Airworthiness Directives; Textron Aviation Inc. Airplanes, 69134-69138 [2020-24046]

Download as PDF 69134 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 212 / Monday, November 2, 2020 / Rules and Regulations passed the requirements in the Accomplishment Instructions, paragraph 3.B.6., of EASB 65.00.19 and EASB 65A008, as applicable to your model helicopter, is acceptable for compliance with this paragraph. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, email fedreg.legal@nara.gov, or go to: https:// www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibrlocations.html. (f) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (1) The Manager, Rotorcraft Standards Branch, FAA, may approve AMOCs for this AD. Send your proposal to: Rao Edupuganti, Aviation Safety Engineer, Regulations and Policy Section, Rotorcraft Standards Branch, FAA, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; telephone 817–222–5110; email 9ASW-FTW-AMOC-Requests@faa.gov. (2) For operations conducted under a 14 CFR part 119 operating certificate or under 14 CFR part 91, subpart K, the FAA suggests that you notify your principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office or certificate holding district office, before operating any aircraft complying with this AD through an AMOC. Issued on October 6, 2020. Lance T. Gant, Director, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, Aircraft Certification Service. (g) Additional Information The subject of this AD is addressed in European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) AD No. 2019–0165–E, dated July 12, 2019. You may view the EASA AD on the internet at https://www.regulations.gov in Docket No. FAA–2020–0618. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES (h) Subject Joint Aircraft Service Component (JASC) Code: 62, Tail Rotor Gearbox. (i) Material Incorporated by Reference (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of the service information listed in this paragraph under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) You must use this service information as applicable to do the actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. (i) Airbus Helicopters Emergency Alert Service Bulletin (EASB) No. 65.00.19, Revision 0, dated July 10, 2019. (ii) Airbus Helicopters EASB No. 65A008, Revision 0, dated July 10, 2019. Note 1 to paragraph (i)(2): Airbus Helicopters EASB Nos. 65.00.19 and 65A008, each Revision 0 and dated July 10, 2019, are co-published as one document along with Airbus Helicopters EASB Nos. 65.00.09 and 65.06, each Revision 0 and dated July 10, 2019, which are not incorporated by reference in this AD. (3) For service information identified in this AD, contact Airbus Helicopters, 2701 N. Forum Drive, Grand Prairie, TX 75052; telephone 972–641–0000 or 800–232–0323; fax 972–641–3775; or at https:// www.airbus.com/helicopters/services/ technical-support.html. (4) You may view this service information at the FAA, Office of the Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N–321, Fort Worth, TX 76177. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 817–222–5110. (5) You may view this service information that is incorporated by reference at the VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:00 Oct 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 [FR Doc. 2020–23977 Filed 10–30–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2020–0472; Project Identifier 2018–CE–060–AD; Amendment 39–21295; AD 2020–21–22] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Textron Aviation Inc. Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Textron Aviation Inc. (Textron) Models 180, 180A, 180B, 180C, 180D, 180E, 180F, 180G, 180H, 180J, 180K, 182, 182A, 182B, 182C, 182D, 185, 185A, 185B, 185C, 185D, 185E, A185E, and A185F airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report of cracks found in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure. This AD requires inspecting the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer for corrosion and cracks and repairing or replacing damaged parts as necessary. The FAA is issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products. DATES: This AD is effective December 7, 2020. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of a certain publication listed in this AD as of December 7, 2020. ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this final rule, contact Textron Aviation Customer Service, P.O. Box 7706, Wichita, Kansas 67277, (316) 517–5800; customercare@ txtav.com; internet: https://txtav.com. You may view this service information at the FAA, Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, 901 Locust, Kansas City, Missouri 64106. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call (816) 329– 4148. It is also available on the internet at https://www.regulations.gov by SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00016 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020–0472. Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the internet at https:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020– 0472; or in person at Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this final rule, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The address for Docket Operations is U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M– 30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tara Shawn, Aerospace Engineer, Wichita ACO Branch, 1801 Airport Road, Room 100, Wichita, Kansas 67209; telephone: (316) 946–4141; fax: (316) 946–4107; email: tara.shawn@faa.gov or WichitaCOS@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion The FAA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR part 39 by adding an AD that would apply to all Textron Aviation Inc. (Textron) (type certificate previously held by Cessna Aircraft Company) Models 180, 180A, 180B, 180C, 180D, 180E, 180F, 180G, 180H, 180J, 180K, 182, 182A, 182B, 182C, 182D, 185, 185A, 185B, 185C, 185D, 185E, A185E, and A185F airplanes. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on May 14, 2020 (85 FR 28890). The NPRM was prompted by a report of cracks found in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure on a Textron Model 185 airplane. The FAA discovered similar conditions on 29 additional Textron 180 and 185 series airplanes and determined that the combination of the attachment structure design and high loads during landing contribute to the development of cracks in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure. The NPRM proposed to require inspecting the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer for corrosion, cracks, and loose or sheared rivets and repairing or replacing damaged parts as necessary. The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent failure of the horizontal stabilizer to tailcone attachment, which could lead to tail separation with consequent loss of control of the airplane. Comments The FAA gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing E:\FR\FM\02NOR1.SGM 02NOR1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 212 / Monday, November 2, 2020 / Rules and Regulations this final rule. The following presents the comments received on the NPRM and the FAA’s response to each comment. Support for the NPRM Two individual commenters supported the NPRM. Request To Clarify Why the AD Is Necessary Three individual commenters requested the FAA clarify why an AD is necessary. The commenters stated the proposed inspection is already performed at every annual inspection. One of these commenters stated the current service bulletin is also sufficient to address this issue, and unlike the seat rail AD, which was necessary to remove subjective interpretation from the inspection measurements, this issue is more objective. The FAA infers that the commenter is referring to AD 2011–10– 09, Amendment 39–16690 (76 FR 27865, May 13, 2011). The FAA disagrees. Although 14 CFR 43.15 and Appendix D to Part 43 do require that 100-hour and annual inspections include an inspection of the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure, this AD requires an inspection directed towards specific areas with a history of cracking. Data obtained during evaluation of this unsafe condition indicated that the current routine maintenance and inspection procedures alone are not adequate to address it. Also, while an operator may incorporate into its maintenance program the inspections in the service bulletin referenced by the commenters, not all operators are required to do so. In order for these inspections to become mandatory, and to correct the unsafe conditions identified in the NPRM, the FAA must issue an AD. The compliance times as proposed should allow the inspections to be completed during the annual/100 hour inspection, thereby minimizing the costs on operators. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on these comments. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES Request To Address Cause of the Cracking An individual commenter requested the AD address the cause of the cracking instead of changing the affected parts so that the cycle time between inspections could be increased. As examples, the commenter stated that if the cause is vibration, then propeller balance should be required to correct the vibration; if the cause is corrosion, then corrosion prevention should be required. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:00 Oct 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 The FAA disagrees. The FAA determined that a combination of the attachment structure design and the high design loads during landing contribute to the development of cracks in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure. The FAA evaluated the failures and determined that the appropriate corrective action was to replace the parts if corrosion or cracks are detected during the inspection. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this comment. Request Change to Applicability The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) requested the FAA clarify why the proposed AD applies to Model 182-series airplanes, because the airplanes found with cracking and corrosion damage were Textron Model 180- and 185-series airplanes that have a different landing gear configuration with higher loads during landing. Citing the same or similar reasons, three individual commenters requested that the proposed AD not apply to Model 182-series airplanes. The FAA agrees to provide additional information explaining why the proposed AD would apply to Model 182-series airplanes. While the landing stresses for the Model 182-series are not equal to that of the Model 180- and 185series, the FAA determined that the development of cracks in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure is a combination of landing stresses and the attachment structure design. Models 182 through 182D airplanes have the same tailcone design as Model 185-series airplanes. After the FAA issued an Airworthiness Concern Sheet about this issue on February 8, 2017, requesting information on Model 180- and 185-series airplanes, Textron released Single Engine Mandatory Service Letter SEL–55–01, dated December 7, 2017 (SEL–55–01), which included Models 182 through 182D. Inspection results from SEL–55–01 have included multiple reports of cracking on Models 182 through 182D. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on these comments. Another individual commenter requested the proposed AD require inspections for Model 182-series airplanes that have been converted to tail wheel airplanes and not require inspections for Model 180- and 185series airplanes on floats, if the cause is vibration from landings. The FAA disagrees. The FAA has determined that the development of cracks in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure is a PO 00000 Frm 00017 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 69135 combination of the attachment structure design and high landing loads. The high loads encountered during landing are not specifically the result of vibration. Data obtained during evaluation of the unsafe condition identified cracking on aircraft with and without floats. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this comment. The same individual commenter also requested the proposed AD not apply to lower time airplanes, such as those with 3,000 hours or less. The commenter did not provide justification for this request. The FAA disagrees. This AD was proposed to address corrosion and cracks in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure. As corrosion may develop over time, regardless of how many flight hours the airplane accumulates, the commenter’s suggestion, if adopted, would not adequately address the unsafe condition. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this comment. Request for Credit for Previous Actions AOPA and two individual commenters requested the FAA revise paragraph (h) of the AD to allow credit for previous actions performed by using SEL–55–01 if the airplane was also inspected for loose or sheared rivets. The commenters suggested there are no significant differences between SEL–55– 01 and the proposed AD. AOPA also requested credit for actions performed during the prior annual inspection. The FAA agrees that operators may take credit for previous compliance with SEL–55–01; however, a change to the AD is unnecessary. Paragraph (f) of this AD requires compliance unless already done. Thus, the AD already allows credit for the initial inspection specified in SEL–55–01 if completed before the effective date of the AD. Similarly, operators may take credit for actions performed during the prior annual inspection if those actions are identical to the procedures specified in SEL–55– 01. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on these comments. Request To Delay Issuance of AD An anonymous commenter requested the FAA delay issuing the AD to allow more research into the problem and solutions. The commenter stated that the AD is too invasive and that removing and replacing the tail every 500 hours could be far more dangerous to the airplane than the cracks. E:\FR\FM\02NOR1.SGM 02NOR1 69136 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 212 / Monday, November 2, 2020 / Rules and Regulations The FAA disagrees. The AD does not require removing the tail in order to complete the visual inspection. SEL– 55–01 provides instructions to gain access to the inspection area without removal of the tail. The FAA has received feedback from operators that this inspection has been completed during annual maintenance. No delay in the effective date of the AD is warranted. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this comment. Comment Concerning Potential Causes of Damage AOPA requested the FAA clarify whether all causes of potential damage have been scrutinized. AOPA suggested that other sources of damage to the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer area attachment structure, such as wear from ground personnel moving the aircraft by the horizontal stabilizer, may have resulted in the cracking and corrosion discovered. The FAA agrees to provide additional information. Damage to the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer could be a result of ground personnel moving the aircraft by the horizontal stabilizer. In addition, high loads due to a number of potential causes in combination with the attachment structure design could result in damage to the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer. However, even if the FAA could identify the exact sources of high loads, it would not likely alter the actions required by the AD to correct the identified unsafe condition. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this comment. Comment Concerning Parts An anonymous commenter stated that parts to repair are not available. The commenter did not provide supporting data with this comment. The FAA is not aware of the unavailability of replacement parts. To the extent operators may have difficulty obtaining replacement parts, the FAA cannot base its AD action on whether spare parts are available or can be produced. While every effort is made to avoid grounding aircraft, the FAA must address the identified unsafe condition. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this comment. Request Regarding Costs One individual commenter requested the FAA require that Textron provide a service kit that addresses the design flaw and assists with the costs mandated by the AD. The commenter stated that this AD focuses on a known vulnerable area in all tail wheeled Cessna aircraft, caused by a systemic design flaw that is a major safety of flight condition. The FAA, as a federal agency, is responsible for all directives, policies, and mandates issued under its authority. The FAA does not have the authority to require a manufacturer to bear AD costs incurred in modifying or repairing privately-owned aircraft. The general obligation of the operator to maintain its aircraft in an airworthy condition is vital, but sometimes expensive. If the manufacturer determines it will cover the cost of implementing a particular action, then the manufacturer does so voluntarily. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this comment. Comment Regarding the Service Information An individual commenter stated the proposed AD does not reference or coincide with Cessna Supplemental Inspection Document 53–10–01, which covers the tailcone inspection. The commenter’s statement does not include a suggestion specific to the AD or a request the FAA can act on. The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this comment. Conclusion The FAA reviewed the relevant data, considered the comments received, and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting this final rule as proposed. Related Service Information Under 1 CFR Part 51 The FAA reviewed Textron Aviation Single Engine Mandatory Service Letter SEL–55–01, dated December 7, 2017. The service information contains procedures for inspecting the stabilizer hinge brackets, tailcone reinforcement angles, corner reinforcements, stabilizer hinge reinforcement channel, stabilizer hinge assemblies, stabilizer aft spar reinforcement, and the lower half of the stabilizer aft spar from station (STA) 16 on the left side of the stabilizer aft spar to STA 16 on the right side for cracks and corrosion. This service information is reasonably available because the interested parties have access to it through their normal course of business or by the means identified in the ADDRESSES section. Differences Between This AD and the Service Information The service information applies to airplanes with more than 3,000 total hours time-in-service or 10 years in service, while this AD applies regardless of the airplane’s time-in-service. This AD requires inspecting for and replacing loose or sheared rivets, which is not specified in the service information. Costs of Compliance The FAA estimates that this AD affects 6,586 airplanes of U.S. registry. The FAA estimates the following costs to comply with this AD: ESTIMATED COSTS Action Labor cost Parts cost Cost per product Cost on U.S. operators Inspection ................. 2 work-hours × $85 per hour = $170 ........ Not applicable ........................................... $170 $1,119,620 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES The FAA estimates the following costs to do any necessary replacements that would be required based on the results of the inspection. The FAA has no way of determining the number of aircraft that might need these actions: ON-CONDITION COSTS Action Labor cost Replace left-hand (LH) stabilizer hinge bracket ........... Replace right-hand (RH) stabilizer hinge bracket ........ 4 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $340 .................... 4 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $340 .................... VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:00 Oct 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 PO 00000 Frm 00018 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 E:\FR\FM\02NOR1.SGM Parts cost 02NOR1 $551 530 Cost per product $891 870 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 212 / Monday, November 2, 2020 / Rules and Regulations 69137 ON-CONDITION COSTS—Continued Labor cost Replace LH tailcone reinforcement angle .................... Replace RH tailcone reinforcement angle ................... Replace LH corner reinforcement ................................ Replace RH corner reinforcement ................................ Replace LH stabilizer hinge reinforcement channel .... Replace RH stabilizer hinge reinforcement channel .... Replace LH stabilizer hinge assembly ......................... Replace RH stabilizer hinge assembly ........................ Replace LH stabilizer aft spar reinforcement ............... Replace RH stabilizer aft spar reinforcement .............. Replace stabilizer aft spar ............................................ (* includes work-hour cost for replacing stabilizer aft spar reinforcement parts). Remove and replace horizontal and vertical stabilizers and rig flight controls. 12 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $1,020 ............... 12 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $1,020 ............... 6 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $510 .................... 6 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $510 .................... 6 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $510 .................... 6 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $510 .................... 1 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $85 ..................... 1 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $85 ...................... (*) .................................................................................. (*) .................................................................................. 28* work-hours × $85 per workhour = $2,380 ............. 2,291 3,006 169 390 99 99 570 694 825 466 563 3,311 4,026 679 900 609 609 655 779 825 466 2,943 8 work-hours × $85 per workhour = $680 .................... Not applicable 680 Since corrosion may affect any or all of the parts subject to the inspection in this AD differently and the severity of the corrosion on each part would affect the time necessary to correct the condition, the FAA has no way to determine an overall cost per product for removing the corrosion. Similarly, loose or sheared rivets may also affect any or all of the parts subject to the inspection in this AD differently, and the time necessary to correct the condition on each product would be different. Therefore, the FAA has no way to determine an overall cost per product for replacing loose or sheared rivets. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. The FAA is issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: General requirements. Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. Regulatory Findings This AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:00 Oct 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866, (2) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive: ■ 2020–21–22 Textron Aviation Inc.: Amendment 39–21295; Docket No. FAA–2020–0472; Project Identifier 2018–CE–060–AD. (a) Effective Date This airworthiness directive (AD) is effective December 7, 2020. (b) Affected ADs None. PO 00000 Frm 00019 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Parts cost Cost per product Action (c) Applicability This AD applies to Textron Aviation Inc. (type certificate previously held by Cessna Aircraft Company) Models 180, 180A, 180B, 180C, 180D, 180E, 180F, 180G, 180H, 180J, 180K, 182, 182A, 182B, 182C, 182D, 185, 185A, 185B, 185C, 185D, 185E, A185E, and A185F airplanes, all serial numbers, certificated in any category. (d) Subject Joint Aircraft System Component (JASC)/ Air Transport Association (ATA) of America Code 53, Fuselage; 55, Stabilizers. (e) Unsafe Condition This AD was prompted by a report of cracks found in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure. The FAA is issuing this AD to detect and correct corrosion and cracks in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure. The unsafe condition, if not addressed, could result in failure of the horizontal stabilizer to tailcone attachment, which could lead to tail separation with consequent loss of control of the airplane. (f) Compliance Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, unless already done. (g) Inspect, Repair, and Replace Within the next 100 hours time-in-service (TIS) after the effective date of this AD or within the next 12 months after the effective date of this AD, whichever occurs later, and thereafter every 500 hours TIS or 5 years, whichever occurs first, visually inspect each stabilizer hinge bracket, tailcone reinforcement angle, corner