Threshold for the Requirement To Collect, Retain, and Transmit Information on Funds Transfers and Transmittals of Funds That Begin or End Outside the United States, and Clarification of the Requirement To Collect, Retain, and Transmit Information on Transactions Involving Convertible Virtual Currencies and Digital Assets With Legal Tender Status, 68005-68019 [2020-23756]

Download as PDF 68005 Proposed Rules Federal Register Vol. 85, No. 208 Tuesday, October 27, 2020 This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains notices to the public of the proposed issuance of rules and regulations. The purpose of these notices is to give interested persons an opportunity to participate in the rule making prior to the adoption of the final rules. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 915 [Doc. No. AMS–SC–20–0064; SC20–915–1 CR] Avocados Grown in South Florida; Continuance Referendum Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule; referendum order. AGENCY: This document directs that a referendum be conducted among eligible growers of avocados grown in South Florida to determine whether they favor continuance of the marketing order regulating the handling of avocados produced in the production area. DATES: The referendum will be conducted from November 30 through December 21, 2020. Only current growers of Florida avocados within the production area that produced avocados during the period April 1, 2019, through March 31, 2020, are eligible to vote in this referendum. ADDRESSES: Copies of the marketing order may be obtained from the Southeast Marketing Field Office, Marketing Order and Agreement Division, Specialty Crops Program, AMS, USDA, 1124 First Street South, Winter Haven, FL 33880; Telephone: (863) 324–3375; or from the Marketing Order and Agreement Division, Specialty Crops Program, AMS, USDA, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, STOP 0237, Washington, DC 20250–0237; Telephone: (202) 720–2491; or on the internet: https://www.regulations.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Abigail Campos, Marketing Specialist, or Christian D. Nissen, Regional Director, Southeast Marketing Field Office, Marketing Order and Agreement Division, Specialty Crops Program, AMS, USDA, 1124 First Street South, Winter Haven, FL 33880; Telephone: jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 (863) 324–3375, Fax: (863) 291–8614, or Email: Abigail.Campos@usda.gov or Christian.Nissen@usda.gov. Pursuant to Marketing Agreement and Order No. 915, as amended (7 CFR part 915), hereinafter referred to as the ‘‘Order,’’ and the applicable provisions of the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601–674), hereinafter referred to as the ‘‘Act,’’ it is hereby directed that a referendum be conducted to ascertain whether continuance of the Order is favored by growers. The referendum shall be conducted from November 30 through December 21, 2020, among Florida avocado growers in the production area. Only current Florida avocado growers who were engaged in the production of Florida avocados grown in the production area, during the period of period April 1, 2019, through March 31, 2020, may participate in the continuance referendum. USDA has determined that continuance referenda are an effective means for determining whether growers favor the continuation of marketing order programs. The Order will continue in effect if two-thirds of the growers that cast votes, or growers representing two-thirds of the volume of Florida avocados voted in the referendum, cast ballots in favor of continuance. In evaluating the merits of continuance versus termination, USDA will not exclusively consider the results of the continuance referendum. USDA will also consider all other relevant information regarding the operation of the Order and relative benefits and disadvantages to growers, handlers, and consumers in determining whether continued operation of the Order would tend to effectuate the declared policy of the Act. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35), the ballots used in the referendum have been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and have been assigned OMB No. 0581–0189, Fruit Crops. It has been estimated it will take an average of 20 minutes for each of the approximately 325 growers of Florida avocados to cast a ballot. Participation is voluntary. Ballots postmarked after December 21, 2020, will not be included in the vote tabulation. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Abigail Campos, Dolores Lowenstine, and Christian D. Nissen of the Southeast Marketing Field Office, Specialty Crops Program, AMS, USDA, are hereby designated as the referendum agents of the Secretary of Agriculture to conduct this referendum. The procedure applicable to the referendum shall be the ‘‘Procedure for the Conduct of Referenda in Connection with Marketing Orders for Fruits, Vegetables, and Nuts Pursuant to the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as Amended’’ (7 CFR 900.400 et seq.). Ballots will be mailed to all growers of record and may also be obtained from the referendum agents or their appointees. List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 915 Avocados, Marketing agreements, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Authority: 7 U.S.C. 601–674. Bruce Summers, Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service. [FR Doc. 2020–23348 Filed 10–26–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–02–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Financial Crimes Enforcement Network 31 CFR Parts 1010 and 1020 [Docket No. FINCEN–2020–0002 ; RIN 1506– AB41] Threshold for the Requirement To Collect, Retain, and Transmit Information on Funds Transfers and Transmittals of Funds That Begin or End Outside the United States, and Clarification of the Requirement To Collect, Retain, and Transmit Information on Transactions Involving Convertible Virtual Currencies and Digital Assets With Legal Tender Status Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (‘‘Board’’); Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (‘‘FinCEN’’), Treasury. ACTION: Joint notice of proposed rulemaking. AGENCY: The Board and FinCEN (collectively, the ‘‘Agencies’’) are issuing this proposed rule to modify the threshold in the rule implementing the SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS 68006 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules Bank Secrecy Act (‘‘BSA’’) requiring financial institutions to collect and retain information on certain funds transfers and transmittals of funds. The proposed modification would reduce this threshold from $3,000 to $250 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States. FinCEN is likewise proposing to reduce from $3,000 to $250 the threshold in the rule requiring financial institutions to transmit to other financial institutions in the payment chain information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States. The Agencies are also proposing to clarify the meaning of ‘‘money’’ as used in these same rules to ensure that the rules apply to domestic and cross-border transactions involving convertible virtual currency (‘‘CVC’’), which is a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that either has an equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for currency, but lacks legal tender status. The Agencies further propose to clarify that these rules apply to domestic and cross-border transactions involving digital assets that have legal tender status. DATES: Written comments on this proposed rule may be submitted on or before November 27, 2020. ADDRESSES: Comments may be submitted by any of the following methods: Board: You may submit comments, identified by Docket No. R–1726; RIN 7100–AF97, by any of the following methods: • Agency website: http:// www.federalreserve.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments at http://www.federalreserve.gov/ generalinfo/foia/ProposedRegs.cfm. • Email: regs.comments@ federalreserve.gov. Include docket and RIN numbers in the subject line of the message. • Fax: (202) 452–3819 or (202) 452– 3102. • Mail: Ann E. Misback, Secretary, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 20th Street and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20551. All public comments will be made available on the Board’s website at http://www.federalreserve.gov/ generalinfo/foia/ProposedRegs.cfm as submitted, unless modified for technical reasons or to remove personally identifiable information at the commenter’s request. Accordingly, comments will not be edited to remove any identifying or contact information. Public comments may also be viewed VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 electronically or in paper in Room 146, 1709 New York Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20006, between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on weekdays. For security reasons, the Board requires that visitors make an appointment to inspect comments. You may do so by calling (202) 452–3684. FinCEN: • Federal E-rulemaking Portal: http:// www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Refer to Docket Number FINCEN–2020– 0002 and the specific RIN number 1506–AB41 the comment applies to. • Mail: Policy Division, Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, P.O. Box 39, Vienna, VA 22183. Refer to Docket Number FINCEN–2020–0002 and the specific RIN number. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Board: Jason Gonzalez, Assistant General Counsel (202) 452–3275 or Evan Winerman, Senior Counsel (202) 872– 7578, Legal Division, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 20th Street and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20551. Users of Telecommunication Device for Deaf (TDD) only, call (202) 263–4869. FinCEN: The FinCEN Regulatory Support Section at 1–800–767–2825 or electronically at frc@fincen.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background A. Statutory and Regulatory Background The Currency and Foreign Transactions Reporting Act of 1970, as amended by the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (‘‘USA PATRIOT Act’’) (Pub. L. 107–56) and other legislation, is the legislative framework commonly referred to as the BSA. The Secretary of the Treasury (‘‘Secretary’’) has delegated to the Director of FinCEN (‘‘Director’’) the authority to implement, administer, and enforce compliance with the BSA and associated regulations.1 Pursuant to this authority, FinCEN may require financial institutions to keep records and file reports that the Director determines have a high degree of usefulness in criminal, tax, or regulatory investigations or proceedings, or in intelligence or counterintelligence matters to protect against international terrorism.2 The Annunzio-Wylie Anti-Money Laundering Act of 1992 (Pub. L. 102– 550) (‘‘Annunzio-Wylie’’) amended the BSA framework. Annunzio-Wylie 1 Treasury 2 31 PO 00000 Order 180–01 (Jan. 14, 2020). U.S.C. 5311. Frm 00002 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 authorizes the Secretary and the Board to jointly issue regulations requiring insured depository institutions to maintain records of domestic funds transfers.3 The Secretary, but not the Board, is authorized to promulgate recordkeeping requirements for domestic wire transfers by nonbank financial institutions.4 In addition, Annunzio-Wylie authorizes the Secretary and the Board, after consultation with state banking supervisors, to jointly issue regulations requiring insured depository institutions and certain nonbank financial institutions to maintain records of international funds transfers and transmittals of funds.5 AnnunzioWylie requires the Secretary and the Board, in issuing regulations for international funds transfers and transmittals of funds, to consider the usefulness of the records in criminal, tax, or regulatory investigations or proceedings, and the effect of the regulations on the cost and efficiency of the payments system.6 FinCEN can continually monitor the benefits of such regulations through its extensive liaison activity with federal and state law enforcement and financial regulatory entities, and the Board can assess costs through its regulatory oversight of financial institutions under its jurisdiction. On January 3, 1995, the Agencies jointly issued a recordkeeping rule (the ‘‘Recordkeeping Rule’’) that requires banks and nonbank financial institutions to collect and retain information related to funds transfers and transmittals of funds in amounts of $3,000 or more.7 The Recordkeeping Rule is intended to help law enforcement and regulatory authorities 3 12 U.S.C. 1829b(b)(2). U.S.C. 1953. 5 12 U.S.C. 1829b(b)(3). The terms ‘‘funds transfer,’’ ‘‘originator,’’ ‘‘beneficiary,’’ and ‘‘payment order’’ apply only in the context of banks. The term ‘‘transmittal of funds’’ includes a funds transfer and its counterpart in the context of nonbank financial institutions. See 31 CFR 1010.100(ddd). Transmittors, recipients, and transmittal orders in the context of nonbank financial institutions play the same role as originators, beneficiaries, and payment orders in the context of banks. 6 12 U.S.C. 1829b(b)(3). 7 60 FR 220 (Jan. 3, 1995). Through a separate rulemaking, the Board added on January 3, 1995 a new subpart B to 12 CFR part 219 (Regulation S), which cross-references the substantive requirements in the Recordkeeping Rule. See 60 FR 231–01 (Jan. 3, 1995). As noted above, the Board (unlike FinCEN) is not authorized to promulgate recordkeeping requirements for domestic wire transfers by nonbank financial institutions. Accordingly, for purposes of Regulation S, the provisions of the Recordkeeping Rule with respect to nonbank financial institutions apply only to international transmittals of funds. 12 CFR 219.23(b). 4 12 E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules detect, investigate, and prosecute money laundering, and other financial crimes by preserving an information trail about persons sending and receiving funds through the funds transfer system. At the same time, FinCEN issued a separate rule—the ‘‘Travel Rule’’—that requires banks and nonbank financial institutions to transmit information on certain funds transfers and transmittals of funds to other banks or nonbank financial institutions participating in the transfer or transmittal.8 The Travel Rule and the Recordkeeping Rule complement each other: Generally, as noted below, the Recordkeeping Rule requires financial institutions to collect and retain the information that, under the Travel Rule, must be included with transmittal orders, although the Recordkeeping Rule also has other applications apart from ensuring that information is available to include with funds transfers. FinCEN issued the Travel Rule pursuant to statutory authority that permits the Treasury to require domestic financial institutions or nonfinancial trades or businesses to maintain appropriate procedures to ensure compliance with the BSA or to guard against money laundering, and to establish anti-money laundering programs.9 This proposed rule would amend both the Recordkeeping Rule and the Travel Rule. The Recordkeeping Rule is codified at 31 CFR 1020.410(a) and 1010.410(e) 10 and the Travel Rule is codified at 31 CFR 1010.410(f).11 Consistent with its rulemaking authority in the BSA, as amended by AnnunzioWylie, the Board is proposing the amendments to § 1010.100(ll) and § 1020.410(a) only to the extent the amendments apply to funds transfers by insured depository institutions, and is proposing the amendments to § 1010.100(eee) and § 1010.410(e) only to the extent the amendments would apply to international transmittals of funds by financial institutions other than insured depository institutions. Because the Board’s Regulation S generally cross-references those portions of the Recordkeeping Rule promulgated jointly by the Board and FinCEN, it is 8 60 FR 234 (Jan. 3, 1995). see also 31 U.S.C. 5218(a)(2) and (h). 10 As explained in n. 6, supra, the Board separately promulgated subpart B to Regulation S, which cross-references the requirements of 31 CFR 1020.410(a) and 1010.410(e). 11 Recordkeeping requirements for banks are set forth in 31 CFR 1020.410(a). Recordkeeping requirements for nonbank financial institutions are set forth in 31 CFR 1010.410(e). The Travel Rule— codified at 31 CFR 1010.410(f)—applies by its terms to both bank and nonbank financial institutions. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS 9 Id.; VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 unnecessary to propose conforming amendments to Regulation S. B. Information Required To Be Collected, Retained, and Transmitted Under the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules The Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule collectively require banks and nonbank financial institutions to collect, retain, and transmit information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds in amounts of $3,000 or more. Under the Recordkeeping Rule, the originator’s bank or transmittor’s financial institution must collect and retain the following information: (a) Name and address of the originator or transmittor; (b) the amount of the payment or transmittal order; (c) the execution date of the payment or transmittal order; (d) any payment instructions received from the originator or transmittor with the payment or transmittal order; and (e) the identity of the beneficiary’s bank or recipient’s financial institution. In addition, the originator’s bank or transmittor’s financial institution must retain the following information if it receives that information from the originator or transmittor: (a) Name and address of the beneficiary or recipient; (b) account number of the beneficiary or recipient; and (c) any other specific identifier of the beneficiary or recipient. The originator’s bank or transmittor’s financial institution is required to verify the identity of the person placing a payment or transmittal order if the order is made in person and the person placing the order is not an established customer.12 Similarly, should the beneficiary’s bank or recipient’s financial institution deliver the proceeds to the beneficiary or recipient in person, the bank or nonbank financial institution must verify the identity of the beneficiary or recipient—and collect and retain various items of information identifying the beneficiary or recipient—if the beneficiary or recipient is not an established customer. Finally, an intermediary bank or financial institution—and the beneficiary’s bank or recipient’s financial institution— must retain originals or copies of payment or transmittal orders. Under the Travel Rule, the originator’s bank or transmittor’s financial institution is required to include information, including all information required under the Recordkeeping Rule, in a payment or transmittal order sent by the bank or nonbank financial institution to another 12 The term ‘‘established customer’’ is defined at 31 CFR 1010.100(p). PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 68007 bank or nonbank financial institution in the payment chain. An intermediary bank or financial institution is also required to transmit this information to other banks or nonbank financial institutions in the payment chain, to the extent the information is received by the intermediary bank or financial institution. II. Lowering of Threshold From $3,000 to $250 for Funds Transfers and Transmittals of Funds by Financial Institutions That Begin or End Outside the United States The existing requirements in 31 CFR 1020.410(a) and 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f) to collect, retain, and transmit information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds currently apply only to funds transfers and transmittals of funds in amounts of $3,000 or more. The Agencies are proposing to lower the threshold under the Recordkeeping Rule, and FinCEN is proposing to lower the threshold under the Travel Rule, to $250 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States.13 In proposing these modifications, the Agencies considered the usefulness of transaction information associated with smallervalue cross-border transfers and transmittals of funds in criminal, tax, or regulatory investigations or proceedings, and in intelligence or counterintelligence activities to protect against international terrorism, as well as the effect on the payments system of requiring information collection and retention for these transactions. The following two sections lay out, respectively, (A) the potential benefits to national security and law enforcement from reducing the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule thresholds for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States, and (B) the potential effect these new requirements would have on the cost and efficiency of the payments system. A. Benefit to National Security and Law Enforcement Information available to the Agencies indicates that malign actors are using smaller-value cross-border wire transfers to facilitate or commit terrorist financing, narcotics trafficking, and other illicit activity, and that increased recordkeeping and reporting concerning these transactions would be valuable to 13 The ‘‘United States’’ includes the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Indian lands (as that term is defined in the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act), and the Territories and Insular Possessions of the United States. 