Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, CA, 68362-68364 [2020-23827]

Download as PDF 68362 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 209 / Wednesday, October 28, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign NAGPRA Office. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign NAGPRA Office at the address in this notice by November 27, 2020. ADDRESSES: Krystiana Krupa, NAGPRA Program Officer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 412 Swanlund Administration Building, 601 E John Street, MC–304, Champaign, IL 61820, telephone (217) 244–2587, email klkrupa@illinois.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Laboratory of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, Champaign, IL. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Nickajack Cave, Marion County, TN. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign professional staff in consultation with representatives of the AlabamaCoushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Cherokee Nation; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; and the United Keetoowah Band of VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:29 Oct 27, 2020 Jkt 253001 Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Nickajack Cave in Marion County, TN. According to an accession card (Nickajack Cave A4782) dated November 1979, the Nickajack Cave materials were found by L.S. Ashley a few hundred yards from the cave entrance, on the margin of a creek flowing through Nickajack Cave, and comprised a collection of Virginia deer leg bones. In 2018, Laboratory of Anthropology staff located and identified a single human right humerus, likely from an adult of unknown sex, and two deer long bones associated with Nickajack Cave A4782. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are two deer long bones. Determinations Made by the Laboratory of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Officials of the Laboratory of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on osteological evidence and collection history. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the two objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribe. • The 1817 Treaty with the Cherokee (Land Cessions 84) and the 1819 Treaty with the Cherokee (Land Cessions 101 and 102) indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects may be to PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Krystiana Krupa, NAGPRA Program Officer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 412 Swanlund Administration Building, 601 E John Street, MC–304, Champaign, IL 61820, telephone (217) 244–2587, email klkrupa@illinois.edu, by November 27, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The Laboratory of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: October 9, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–23828 Filed 10–27–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0031019; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), assisted by the Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and the San Luis Obispo County Archaeological Society Research and Collections Facility (SLOCAS), has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\28OCN1.SGM 28OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 209 / Wednesday, October 28, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the California Department of Transportation. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the California Department of Transportation at the address in this notice by November 27, 2020. ADDRESSES: Sarah Allred, California Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271– 0001, telephone (916) 653–0013, email Sarah.Allred@dot.ca.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the California Department of Transportation, Sacramento, CA, and in the physical custody of the Fowler Museum at the University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA and the San Luis Obispo County Archaeological Society Research and Collections Facility, San Luis Obispo, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from San Luis Obispo County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by California Department of Transportation, UCLA, and SLOCAS professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California and three non-federally recognized Indian VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:29 Oct 27, 2020 Jkt 253001 groups—the Barbareno/Ventureno Band of Mission Indians, Northern Chumash Tribe, and Salinan Tribe of San Luis Obispo and Monterey Counties (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes and Groups’’). History and Description of the Remains In 1965 and 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, 74 individuals were removed from CA– SLO–175 in San Luis Obispo County, CA. David Abrams and Nelson Leonard, in association with the University of California Archeological Survey, began excavations when Caltrans sought to widen Highway 1, which would significantly impact this Middle-to-Late Period site. The land