reinforcement, stabilizer hinge reinforcement channel, stabilizer hinge assembly, stabilizer aft spar reinforcement, and the lower half of the stabilizer aft spar from station (STA) 16 on the left side to STA 16 on the right side for corrosion and cracks; remove any corrosion; and replace any part with a crack by following the Accomplishment Instructions, paragraphs 9 through 11 and 13, of Textron Aviation Single Engine Mandatory Service Letter SEL–55–01, dated December 7, 2017. Also inspect for loose rivets and sheared E:\FR\FM\02NOR1.SGM 02NOR1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES 69138 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 212 / Monday, November 2, 2020 / Rules and Regulations rivets. If there is a loose or sheared rivet, before further flight, replace the rivet. of the local flight standards district office/ certificate holding district office. (h) Credit for Previous Actions Actions accomplished before the effective date of this AD within the previous 5 years or 500 hours TIS, whichever was the most recent, in accordance with the procedures specified in the documents listed in paragraphs (h)(i) through (viii) of this AD as applicable to your airplane are considered acceptable for compliance with the corresponding actions in paragraph (g) of this AD. The time between any inspection for which credit is allowed by this paragraph and the next inspection accomplished in accordance with paragraph (g) of this AD must not exceed 500 hours TIS or 5 years, whichever occurs first. (i) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 100 Series (1953–1962) Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 53–10–01, D138–1–13 Temporary Revision Number 8, dated May 18, 2015. (ii) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 100 Series (1963–1968) Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 53–10–01, D637–1–13 Temporary Revision Number 10, dated May 18, 2015; (iii) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 180/ 185 Series (1969–1980) Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 53–10–01, D2000–9–13 Temporary Revision Number 9, dated May 18, 2015. (iv) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 180/ 185 Series (1981–1985) Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 53–10–01, D2067–1TR9 Temporary Revision Number 9, dated May 1, 2016. (v) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 100 Series (1953–1962) Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 55–10–01, D138–1–13 Temporary Revision Number 7, dated December 1, 2011. (vi) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 100 Series (1963–1968) Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 55–10–01, D637–1–13 Temporary Revision Number 9, dated December 1, 2011. (vii) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 180/ 185 Series (1969–1980) Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 55–10–01, D2000–9–13 Temporary Revision Number 7, dated December 1, 2011. (viii) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 180/ 185 Series (1981–1985) Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 55–10–01, D2067–1–13 Temporary Revision Number 7, dated December 1, 2011. (j) Related Information For more information about this AD, contact Tara Shawn, Aerospace Engineer, Wichita ACO Branch, 1801 Airport Road, Room 100, Wichita, Kansas 67209; telephone: (316) 946–4141; fax: (316) 946–4107; email: tara.shawn@faa.gov or Wichita-COS@faa.gov. (i) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (1) The Manager, Wichita ACO Branch, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the manager of the certification office, send it to the attention of the person identified in paragraph (j) of this AD. (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:00 Oct 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 (k) Material Incorporated by Reference (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference (IBR) of the service information listed in this paragraph under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) You must use this service information as applicable to do the actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. (i) Textron Aviation Single Engine Mandatory Service Letter SEL–55–01, dated December 7, 2017. (ii) [Reserved] (3) For Textron Aviation service information identified in this AD, contact Textron Aviation Customer Service, P.O. Box 7706, Wichita, Kansas 67277, (316) 517– 5800; customercare@txtav.com; internet: https://txtav.com. (4) You may view this service information at FAA, Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, 901 Locust, Kansas City, Missouri 64106. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call (816) 329–4148. (5) You may view this service information that is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, email: fedreg.legal@nara.gov, or go to: https://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ ibr-locations.html. Issued on October 8, 2020. Lance T. Gant, Director, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2020–24046 Filed 10–30–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2020–0746; Project Identifier 2019–CE–012–AD; Amendment 39–21301; AD 2020–22–05] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Pilatus Aircraft Ltd. Model PC–12/47E airplanes. This AD was results from SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00020 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as seizing of a main landing gear (MLG) spring pack assembly. This AD requires replacement of affected parts and prohibits (re)installation of affected parts. The FAA is issuing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products. DATES: This AD is effective December 7, 2020. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of a certain publication listed in this AD as of December 7, 2020. ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this final rule, contact Pilatus Aircraft Ltd., Customer Technical Support (MCC), P.O. Box 992, CH–6371 Stans, Switzerland; telephone: +41 (0)41 619 67 74; fax: +41 (0)41 619 67 73; email: Techsupport@pilatusaircraft.com; internet: https:// www.pilatus-aircraft.com/en. You may view this service information at the FAA, Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, 901 Locust, Kansas City, Missouri 64106. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call (816) 329– 4148. It is also available on the internet at https://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020–0746. Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the internet at https:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020– 0746; or in person at Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this final rule, the MCAI, any comments received, and other information. The address for Docket Operations is U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M– 30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Doug Rudolph, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, General Aviation & Rotorcraft Section, International Validation Branch, 901 Locust, Room 301, Kansas City, Missouri 64106; telephone: (816) 329–4059; fax: (816) 329–4090; email: doug.rudolph@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion The FAA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR E:\FR\FM\02NOR1.SGM 02NOR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 212 (Monday, November 2, 2020)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 69134-69138]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-24046]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2020-0472; Project Identifier 2018-CE-060-AD; Amendment 
39-21295; AD 2020-21-22]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Textron Aviation Inc. Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all 
Textron Aviation Inc. (Textron) Models 180, 180A, 180B, 180C, 180D, 
180E, 180F, 180G, 180H, 180J, 180K, 182, 182A, 182B, 182C, 182D, 185, 
185A, 185B, 185C, 185D, 185E, A185E, and A185F airplanes. This AD was 
prompted by a report of cracks found in the tailcone and horizontal 
stabilizer attachment structure. This AD requires inspecting the 
tailcone and horizontal stabilizer for corrosion and cracks and 
repairing or replacing damaged parts as necessary. The FAA is issuing 
this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products.

