 
companies, National banks, Privacy, Reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements, Savings associations.

Authority and Issuance

    For the reasons set forth in the preamble, the Bureau amends 
Regulation V, 12 CFR part 1022, as set forth below:

PART 1022--FAIR CREDIT REPORTING (REGULATION V)

0
1. The authority citation for part 1022 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  12 U.S.C. 5512, 5581; 15 U.S.C. 1681a, 1681b, 1681c, 
1681c-1, 1681e, 1681g, 1681i, 1681j, 1681m, 1681s, 1681s-2, 1681s-3, 
and 1681t; Sec. 214, Pub. L. 108-159, 117 Stat. 1952.


0
2. Appendix O is revised to read as follows:

Appendix O to Part 1022--Reasonable Charges for Certain Disclosures

    Section 612(f) of the FCRA, 15 U.S.C. 1681j(f), directs the 
Bureau to increase the maximum allowable charge a consumer reporting 
agency may impose for making a disclosure to the consumer pursuant 
to section 609 of the FCRA, 15 U.S.C. 1681g, on January 1 of each 
year, based proportionally on changes in the Consumer Price Index, 
with fractional changes rounded to the nearest fifty cents. The 
Bureau will publish notice of the maximum allowable charge each year 
by amending this appendix. For calendar year 2021, the maximum 
allowable charge is $13.00. For historical purposes:
    1. For calendar year 2012, the maximum allowable disclosure 
charge was $11.50.
    2. For calendar year 2013, the maximum allowable disclosure 
charge was $11.50.
    3. For calendar year 2014, the maximum allowable disclosure 
charge was $11.50.
    4. For calendar year 2015, the maximum allowable disclosure 
charge was $12.00.

[[Page 83751]]

    5. For calendar year 2016, the maximum allowable disclosure 
charge was $12.00.
    6. For calendar year 2017, the maximum allowable disclosure 
charge was $12.00.
    7. For calendar year 2018, the maximum allowable disclosure 
charge was $12.00.
    8. For calendar year 2019, the maximum allowable disclosure 
charge was $12.50.
    9. For calendar year 2020, the maximum allowable disclosure 
charge was $12.50.
    10. For calendar year 2021, the maximum allowable disclosure 
charge is $13.00.

    Dated: December 18, 2020.
Grace Feola,
Federal Register Liaison, Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection.
[FR Doc. 2020-28409 Filed 12-22-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4810-AM-P