31 CFR 1010.100(hhh). E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 68008 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules law enforcement and national security authorities. In proposing to lower the current threshold under the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules, the Agencies have specifically considered Suspicious Activity Reports (‘‘SARs’’) filed by money transmitters, which indicate that a substantial volume of potentially illicit funds transfers and transmittals of funds occur below the $3,000 threshold; evidence used in recent criminal prosecutions; and the views of law enforcement partners and the Financial Action Task Force (‘‘FATF’’) 14 on the utility of mandating information collection for smaller-value wire transfers. First, FinCEN analyzed data derived from approximately 2,000 SARs filed by money transmitters between 2016 and 2019 related to potential terrorist financing-related transmittals of funds.15 These SARs referenced approximately 1.29 million underlying transmittals of funds, approximately 99 percent of which began or ended outside the United States (only approximately 17,000 of the approximately 1.29 million transactions included within its terrorist-financing analysis dataset involved domestic-only transactions). The mean and median dollar-value of transmittals of funds mentioned in those SARs were approximately $509 and $255, respectively. Approximately 71 percent of those 1.29 million transmittals (more than 916,000) were at or below $500, totaling more than $179 million. Approximately 57 percent of those transmittals (more than 728,000) were at or below $300, totaling more than $103 million. As noted in the 2015 National Terrorism Finance Risk Assessment, terrorist financiers and facilitators are creative and will seek to exploit vulnerabilities in the financial system to further their unlawful aims, including, as the above analysis indicates, through the use of low-dollar transactions.16 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS 14 The FATF is an international, intergovernmental task force whose purpose is the development and promotion of international standards and the effective implementation of legal, regulatory, and operational measures to combat money laundering, terrorist financing, the financing of proliferation, and other related threats to the integrity of the international financial system. 15 FinCEN determined that these SARs were potentially related to terrorist financing based on the application of certain search terms and analytic methods developed by FinCEN. FinCEN shared its analysis with law enforcement. FinCEN is aware, based on feedback from domestic and foreign law enforcement partners, that those partners have used information contained in terrorism-related SARs in their investigations. 16 See Dep’t of the Treasury, 2015 National Terrorism Finance Risk Assessment, at 2 (June 2015), https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/ terrorist-illicit-finance/Documents/National%20 VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 FinCEN also reviewed a separate subset of 363 SARs filed by a money transmitter for the period between 2012 and 2018 that FinCEN determined to be potentially related to fentanyl trafficking.17 These SARs referenced approximately 78,000 transmittals of funds, over 82% of which began or ended outside the United States. The mean and median dollar-value of transmittals of funds mentioned in these SARs were approximately $588 and $283, respectively. Approximately 67 percent of those 78,000 transmittals (more than 52,000) were at or below $500, totaling more than $10 million. Approximately 52 percent of those transmittals (more than 40,000) were at or below $300, totaling more than $5.7 million. In the 1995 rulemaking implementing the Travel Rule, the Treasury noted that it would monitor the effectiveness of financial institutions’ suspicious transaction reporting protocols to determine whether potentially illicit transactions below the $3,000 threshold were being reported (and thus whether it might be unnecessary, from a law enforcement perspective, to lower the threshold).18 FinCEN has been able to analyze some records of transmittals of funds below $3,000, as noted above, because money transmitters have retained records for those transmittals of funds after recognizing the underlying activity as suspicious. However, the Agencies believe that lowering the threshold to capture smaller-value cross-border funds transfers and transmittals of funds would be valuable for law enforcement and national security authorities, despite financial institutions’ suspicious activity reporting programs, because some financial institutions may not recognize or retain records for all suspicious activity below the $3,000 threshold or the suspicious pattern may not become clear until the records are aggregated. This could inhibit law enforcement from promptly investigating and mapping illicit networks. Second, recent prosecutions show that individuals are sending and receiving funds to finance terrorist activity in amounts below (and in some cases, well below) the current $3,000 recordkeeping threshold. Those cases involved persons providing material Terrorist%20Financing%20Risk%20 Assessment%20-%2006-12-2015.pdf. 17 FinCEN determined that these SARs were potentially related to fentanyl trafficking based on the application of certain search terms and analytic methods developed by FinCEN, including through FinCEN’s work with law enforcement. FinCEN shared its analysis with law enforcement. 18 60 FR 234, 236 (Jan. 3, 1995). PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 support for terrorist activity to a designated Foreign Terrorist Organization (‘‘FTO’’). In one such case, during 2013, the defendant allegedly sent $1,500 to a co-defendant’s financial account within the United States; the co-defendant was collecting money from his co-conspirators in support of an FTO fighter in Syria, ultimately transmitting those funds through money remitting businesses and intermediaries overseas.19 In another case, a man was prosecuted for meeting with an FTO recruiter in 2015, wiring funds in the amount of $250 to an FTO, and attempting to leave the United States with the intent of joining the FTO in Libya.20 Another example of small dollar funds transfers made in support of terrorism involved an individual in the United States who received several cash transfers in 2015 from FTO affiliates, totaling about $8,700 and sent primarily in sums of less than $3,000.21 One such transfer in 2016 was from a person located in Egypt, in the amount of $1,000, and sent through a U.S. money transmitter.22 The subject later admitted to law enforcement that the money was to be used to finance a terrorist attack in the United States, and the subject was subsequently convicted of providing material support to an FTO.23 Third, the Money Laundering and Asset Recovery Section (‘‘MLARS’’) of the Criminal Division of the Department of Justice (‘‘DOJ’’) has advised the Agencies that it supports lowering the dollar threshold for the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules. In 2006, MLARS (previously known as the Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section) submitted a public comment to the Agencies in response to an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (‘‘2006 ANPRM’’) in which the Agencies sought comments on lowering the thresholds of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules.24 MLARS’s public comment included a 19 See United States v. Harcevic, 2015 WL 1821509, at *1 (E.D. Mo. Apr. 21, 2015); United States v. Hodzic, 2016 WL 11578530, at *1 (E.D. Mo. Aug. 22, 2016), report and recommendation adopted, 355 F. Supp. 3d 825 (E.D. Mo. 2019); see also Press Release, Department of Justice, ‘‘Missouri Man Pleads Guilty to Providing Material Support to Terrorists,’’ 2019 WL 1472565 (Apr. 3, 2019). 20 See Press Release, Department of Justice, ‘‘Columbus Man Sentenced to 80 Months in Prison for Attempting to Provide Material Support to ISIS’’ (July 6, 2019), https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdoh/ pr/columbus-man-sentenced-80-months-prisonattempting-provide-material-support-isis; see also United States v Daniels, 2:2016–cr–222 (ECF No. 7 at 2) (filed Nov. 10, 2016). 21 See United States v. Elshinawy, No. CR ELH– 16–009, 2018 WL 1521876, at *17–18 (D. Md. Mar. 28, 2018), aff’d, 781 F. App’x 168 (4th Cir. 2019). 22 Id. at *17. 23 Id. at *8. 24 71 FR 119 (June 21, 2006). E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS synthesis of comments from agents and prosecutors at several federal law enforcement agencies who use this information, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (‘‘FBI’’), the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (‘‘DEA’’), the Internal Revenue Service (‘‘IRS’’), the United States Secret Service (‘‘USSS’’), and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. While not the official comment of each such agency, the agents and prosecutors specializing in money laundering cases and who routinely use wire transfer information supported lowering or eliminating altogether the reporting threshold to disrupt illegal activity and increase its cost to the perpetrators. At the same time, MLARS identified two potential concerns—first, that some criminals would structure transactions to evade the lower threshold, and second, if such structuring occurred, those smaller dollar transactions would be difficult to distinguish from legitimate wire transfers. Ultimately, in spite of these concerns, MLARS supported a lower, uniform recordkeeping threshold. More recently, MLARS has advised the Agencies that it continues to support lowering the threshold, particularly if doing so would bring the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule in line with international standards (which are further described immediately below). MLARS indicated that its views apply equally to funds transfers by banks and transmittals of funds by nonbank financial institutions. The DEA, the IRS, and the USSS have similarly expressed support for lowering the reporting threshold for purposes of the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule. Finally, the FATF has indicated that records of smaller-value transactions are valuable to law enforcement, particularly with respect to terrorist financing investigations.25 The FATF recommends that ‘‘basic information’’ concerning the originator and beneficiary of wire transfers be immediately available to appropriate government authorities, including law enforcement and financial intelligence units, as well as to financial institutions participating in the transaction.26 For cross-border wire transfers, the FATF recommends that countries provide for the collection and transmission 25 See Recommendation 16 and Interpretive Note to FATF Recommendation 16, International Standards on Combating Money Laundering and the Financing of Terrorism & Proliferation—The FATF Recommendations, at 15–16, 73–77 (June 2019), available at www.fatf-gafi.org/ recommendations.html). 26 See id. at 73 (Interpretive Note to FATF Recommendation 16). VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 throughout the payment chain of the originator’s name, account number, and address, and the name of the beneficiary and their account number.27 The FATF further states that countries may adopt a de minimis threshold of no higher than USD/EUR 1,000 for cross-border wire transfers, below which the name and account numbers of the originator and beneficiary should be collected and transmitted but need not be verified for accuracy unless there is a suspicion of money laundering or terrorist financing.28 The FATF recommends that countries minimize this and other thresholds to the extent practicable, after taking into account the risk of ‘‘driving transactions underground’’ and the ‘‘importance of financial inclusion.’’ 29 The 1,000 USD/EUR de minimis cross-border threshold specified in the FATF Recommendations has been adopted by the European Union and by the vast majority of jurisdictions around the world. Accordingly, the Agencies believe that mandating the collection, retention, and transmission of information for funds transfers and transmittals of funds of at least $250 that originate or terminate outside the United States would likely lead to the preservation of information that would benefit law enforcement and national security investigations. Given the usefulness of this information and the potential that financial institutions may not correctly identify a transaction as suspicious, as noted previously, the Agencies believe that it is appropriate to propose lowering the threshold of the Recordkeeping Rule, and FinCEN concludes that it is appropriate to propose lowering the threshold of the Travel Rule, even though financial institutions are subject to SAR reporting requirements through which they may report certain of these smaller-value transactions that fall below the current threshold. B. Effect on Financial Institutions and the Payments System The Agencies believe that the effect of lowering the $3,000 threshold on financial institutions and on the cost and efficiency of the payments system is likely to be low. As demonstrated by the SARs described in the preceding section, some financial institutions are already collecting information on at least a portion of transactions taking place under the current threshold for purposes of reporting suspicious 27 See id. id. 29 See id. 28 See PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 68009 transactions to FinCEN. FinCEN is also aware that some financial institutions already collect information on the originator and beneficiary for transmittals below the $3,000 threshold for reasons separate from reporting suspicious transactions to FinCEN, for instance because it is cost-effective to maintain a single set of processes for all transactions.. The Agencies note that in completing the 1995 rulemakings implementing the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules, and in obtaining comments from the industry in connection with the 2006 ANPRM, some financial institutions advised that they were already collecting information for smaller-value transmittals and that mandating recordkeeping requirements for such transactions would not have a material impact on the payment system. At the same time, other financial institutions expressed concern that imposing information collection requirements (especially for smallervalue transmittals) could increase regulatory compliance costs by mandating the use of new technologies and processes to collect the information, and that these costs could be passed on to consumers. In deciding on a threshold of $3,000 in 1995, the Agencies balanced the value of data on funds transfers and transmittals of funds with the burden that the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule imposed on both bank and nonbank financial institutions. The Agencies are proposing to lower the threshold because the current threshold may no longer represent the appropriate balance for transmittals originating or terminating outside the United States. As noted in the 2006 ANPRM, subsequent to 1995, the responsibilities of financial institutions under the BSA have expanded. For example, an MSB must now report suspicious transactions 30 and implement antimoney laundering programs for ensuring compliance with the BSA.31 MSBs may collect and retain information on transmittals of funds as a means of ensuring compliance with the requirement to report suspicious transactions. The requirement for MSBs to report suspicious transactions likely means that reducing or eliminating the threshold for transmittals would impose less of an incremental cost. Further, the 30 See 31 CFR 1022.320(a)–(f). The requirement applies to transactions occurring after December 31, 2001. The threshold for the requirement to report suspicious transactions is $2,000. 31 See 31 CFR 1022.210(a)–(e). An MSB must implement the program on or before the later of July 24, 2002 and the end of the 90-day period beginning on the day following the date the business is established. E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 68010 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules Agencies note that technology has advanced significantly since the issuance of the 2006 ANPRM. Among other things, data storage costs have gone down, and accordingly it is likely that financial institutions generally use less expensive or more efficient means of electronic storage and retrieval. The Agencies believe there has been an increase in the ability of small institutions to rely on third-party vendors to reduce their costs of handling compliance with a revised threshold. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS III. Application of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules to CVC and Digital Assets That Have Legal Tender Status A. The Meaning of ‘‘Money’’ as Applicable to the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules The Recordkeeping Rule applies to funds transfers (i.e., transactions involving banks) and transmittals of funds (i.e., transactions involving nonbank financial institutions). The term ‘‘funds transfer’’ is defined, as in Article 4A of the Uniform Commercial Code (‘‘UCC’’), to include ‘‘[t]he series of transactions, beginning with the originator’s payment order, made for the purpose of making payment to the beneficiary of the order.’’ 32 The Recordkeeping Rule in turn defines ‘‘payment order’’ similarly to the UCC Article 4A definition, stating that a payment order is ‘‘[a]n instruction of a sender to a receiving bank . . . to pay, or to cause another bank or foreign bank to pay, a fixed or determinable amount of money to a beneficiary.’’ 33 (Emphasis added.) The Recordkeeping Rule’s definition of ‘‘transmittal of funds’’ parallels the UCC Article 4A definition of ‘‘funds transfer,’’ with minor adjustments that allow the definition to apply to nonbank financial institutions. Specifically, the Recordkeeping Rule defines transmittal of funds as ‘‘[a] series of transactions beginning with the transmittor’s transmittal order, made for the purpose of making payment to the recipient. . . .’’ 34 The Recordkeeping Rule’s definition of ‘‘transmittal order’’ in turn parallels the UCC Article 4A definition of payment order, stating that ‘‘[t]he term transmittal order includes a payment order and is an instruction of a sender to a receiving financial institution . . . to pay, a fixed or determinable amount of money to a recipient . . . .’’ 35 (Emphasis added.) 32 31 CFR 1010.100(w); see also U.C.C. 4A–104(a). CFR 1010.100(ll); see also U.C.C. 4A– 103(a)(1). 34 31 CFR 1010.100(ddd). 35 31 CFR 1010.100(eee). 33 31 VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:32 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 Accordingly, funds transfers and transmittals of funds involve an instruction to pay a ‘‘fixed or determinable amount of money.’’ The Recordkeeping Rule does not explicitly define the word ‘‘money.’’ However, in the preamble to the Federal Register document adopting the Recordkeeping Rule, the Agencies explained that ‘‘terms . . . that are not defined specifically in the regulation, but are defined in relevant provisions of the UCC, will have the meaning given them in the UCC, unless otherwise indicated.’’ 36 Under the UCC, the term ‘‘money’’ is defined as ‘‘a medium of exchange currently authorized or adopted by a domestic or foreign government.’’ 37 In guidance issued in November 2010, FinCEN similarly explained that the Travel Rule ‘‘uses terms that are intended to parallel those used in UCC Article 4A, but that are applicable to all financial institutions, as defined within the Bank Secrecy Act’s implementing regulations.’’ Similar to the Recordkeeping Rule, FinCEN’s implementing regulations explain that a transmittal order ‘‘includes a payment order and is an instruction of a sender to a receiving financial institution, transmitted orally, electronically, or in writing, to pay, or cause another financial institution or foreign financial agency to pay, a fixed or determinable amount of money to a recipient[.]’’ 38 B. FinCEN’s Prior Guidance on CVC, and This Proposed Rule’s Further Clarification of the Definition of ‘‘Money’’ as Applicable to the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules Since the Agencies issued the Recordkeeping Rule, and FinCEN issued the Travel Rule, a number of CVCs, such as Bitcoin and Ethereum, have been created. CVC is a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that either has an equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for currency, but lacks legal tender status. Generally, CVCs can be exchanged instantaneously anywhere in the world through peer-to-peer payment systems (a distributed ledger) that allow any two parties to transact directly with each other without the need for an intermediary financial institution. However, in practice, many persons hold and transmit CVC using a third-party financial institution such as a ‘‘hosted wallet’’ or an exchange. 36 60 FR 220, 222 (Jan. 3, 1995). 1–201(b)(24) (2001); see also U.C.C. 4A– 105(d) (2012) (stating that Article 1 general definitions are applicable throughout Article 4A). 38 31 CFR 1010.100(eee). 37 U.C.C. PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Public use of CVCs has grown significantly in recent years. Estimated transactions in Bitcoin alone were approximately $366 billion dollars in 2019 and $312 billion through in 2020 through August.39 Furthermore, the market capitalization of Bitcoin alone was approximately $216 billion as of August 2020.40 The Treasury, including FinCEN, has closely monitored illicit finance risks posed by CVCs. The Agencies note that malign actors have used CVCs to facilitate international terrorist financing, weapons proliferation, sanctions evasion, and transnational money laundering, as well as to buy and sell controlled substances, stolen and fraudulent identification documents and access devices, counterfeit goods, malware and other computer hacking tools, firearms, and toxic chemicals.41 For example, North Korean cyber actors, such as the Lazarus Group, have continuously engaged in efforts to steal and extort CVC as a means of generating and laundering large amounts of revenue for the regime.42 To mitigate illicit finance risks posed by CVC, the FATF has advised that countries should consider so-called virtual assets as ‘‘property,’’ ‘‘proceeds,’’ 39 Estimates based on data from blockchain.com, https://www.blockchain.com/charts/estimatedtransaction-volume-usd. 40 See Coingecko, Top 100 Coins by Market Capitalization, https://www.coingecko.com/en. 41 See, e.g., United States. v. Cazes, No. 1:17CR– 00144, Indictment ¶ 2 (E.D. Ca. filed June 1, 2017) (alleging that ‘‘AlphaBay [was] a dark-web marketplace designed to enable users to buy and sell illegal goods, including controlled substances, stolen and fraudulent identification documents and access devices, counterfeit goods, malware and other computer hacking tools, firearms, and toxic chemicals . . . AlphaBay required its users to transact in digital currencies, including Bitcoin, Monero, and Ethereum.’’); Dep’t of the Treasury Press Release—Remarks of Sigal Mandelker, Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence (May 13, 2019), https://home.treasury.gov/news/ press-releases/sm687; Press Release, Dep’t of Justice, ‘‘Two Chinese Nationals Charged with Laundering Over $100 Million in Cryptocurrency from Exchange Hack’’ at 1 (Mar. 2, 2020) (‘‘North Korea continues to attack the growing worldwide ecosystem of virtual currency as a means to bypass the sanctions imposed on it by the United States and the United Nations Security Council.’’), https:// www.justice.gov/opa/pr/two-chinese-nationalscharged-laundering-over-100-millioncryptocurrency-exchange-hack. For vulnerabilities of digital assets to securities fraud, see SEC— Investor Alert: Ponzi Schemes Using Virtual Currencies, SEC Pub. No. 153 (7/13), http:// www.sec.gov/investor/alerts/ia_ virtualcurrencies.pdf (accessed June 23, 2020); CFTC—Investor Alert: Watch Out for Fraudulent Digital Asset and ‘‘Crypto’’ Trading websites, https://www.cftc.gov/LearnAndProtect/ AdvisoriesAndArticles/watch_out_for_digital_ fraud.html (accessed Aug. 28, 2020). 42 Dep’t of the Treasury Press Release—Remarks of Sigal Mandelker, Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence (May 13, 2019), https:// home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm687. E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS ‘‘funds,’’ ‘‘funds or other assets,’’ or other ‘‘corresponding value’’ and, consequently, should apply relevant FATF anti-money laundering/counterterrorist-financing measures to virtual assets.43 Consistent with the FATF guidance, in May 2019, FinCEN issued guidance advising that CVC-based transfers effectuated by a nonbank financial institution may fall within the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules, on the grounds that such transfers involve the making of a ‘‘transmittal order’’ by the sender—i.e., an instruction to pay ‘‘a determinable amount of money to a recipient’’—a criterion for application of the rules.44 However, FinCEN understands that at least one industry group has asserted that the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules do not apply to transactions involving CVC, in part because the group asserts that CVC is not ‘‘money’’ as defined by the rules. In addition to CVCs, foreign governments—including Iran, Venezuela, and Russia—have created or expressed interest in creating digital currencies that could be used to engage in sanctions evasion. For example, the Venezuelan government developed a state-backed digital currency called the ‘‘petro,’’ which the government publicly indicated was designed for the purpose of evading U.S sanctions.45 The President subsequently issued Executive Order 13827, prohibiting any U.S. persons from involvement in the petro digital currency. This proposed rule would define ‘‘money’’ in 31 CFR 1010.100(ll) and (eee) to make explicitly clear that both payment orders and transmittal orders include any instruction by the sender to transmit CVC or any digital asset having legal tender status to a recipient.46 The 43 Interpretive Note to FATF Recommendation 15 at 70. 44 FinCEN Guidance—Application of FinCEN’s Regulations to Certain Business Models Involving Convertible Virtual Currencies at 11–12 (May 9, 2019); see also 31 CFR 1010.100(eee) (defining transmittal order) and 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f). 45 E.O. 13827, Taking Additional Steps to Address the Situation in Venezuela, (March 19, 2018); see also FinCEN Advisory—Updated Advisory on Widespread Public Corruption in Venezuela at 11 (May 3, 2019), https://www.fincen.gov/sites/default/ files/advisory/2019-05-03/ Venezuela%20Advisory%20FINAL%20508.pdf. 46 The regulatory definitions of ‘‘money’’ and ‘‘convertible virtual currency’’ that this rulemaking proposes to add to the definitions of ‘‘payment order’’ and ‘‘transmittal order’’ at 31 CFR 1010.100(ll) and (eee) are specific to those provisions and not intended to have any impact on, inter alia, the definition of ‘‘currency’’ in 31 CFR 1010.100(m). Furthermore, nothing in this document shall constitute a determination that any asset that is within the regulatory definitions of ‘‘money’’ or ‘‘convertible virtual currency’’ that this rulemaking proposes to add to the definitions of ‘‘payment order’’ and ‘‘transmittal order’’ is currency for the purposes of the federal securities VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 proposed rule would therefore supersede the UCC’s definition of ‘‘money’’ for purposes of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules. The Agencies believe this action is appropriate to provide clarity concerning the application of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules. FinCEN is aware that the CVC industry is working on developing systems and processes to achieve full compliance with the Travel Rule as applied to virtual currency transactions as a result of the distinctive characteristics of CVCs. The Agencies welcome comment on these efforts and any costs related thereto. IV. Section-by-Section Analysis A. Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule Thresholds This proposed rule would lower the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule thresholds set forth in 31 CFR 1020.410 and 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f) for financial institutions. The thresholds would be lowered from $3,000 to $250, but only with respect to funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States. As set forth in the proposed revised sections below, a funds transfer or transmittal of funds would be considered to begin or end outside the United States if the financial institution knows or has reason to know that the transmittor, transmittor’s financial institution, recipient, or recipient’s financial institution is located in, is ordinarily resident in, or is organized under the laws of a jurisdiction other than the United States or a jurisdiction within the United States. For this purpose, a financial institution would have ‘‘reason to know’’ that a transaction begins or ends outside the United States only to the extent such information could be determined based on the information the financial institution receives in the transmittal order, collects from the transmittor to effectuate the transmittal of funds, or otherwise collects from the transmittor or recipient to comply with regulations implementing the BSA. Financial institutions are already required to retain the address of the transmittor and recipient under the Recordkeeping Rule for transactions subject to the current threshold, and may, as a matter of their own business practices, retain the addresses of other participants in a funds transfer or transmittal of funds. This proposed rule would not impose any new laws, 15 U.S.C. 78c(47), or the federal derivatives laws, 7 U.S.C. 1–26, and the regulations promulgated thereunder. PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 68011 requirements to retain address information, other than those resulting from a change to the applicable thresholds. B. Definition of ‘‘Money’’ This proposed rule also would revise the definitions of payment order and transmittal order set forth in the BSA regulations so that the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule would explicitly apply to domestic and cross-border transactions in CVC and digital assets having legal tender status. Both the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule refer to a ‘‘payment order’’ (in the case of banks) and a ‘‘transmittal order’’ (in the case of financial institutions other than banks). These terms, in turn, use the term ‘‘money.’’ This proposed rule would clarify the meaning of money in 31 CFR 1010.100(ll) (payment order) and 1010.100(eee) (transmittal order), explaining that money includes (1) a medium of exchange currently authorized or adopted by a domestic or foreign government, including any digital asset that has legal tender status in any jurisdiction 47 and (2) CVC. The proposed rule would define CVC as a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that either has an equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for currency, but lacks legal tender status.48 V. Request for Comment The Agencies welcome comment on all aspects of this proposed rule. The Agencies encourage all interested parties to provide their views. With respect to the effect of lowering the threshold for the requirement in 31 CFR 1020.410 and 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f) to collect, retain, and transmit information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States, the Agencies in particular request comment on the following questions from financial institutions and members of the public: (1) To what extent would the proposed rule impose a burden on financial institutions, including with respect to information technology implementation costs? To what extent would the burden be different for thresholds such as $0, $500, or $1,000 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States? What would be the 47 ‘‘Money’’ would also include a monetary unit of account established by an intragovernmental organization or by agreement between two or more countries. 48 CVC is therefore a type of ‘‘value that substitutes for currency.’’ See 31 CFR 1010.100(ff)(5)(i)(A). E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS 68012 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules impact on the burden if the proposed threshold change were extended to all transactions, including domestic transactions? (2) To what extent would the burden of the proposed rule on financial institutions and the public be mitigated were the Agencies to select a threshold of $250 but not require nonbank financial institutions to collect a social security number or employer identification number (‘‘EIN’’) for nonestablished customers engaging in transmittals of funds between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end outside the United States? (3) To what extent would the burden of the proposed rule be reduced if the Agencies issued specific guidance about appropriate forms of identification to be used in conjunction with identity verification, including in regards to whether there are circumstances in which verification may be done remotely and what documents are acceptable as proof? (4) To what extent would the burden of the proposed rule on financial institutions and the public be mitigated if the Agencies were to include in the regulation the standard described in Section IV.A for determining when an institution would be subject to the $250 threshold for cross-border transfers, i.e., that ‘‘reason to know’’ that a transaction begins or ends outside the United States exists when such information could be determined based on the information the financial institution receives in the transmittal order, collects from the transmittor to effectuate the transmittal of funds, or otherwise collects from the transmittor or recipient to comply with regulations implementing the BSA? The Agencies request comment from law enforcement with respect to the following related questions: (1) To what extent would the proposed rule benefit law enforcement? To what extent would these benefits be different for thresholds such as $0, $500, or $1,000 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States? What would be the impact on the benefits to law enforcement if the proposed threshold change were extended to all transactions, including domestic transactions? (2) To what extent would the benefit of the proposed rule to law enforcement be compromised were the Agencies to select a threshold of $250 but not require that nonbank financial institutions collect a social security number or EIN for non-established nonbank customers engaging in transmittals of funds between $250 and VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 $3,000 that begin or end outside the United States? With respect to the effect of clarifying the meaning of ‘‘money’’ in the definitions of ‘‘payment order’’ and ‘‘transmittal order’’ in 31 CFR 1010.100, the Agencies in particular request comment on the following questions from law enforcement, financial institutions, and members of the public: (1) Describe the additional costs, if any, from complying with the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule in light of the clarification included in the proposed rule, including with respect to information technology costs. (2) What mechanisms have persons that engage in CVC transactions developed to comply with the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule and what is the impact of adopting these solutions on the CVC industry, including on other BSA compliance efforts? VI. Regulatory Analysis A. Executive Orders 13563, 12866, and 13771 Executive Orders 13563 and 12866 direct agencies to assess costs and benefits of available regulatory alternatives and, if regulation is necessary, to select regulatory approaches that maximize net benefits (including potential economic, environmental, and public health and safety effects; distributive impacts; and equity). Executive Order 13563 emphasizes the importance of quantifying both costs and benefits, of reducing costs, of harmonizing rules, and of promoting flexibility. This proposed rule has been designated a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866. Accordingly, the proposed rule has been reviewed by the Office of Management and Budget (‘‘OMB’’). FinCEN believes the primary cost of complying with the proposed rule is captured in its Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3507(d)) (‘‘PRA’’) burden estimates described in detail below, which amount to 3,315,844 hours. FinCEN estimated in its recent OMB control number renewal for SAR requirements that the average labor cost of storing SARs and supporting documentation, weighed against the relevant labor required, was $24 per hour.49 FinCEN assesses that this is a reasonable estimate for the labor cost of the requirements imposed by this rule. Therefore a reasonable minimum estimate for the burden of administering the proposed rule is approximately 49 85 FR 31598, at 31604 and 31607 (May 26, 2020). PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 $79.58 million annually (3,315,844 hours multiplied by $24 per hour). However, the PRA burden does not include certain costs, such as information technology implementation costs solely resulting from the need to comply with this proposed rule. FinCEN specifically requests comment regarding the costs associated with implementing these requirements. The benefits from the proposed rule include enhanced law enforcement ability to investigate, prosecute and disrupt the financing of international terrorism and other priority transnational security threats, as well as other types of transnational financial crime. The cost of terrorist attacks can be immense. For instance, one public report estimated the cost of terrorism globally at $33 billion in 2018, though this cost was primarily borne outside the United States.50 The cost of a major terrorist attack, such as the September 11 attacks, can reach tens of billions of dollars.51 Of course, it is difficult to quantify the contribution of a particular rule to a reduction in the risk of a terrorist attack. However, even if the proposed rule produced very small reductions in the probability of a major terrorist attack, the benefits would exceed the costs. For instance, if the proposed rule reduced by 0.26 percent the annual probability of a major terrorist attack with an economic impact of $30 billion, the benefits would be greater than the PRA burden costs described above. Of course, the proposed rule would not simply reduce the probability of terrorism but also would contribute to the ability of law enforcement to investigate a wide array of other priority transnational threats and financial crimes, including proliferation financing, sanctions evasion, and money laundering. FinCEN considered several alternatives to the proposed rule. First, FinCEN considered the possibility of modifying the proposed rule by applying the FATF’s suggested de minimis threshold of $1,000 to transactions that begin or end outside the United States. However, this threshold would exclude over 88 percent of the transactions in FinCEN’s 50 See Institute for Econoimcs and Peace, Global Terrorsim Index, 2019 (Nov. 2019), http:// visionofhumanity.org/app/uploads/2019/11/GTI2019web.pdf. 51 For example, the New York Comptroller estimated in 2002 that the direct physical and human cost of the September 11 attacks on New York was over $30.5 billion. See City of New York Comptroller, One Year Later: The Fiscal Impact of 9/11 on New York City (Sept. 4, 2002), https:// comptroller.nyc.gov/wp-content/uploads/ documents/impact-9-11-year-later.pdf. E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules dataset of transactions potentially linked to terrorism. Given the intended goal of the proposed rule to increase the availability of information to address priority transnational threats, including terrorism, FinCEN believes a lower threshold would be appropriate. Second, FinCEN considered the possibility of implementing the proposed rule with a threshold of $0 for transactions beginning or ending outside of the United States. FinCEN’s terrorism-related transaction analysis suggests that transactions potentially related to terrorism occur at values below the $250 level. Although FinCEN believes that a $0 threshold would lead to enhanced benefits in terms of capturing a larger universe of transactions, requiring collection and verification of transaction information for low-value transactions could impose a substantial burden on small financial institutions, such as small money services businesses. Nonetheless, FinCEN will carefully consider comments to determine whether a $0 threshold would be appropriate in a final rule. FinCEN will also consider in a final rule the extent to which the burden could be minimized by providing guidance on appropriate verification procedures for lower-value transactions. Third, FinCEN considered applying the requirements of the proposed rule to all transactions, including those that begin and end within the United States. However, FinCEN’s analysis identified that only approximately 17,000 of the approximately 1.29 million transactions included within its terrorism analysis dataset involved domestic-only transactions. Applying the requirements to all domestic transactions would therefore capture a relatively small number of additional transactions while resulting in significant additional recordkeeping burden for financial institutions. FinCEN believes that, at this time, it would therefore be appropriate to limit the proposed rule to transactions that begin or end outside the United States. Again, based on comments received, FinCEN will consider in a final rule the extent to which the benefits of extending the scope of the changes to the thresholds of the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule to include domestic transactions would exceed the burdens. With respect to the clarification of the definition of ‘‘money,’’ FinCEN considered the alternative of leaving the regulation as it was, but believed doing so would perpetuate uncertainty about the applicability of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules to transactions involving CVC. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 FinCEN requests comment on the benefits, and any estimates of costs, associated with the requirements of the proposed rule and the proposed alternatives. Executive Order 13771 requires an agency to identify at least two existing regulations to be repealed whenever it publicly proposes for notice and comment or otherwise promulgates a new regulation. As described above, the proposed amendments to the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule involve a national security function. Therefore, Executive Order 13771 does not apply. B. Regulatory Flexibility Act The Regulatory Flexibility Act (‘‘RFA’’) (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) requires an agency either to provide an initial regulatory flexibility analysis with a proposed rule or certify that the proposed rule will not have a significant impact on a substantial number of small entities. This proposed regulation on its face would apply to all financial institutions. However, because of the nature of the requirements contained therein, only banks (including credit unions), money transmitters, and other MSBs would be impacted. Although the Agencies believe that the proposed regulatory changes would affect a substantial number of small entities, the Agencies also believe these changes would be unlikely to have a significant economic impact on such entities. The Agencies, however, recognize the limitations in readily available data about potential costs and benefits and have prepared an initial regulatory flexibility analysis pursuant to the RFA. The Agencies welcome comments on all aspects of the initial regulatory flexibility analysis. A final regulatory flexibility analysis will be conducted after consideration of comments received during the comment period. i. Statement of the Need for, and Objectives of, the Proposed Regulation The proposed changes to the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule would reduce from $3,000 to $250 the threshold for the requirement to collect, retain, and transmit information on funds transfers and transmittal of funds for transactions that begin or end outside the United States. These changes are necessary because funds transfers and transmittals of funds related to terrorist financing, narcotics trafficking, and other crimes are occurring well below the current $3,000 threshold. It therefore would benefit law enforcement for this additional information to be collected, retained, PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 68013 and transmitted by financial institutions. The clarifications regarding the meaning of ‘‘money’’ in the definitions of ‘‘payment order’’ and ‘‘transmittal order’’ in 31 CFR 1010.100 address urgent concerns regarding illicit finance, including the financing of international terrorism, sanctions evasion, and weapons proliferation through CVC. In the absence of clarification, some entities may not be aware of or may choose not to comply with the Recordkeeping Rule and the Travel Rule when engaging in transactions involving CVC. The Agencies are also clarifying that ‘‘money’’ includes digital assets with legal tender status. ii. Small Entities Affected by the Proposed Regulation The proposed changes to the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule would apply to all financial institutions regulated under the BSA.52 However, as a practical matter, because the requirements of this proposed rule are only triggered by funds transfers and transmittals of funds, the proposal would impact mostly banks and money transmitters. As described in the PRA section that follows, based upon current data there are 5,306 banks, 5,236 credit unions, and 12,692 money transmitters that would be impacted by the proposed rule changes. Based upon current data, for the purposes of the RFA, there are at least 3,817 small Federally-regulated banks and 4,681 small credit unions.53 The Agencies believe that most money transmitters are small entities.54 Because the proposed rule would apply to all of these small financial 52 31 CFR 1010.400 notes that ‘‘[e]ach financial institution (as defined in 31 U.S.C. 5312(a)(2) or (c)(1)) should refer to its chapter X part for any additional recordkeeping requirements. Unless otherwise indicated, the recordkeeping requirements contained in this subpart D apply to all financial institutions.’’ See 31 CFR 1020.410 (banks), 31 CFR 1022.410 (dealers in foreign exchange), 31 CFR 1022.400 (MSBs), 31 CFR 1023.410 (broker dealers in securities), 31 CFR 1024.410 (mutual funds), 31 CFR 1025.410 (insurance), 31 CFR 1026.410 (futures commission merchants and introducing brokers in commodities), 31 CFR 1027.410 (dealers in precious metals, precious stones, or jewels), 31 CFR 1028.410 (operators of credit card systems), 31 CFR 1029.400 (loan or finance companies), and 31 CFR 1030.400 (housing government sponsored entities). 53 The Small Business Administration (‘‘SBA’’) defines a depository institution (including a credit union) as a small business if it has assets of $600 million or less. The information on small banks is published by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (‘‘FDIC’’) and was current as of March 31, 2020. 54 The SBA defines an entity engaged in ‘‘Financial Transactions Processing, Reserve, and Clearinghouse Activities’’ to be small if it has assets of $41.5 million or less. FinCEN assesses that money transmitters most closely align with this SBA category of entities. E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS 68014 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules institutions, the Agencies conclude that this proposed rule would apply to a substantial number of small entities. Although the proposed changes would apply to a substantial number of small entities, the Agencies believe that the changes would not have a significant economic impact on such entities for the reasons noted below. In the first year, the Agencies expect additional expense of time and resources to read and understand the regulations and train staff and implement technological changes. In 2006, the Agencies solicited public comment on the potential benefits and burdens of reducing the threshold for the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule requirements.55 Based on the comments received at that time, it appears that almost all banks, regardless of size, maintain records of all funds transfers and transmittals of funds regardless of the dollar amount, including those transfers/transmittals below the $3,000 regulatory threshold. Similarly, in 2006, many money transmitters indicated that they maintained records of transfers/ transmittals at approximately the $1,000 level. Since 2006 there have been significant advances in technology, likely allowing small entities to comply with regulatory recordkeeping requirements at a lower cost. As noted previously, in May 2019, FinCEN issued guidance advising that CVC-based transfers effectuated by a nonbank financial institution may fall within the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules, on the grounds that such transfers involve the making of a ‘‘transmittal order’’ by the sender—i.e., an instruction to pay ‘‘a determinable amount of money to a recipient’’—a criterion for application of the rules.56 Therefore, the proposed rule would codify FinCEN’s existing expectation. In addition, FATF’s international standards now call for jurisdictions to apply their rules equivalent to the Recordkeeping and Travel Rule to virtual assets.57 Therefore, U.S. financial institutions engaged in CVC transactions with an international nexus would likely need to adopt such compliance measures regardless of the applicable U.S. rules, as other countries have aligned or are aligning their regulatory regimes with the FATF recommendations. As described above, the proposed rule would also clarify the Agencies’ existing 55 71 FR 35564 (June 21, 2006). Guidance—Application of FinCEN’s Regulations to Certain Business Models Involving Convertible Virtual Currencies at 11–12 (May 9, 2019); see also 31 CFR 1010.100(eee) (defining transmittal order) and 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f). 57 Interpretive Note to FATF Recommendation 15. 56 FinCEN VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 interpretation that the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules apply to transactions involving a digital asset with legal tender status. The Agencies do not believe that any financial institutions currently facilitate transactions involving sovereign digital currencies. iii. Compliance Requirements Compliance costs for entities that would be affected by these regulations are generally, reporting, recordkeeping, and information technology implementation and maintenance costs. Data are not readily available to determine the costs specific to small entities and the Agencies invite comments about compliance costs, especially those affecting small entities. These proposed changes (a) reduce the threshold for the Recordkeeping and Travel Rule requirements to collect, retain, and transmit information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds for transactions that begin or end outside the United States; and (b) clarify the application of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rule requirements to transactions involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender status. Banks and other financial institutions therefore would need to collect and retain the following information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds in amounts at or above the applicable threshold, including with respect to transactions involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender status: The name and address of the originator or transmittor; the amount and date of the transaction; any payment instructions received; and the identity of the beneficiary’s bank or recipient’s financial institution. In addition, for transactions at or above the applicable threshold, including with respect to transactions involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender status, an originator’s bank or transmittor’s financial institution would be required to verify the identity of the person placing a payment or transmittal order if the order is made in person and the person placing the order is not an established customer. An intermediary bank or intermediary financial institution, and the beneficiary’s bank or recipient’s financial institution, also would be required to retain originals or copies of payment or transmittal orders. For funds transfers and transmittals of funds at or above the applicable threshold, including with respect to transactions involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender status, the originator’s bank or transmittor’s financial institution also would be required to include information, including all information required under the Recordkeeping Rule, in a PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 payment or transmittal order sent by the bank or nonbank financial institution to another bank or nonbank financial institution in the payment chain. An intermediary bank or financial institution would also be required to transmit information to other banks or nonbank financial institutions in the payment chain, to the extent the information is received by the intermediary bank or financial institution. iv. Duplicative, Overlapping, or Conflicting Federal Rules The Agencies are unaware of any Federal rules that duplicate, overlap with, or conflict with the proposed changes to the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules, except that some financial institutions may already collect some of the information required by the proposed modifications as part of their existing implementation of their riskbased AML programs under the BSA and its implementing regulations. v. Significant Alternatives to the Proposed Regulations The Agencies considered several alternatives to the proposed