DATES: This AD is effective December 7, 2020.
    The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by 
reference of a certain publication listed in this AD as of December 7, 
2020.

ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this final rule, 
contact Textron Aviation Customer Service, P.O. Box 7706, Wichita, 
Kansas 67277, (316) 517-5800; [email protected]; internet: https://txtav.com. You may view this service information at the FAA, 
Airworthiness Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, 901 Locust, 
Kansas City, Missouri 64106. For information on the availability of 
this material at the FAA, call (816) 329-4148. It is also available on 
the internet at https://www.regulations.gov by searching for and 
locating Docket No. FAA-2020-0472.

Examining the AD Docket

    You may examine the AD docket on the internet at https://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA-2020-
0472; or in person at Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains 
this final rule, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and 
other information. The address for Docket Operations is U.S. Department 
of Transportation, Docket Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, 
Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tara Shawn, Aerospace Engineer, 
Wichita ACO Branch, 1801 Airport Road, Room 100, Wichita, Kansas 67209; 
telephone: (316) 946-4141; fax: (316) 946-4107; email: 
[email protected] or [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Discussion

    The FAA issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 
CFR part 39 by adding an AD that would apply to all Textron Aviation 
Inc. (Textron) (type certificate previously held by Cessna Aircraft 
Company) Models 180, 180A, 180B, 180C, 180D, 180E, 180F, 180G, 180H, 
180J, 180K, 182, 182A, 182B, 182C, 182D, 185, 185A, 185B, 185C, 185D, 
185E, A185E, and A185F airplanes. The NPRM published in the Federal 
Register on May 14, 2020 (85 FR 28890). The NPRM was prompted by a 
report of cracks found in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer 
attachment structure on a Textron Model 185 airplane. The FAA 
discovered similar conditions on 29 additional Textron 180 and 185 
series airplanes and determined that the combination of the attachment 
structure design and high loads during landing contribute to the 
development of cracks in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer 
attachment structure. The NPRM proposed to require inspecting the 
tailcone and horizontal stabilizer for corrosion, cracks, and loose or 
sheared rivets and repairing or replacing damaged parts as necessary. 
The FAA is issuing this AD to prevent failure of the horizontal 
stabilizer to tailcone attachment, which could lead to tail separation 
with consequent loss of control of the airplane.

Comments

    The FAA gave the public the opportunity to participate in 
developing

[[Page 69135]]

this final rule. The following presents the comments received on the 
NPRM and the FAA's response to each comment.

Support for the NPRM

    Two individual commenters supported the NPRM.

Request To Clarify Why the AD Is Necessary

    Three individual commenters requested the FAA clarify why an AD is 
necessary. The commenters stated the proposed inspection is already 
performed at every annual inspection. One of these commenters stated 
the current service bulletin is also sufficient to address this issue, 
and unlike the seat rail AD, which was necessary to remove subjective 
interpretation from the inspection measurements, this issue is more 
objective. The FAA infers that the commenter is referring to AD 2011-
10-09, Amendment 39-16690 (76 FR 27865, May 13, 2011).
    The FAA disagrees. Although 14 CFR 43.15 and Appendix D to Part 43 
do require that 100-hour and annual inspections include an inspection 
of the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure, this AD 
requires an inspection directed towards specific areas with a history 
of cracking. Data obtained during evaluation of this unsafe condition 
indicated that the current routine maintenance and inspection 
procedures alone are not adequate to address it. Also, while an 
operator may incorporate into its maintenance program the inspections 
in the service bulletin referenced by the commenters, not all operators 
are required to do so. In order for these inspections to become 
mandatory, and to correct the unsafe conditions identified in the NPRM, 
the FAA must issue an AD. The compliance times as proposed should allow 
the inspections to be completed during the annual/100 hour inspection, 
thereby minimizing the costs on operators.
    The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on these 
comments.

