Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State Police, Lansing, MI, 71090-71092 [2020-24686]

Download as PDF 71090 ACTION: Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 216 / Friday, November 6, 2020 / Notices Notice. SUMMARY: The purpose of this notice is to request a second call for public nominations for members to the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Rio Puerco Management Committee (Committee). A completed nomination form and accompanying nomination/ recommendation letters must be received by December 7, 2020. ADDRESSES: Send nominations to Mark Matthews, BLM acting Albuquerque District Manager, 100 Sun Blvd. NE, Suite 330, Albuquerque, NM 87109, Attention: Rio Puerco Management Committee Nominations. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Contact Allison Sandoval, Public Affairs Specialist, BLM New Mexico State Office, 301 Dinosaur Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87508, phone (505) 954–2019, or email aesandoval@blm.gov. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1–800–877–8229, to contact the above individual during normal business hours. The FRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Omnibus Parks and Public Lands Management Act, Section 401, reauthorized through the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act, Section 1122, directs the Secretary of the Interior to establish the Committee. The Committee will be regulated by the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) (5 U.S.C. Appendix 2) and section 309 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA). The BLM rules governing advisory committees are found at 43 CFR subpart 1784. The Committee shall advise the Secretary, acting through the Director of the BLM, on the development and implementation of the Rio Puerco Management Program and serve as a forum for information about activities that may affect or further the development and implementation of the best management practices. The Committee shall be convened by a representative of the Bureau of Land Management and shall include representatives from: (1) The Rio Puerco Watershed Committee; (2) affected tribes and pueblos; (3) the United States Forest Service of the Department of Agriculture; (4) the Bureau of Reclamation; DATES: VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:00 Nov 05, 2020 Jkt 253001 (5) the United States Geological Survey; (6) the Bureau of Indian Affairs; (7) the United States Fish and Wildlife Service; (8) the Army Corps of Engineers; (9) the Environmental Protection Agency; (10) the Natural Resources Conservation Service of the Department of Agriculture; (11) the State of New Mexico, including the New Mexico Environment Department of the State Engineer; (12) affected local soil and water conservation districts; (13) the Elephant Butte Irrigation District; (14) private landowners; and (15) other interested citizens. Members will be appointed by the Secretary to staggered 3-year terms. Nominating Potential Members: Nomination forms may be obtained from the Rio Puerco Field Office (address listed above) or https://www.blm.gov/ get-involved/resource-advisory-council/ near-you/New-Mexico. All nominations must include a completed Resource Advisory Council application (OMB Control No. 1004–0204), letters of reference from the represented interests or organizations, and any other information that speaks to the candidate’s qualifications. The specific category the nominee would be representing should be identified in the letter of nomination and on the application form. Non-Federal members of the Committee serve without compensation. However, while away from their homes or regular places of business, Committee and subcommittee members engaged in Committee or subcommittee business may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5703, in the same manner as persons employed intermittently in Federal Government service. The Committee shall meet approximately two to four times annually, and at such other times as determined by the Designated Federal Officer. Certification Statement: I hereby certify that the Rio Puerco Management Committee is necessary and is in the public interest in connection with the performance of duties pursuant to the Department of the Interior’s authority under the Omnibus Parks and Public Lands Management Act, the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009, and the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act. PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Authority: 43 CFR 1784.4–1. Mark Matthews, Acting Albuquerque District Manager. [FR Doc. 2020–24757 Filed 11–5–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–FB–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0031097; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State Police, Lansing, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: SUMMARY: The Michigan State Police (MSP) has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Michigan State Police. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Michigan State Police at the address in this notice by December 7, 2020. ADDRESSES: Hanna Friedlander, Human Remains Analyst, Michigan State Police, Intelligence Operations Division— Missing Persons Coordinator Unit, 7150 Harris Drive, Lansing, MI 48821, telephone (517) 242–5731, email friedlanderh@michigan.