regulatory changes. First, the Agencies considered the possibility of modifying the proposed rule by applying the FATF’s suggested de minimis threshold of $1,000 to transactions that begin or end outside the United States. However, this threshold would exclude an unacceptably large percentage of transactions. It is unclear what impact this alternative would have on small entities and it might not reduce the impact on affected small entities in a meaningful way. Second, the Agencies considered the possibility of implementing the proposed rule with a threshold of $0 for transactions that begin or end outside of the United States. Although this would expand the data available to law enforcement, and the Agencies will carefully consider comments to determine whether a $0 threshold would be appropriate in a final rule, the Agencies believed that a $0 threshold might impose a significant burden on small financial institutions and therefore are not proposing a $0 threshold at this time. Third, the Agencies considered exempting small banks from the lower threshold requirement entirely. However, the Agencies believe that the number of transactions beginning or ending outside the United States is relatively low for most small banks, which should substantially reduce the burden on them from the proposed change in the threshold. E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules Finally, the Agencies considered the possibility of waiving the requirement that financial institutions obtain a social security number or EIN for funds transfers or transmittals of funds below a certain threshold by non-established customers. Adopting this alternative would primarily impact MSBs, many of which are small and more likely to deal with non-established customers. The Agencies have not adopted this alternative at this time because it would increase the likelihood of criminals using false identities to transmit funds. Although the Agencies have not adopted this alternative at this time, this proposed rule requests comment on the benefits and drawbacks of waiving the requirement to obtain a social security number or EIN below some threshold. The Agencies welcome comment on the overall regulatory flexibility analysis, especially information about compliance costs and alternatives. C. Unfunded Mandates Act Section 202 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (‘‘Unfunded Mandates Act’’), Public Law 104–4 (March 22, 1995), requires that an agency prepare a budgetary impact statement before promulgating a rule that may result in expenditure by the state, local, and tribal governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 million or more in any one year. If a budgetary impact statement is required, section 202 of the Unfunded Mandates Act also requires an agency to identify and consider a reasonable number of regulatory alternatives before promulgating a rule. See section VI.A for a discussion of the economic impact of this proposed rule. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS D. Paperwork Reduction Act The recordkeeping requirements contained in this proposed rule (31 CFR 1010.410 and 31 CFR 1020.410) have been submitted by FinCEN to OMB for review in accordance with the PRA. Written comments and recommendations for the proposed information collection can be submitted by visiting www.reginfo.gov/public/do/ PRAMain. Find this particular document by selecting ‘‘Currently under Review—Open for Public Comments’’ or by using the search function. Comments are welcome and must be received by November 27, 2020. In accordance with requirements of the PRA and its implementing regulations, 5 CFR part 1320, the following information concerning the collections of information are presented to assist those persons wishing to comment on the information collections. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 Currently, financial institutions must collect, retain, and transmit certain information as part of funds transfers or transmittals of funds involving $3,000 or more (31 CFR 1020.410(a) and 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f)). This proposed rule would modify the thresholds in the rules implementing the BSA requiring financial institutions to collect and retain information on certain funds transfers and transmittals of funds. The modifications would reduce the threshold from the current $3,000 to $250 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States. The proposed rule likewise would modify the threshold in the rule requiring financial institutions to transmit to other financial institutions in the payment chain information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds from $3,000 to $250 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States. The proposed rule would also clarify the meaning of ‘‘money,’’ making more clear the transactions in relation to which financial institutions must comply with the Recordkeeping Rule and the Travel Rule. Since FinCEN has authority to implement the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule with respect to all respondents, FinCEN will be responsible for the entire paperwork burden associated with this information collection. i. Threshold Changes to the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules This proposed rule would reduce from $3,000 to $250 the threshold for the requirement to collect, retain, and transmit information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States. This threshold change is necessary because funds transfers and transmittals of funds related to terrorist financing, drug trafficking, and other crimes often occur well below the current threshold. It therefore would benefit law enforcement for this additional financial information to be collected, retained, and transmitted by financial institutions. 1. 31 CFR 1010.410(e) This proposed rule would reduce the threshold for the requirement to collect and retain information on transmittals of funds conducted by nonbank financial institutions that begin or end outside the United States. Description of Recordkeepers: Financial institutions other than banks that conduct transmittals of funds in an amount between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end outside the United States. PO 00000 Frm 00011 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 68015 Although the proposed rule on its face would apply to all nonbank financial institutions, because of the nature of the requirements contained therein, mostly money transmitters and other MSBs that conduct transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States would be impacted. Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 12,692 money transmitters. As of June 2020, there were 12,692 MSBs registered with FinCEN that indicated they were conducting money transmission. Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The estimated average burden hours would vary depending on the number of transmittals of funds conducted by a nonbank financial institution between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end outside the United States. Under OMB control number 1506–0058, FinCEN estimates that the recordkeeping burden per recordkeeper to maintain records of all transmittals of funds of $3,000 or more is 16 hours a year. FinCEN estimates that twice as many transmittals of funds conducted by nonbank financial institutions are between $250 and $3,000, and begin or end outside the United States, in comparison to all transmittals of funds over $3,000. For that reason, FinCEN estimates that the proposed rule would add an additional 32 hours of burden per recordkeeper a year.58 Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 406,144 hours. (12,692 money transmitters multiplied by 32 hours). 2. 31 CFR 1010.410(f) This proposed rule would reduce the threshold for the requirement to transmit information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds conducted by financial institutions acting as the transmitting financial institution or the intermediary financial institution in funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States. Description of Recordkeepers: Financial institutions, including banks and credit unions, that are the transmitting or intermediary financial institution in a transmittal of funds in an amount between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end outside the United States. Although the proposed rule on its face would apply to all financial institutions, because of the nature of the requirements contained therein, only 58 FinCEN estimates that the costs of the Recordkeeping Rule scale linearly with the number of transactions, though there may well be economies of scale that reduce the burden. This observation applies to the other burden estimates in this section as well. E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 68016 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules banks, credit unions, money transmitters, and other MSBs that conduct transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States would be impacted. Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 23,234 financial institutions. FinCEN estimates that there are approximately 5,306 federally regulated banks and 5,236 federally regulated credit unions.59 As of June 2020, there were 12,692 MSBs registered with FinCEN that indicated they were conducting money transmission. Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The estimated average burden hours will vary depending on the number of transmittals of funds conducted by banks, credit unions, and money transmitters between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end outside the United States. Under OMB control number 1506–0058, FinCEN estimates that the recordkeeping burden per recordkeeper to transmit information relating to all transmittals of funds of $3,000 or more is 12 hours a year. FinCEN estimates that twice as many transmittals of funds conducted by banks, credit unions, and money transmitters are between $250 and $3,000, and begin or end outside the United States, in comparison to all transmittals of funds over $3,000. For that reason, FinCEN estimates that the proposed rule would add an additional 24 hours of burden per recordkeeper a year. Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 557,616 hours. (23,234 financial institutions multiplied by 24 hours). 3. 31 CFR 1020.410 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS This proposed rule would reduce the threshold for the requirement to collect and retain information on funds transfers conducted by a bank acting as the transmitting, intermediary, or recipient bank when the funds transfer begins or ends outside the United States. Description of Recordkeepers: Banks that are the originator’s bank, the intermediary bank, or the beneficiary’s bank with respect to funds transfers in an amount between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end outside the United States. 59 According to the FDIC there were 5,103 FDICinsured banks as of March 31, 2020. According to the Board, there were 203 other entities supervised by the Board or other Federal regulators, as of June 16, 2020, that fall within the definition of bank. (20 Edge Act institutions, 15 agreement corporations, and 168 foreign banking organizations). According to the National Credit Union Administration, there were 5,236 federally regulated credit unions as of December 31, 2019. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 10,542 banks and credit unions. FinCEN estimates that there are approximately 5,306 federally regulated banks and 5,236 federally regulated credit unions. Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The estimated average burden hours will vary depending on the number of funds transfers conducted by banks and credit unions between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end outside the United States. Under OMB control number 1506–0059, FinCEN estimates that the recordkeeping burden per recordkeeper to maintain records of all funds transfers of $3,000 or more is 100 hours a year. FinCEN estimates that on average twice as many funds transfers conducted by banks and credit unions are between $250 and $3,000 and begin or end outside the United States, in comparison to all transmittals of funds over $3,000. For that reason, FinCEN estimates that the proposed rule would add an additional 200 hours of burden per recordkeeper a year. Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 2,108,400 hours. (10,542 banks and credit unions multiplied by 200 hours). 4. Total Burden Resulting From Threshold Changes to the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules Total Estimated Annual Burden Increase Because of Threshold Reduction in the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules: 31 CFR 1010.410(e) [406,144 hours] + 31 CFR 1010.410(f) [557,616 hours] + 31 CFR 1020.410 [2,108,400 hours] = 3,072,160 hours. ii. Clarification of the Meaning of ‘‘Money’’ in the Recordkeeping Rule and the Travel Rule This proposed rule also would clarify the meaning of ‘‘money’’ as used in the Recordkeeping Rule and the Travel Rule. Specifically, the proposed rule would explicitly clarify that these rules apply to transactions involving (1) CVC, or (2) any digital asset having legal tender status. The clarification related to such transactions is necessary because many of these transactions present heightened terrorist financing, weapons proliferation, sanctions evasion, and money laundering risks due to their global nature, distributed structure, limited transparency, and speed. While these transactions pose some of the same risks as those made in traditional financial systems, in addition, a combination of features unique to CVC allows individual users to move value nearly instantaneously to anywhere in the world without ever having to pass through a regulated financial institution, PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 thus increasing such risks. Although the clarification is consistent with FinCEN’s interpretation of existing rules, the estimates below analyze the costs of compliance with this clarification against a baseline in which financial institutions are not complying with FinCEN’s interpretation of the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule for such transactions. 1. 31 CFR 1010.410(e) This proposed rule would explicitly include within the requirement to collect and retain information on transmittals of funds conducted by nonbank financial institutions transactions involving (1) CVC, or (2) any digital asset having legal tender status. Description of Recordkeepers: Financial institutions other than banks that conduct transmittals of funds involving CVCs or digital assets with legal tender status. Although the proposed rule on its face applies to all nonbank financial institutions, this provision would only impact money transmitters and other MSBs that conduct transmittals of funds involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender status. Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 530 money transmitters and other MSBs engaged in CVC transactions, which FinCEN assesses is a reasonable estimate of the number of MSBs engaging in transactions involving CVC. As of June 2020, there were 12,692 MSBs registered with FinCEN that indicated they were conducting money transmission. Of those 12,692 MSBs, FinCEN estimates that 530 engage in CVC transactions. The FinCEN MSB registration form does not require that companies disclose whether they engage in CVC transactions. This estimate is therefore based on adding the number of MSBs that indicated they engage in CVC transactions in an optional field on the MSB registration form, and the number that did not so indicate but which, based on FinCEN’s research, FinCEN believes engage in CVC transactions. FinCEN does not believe that any nonbank financial institutions currently facilitate transactions involving sovereign digital currencies. Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The estimated average burden hours will vary depending on the number of transmittals of funds conducted by a nonbank financial institution engaged in CVC transactions. Under OMB control number 1506–0058, FinCEN estimates that the recordkeeping burden per recordkeeper to maintain records of traditional transmittals of funds of E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules $3,000 or more is 16 hours a year. Above, FinCEN estimated that the additional burden from complying with the $250 threshold imposed by the proposed rule is 32 hours, for a total burden of 48 hours. Because of the large volume of CVC transactions, FinCEN estimates that a nonbank financial institution engaged in CVC transactions conducts five times as many transmittals of funds in CVC in comparison to the number of non-CVC transactions that will be conducted by MSBs as a result of the threshold change. For that reason, FinCEN estimates that the proposed rule would add an additional 240 hours of burden per recordkeeper a year (five multiplied by the new baseline of 48 hours), although this is a conservative estimate because the recordkeeping is likely less costly for transactions involving CVCs since it is likely to be electronic and possible to automate. Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 127,200 hours. (530 money transmitters and other MSBs engaged in CVC transactions multiplied by 240 hours). jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS 2. 31 CFR 1010.410(f) This proposed rule would explicitly include within the requirement to transmit information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds conducted by financial institutions acting as the transmittor’s financial institution or an intermediary financial institution, funds transfers and transmittals of funds transactions involving (1) CVC, or (2) any digital asset having legal tender status. Description of Recordkeepers: Financial institutions, including banks, that are the transmittor’s financial institution or an intermediary financial institution in a transmittal of funds involving CVCs or digital assets with legal tender status. Although the proposed rule on its face applies to all financial institutions, this provision would only impact financial institutions that conduct transmissions of funds involving such CVC. FinCEN does not believe that any financial institutions currently facilitate transactions involving sovereign digital currencies. Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 11,072 financial institutions. FinCEN estimates that there are approximately 5,306 federally regulated banks and 5,236 federally regulated credit unions. FinCEN assesses that all of these banks and credit unions engage in transactions involving CVCs. As assessed above, 530 MSBs engaged in CVC transactions and would be impacted by this rule (5,306 + 5,236 + 530 = 11,702). VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The estimated average burden hours will vary depending on the number of transmittals of funds conducted by banks, credit unions, and MSBs involving CVCs below the applicable threshold. Under OMB control number 1506–0058, FinCEN estimates that the recordkeeping burden per recordkeeper to transmit information relating to traditional transmittals of funds of $3,000 or more is 12 hours a year. FinCEN assessed above that the imposition of the $250 threshold for transactions that begin or end outside the United States adds an additional 24 hours of burden per recordkeeper a year, for a total of 36 hours of burden per recordkeeper. FinCEN understands that banks, including credit unions, currently engage in very few, if any, funds transfers involving CVCs. For that reason, FinCEN therefore estimates that the proposed rule would add only 1 additional hour of burden per bank recordkeeper a year. Because of the large volume of CVC transactions, FinCEN estimates that the 530 MSBs will process five times the volume of transmittals of funds involving CVC in comparison to the number of non-CVC transactions that will be conducted by MSBs as a result of the change in the threshold. For that reason, FinCEN estimates that the proposed rule would add an additional 180 hours of burden per nonbank recordkeeper a year (five multiplied by the new baseline of 36 hours). Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 95,400 hours (530 money transmitters and other MSBs engaged in CVC transactions multiplied by 180 hours per recordkeeper) plus 10,542 hours (10,542 banks and credit unions multiplied by 1 hour per recordkeeper), for a total additional annual burden of 105,942 hours. 3. 31 CFR 1020.410 This proposed rule would explicitly include transactions involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender status within the requirement to collect and retain information on funds transfers conducted by banks acting as the originator’s bank, intermediary bank, or beneficiary’s bank. Description of Recordkeepers: Banks that are the originator’s bank, the intermediary bank, or the beneficiary’s bank with respect to funds transfers involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender status. Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 10,542 banks and credit unions. FinCEN estimates that there are approximately PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 68017 5,306 federally regulated banks and 5,236 federally regulated credit unions. Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The estimated average burden hours will vary depending on the number of funds transfers involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender status conducted by banks and credit unions. Under OMB control number 1506–0059, FinCEN estimates that the recordkeeping burden per recordkeeper to maintain records of funds transfers of $3,000 or more is 100 hours a year. FinCEN understands that banks, including credit unions, currently engage in very few, if any, funds transfers involving CVC. FinCEN does not believe that any banks currently facilitate transactions involving sovereign digital currencies. For that reason, FinCEN therefore estimates that the proposed rule would add only 1 additional hour of burden per bank or credit union recordkeeper a year. Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 10,542 hours. (10,542 banks and credit unions multiplied by 1 hour). 4. Total Burden Resulting From Inclusion of CVC Transactions in the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules Total Estimated Annual Burden Increase Because of Inclusion of CVC Transactions in the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules: 31 CFR 1010.410(e) [127,200 hours] + 31 CFR 1010.410(f) [105,942 hours] + 31 CFR 1020.410 [10,542 hours] = 243,684 hours. iii. Total Annual Burden Hours Estimate as a Result of This Proposed Rule 3,072,160 hours (lower threshold) + 243,684 hours (CVC transactions) = 3,315,844 hours. The current estimated total burden hours for OMB control number 1506– 0058 is 2,150,200 hours. 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f) are both included in OMB control number 1506–0058. The total estimated increase in burden hours as a result of this proposed rulemaking for this control number is 1,196,902 hours. (533,344 hours (31 CFR 1010.410(e)) + 663,558 hours (31 CFR 1010.410(f)).60 The new estimated total burden hours for OMB control number 1506–0058 would be 3,347,102 hours. The current estimated total burden hours for OMB control number 1506– 0059 is 2,290,000 hours. 31 CFR 1020.410 is included in OMB control number 1506–0059. The total estimated 60 This estimated increase is further broken down as follows: 31 CFR 1010.410(e) (threshold changes 406,144 + CVC transactions 127,200 = 533,344), and 31 CFR 1010.410(f) (threshold changes 557,616 + CVC transactions 105,942 = 663,558). E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 68018 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules increase in burden hours as a result of this proposed rulemaking for this control number is 2,118,942 hours. (2,108,400 threshold change + 10,542 CVC transactions). The new estimated total burden hours for OMB control number 1506–0059 would be 4,408,942 hours. iv. Questions for Comment In addition to the questions listed above, FinCEN specifically invites comment on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of FinCEN, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the estimated burden associated with the proposed collection of information; (c) how the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected may be enhanced; and (d) how the burden of complying with the proposed collection of information may be minimized, including through the application of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. List of Subjects in 31 CFR Parts 1010 and 1020 Administrative practice and procedure, Banks, Banking, Currency, Foreign banking, Foreign currencies, Investigations, Penalties, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Terrorism. For the reasons set forth in the preamble, Parts 1010 and 1020 of Chapter X of Title 31 of the Code of Federal Regulations are proposed to be amended as follows: PART 1010—GENERAL PROVISIONS 1. The authority citation for part 1010 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 12 U.S.C. 1829b and 1951–1959; 31 U.S.C. 5311–5314 and 5316–5332; Title III, sec. 314, Pub. L. 107–56, 115 Stat. 307; sec. 701, Pub. L. 114–74, 129 Stat. 599. 2. In § 1010.100, revise paragraphs (ll) and (eee) to read as follows: ■ § 1010.100 General definitions. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS * * * * * (ll) Payment order. (1) An instruction of a sender to a receiving bank, transmitted orally, electronically, or in writing, to pay, or to cause another bank or foreign bank to pay, a fixed or determinable amount of money to a beneficiary if: (i) The instruction does not state a condition to payment to the beneficiary other than time of payment; (ii) The receiving bank is to be reimbursed by debiting an account of, or otherwise receiving payment from, the sender; and VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 (iii) The instruction is transmitted by the sender directly to the receiving bank or to an agent, funds transfer system, or communication system for transmittal to the receiving bank. (2) For purposes of this paragraph (ll), money means: (i) A medium of exchange currently authorized or adopted by a domestic or foreign government, including any digital asset that has legal tender status in any jurisdiction. The term includes a monetary unit of account established by an intragovernmental organization or by agreement between two or more countries; or (ii) A convertible virtual currency. (3) For purposes of this paragraph (ll), convertible virtual currency means a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that either has an equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for currency, but lacks legal tender status. * * * * * (eee) Transmittal order. (1) The term transmittal order includes a payment order and is an instruction of a sender to a receiving financial institution, transmitted orally, electronically, or in writing, to pay, or cause another financial institution or foreign financial agency to pay, a fixed or determinable amount of money to a recipient if: (i) The instruction does not state a condition to payment to the recipient other than time of payment; (ii) The receiving financial institution is to be reimbursed by debiting an account of, or otherwise receiving payment from, the sender; and (iii) The instruction is transmitted by the sender directly to the receiving financial institution or to an agent or communication system for transmittal to the receiving financial institution. (2) For purposes of this paragraph (eee), the term ‘‘money’’ means: (i) A medium of exchange currently authorized or adopted by a domestic or foreign government, including any digital asset that has legal tender status in any jurisdiction. The term includes a monetary unit of account established by an intragovernmental organization or by agreement between two or more countries; or (ii) A convertible virtual currency. (3) For purposes of this paragraph (eee), convertible virtual currency means a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that either has an equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for currency, but lacks legal tender status. * * * * * ■ 3. In § 1010.410, revise the introductory text of paragraphs (e) and (f) to read as follows: PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 § 1010.410 Records to be made and retained by financial institutions. * * * * * (e) Nonbank financial institutions. Each agent, agency, branch, or office located within the United States of a financial institution other than a bank is subject to the requirements of this paragraph (e) with respect to a transmittal of funds in the amount of $3,000 or more. A financial institution other than a bank also is subject to the requirements of this paragraph (e) with respect to a transmittal of funds in the amount of $250 or more that begins or ends outside the United States. For purposes of this paragraph (e), a transmittal of funds will be considered to begin or end outside the United States if a financial institution other than a bank knows or has reason to know that the transmittor, transmittor’s financial institution, recipient, or recipient’s financial institution is located in, is ordinarily resident in, or is organized under the laws of a jurisdiction other than the United States or a jurisdiction within the United States. * * * * * (f) Any transmittor’s financial institution or intermediary financial institution located within the United States shall include in any transmittal order for a transmittal of funds in the amount of $3,000 or more, information as required in this paragraph (f). A financial institution also is subject to the requirements of this paragraph (f) with respect to a transmittal of funds in the amount of $250 or more that begins or ends outside the United States. For purposes of this paragraph (f), a transmittal of funds will be considered to begin or end outside the United States if a financial institution knows or has reason to know that the transmittor, transmittor’s financial institution, recipient, or recipient’s financial institution is located in, is ordinarily resident in, or is organized under the laws of a jurisdiction other than the United States or a jurisdiction within the United States. * * * * * PART 1020—RULES FOR BANKS 4. The authority citation for part 1020 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 12 U.S.C. 1829b and 1951–1959; 31 U.S.C. 5311–5314 and 5316–5332; title III, sec. 314, Pub. L. 107–56, 115 Stat. 307; sec. 701, Pub. L. 114–74, 129 Stat. 599. 5. In § 1020.410, revise the introductory text of paragraph (a) to read as follows: ■ E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 208 / Tuesday, October 27, 2020 / Proposed Rules § 1020.410 Records to be made and retained by banks. (a) Each agent, agency, branch, or office located within the United States of a bank is subject the requirements of this paragraph (a) with respect to a funds transfer in the amount of $3,000 or more. A bank also is subject to the requirements of this paragraph (a) with respect to a funds transfer in the amount of $250 or more that begins or ends outside the United States. For purposes of this paragraph, a funds transfer will be considered to begin or end outside the United States if a bank knows or has reason to know that the originator, originator’s bank, beneficiary, or beneficiary’s bank is located in, is ordinarily resident in, or is organized under the laws of a jurisdiction other than the United States or a jurisdiction within the United States. For funds transfers subject to the requirements of this paragraph (a), each agent, agency, branch, or office located within the United States of a bank is required to retain either the original or a copy or reproduction of each of the following: * * * * * In concurrence: By the Department of the Treasury. Michael G. Mosier, Deputy Director, Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. By order of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Ann Misback, Secretary of the Board. [FR Doc. 2020–23756 Filed 10–23–20; 11:15 am] BILLING CODE 4810–02–P; 6210–01–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 [Docket No. USCG–2020–0513] RIN 1625–AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; River Rouge, Detroit, MI Coast Guard, DHS Notice of proposed rulemaking. AGENCY: ACTION: The Coast Guard proposes to modify the operating schedule that governs the National Steel Corporation Railroad Bridge, mile 0.40, the Delray Connecting Railroad Bridge, mile 0.34, and the Delray Connecting Railroad Bridge, mile 0.80. Delray Connecting Railroad Company, the owner and operator of these three bridges, has requested to stop continual drawtender jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:08 Oct 26, 2020 Jkt 253001 68019 CFR Code of Federal Regulations DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register IGLD85 International Great Lakes Datum of 1985 LWD Low Water Datum based on IGLD85 OMB Office of Management and Budget NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (Advance, Supplemental) § Section U.S.C. United States Code bends through the area that is referred to as the Old Channel before emptying into the Detroit River. In 1888 the Zug Island Improvement Company cut a channel through the south section of Zug Island locally called the Short Cut Channel creating Zug Island and allowing vessels to bypass the two ninety-degree bends in the Old Channel. This Short Cut Channel is the preferred path for large vessels. Currently the waterway is used by large commercial freighters and several tug and barge vessels. Recreational use of the waterway is very limited. There are twelve bridges across the River Rouge. The National Steel Corporation Railroad Bridge, mile 0.40, is a single leaf bascule bridge, that provides an unlimited clearance in the open position and a vertical clearance of six feet above LWD in the closed position. The Delray Connecting Railroad Bridge, mile 0.34, is a single leaf bascule bridge, that provides an unlimited clearance in the open position and a vertical clearance of seven feet above LWD in the closed position. The Delray Connecting Railroad Bridge, mile 0.80, is a swing bridge that provides an unlimited clearance in the open position and a vertical clearance of seven feet above LWD in the closed position. All three bridges are owned by the Delray Connecting Railroad who is requesting the change. II. Background, Purpose and Legal Basis The Delray Connecting Railroad requested to reduce drawtender staffing at their three bridges at Zug Island. The National Steel Corporation Railroad Bridge, mile 0.40, the Delray Connecting Railroad Bridge, mile 0.34, and the Delray Connecting Railroad Bridge, mile 0.80, currently open on signal and are required to be manned by a drawtender at each bridge. The reason for the request to stop continual drawtender service is that the primary customer, a steel mill on Zug Island, has been placed into caretaker status, significantly decreasing the rail traffic across these bridges. The operation of the bridges should however remain transparent to the vessels navigating the waterway. The River Rouge is a commercial waterway that serves several heavy industries near the city of Detroit, MI. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are currently improving the width and depth of the Rouge River, where both the swing and the bascule Delray Bridges are located. Originally, the River Rouge navigated two ninety-degree III. Discussion of Proposed Rule The proposed rule will establish the procedures to move the bridge to allow rail traffic to cross the bridge while giving notice to the vessels transiting the waterway that the bridge will be lowering. Ten minutes before the bridge is lowered for train traffic a crewmember from the train will initiate a SECURITE call on VHF–FM Marine Channel 16 that the bridge will be lowering for train traffic and invite any concerned mariners to contact the drawtender on VHF–FM Marine Channel 12. The drawtender will also visually monitor for vessel traffic and listen for the standard bridge opening signal of one prolonged blast and one short blast from vessels already transiting the waterway. After the ten minute warning, one last SECURITE call will be made that the bridge will be lowering for rail traffic five minutes before lowering. Once the drawtender is satisfied that it is safe the bridge will be lowered for rail traffic. Once the rail traffic has cleared the bridge, the bridge will be raised and locked in the fully open to navigation position. The Delray Connecting Railroad Bridge, mile 0.34, has had limited requests for openings and provides service and to operate the two bridges only while trains are crossing the bridge, and one bridge upon signal if a 4-hour advance notice is received. DATES: Comments and related material must reach the Coast Guard on or before December 28, 2020. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by docket number USCG– 2020–0513 using Federal e-Rulemaking Portal at https://www.regulations.gov. See the ‘‘Public Participation and Request for Comments’’ portion of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below for instructions on submitting comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions on this proposed rule, call or email: Mr. Lee D. Soule, Bridge Management Specialist, Ninth Coast Guard District; telephone 216– 902–6085, email Lee.D.Soule@uscg.mil. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Table of Abbreviations PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 E:\FR\FM\27OCP1.SGM 27OCP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 208 (Tuesday, October 27, 2020)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 68005-68019]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-23756]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