Request To Address Cause of the Cracking

    An individual commenter requested the AD address the cause of the 
cracking instead of changing the affected parts so that the cycle time 
between inspections could be increased. As examples, the commenter 
stated that if the cause is vibration, then propeller balance should be 
required to correct the vibration; if the cause is corrosion, then 
corrosion prevention should be required.
    The FAA disagrees. The FAA determined that a combination of the 
attachment structure design and the high design loads during landing 
contribute to the development of cracks in the tailcone and horizontal 
stabilizer attachment structure. The FAA evaluated the failures and 
determined that the appropriate corrective action was to replace the 
parts if corrosion or cracks are detected during the inspection. The 
FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this comment.

Request Change to Applicability

    The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) requested the FAA 
clarify why the proposed AD applies to Model 182-series airplanes, 
because the airplanes found with cracking and corrosion damage were 
Textron Model 180- and 185-series airplanes that have a different 
landing gear configuration with higher loads during landing. Citing the 
same or similar reasons, three individual commenters requested that the 
proposed AD not apply to Model 182-series airplanes.
    The FAA agrees to provide additional information explaining why the 
proposed AD would apply to Model 182-series airplanes. While the 
landing stresses for the Model 182-series are not equal to that of the 
Model 180- and 185-series, the FAA determined that the development of 
cracks in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure 
is a combination of landing stresses and the attachment structure 
design. Models 182 through 182D airplanes have the same tailcone design 
as Model 185-series airplanes. After the FAA issued an Airworthiness 
Concern Sheet about this issue on February 8, 2017, requesting 
information on Model 180- and 185-series airplanes, Textron released 
Single Engine Mandatory Service Letter SEL-55-01, dated December 7, 
2017 (SEL-55-01), which included Models 182 through 182D. Inspection 
results from SEL-55-01 have included multiple reports of cracking on 
Models 182 through 182D.
    The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on these 
comments.
    Another individual commenter requested the proposed AD require 
inspections for Model 182-series airplanes that have been converted to 
tail wheel airplanes and not require inspections for Model 180- and 
185-series airplanes on floats, if the cause is vibration from 
landings.
    The FAA disagrees. The FAA has determined that the development of 
cracks in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure 
is a combination of the attachment structure design and high landing 
loads. The high loads encountered during landing are not specifically 
the result of vibration. Data obtained during evaluation of the unsafe 
condition identified cracking on aircraft with and without floats.
    The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this 
comment.
    The same individual commenter also requested the proposed AD not 
apply to lower time airplanes, such as those with 3,000 hours or less. 
The commenter did not provide justification for this request.
    The FAA disagrees. This AD was proposed to address corrosion and 
cracks in the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure. 
As corrosion may develop over time, regardless of how many flight hours 
the airplane accumulates, the commenter's suggestion, if adopted, would 
not adequately address the unsafe condition.
    The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this 
comment.

Request for Credit for Previous Actions

    AOPA and two individual commenters requested the FAA revise 
paragraph (h) of the AD to allow credit for previous actions performed 
by using SEL-55-01 if the airplane was also inspected for loose or 
sheared rivets. The commenters suggested there are no significant 
differences between SEL-55-01 and the proposed AD. AOPA also requested 
credit for actions performed during the prior annual inspection.
    The FAA agrees that operators may take credit for previous 
compliance with SEL-55-01; however, a change to the AD is unnecessary. 
Paragraph (f) of this AD requires compliance unless already done. Thus, 
the AD already allows credit for the initial inspection specified in 
SEL-55-01 if completed before the effective date of the AD. Similarly, 
operators may take credit for actions performed during the prior annual 
inspection if those actions are identical to the procedures specified 
in SEL-55-01.
    The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on these 
comments.

Request To Delay Issuance of AD

    An anonymous commenter requested the FAA delay issuing the AD to 
allow more research into the problem and solutions. The commenter 
stated that the AD is too invasive and that removing and replacing the 
tail every 500 hours could be far more dangerous to the airplane than 
the cracks.

[[Page 69136]]

    The FAA disagrees. The AD does not require removing the tail in 
order to complete the visual inspection. SEL-55-01 provides 
instructions to gain access to the inspection area without removal of 
the tail. The FAA has received feedback from operators that this 
inspection has been completed during annual maintenance. No delay in 
the effective date of the AD is warranted.
    The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this 
comment.

Comment Concerning Potential Causes of Damage

    AOPA requested the FAA clarify whether all causes of potential 
damage have been scrutinized. AOPA suggested that other sources of 
damage to the tailcone and horizontal stabilizer area attachment 
structure, such as wear from ground personnel moving the aircraft by 
the horizontal stabilizer, may have resulted in the cracking and 
corrosion discovered.
    The FAA agrees to provide additional information. Damage to the 
tailcone and horizontal stabilizer could be a result of ground 
personnel moving the aircraft by the horizontal stabilizer. In 
addition, high loads due to a number of potential causes in combination 
with the attachment structure design could result in damage to the 
tailcone and horizontal stabilizer. However, even if the FAA could 
identify the exact sources of high loads, it would not likely alter the 
actions required by the AD to correct the identified unsafe condition.
    The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this 
comment.

Comment Concerning Parts

    An anonymous commenter stated that parts to repair are not 
available. The commenter did not provide supporting data with this 
comment.
    The FAA is not aware of the unavailability of replacement parts. To 
the extent operators may have difficulty obtaining replacement parts, 
the FAA cannot base its AD action on whether spare parts are available 
or can be produced. While every effort is made to avoid grounding 
aircraft, the FAA must address the identified unsafe condition.
    The FAA did not make any changes to the proposed AD based on this 
comment.