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Michigan State Police, Lansing, MI. The human remains were removed from Frenchtown Charter Township, Monroe County and Jackson County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 216 / Friday, November 6, 2020 / Notices U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Michigan State Police professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi (previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. History and Description of the Remains On April 22, 2009, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Frenchtown Charter Township, Monroe County, MI (Frenchtown Twp.). MSP Monroe was dispatched to a private residence along the Lake Erie shoreline in Frenchtown Twp., on April 22, 2009, following the reported finding of a possible human jaw laying in the sand on the lakeside. The homeowners had removed the mandible from the lakeside to their patio to protect it. Upon arrival, the officer examined the human remains, collected them, and took them to the Michigan State Police Northville Lab for assessment. The remains were determined to be human and sent to the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification (UNTCHI) for analysis. A sample of bone was taken for DNA analysis and extraction while at the UNTCHI. The human remains were returned to MSP Monroe on September 4, 2012. On March 13, 2013, the human remains were transferred to the Wayne County Medical Examiner’s Office (WCMEO) in Detroit, MI. On December 16, 2019, Ms. Hanna Friedlander located the human remains at the WCMEO and transferred them to the MSP Headquarters in Lansing, MI, where they are known as MSP 28–1233–09. Based on the robustness of the mandible and the bilobate chin, the mandible was determined to be male. The teeth showed pronounced occlusal wear, most likely from a diet high in coarse materials. The clasis on the lingual side of the mandible was minimal, suggesting a younger individual. The pronounced parabolic arch, in combination with the dental wear, yielded an assessment that the individual was of Native American VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:00 Nov 05, 2020 Jkt 253001 descent. This determination was made by John A. Servello, BA, and overseen by Dr. H. Gill-King, D–ABFA. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On July 22, 2019, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from their resting spot in Jackson County, MI. The remains were transported to Michigan State University for forensic anthropological assessment, which was completed by MA student Alex Groots and Dr. Joseph Hefner, D–ABFA. On October 10, 2019, the human remains were returned to the Michigan State Police, where they are known as FA020–19. The recovered human remains consist of 13 maxillary and 11 mandibular fragments, fragmentary cranium and mandible, seven approximately unidentifiable cranial fragments, four fragmentary left ribs, four unsided rib fragments, two fragmentary cervical vertebrae, one fragmentary thoracic vertebra, one left clavicle fragment, one unsided scapula fragment, the shaft of the left tibia, the left navicular, and approximately 17 unidentifiable postcranial fragments. Analysis of the human remains indicate that the individual was an adult male over the age of 50. The cranial features include a large mastoid process, blunt supraorbital margins, and a robust glabella (Buikstra and Ubelaker 1994); this is confirmed via a logistic regression equation (Walker 2008). The age of the individual was determined via the complete obliteration of the transverse palatine suture, in combination with the complete eruption of all third molars and extensive tooth wear. Based on a three-group discriminant function analysis, the individual exhibits macromorphoscopic traits most similar to those of Native Americans. In addition, the dentition of this individual is characteristic of Native American ancestry. The taphonomy of the human remains indicates they had been buried for a long time. No known individual was identified. The 22 associated funerary objects are seven sherds of cordimpressed pottery, three worked stones, and 12 assorted fire-cracked rocks. The funerary objects are consistent with prehistoric Native American burials. Determinations Made by the Michigan State Police Officials of the Michigan State Police have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on the dental occlusal wear, the post-mortem interval PO 00000 Frm 00045 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 71091 as indicated by the shells, mollusks, and other aquatic indications left on the mandible, and a three-group discriminant function analysis using macromorphic traits, in addition to dental characteristics including shovel shaped incisors and extreme tooth wear. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 22 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian Tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana (previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana); Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Six component reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band); Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1 71092 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 216 / Friday, November 6, 2020 / Notices Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Shawnee Tribe; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the Wyandotte Nation (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). • Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains may be to The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Hanna Friedlander, Human Remains Analyst, Michigan State Police, Intelligence Operations Division—Missing Persons Coordinator Unit, 7150 Harris Drive, Lansing, MI 48821, telephone (517) 242–5731, email friedlanderh@michigan.gov, by December 7, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the Monroe County human remains to The Tribes may proceed. The Michigan State Police is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: October 22, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–24686 Filed 11–5–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:00 Nov 05, 2020 Jkt 253001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0031088; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: SUMMARY: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the TVA. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the TVA at the address in this notice by December 7, 2020. ADDRESSES: Dr. Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632– 7458, email tomaher@tva.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from the Colbert Creek Mound, 1LU54, in Lauderdale County, AL. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, PO 00000 Frm 00046 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by TVA professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains From February 2 to May 12, 1937, human remains representing, at minimum, 26 individuals were removed from the Colbert Creek Mound, 1LU54, in Lauderdale County, AL, by the Alabama Museum of Natural History (AMNH) at the University of Alabama. Details regarding the excavation of this mound may be found in a report by William Webb and David DeJarnette, An archeological Survey of Pickwick Basin in the Adjacent Portions of the States of Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. TVA acquired this site on November 10, 1936, for the Pickwick Reservoir project. This site was located near the confluence of Colbert Creek and the Tennessee River. While there are no radiocarbon dates from this site, the excavated artifacts indicate that the mound was created during the Copena phase (A.D. 100–500). This burial mound was placed on a natural rise in the second terrace adjacent to the Tennessee River. In the historic period, the site became part of an African American cemetery. This resulted in disturbance of the prehistoric occupation. As the soil was comprised of acidic clay and was relatively rock-filled, identifying burial units was difficult. Preservation of bone and other organic remains was restricted to teeth, skull fragments and impressions of long bones. Both extended and bundled burials were encountered. The fragmentary nature of the human remains made it difficult to identify sex. One set of remains is identified as female and the rest are of indeterminate sex. Twenty individuals are adults and six are sub-adults. No known individuals were identified. The 13 associated funerary objects include seven pieces of galena, one Hillabee schist spade, one chert biface, one chert uniface, and three soil and charcoal samples. E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 216 (Friday, November 6, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 71090-71092]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-24686]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0031097; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State Police, Lansing, 
MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Michigan State Police (MSP) has completed an inventory of 
human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or 
Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day 
Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any 
Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this 
notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains 
should submit a written request to the Michigan State Police. If no 
additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human 
remains to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written 
request with information in support of the request to the Michigan 
State Police at the address in this notice by December 7, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Hanna Friedlander, Human Remains Analyst, Michigan State 
Police, Intelligence Operations Division--Missing Persons Coordinator 
Unit, 7150 Harris Drive, Lansing, MI 48821, telephone (517) 242-5731, 
email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the Michigan State Police, Lansing, MI. The human 
remains were removed from Frenchtown Charter Township, Monroe County 
and Jackson County, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25