31 CFR Parts 1010 and 1020

[Docket No. FINCEN-2020-0002 ; RIN 1506-AB41]


Threshold for the Requirement To Collect, Retain, and Transmit 
Information on Funds Transfers and Transmittals of Funds That Begin or 
End Outside the United States, and Clarification of the Requirement To 
Collect, Retain, and Transmit Information on Transactions Involving 
Convertible Virtual Currencies and Digital Assets With Legal Tender 
Status

AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (``Board''); 
Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (``FinCEN''), Treasury.

ACTION: Joint notice of proposed rulemaking.

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SUMMARY: The Board and FinCEN (collectively, the ``Agencies'') are 
issuing this proposed rule to modify the threshold in the rule 
implementing the

[[Page 68006]]

Bank Secrecy Act (``BSA'') requiring financial institutions to collect 
and retain information on certain funds transfers and transmittals of 
funds. The proposed modification would reduce this threshold from 
$3,000 to $250 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin 
or end outside the United States. FinCEN is likewise proposing to 
reduce from $3,000 to $250 the threshold in the rule requiring 
financial institutions to transmit to other financial institutions in 
the payment chain information on funds transfers and transmittals of 
funds that begin or end outside the United States. The Agencies are 
also proposing to clarify the meaning of ``money'' as used in these 
same rules to ensure that the rules apply to domestic and cross-border 
transactions involving convertible virtual currency (``CVC''), which is 
a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that either has an 
equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for currency, but 
lacks legal tender status. The Agencies further propose to clarify that 
these rules apply to domestic and cross-border transactions involving 
digital assets that have legal tender status.

DATES: Written comments on this proposed rule may be submitted on or 
before November 27, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Comments may be submitted by any of the following methods:
    Board: You may submit comments, identified by Docket No. R-1726; 
RIN 7100-AF97, by any of the following methods:
     Agency website: http://www.federalreserve.gov. Follow the 
instructions for submitting comments at http://www.federalreserve.gov/generalinfo/foia/ProposedRegs.cfm.
     Email: [email protected]. Include docket 
and RIN numbers in the subject line of the message.
     Fax: (202) 452-3819 or (202) 452-3102.
     Mail: Ann E. Misback, Secretary, Board of Governors of the 
Federal Reserve System, 20th Street and Constitution Avenue NW, 
Washington, DC 20551.
    All public comments will be made available on the Board's website 
at http://www.federalreserve.gov/generalinfo/foia/ProposedRegs.cfm as 
submitted, unless modified for technical reasons or to remove 
personally identifiable information at the commenter's request. 
Accordingly, comments will not be edited to remove any identifying or 
contact information. Public comments may also be viewed electronically 
or in paper in Room 146, 1709 New York Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20006, 
between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on weekdays. For security reasons, the 
Board requires that visitors make an appointment to inspect comments. 
You may do so by calling (202) 452-3684.
    FinCEN:
     Federal E-rulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. 
Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Refer to Docket Number 
FINCEN-2020-0002 and the specific RIN number 1506-AB41 the comment 
applies to.
     Mail: Policy Division, Financial Crimes Enforcement 
Network, P.O. Box 39, Vienna, VA 22183. Refer to Docket Number FINCEN-
2020-0002 and the specific RIN number.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: 
    Board: Jason Gonzalez, Assistant General Counsel (202) 452-3275 or 
Evan Winerman, Senior Counsel (202) 872-7578, Legal Division, Board of 
Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 20th Street and Constitution 
Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20551. Users of Telecommunication Device for 
Deaf (TDD) only, call (202) 263-4869.
    FinCEN: The FinCEN Regulatory Support Section at 1-800-767-2825 or 
electronically at [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

A. Statutory and Regulatory Background

    The Currency and Foreign Transactions Reporting Act of 1970, as 
amended by the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing 
Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 
2001 (``USA PATRIOT Act'') (Pub. L. 107-56) and other legislation, is 
the legislative framework commonly referred to as the BSA. The 
Secretary of the Treasury (``Secretary'') has delegated to the Director 
of FinCEN (``Director'') the authority to implement, administer, and 
enforce compliance with the BSA and associated regulations.\1\ Pursuant 
to this authority, FinCEN may require financial institutions to keep 
records and file reports that the Director determines have a high 
degree of usefulness in criminal, tax, or regulatory investigations or 
proceedings, or in intelligence or counterintelligence matters to 
protect against international terrorism.\2\
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    \1\ Treasury Order 180-01 (Jan. 14, 2020).
    \2\ 31 U.S.C. 5311.
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    The Annunzio-Wylie Anti-Money Laundering Act of 1992 (Pub. L. 102-
550) (``Annunzio-Wylie'') amended the BSA framework. Annunzio-Wylie 
authorizes the Secretary and the Board to jointly issue regulations 
requiring insured depository institutions to maintain records of 
domestic funds transfers.\3\ The Secretary, but not the Board, is 
authorized to promulgate recordkeeping requirements for domestic wire 
transfers by nonbank financial institutions.\4\ In addition, Annunzio-
Wylie authorizes the Secretary and the Board, after consultation with 
state banking supervisors, to jointly issue regulations requiring 
insured depository institutions and certain nonbank financial 
institutions to maintain records of international funds transfers and 
transmittals of funds.\5\ Annunzio-Wylie requires the Secretary and the 
Board, in issuing regulations for international funds transfers and 
transmittals of funds, to consider the usefulness of the records in 
criminal, tax, or regulatory investigations or proceedings, and the 
effect of the regulations on the cost and efficiency of the payments 
system.\6\ FinCEN can continually monitor the benefits of such 
regulations through its extensive liaison activity with federal and 
state law enforcement and financial regulatory entities, and the Board 
can assess costs through its regulatory oversight of financial 
institutions under its jurisdiction.
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    \3\ 12 U.S.C. 1829b(b)(2).
    \4\ 12 U.S.C. 1953.
    \5\ 12 U.S.C. 1829b(b)(3). The terms ``funds transfer,'' 
``originator,'' ``beneficiary,'' and ``payment order'' apply only in 
the context of banks. The term ``transmittal of funds'' includes a 
funds transfer and its counterpart in the context of nonbank 
financial institutions. See 31 CFR 1010.100(ddd). Transmittors, 
recipients, and transmittal orders in the context of nonbank 
financial institutions play the same role as originators, 
beneficiaries, and payment orders in the context of banks.
    \6\ 12 U.S.C. 1829b(b)(3).
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    On January 3, 1995, the Agencies jointly issued a recordkeeping 
rule (the ``Recordkeeping Rule'') that requires banks and nonbank 
financial institutions to collect and retain information related to 
funds transfers and transmittals of funds in amounts of $3,000 or 
more.\7\ The Recordkeeping Rule is intended to help law enforcement and 
regulatory authorities

[[Page 68007]]

detect, investigate, and prosecute money laundering, and other 
financial crimes by preserving an information trail about persons 
sending and receiving funds through the funds transfer system.
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    \7\ 60 FR 220 (Jan. 3, 1995). Through a separate rulemaking, the 
Board added on January 3, 1995 a new subpart B to 12 CFR part 219 
(Regulation S), which cross-references the substantive requirements 
in the Recordkeeping Rule. See 60 FR 231-01 (Jan. 3, 1995). As noted 
above, the Board (unlike FinCEN) is not authorized to promulgate 
recordkeeping requirements for domestic wire transfers by nonbank 
financial institutions. Accordingly, for purposes of Regulation S, 
the provisions of the Recordkeeping Rule with respect to nonbank 
financial institutions apply only to international transmittals of 
funds. 12 CFR 219.23(b).
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    At the same time, FinCEN issued a separate rule--the ``Travel 
Rule''--that requires banks and nonbank financial institutions to 
transmit information on certain funds transfers and transmittals of 
funds to other banks or nonbank financial institutions participating in 
the transfer or transmittal.\8\ The Travel Rule and the Recordkeeping 
Rule complement each other: Generally, as noted below, the 
Recordkeeping Rule requires financial institutions to collect and 
retain the information that, under the Travel Rule, must be included 
with transmittal orders, although the Recordkeeping Rule also has other 
applications apart from ensuring that information is available to 
include with funds transfers. FinCEN issued the Travel Rule pursuant to 
statutory authority that permits the Treasury to require domestic 
financial institutions or nonfinancial trades or businesses to maintain 
appropriate procedures to ensure compliance with the BSA or to guard 
against money laundering, and to establish anti-money laundering 
programs.\9\
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    \8\ 60 FR 234 (Jan. 3, 1995).
    \9\ Id.; see also 31 U.S.C. 5218(a)(2) and (h).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This proposed rule would amend both the Recordkeeping Rule and the 
Travel Rule. The Recordkeeping Rule is codified at 31 CFR 1020.410(a) 
and 1010.410(e) \10\ and the Travel Rule is codified at 31 CFR 
1010.410(f).\11\ Consistent with its rulemaking authority in the BSA, 
as amended by Annunzio-Wylie, the Board is proposing the amendments to 
Sec.  1010.100(ll) and Sec.  1020.410(a) only to the extent the 
amendments apply to funds transfers by insured depository institutions, 
and is proposing the amendments to Sec.  1010.100(eee) and Sec.  
1010.410(e) only to the extent the amendments would apply to 
international transmittals of funds by financial institutions other 
than insured depository institutions. Because the Board's Regulation S 
generally cross-references those portions of the Recordkeeping Rule 
promulgated jointly by the Board and FinCEN, it is unnecessary to 
propose conforming amendments to Regulation S.
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    \10\ As explained in n. 6, supra, the Board separately 
promulgated subpart B to Regulation S, which cross-references the 
requirements of 31 CFR 1020.410(a) and 1010.410(e).
    \11\ Recordkeeping requirements for banks are set forth in 31 
CFR 1020.410(a). Recordkeeping requirements for nonbank financial 
institutions are set forth in 31 CFR 1010.410(e). The Travel Rule--
codified at 31 CFR 1010.410(f)--applies by its terms to both bank 
and nonbank financial institutions.
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B. Information Required To Be Collected, Retained, and Transmitted 
Under the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules

    The Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule collectively require banks 
and nonbank financial institutions to collect, retain, and transmit 
information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds in amounts of 
$3,000 or more.
    Under the Recordkeeping Rule, the originator's bank or 
transmittor's financial institution must collect and retain the 
following information: (a) Name and address of the originator or 
transmittor; (b) the amount of the payment or transmittal order; (c) 
the execution date of the payment or transmittal order; (d) any payment 
instructions received from the originator or transmittor with the 
payment or transmittal order; and (e) the identity of the beneficiary's 
bank or recipient's financial institution. In addition, the 
originator's bank or transmittor's financial institution must retain 
the following information if it receives that information from the 
originator or transmittor: (a) Name and address of the beneficiary or 
recipient; (b) account number of the beneficiary or recipient; and (c) 
any other specific identifier of the beneficiary or recipient. The 
originator's bank or transmittor's financial institution is required to 
verify the identity of the person placing a payment or transmittal 
order if the order is made in person and the person placing the order 
is not an established customer.\12\ Similarly, should the beneficiary's 
bank or recipient's financial institution deliver the proceeds to the 
beneficiary or recipient in person, the bank or nonbank financial 
institution must verify the identity of the beneficiary or recipient--
and collect and retain various items of information identifying the 
beneficiary or recipient--if the beneficiary or recipient is not an 
established customer. Finally, an intermediary bank or financial 
institution--and the beneficiary's bank or recipient's financial 
institution--must retain originals or copies of payment or transmittal 
orders.
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    \12\ The term ``established customer'' is defined at 31 CFR 
1010.100(p).
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    Under the Travel Rule, the originator's bank or transmittor's 
financial institution is required to include information, including all 
information required under the Recordkeeping Rule, in a payment or 
transmittal order sent by the bank or nonbank financial institution to 
another bank or nonbank financial institution in the payment chain. An 
intermediary bank or financial institution is also required to transmit 
this information to other banks or nonbank financial institutions in 
the payment chain, to the extent the information is received by the 
intermediary bank or financial institution.