Request Regarding Costs

    One individual commenter requested the FAA require that Textron 
provide a service kit that addresses the design flaw and assists with 
the costs mandated by the AD. The commenter stated that this AD focuses 
on a known vulnerable area in all tail wheeled Cessna aircraft, caused 
by a systemic design flaw that is a major safety of flight condition.
    The FAA, as a federal agency, is responsible for all directives, 
policies, and mandates issued under its authority. The FAA does not 
have the authority to require a manufacturer to bear AD costs incurred 
in modifying or repairing privately-owned aircraft. The general 
obligation of the operator to maintain its aircraft in an airworthy 
condition is vital, but sometimes expensive. If the manufacturer 
determines it will cover the cost of implementing a particular action, 
then the manufacturer does so voluntarily. The FAA did not make any 
changes to the proposed AD based on this comment.

Comment Regarding the Service Information

    An individual commenter stated the proposed AD does not reference 
or coincide with Cessna Supplemental Inspection Document 53-10-01, 
which covers the tailcone inspection.
    The commenter's statement does not include a suggestion specific to 
the AD or a request the FAA can act on. The FAA did not make any 
changes to the proposed AD based on this comment.

Conclusion

    The FAA reviewed the relevant data, considered the comments 
received, and determined that air safety and the public interest 
require adopting this final rule as proposed.

Related Service Information Under 1 CFR Part 51

    The FAA reviewed Textron Aviation Single Engine Mandatory Service 
Letter SEL-55-01, dated December 7, 2017. The service information 
contains procedures for inspecting the stabilizer hinge brackets, 
tailcone reinforcement angles, corner reinforcements, stabilizer hinge 
reinforcement channel, stabilizer hinge assemblies, stabilizer aft spar 
reinforcement, and the lower half of the stabilizer aft spar from 
station (STA) 16 on the left side of the stabilizer aft spar to STA 16 
on the right side for cracks and corrosion. This service information is 
reasonably available because the interested parties have access to it 
through their normal course of business or by the means identified in 
the ADDRESSES section.

Differences Between This AD and the Service Information

    The service information applies to airplanes with more than 3,000 
total hours time-in-service or 10 years in service, while this AD 
applies regardless of the airplane's time-in-service. This AD requires 
inspecting for and replacing loose or sheared rivets, which is not 
specified in the service information.

Costs of Compliance

    The FAA estimates that this AD affects 6,586 airplanes of U.S. 
registry.
    The FAA estimates the following costs to comply with this AD:

                                                 Estimated Costs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                    Cost per       Cost on U.S.
              Action                     Labor cost            Parts cost           product         operators
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inspection........................  2 work-hours x $85    Not applicable......            $170       $1,119,620
                                     per hour = $170.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The FAA estimates the following costs to do any necessary 
replacements that would be required based on the results of the 
inspection. The FAA has no way of determining the number of aircraft 
that might need these actions:

                                               On-Condition Costs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                     Cost per
                    Action                                 Labor cost               Parts cost        product
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Replace left-hand (LH) stabilizer hinge         4 work-hours x $85 per workhour             $551            $891
 bracket.                                        = $340.
Replace right-hand (RH) stabilizer hinge        4 work-hours x $85 per workhour              530             870
 bracket.                                        = $340.

[[Page 69137]]

 
Replace LH tailcone reinforcement angle.......  12 work-hours x $85 per workhour           2,291           3,311
                                                 = $1,020.
Replace RH tailcone reinforcement angle.......  12 work-hours x $85 per workhour           3,006           4,026
                                                 = $1,020.
Replace LH corner reinforcement...............  6 work-hours x $85 per workhour              169             679
                                                 = $510.
Replace RH corner reinforcement...............  6 work-hours x $85 per workhour              390             900
                                                 = $510.
Replace LH stabilizer hinge reinforcement       6 work-hours x $85 per workhour               99             609
 channel.                                        = $510.
Replace RH stabilizer hinge reinforcement       6 work-hours x $85 per workhour               99             609
 channel.                                        = $510.
Replace LH stabilizer hinge assembly..........  1 work-hours x $85 per workhour              570             655
                                                 = $85.
Replace RH stabilizer hinge assembly..........  1 work-hours x $85 per workhour              694             779
                                                 = $85.
Replace LH stabilizer aft spar reinforcement..  (*).............................             825             825
Replace RH stabilizer aft spar reinforcement..  (*).............................             466             466
Replace stabilizer aft spar...................  28* work-hours x $85 per                     563           2,943
(* includes work-hour cost for replacing         workhour = $2,380.
 stabilizer aft spar reinforcement parts).
Remove and replace horizontal and vertical      8 work-hours x $85 per workhour   Not applicable             680
 stabilizers and rig flight controls.            = $680.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Since corrosion may affect any or all of the parts subject to the 
inspection in this AD differently and the severity of the corrosion on 
each part would affect the time necessary to correct the condition, the 
FAA has no way to determine an overall cost per product for removing 
the corrosion. Similarly, loose or sheared rivets may also affect any 
or all of the parts subject to the inspection in this AD differently, 
and the time necessary to correct the condition on each product would 
be different. Therefore, the FAA has no way to determine an overall 
cost per product for replacing loose or sheared rivets.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    The FAA is issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: General requirements. 
Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight 
of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for 
practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary 
for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that 
authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to 
exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    This AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 
13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, 
on the relationship between the national government and the States, or 
on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various 
levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
    (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive 
Order 12866,
    (2) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and
    (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

Adoption of the Amendment

    Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the 
Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13   [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness 
directive:

2020-21-22 Textron Aviation Inc.: Amendment 39-21295; Docket No. 
FAA-2020-0472; Project Identifier 2018-CE-060-AD.

(a) Effective Date

    This airworthiness directive (AD) is effective December 7, 2020.

(b) Affected ADs

    None.