was originally owned by the Hearst Corporation; Caltrans purchased the right-of-way in June 1966. All laboratory work was completed at UCLA. Abrams reported on the site and excavation in the MA thesis he submitted to the University of California Davis. Except for the human remains and associated funerary objects, UCLA sent the collection from CA– SLO–175 to SLOCAS (located at Cuesta College) for further study and analysis in March 1973. Subsequently, additional materials associated with the site were found at UCLA, and in May 1978, they were sent to SLOCAS for permanent curation. On July 14, 2017, UCLA sent the human remains and associated funerary objects to SLOCAS in order to bring the collection back together for an inventory, and to look for missing and loaned artifacts with the assistance of Chumash community members. The human remains derive from 40 formal burials and recovered fragmentary remains, representing a minimum number of 74 individuals in total. (The field notes refer to a Burial 41, but only 40 burials in total were identified, as ‘‘Burial 6’’ was not assigned.) They belong to 47 adult individuals, 15 of whom could be identified as male and nine of whom could be identified as female; 22 juvenile individuals; one infant; and four individuals of unidentifiable age or sex. No known individuals were identified. The 1,277 associated funerary objects include 107 pieces and 12 bags of unmodified faunal remains; three bone awl fragments; 14 bone ornaments; six bone whistles; five bone sweat sticks; three modified bone pieces; 46 pieces of chipped chert; one limestone fragment; one coral fragment; one sandstone hammerstone; one siltstone pick; three stone fragments; three steatite beads; two tarring pebbles; two net weights; five obsidian flakes; five pieces of red ochre; 15 fragments and one bag of asphaltum (13 of the 15 PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 68363 pieces are inlaid with shell beads); two asphaltum plugs; 1,019 beads and one bag of shell beads; three shell ornaments; 12 pieces and one bag of unmodified shell; one piece and one bag of shell with asphaltum residue; and one piece of charcoal. (Eight additional items—two pieces of unmodified shell, two pieces of chipped chert, one net weight, one piece of cut wood, and two asphaltum inlaid pipes—have not yet been located.) In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 individuals were removed from CA–SLO–179 in San Luis Obispo County, CA. Nelson Leonard and a UCLA Archaeological Survey crew conducted excavation at this large shell midden near Pico Creek before the widening of Highway 1, which would partially destroy the Middle-to-Late Period site. All analysis and reports were completed at UCLA in Anthropology. Except for the human remains and associated funerary objects, UCLA sent the collection from CA– SLO–179 to SLOCAS for further study and analysis in March 1973. Subsequently, additional materials associated with the site were found at UCLA, and in May 1978, they were sent to SLOCAS for permanent curation. On July 14, 2017, UCLA sent the human remains and associated funerary objects to SLOCAS in order to bring the collection back together for an inventory, and to look for missing and loaned artifacts with the assistance of Chumash community members. The human remains of three individuals— two adult males and a juvenile—derive from two formal burials, while the human remains of, at minimum, eight individuals—three of them juvenile— were recovered from midden contexts. No known individuals were identified. The five associated funerary objects are projectile point fragments. (One glass fragment and one large mussel shell are currently missing from the collections. Records indicate that the missing items were transferred to Cuesta College in May 1978. No further information could be found.) Based on geographical, ethnographic, historical, oral traditional, and archeological information, Caltrans has determined that CA–SLO–175 and CA– SLO–179 lie within the traditional territory of the Chumash and Salinan people. The associated funerary objects, too, are consistent with those belonging to groups ancestral to the present-day Chumash and Salinan people. Determinations Made by the California Department of Transportation Officials of the California Department of Transportation have determined that: E:\FR\FM\28OCN1.SGM 28OCN1 68364 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 209 / Wednesday, October 28, 2020 / Notices • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 85 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 1,282 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Sarah Allred, California Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271– 0001, telephone (916) 653–0013, email Sarah.Allred@dot.ca.gov, by November 27, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California may proceed. The California Department of Transportation is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes and Groups that this notice has been published. Dated: October 9, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–23827 Filed 10–27–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0031058; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: The Minnesota Historical Society has corrected a Notice of Intent SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:29 Oct 27, 2020 Jkt 253001 to Repatriate published in the Federal Register on November 14, 2018. This notice corrects the identity and affiliation of one cultural item. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request to the Minnesota Historical Society. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural item to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Minnesota Historical Society at the address in this notice by November 27, 2020. ADDRESSES: Ben Gessner, Minnesota Historical Society, 345 W Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul, MN 55102, telephone (651) 259–3281, email benjamin.gessner@ mnhs.org. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the control of the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN, that meets the definition of unassociated funerary object and object of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects the identity and affiliation of one cultural item, a Jefferson Peace Medal, that was published in a Notice of Intent to Repatriate in the Federal Register (83 FR 56871–56872, November 14, 2018). Transfer of control of the item in this correction notice has not occurred. The Minnesota Historical Society’s NAGPRA Committee and leadership examined additional geographic, historical, anthropological and archeological information provided by the Prairie Island Indian Community in the State of Minnesota (Mdewakanton Dakota), including a report provided by the Prairie Island Tribal Historic Preservation Officer and Dr. Ron Schirmer, Professor of Anthropology at PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Minnesota State University, Mankato, and have determined that in his role as a village headman, Tatankamani would have accepted a Jefferson Peace Medal on behalf of his entire community. Therefore, the Peace Medal cannot be owned by an individual. Further, Minnesota Historical Society’s NAGPRA Committee and leadership have determined that the Peace Medal has ongoing historical, traditional, and cultural importance central to the Prairie Island Indian Community in the State of Minnesota. Mdewakanton Dakota people have lived on the shores of Lake Pepin and on Prairie Island since at least A.D. 1680, and the historical record unequivocally establishes the continuous presence of the Red Wing band of Mdewakanton Dakota people in the area from the 1600s to the current time. Consequently, Minnesota Historical Society’s NAGPRA Committee and leadership have determined that the Peace Medal is both an unassociated funerary object and an object of cultural patrimony. The Prairie Island Indian Community has requested the repatriation of this unassociated funerary object and object of cultural patrimony. Their request is supported by the Santee Sioux Nation, Nebraska, as well as a lineal descendant of Tatankamani, Sheila Ann Red Wing. Correction In the Federal Register (83 FR 56871, November 14, 2018), column 2, paragraph 1, sentence 1 under the heading ‘‘Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN’’ is corrected by substituting the following sentence: The Minnesota Historical Society, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of unassociated funerary object and object of cultural patrimony. In the Federal Register (83 FR 56871, November 14, 2018), column 2, paragraph 4, sentence 1 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the control of the Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN, that meets the definition of unassociated funerary object and object of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. In the Federal Register (83 FR 56872, November 14, 2018), column 1, paragraph 1 is corrected by adding the following sentence after sentence 1: Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the one cultural item described above has ongoing E:\FR\FM\28OCN1.SGM 28OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 209 (Wednesday, October 28, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 68362-68364]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-23827]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0031019; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: California Department of 
Transportation, Sacramento, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), 
assisted by the Fowler Museum at the University of California Los 
Angeles (UCLA) and the San Luis Obispo County Archaeological Society 
Research and Collections Facility (SLOCAS), has completed an inventory 
of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with 
the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations and has 
determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes 
or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives 
of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian

[[Page 68363]]

organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request to the California Department of 
Transportation. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations 
stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the California Department of Transportation 
at the address in this notice by November 27, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Sarah Allred, California Department of Transportation, P.O. 
Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271-0001, telephone (916) 653-0013, 
email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the California 
Department of Transportation, Sacramento, CA, and in the physical 
custody of the Fowler Museum at the University of California Los 
Angeles, Los Angeles, CA and the San Luis Obispo County Archaeological 
Society Research and Collections Facility, San Luis Obispo, CA. The 
human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from San 
Luis Obispo County, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by California Department of Transportation, UCLA, and 
SLOCAS professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California and three non-federally recognized Indian 
groups--the Barbareno/Ventureno Band of Mission Indians, Northern 
Chumash Tribe, and Salinan Tribe of San Luis Obispo and Monterey 
Counties (hereafter referred to as ``The Consulted Tribes and 
Groups'').

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1965 and 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, 74 
individuals were removed from CA-SLO-175 in San Luis Obispo County, CA. 
David Abrams and Nelson Leonard, in association with the University of 
California Archeological Survey, began excavations when Caltrans sought 
to widen Highway 1, which would significantly impact this Middle-to-
Late Period site. The land was originally owned by the Hearst 
Corporation; Caltrans purchased the right-of-way in June 1966. All 
laboratory work was completed at UCLA. Abrams reported on the site and 
excavation in the MA thesis he submitted to the University of 
California Davis. Except for the human remains and associated funerary 
objects, UCLA sent the collection from CA-SLO-175 to SLOCAS (located at 
Cuesta College) for further study and analysis in March 1973. 
Subsequently, additional materials associated with the site were found 
at UCLA, and in May 1978, they were sent to SLOCAS for permanent 
curation. On July 14, 2017, UCLA sent the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to SLOCAS in order to bring the collection back 
together for an inventory, and to look for missing and loaned artifacts 
with the assistance of Chumash community members. The human remains 
derive from 40 formal burials and recovered fragmentary remains, 
representing a minimum number of 74 individuals in total. (The field 
notes refer to a Burial 41, but only 40 burials in total were 
identified, as ``Burial 6'' was not assigned.) They belong to 47 adult 
individuals, 15 of whom could be identified as male and nine of whom 
could be identified as female; 22 juvenile individuals; one infant; and 
four individuals of unidentifiable age or sex. No known individuals 
were identified. The 1,277 associated funerary objects include 107 
pieces and 12 bags of unmodified faunal remains; three bone awl 
fragments; 14 bone ornaments; six bone whistles; five bone sweat 
sticks; three modified bone pieces; 46 pieces of chipped chert; one 
limestone fragment; one coral fragment; one sandstone hammerstone; one 
siltstone pick; three stone fragments; three steatite beads; two 
tarring pebbles; two net weights; five obsidian flakes; five pieces of 
red ochre; 15 fragments and one bag of asphaltum (13 of the 15 pieces 
are inlaid with shell beads); two asphaltum plugs; 1,019 beads and one 
bag of shell beads; three shell ornaments; 12 pieces and one bag of 
unmodified shell; one piece and one bag of shell with asphaltum 
residue; and one piece of charcoal. (Eight additional items--two pieces 
of unmodified shell, two pieces of chipped chert, one net weight, one 
piece of cut wood, and two asphaltum inlaid pipes--have not yet been 
located.)
    In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 individuals 
were removed from CA-SLO-179 in San Luis Obispo County, CA. Nelson 
Leonard and a UCLA Archaeological Survey crew conducted excavation at 
this large shell midden near Pico Creek before the widening of Highway 
1, which would partially destroy the Middle-to-Late Period site. All 
analysis and reports were completed at UCLA in Anthropology. Except for 
the human remains and associated funerary objects, UCLA sent the 
collection from CA-SLO-179 to SLOCAS for further study and analysis in 
March 1973. Subsequently, additional materials associated with the site 
were found at UCLA, and in May 1978, they were sent to SLOCAS for 
permanent curation. On July 14, 2017, UCLA sent the human remains and 
associated funerary objects to SLOCAS in order to bring the collection 
back together for an inventory, and to look for missing and loaned 
artifacts with the assistance of Chumash community members. The human 
remains of three individuals--two adult males and a juvenile--derive 
from two formal burials, while the human remains of, at minimum, eight 
individuals--three of them juvenile--were recovered from midden 
contexts. No known individuals were identified. The five associated 
funerary objects are projectile point fragments. (One glass fragment 
and one large mussel shell are currently missing from the collections. 
Records indicate that the missing items were transferred to Cuesta 
College in May 1978. No further information could be found.)
    Based on geographical, ethnographic, historical, oral traditional, 
and archeological information, Caltrans has determined that CA-SLO-175 
and CA-SLO-179 lie within the traditional territory of the Chumash and 
Salinan people. The associated funerary objects, too, are consistent 
with those belonging to groups ancestral to the present-day Chumash and 
Salinan people.

Determinations Made by the California Department of Transportation

    Officials of the California Department of Transportation have 
determined that:

[[Page 68364]]

     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 85 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 1,282 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa 
Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, 
California.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Sarah Allred, California Department of 
Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271-0001, 
telephone (916) 653-0013, email [email protected], by November 
27, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come 
forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of 
the Santa Ynez Reservation, California may proceed.
    The California Department of Transportation is responsible for 
notifying The Consulted Tribes and Groups that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: October 9, 2020.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2020-23827 Filed 10-27-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P