[[Page 71091]]

U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this 
notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or 
Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. 
The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in 
this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Michigan 
State Police professional staff in consultation with representatives of 
the Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; 
Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi (previously listed as Huron 
Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and 
Indiana; and the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan.

History and Description of the Remains

    On April 22, 2009, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Frenchtown Charter Township, Monroe 
County, MI (Frenchtown Twp.). MSP Monroe was dispatched to a private 
residence along the Lake Erie shoreline in Frenchtown Twp., on April 
22, 2009, following the reported finding of a possible human jaw laying 
in the sand on the lakeside. The homeowners had removed the mandible 
from the lakeside to their patio to protect it. Upon arrival, the 
officer examined the human remains, collected them, and took them to 
the Michigan State Police Northville Lab for assessment. The remains 
were determined to be human and sent to the University of North Texas 
Center for Human Identification (UNTCHI) for analysis. A sample of bone 
was taken for DNA analysis and extraction while at the UNTCHI. The 
human remains were returned to MSP Monroe on September 4, 2012. On 
March 13, 2013, the human remains were transferred to the Wayne County 
Medical Examiner's Office (WCMEO) in Detroit, MI. On December 16, 2019, 
Ms. Hanna Friedlander located the human remains at the WCMEO and 
transferred them to the MSP Headquarters in Lansing, MI, where they are 
known as MSP 28-1233-09.
    Based on the robustness of the mandible and the bilobate chin, the 
mandible was determined to be male. The teeth showed pronounced 
occlusal wear, most likely from a diet high in coarse materials. The 
clasis on the lingual side of the mandible was minimal, suggesting a 
younger individual. The pronounced parabolic arch, in combination with 
the dental wear, yielded an assessment that the individual was of 
Native American descent. This determination was made by John A. 
Servello, BA, and overseen by Dr. H. Gill-King, D-ABFA. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On July 22, 2019, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from their resting spot in Jackson County, MI. 
The remains were transported to Michigan State University for forensic 
anthropological assessment, which was completed by MA student Alex 
Groots and Dr. Joseph Hefner, D-ABFA. On October 10, 2019, the human 
remains were returned to the Michigan State Police, where they are 
known as FA020-19.
    The recovered human remains consist of 13 maxillary and 11 
mandibular fragments, fragmentary cranium and mandible, seven 
approximately unidentifiable cranial fragments, four fragmentary left 
ribs, four unsided rib fragments, two fragmentary cervical vertebrae, 
one fragmentary thoracic vertebra, one left clavicle fragment, one 
unsided scapula fragment, the shaft of the left tibia, the left 
navicular, and approximately 17 unidentifiable post-cranial fragments. 
Analysis of the human remains indicate that the individual was an adult 
male over the age of 50. The cranial features include a large mastoid 
process, blunt supraorbital margins, and a robust glabella (Buikstra 
and Ubelaker 1994); this is confirmed via a logistic regression 
equation (Walker 2008). The age of the individual was determined via 
the complete obliteration of the transverse palatine suture, in 
combination with the complete eruption of all third molars and 
extensive tooth wear. Based on a three-group discriminant function 
analysis, the individual exhibits macromorphoscopic traits most similar 
to those of Native Americans. In addition, the dentition of this 
individual is characteristic of Native American ancestry. The taphonomy 
of the human remains indicates they had been buried for a long time. No 
known individual was identified. The 22 associated funerary objects are 
seven sherds of cord-impressed pottery, three worked stones, and 12 
assorted fire-cracked rocks. The funerary objects are consistent with 
prehistoric Native American burials.

Determinations Made by the Michigan State Police

    Officials of the Michigan State Police have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on the dental occlusal wear, 
the post-mortem interval as indicated by the shells, mollusks, and 
other aquatic indications left on the mandible, and a three-group 
discriminant function analysis using macromorphic traits, in addition 
to dental characteristics including shovel shaped incisors and extreme 
tooth wear.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 22 objects described 
in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and any present-day Indian Tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the 
Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of 
the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of 
the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, 
Michigan; Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana 
(previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's 
Reservation, Montana); Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware 
Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Traverse 
Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian 
Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac 
Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; 
Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du 
Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake 
Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa 
Indians, Michigan; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; 
Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-
she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Minnesota Chippewa 
Tribe, Minnesota (Six component reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett 
Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille 
Lacs Band; White Earth Band); Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the 
Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); 
Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan 
and Indiana; Prairie Band

[[Page 71092]]

Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi 
Nation, Kansas); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw 
Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa 
Indians, Michigan; Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as 
Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation (previously listed as 
Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Shawnee Tribe; Sokaogon Chippewa 
Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; 
Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca 
(previously listed as Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); 
Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the 
Wyandotte Nation (hereafter referred to as ``The Tribes'').
     Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders, indicate 
that the land from which the Native American human remains were removed 
is the aboriginal land of The Tribes.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains may be to The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains should submit a written request with information 
in support of the request to Hanna Friedlander, Human Remains Analyst, 
Michigan State Police, Intelligence Operations Division--Missing 
Persons Coordinator Unit, 7150 Harris Drive, Lansing, MI 48821, 
telephone (517) 242-5731, email [email protected], by December 
7, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come 
forward, transfer of control of the Monroe County human remains to The 
Tribes may proceed.
    The Michigan State Police is responsible for notifying The Tribes 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: October 22, 2020.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2020-24686 Filed 11-5-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P