(c) Applicability

    This AD applies to Textron Aviation Inc. (type certificate 
previously held by Cessna Aircraft Company) Models 180, 180A, 180B, 
180C, 180D, 180E, 180F, 180G, 180H, 180J, 180K, 182, 182A, 182B, 
182C, 182D, 185, 185A, 185B, 185C, 185D, 185E, A185E, and A185F 
airplanes, all serial numbers, certificated in any category.

(d) Subject

    Joint Aircraft System Component (JASC)/Air Transport Association 
(ATA) of America Code 53, Fuselage; 55, Stabilizers.

(e) Unsafe Condition

    This AD was prompted by a report of cracks found in the tailcone 
and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure. The FAA is issuing 
this AD to detect and correct corrosion and cracks in the tailcone 
and horizontal stabilizer attachment structure. The unsafe 
condition, if not addressed, could result in failure of the 
horizontal stabilizer to tailcone attachment, which could lead to 
tail separation with consequent loss of control of the airplane.

(f) Compliance

    Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, 
unless already done.

(g) Inspect, Repair, and Replace

    Within the next 100 hours time-in-service (TIS) after the 
effective date of this AD or within the next 12 months after the 
effective date of this AD, whichever occurs later, and thereafter 
every 500 hours TIS or 5 years, whichever occurs first, visually 
inspect each stabilizer hinge bracket, tailcone reinforcement angle, 
corner reinforcement, stabilizer hinge reinforcement channel, 
stabilizer hinge assembly, stabilizer aft spar reinforcement, and 
the lower half of the stabilizer aft spar from station (STA) 16 on 
the left side to STA 16 on the right side for corrosion and cracks; 
remove any corrosion; and replace any part with a crack by following 
the Accomplishment Instructions, paragraphs 9 through 11 and 13, of 
Textron Aviation Single Engine Mandatory Service Letter SEL-55-01, 
dated December 7, 2017. Also inspect for loose rivets and sheared

[[Page 69138]]

rivets. If there is a loose or sheared rivet, before further flight, 
replace the rivet.

(h) Credit for Previous Actions

    Actions accomplished before the effective date of this AD within 
the previous 5 years or 500 hours TIS, whichever was the most 
recent, in accordance with the procedures specified in the documents 
listed in paragraphs (h)(i) through (viii) of this AD as applicable 
to your airplane are considered acceptable for compliance with the 
corresponding actions in paragraph (g) of this AD. The time between 
any inspection for which credit is allowed by this paragraph and the 
next inspection accomplished in accordance with paragraph (g) of 
this AD must not exceed 500 hours TIS or 5 years, whichever occurs 
first.
    (i) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 100 Series (1953-1962) Service 
Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 53-10-01, D138-1-13 
Temporary Revision Number 8, dated May 18, 2015.
    (ii) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 100 Series (1963-1968) 
Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 53-10-01, D637-1-13 
Temporary Revision Number 10, dated May 18, 2015;
    (iii) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 180/185 Series (1969-1980) 
Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 53-10-01, D2000-9-13 
Temporary Revision Number 9, dated May 18, 2015.
    (iv) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 180/185 Series (1981-1985) 
Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 53-10-01, D2067-1TR9 
Temporary Revision Number 9, dated May 1, 2016.
    (v) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 100 Series (1953-1962) Service 
Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 55-10-01, D138-1-13 
Temporary Revision Number 7, dated December 1, 2011.
    (vi) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 100 Series (1963-1968) 
Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 55-10-01, D637-1-13 
Temporary Revision Number 9, dated December 1, 2011.
    (vii) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 180/185 Series (1969-1980) 
Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 55-10-01, D2000-9-13 
Temporary Revision Number 7, dated December 1, 2011.
    (viii) Cessna Aircraft Company Model 180/185 Series (1981-1985) 
Service Manual, Supplemental Inspection Number: 55-10-01, D2067-1-13 
Temporary Revision Number 7, dated December 1, 2011.

(i) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

    (1) The Manager, Wichita ACO Branch, FAA, has the authority to 
approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found 
in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request 
to your principal inspector or local Flight Standards District 
Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the 
manager of the certification office, send it to the attention of the 
person identified in paragraph (j) of this AD.
    (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate 
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager 
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding 
district office.

 (j) Related Information

    For more information about this AD, contact Tara Shawn, 
Aerospace Engineer, Wichita ACO Branch, 1801 Airport Road, Room 100, 
Wichita, Kansas 67209; telephone: (316) 946-4141; fax: (316) 946-
4107; email: [email protected] or [email protected].

(k) Material Incorporated by Reference

    (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the 
incorporation by reference (IBR) of the service information listed 
in this paragraph under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51.
    (2) You must use this service information as applicable to do 
the actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise.
    (i) Textron Aviation Single Engine Mandatory Service Letter SEL-
55-01, dated December 7, 2017.
    (ii) [Reserved]
    (3) For Textron Aviation service information identified in this 
AD, contact Textron Aviation Customer Service, P.O. Box 7706, 
Wichita, Kansas 67277, (316) 517-5800; [email protected]; 
internet: https://txtav.com.
    (4) You may view this service information at FAA, Airworthiness 
Products Section, Operational Safety Branch, 901 Locust, Kansas 
City, Missouri 64106. For information on the availability of this 
material at the FAA, call (816) 329-4148.
    (5) You may view this service information that is incorporated 
by reference at the National Archives and Records Administration 
(NARA). For information on the availability of this material at 
NARA, email: [email protected], or go to: https://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html.

    Issued on October 8, 2020.
Lance T. Gant,
Director, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, Aircraft Certification 
Service.
[FR Doc. 2020-24046 Filed 10-30-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P