II. Lowering of Threshold From $3,000 to $250 for Funds Transfers and 
Transmittals of Funds by Financial Institutions That Begin or End 
Outside the United States

    The existing requirements in 31 CFR 1020.410(a) and 31 CFR 
1010.410(e) and (f) to collect, retain, and transmit information on 
funds transfers and transmittals of funds currently apply only to funds 
transfers and transmittals of funds in amounts of $3,000 or more. The 
Agencies are proposing to lower the threshold under the Recordkeeping 
Rule, and FinCEN is proposing to lower the threshold under the Travel 
Rule, to $250 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin 
or end outside the United States.\13\ In proposing these modifications, 
the Agencies considered the usefulness of transaction information 
associated with smaller-value cross-border transfers and transmittals 
of funds in criminal, tax, or regulatory investigations or proceedings, 
and in intelligence or counterintelligence activities to protect 
against international terrorism, as well as the effect on the payments 
system of requiring information collection and retention for these 
transactions. The following two sections lay out, respectively, (A) the 
potential benefits to national security and law enforcement from 
reducing the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule thresholds for funds 
transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the 
United States, and (B) the potential effect these new requirements 
would have on the cost and efficiency of the payments system.
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    \13\ The ``United States'' includes the States of the United 
States, the District of Columbia, the Indian lands (as that term is 
defined in the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act), and the Territories 
and Insular Possessions of the United States. 31 CFR 1010.100(hhh).
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A. Benefit to National Security and Law Enforcement

    Information available to the Agencies indicates that malign actors 
are using smaller-value cross-border wire transfers to facilitate or 
commit terrorist financing, narcotics trafficking, and other illicit 
activity, and that increased recordkeeping and reporting concerning 
these transactions would be valuable to

[[Page 68008]]

law enforcement and national security authorities. In proposing to 
lower the current threshold under the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules, 
the Agencies have specifically considered Suspicious Activity Reports 
(``SARs'') filed by money transmitters, which indicate that a 
substantial volume of potentially illicit funds transfers and 
transmittals of funds occur below the $3,000 threshold; evidence used 
in recent criminal prosecutions; and the views of law enforcement 
partners and the Financial Action Task Force (``FATF'') \14\ on the 
utility of mandating information collection for smaller-value wire 
transfers.
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    \14\ The FATF is an international, inter-governmental task force 
whose purpose is the development and promotion of international 
standards and the effective implementation of legal, regulatory, and 
operational measures to combat money laundering, terrorist 
financing, the financing of proliferation, and other related threats 
to the integrity of the international financial system.
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    First, FinCEN analyzed data derived from approximately 2,000 SARs 
filed by money transmitters between 2016 and 2019 related to potential 
terrorist financing-related transmittals of funds.\15\ These SARs 
referenced approximately 1.29 million underlying transmittals of funds, 
approximately 99 percent of which began or ended outside the United 
States (only approximately 17,000 of the approximately 1.29 million 
transactions included within its terrorist-financing analysis dataset 
involved domestic-only transactions). The mean and median dollar-value 
of transmittals of funds mentioned in those SARs were approximately 
$509 and $255, respectively. Approximately 71 percent of those 1.29 
million transmittals (more than 916,000) were at or below $500, 
totaling more than $179 million. Approximately 57 percent of those 
transmittals (more than 728,000) were at or below $300, totaling more 
than $103 million. As noted in the 2015 National Terrorism Finance Risk 
Assessment, terrorist financiers and facilitators are creative and will 
seek to exploit vulnerabilities in the financial system to further 
their unlawful aims, including, as the above analysis indicates, 
through the use of low-dollar transactions.\16\
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    \15\ FinCEN determined that these SARs were potentially related 
to terrorist financing based on the application of certain search 
terms and analytic methods developed by FinCEN. FinCEN shared its 
analysis with law enforcement. FinCEN is aware, based on feedback 
from domestic and foreign law enforcement partners, that those 
partners have used information contained in terrorism-related SARs 
in their investigations.
    \16\ See Dep't of the Treasury, 2015 National Terrorism Finance 
Risk Assessment, at 2 (June 2015), https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/terrorist-illicit-finance/Documents/National%20Terrorist%20Financing%20Risk%20Assessment%20-%2006-12-2015.pdf.
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    FinCEN also reviewed a separate subset of 363 SARs filed by a money 
transmitter for the period between 2012 and 2018 that FinCEN determined 
to be potentially related to fentanyl trafficking.\17\ These SARs 
referenced approximately 78,000 transmittals of funds, over 82% of 
which began or ended outside the United States. The mean and median 
dollar-value of transmittals of funds mentioned in these SARs were 
approximately $588 and $283, respectively. Approximately 67 percent of 
those 78,000 transmittals (more than 52,000) were at or below $500, 
totaling more than $10 million. Approximately 52 percent of those 
transmittals (more than 40,000) were at or below $300, totaling more 
than $5.7 million.
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    \17\ FinCEN determined that these SARs were potentially related 
to fentanyl trafficking based on the application of certain search 
terms and analytic methods developed by FinCEN, including through 
FinCEN's work with law enforcement. FinCEN shared its analysis with 
law enforcement.
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    In the 1995 rulemaking implementing the Travel Rule, the Treasury 
noted that it would monitor the effectiveness of financial 
institutions' suspicious transaction reporting protocols to determine 
whether potentially illicit transactions below the $3,000 threshold 
were being reported (and thus whether it might be unnecessary, from a 
law enforcement perspective, to lower the threshold).\18\ FinCEN has 
been able to analyze some records of transmittals of funds below 
$3,000, as noted above, because money transmitters have retained 
records for those transmittals of funds after recognizing the 
underlying activity as suspicious. However, the Agencies believe that 
lowering the threshold to capture smaller-value cross-border funds 
transfers and transmittals of funds would be valuable for law 
enforcement and national security authorities, despite financial 
institutions' suspicious activity reporting programs, because some 
financial institutions may not recognize or retain records for all 
suspicious activity below the $3,000 threshold or the suspicious 
pattern may not become clear until the records are aggregated. This 
could inhibit law enforcement from promptly investigating and mapping 
illicit networks.
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    \18\ 60 FR 234, 236 (Jan. 3, 1995).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Second, recent prosecutions show that individuals are sending and 
receiving funds to finance terrorist activity in amounts below (and in 
some cases, well below) the current $3,000 recordkeeping threshold. 
Those cases involved persons providing material support for terrorist 
activity to a designated Foreign Terrorist Organization (``FTO''). In 
one such case, during 2013, the defendant allegedly sent $1,500 to a 
co-defendant's financial account within the United States; the co-
defendant was collecting money from his co-conspirators in support of 
an FTO fighter in Syria, ultimately transmitting those funds through 
money remitting businesses and intermediaries overseas.\19\ In another 
case, a man was prosecuted for meeting with an FTO recruiter in 2015, 
wiring funds in the amount of $250 to an FTO, and attempting to leave 
the United States with the intent of joining the FTO in Libya.\20\ 
Another example of small dollar funds transfers made in support of 
terrorism involved an individual in the United States who received 
several cash transfers in 2015 from FTO affiliates, totaling about 
$8,700 and sent primarily in sums of less than $3,000.\21\ One such 
transfer in 2016 was from a person located in Egypt, in the amount of 
$1,000, and sent through a U.S. money transmitter.\22\ The subject 
later admitted to law enforcement that the money was to be used to 
finance a terrorist attack in the United States, and the subject was 
subsequently convicted of providing material support to an FTO.\23\
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    \19\ See United States v. Harcevic, 2015 WL 1821509, at *1 (E.D. 
Mo. Apr. 21, 2015); United States v. Hodzic, 2016 WL 11578530, at *1 
(E.D. Mo. Aug. 22, 2016), report and recommendation adopted, 355 F. 
Supp. 3d 825 (E.D. Mo. 2019); see also Press Release, Department of 
Justice, ``Missouri Man Pleads Guilty to Providing Material Support 
to Terrorists,'' 2019 WL 1472565 (Apr. 3, 2019).
    \20\ See Press Release, Department of Justice, ``Columbus Man 
Sentenced to 80 Months in Prison for Attempting to Provide Material 
Support to ISIS'' (July 6, 2019), https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdoh/pr/columbus-man-sentenced-80-months-prison-attempting-provide-material-support-isis; see also United States v Daniels, 2:2016-cr-
222 (ECF No. 7 at 2) (filed Nov. 10, 2016).
    \21\ See United States v. Elshinawy, No. CR ELH-16-009, 2018 WL 
1521876, at *17-18 (D. Md. Mar. 28, 2018), aff'd, 781 F. App'x 168 
(4th Cir. 2019).
    \22\ Id. at *17.
    \23\ Id. at *8.
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    Third, the Money Laundering and Asset Recovery Section (``MLARS'') 
of the Criminal Division of the Department of Justice (``DOJ'') has 
advised the Agencies that it supports lowering the dollar threshold for 
the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules. In 2006, MLARS (previously known as 
the Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section) submitted a public 
comment to the Agencies in response to an Advance Notice of Proposed 
Rulemaking (``2006 ANPRM'') in which the Agencies sought comments on 
lowering the thresholds of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules.\24\ 
MLARS's public comment included a

[[Page 68009]]

synthesis of comments from agents and prosecutors at several federal 
law enforcement agencies who use this information, including the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (``FBI''), the United States Drug 
Enforcement Administration (``DEA''), the Internal Revenue Service 
(``IRS''), the United States Secret Service (``USSS''), and U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement. While not the official comment of 
each such agency, the agents and prosecutors specializing in money 
laundering cases and who routinely use wire transfer information 
supported lowering or eliminating altogether the reporting threshold to 
disrupt illegal activity and increase its cost to the perpetrators. At 
the same time, MLARS identified two potential concerns--first, that 
some criminals would structure transactions to evade the lower 
threshold, and second, if such structuring occurred, those smaller 
dollar transactions would be difficult to distinguish from legitimate 
wire transfers. Ultimately, in spite of these concerns, MLARS supported 
a lower, uniform recordkeeping threshold.
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    \24\ 71 FR 119 (June 21, 2006).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    More recently, MLARS has advised the Agencies that it continues to 
support lowering the threshold, particularly if doing so would bring 
the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule in line with international 
standards (which are further described immediately below). MLARS 
indicated that its views apply equally to funds transfers by banks and 
transmittals of funds by nonbank financial institutions. The DEA, the 
IRS, and the USSS have similarly expressed support for lowering the 
reporting threshold for purposes of the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel 
Rule.
    Finally, the FATF has indicated that records of smaller-value 
transactions are valuable to law enforcement, particularly with respect 
to terrorist financing investigations.\25\ The FATF recommends that 
``basic information'' concerning the originator and beneficiary of wire 
transfers be immediately available to appropriate government 
authorities, including law enforcement and financial intelligence 
units, as well as to financial institutions participating in the 
transaction.\26\ For cross-border wire transfers, the FATF recommends 
that countries provide for the collection and transmission throughout 
the payment chain of the originator's name, account number, and 
address, and the name of the beneficiary and their account number.\27\ 
The FATF further states that countries may adopt a de minimis threshold 
of no higher than USD/EUR 1,000 for cross-border wire transfers, below 
which the name and account numbers of the originator and beneficiary 
should be collected and transmitted but need not be verified for 
accuracy unless there is a suspicion of money laundering or terrorist 
financing.\28\ The FATF recommends that countries minimize this and 
other thresholds to the extent practicable, after taking into account 
the risk of ``driving transactions underground'' and the ``importance 
of financial inclusion.'' \29\ The 1,000 USD/EUR de minimis cross-
border threshold specified in the FATF Recommendations has been adopted 
by the European Union and by the vast majority of jurisdictions around 
the world.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \25\ See Recommendation 16 and Interpretive Note to FATF 
Recommendation 16, International Standards on Combating Money 
Laundering and the Financing of Terrorism & Proliferation--The FATF 
Recommendations, at 15-16, 73-77 (June 2019), available at www.fatf-gafi.org/recommendations.html).
    \26\ See id. at 73 (Interpretive Note to FATF Recommendation 
16).
    \27\ See id.
    \28\ See id.
    \29\ See id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Accordingly, the Agencies believe that mandating the collection, 
retention, and transmission of information for funds transfers and 
transmittals of funds of at least $250 that originate or terminate 
outside the United States would likely lead to the preservation of 
information that would benefit law enforcement and national security 
investigations. Given the usefulness of this information and the 
potential that financial institutions may not correctly identify a 
transaction as suspicious, as noted previously, the Agencies believe 
that it is appropriate to propose lowering the threshold of the 
Recordkeeping Rule, and FinCEN concludes that it is appropriate to 
propose lowering the threshold of the Travel Rule, even though 
financial institutions are subject to SAR reporting requirements 
through which they may report certain of these smaller-value 
transactions that fall below the current threshold.

B. Effect on Financial Institutions and the Payments System

    The Agencies believe that the effect of lowering the $3,000 
threshold on financial institutions and on the cost and efficiency of 
the payments system is likely to be low. As demonstrated by the SARs 
described in the preceding section, some financial institutions are 
already collecting information on at least a portion of transactions 
taking place under the current threshold for purposes of reporting 
suspicious transactions to FinCEN. FinCEN is also aware that some 
financial institutions already collect information on the originator 
and beneficiary for transmittals below the $3,000 threshold for reasons 
separate from reporting suspicious transactions to FinCEN, for instance 
because it is cost-effective to maintain a single set of processes for 
all transactions..
    The Agencies note that in completing the 1995 rulemakings 
implementing the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules, and in obtaining 
comments from the industry in connection with the 2006 ANPRM, some 
financial institutions advised that they were already collecting 
information for smaller-value transmittals and that mandating 
recordkeeping requirements for such transactions would not have a 
material impact on the payment system. At the same time, other 
financial institutions expressed concern that imposing information 
collection requirements (especially for smaller-value transmittals) 
could increase regulatory compliance costs by mandating the use of new 
technologies and processes to collect the information, and that these 
costs could be passed on to consumers.
    In deciding on a threshold of $3,000 in 1995, the Agencies balanced 
the value of data on funds transfers and transmittals of funds with the 
burden that the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule imposed on both bank 
and nonbank financial institutions. The Agencies are proposing to lower 
the threshold because the current threshold may no longer represent the 
appropriate balance for transmittals originating or terminating outside 
the United States. As noted in the 2006 ANPRM, subsequent to 1995, the 
responsibilities of financial institutions under the BSA have expanded. 
For example, an MSB must now report suspicious transactions \30\ and 
implement anti-money laundering programs for ensuring compliance with 
the BSA.\31\ MSBs may collect and retain information on transmittals of 
funds as a means of ensuring compliance with the requirement to report 
suspicious transactions. The requirement for MSBs to report suspicious 
transactions likely means that reducing or eliminating the threshold 
for transmittals would impose less of an incremental cost. Further, the

[[Page 68010]]

Agencies note that technology has advanced significantly since the 
issuance of the 2006 ANPRM. Among other things, data storage costs have 
gone down, and accordingly it is likely that financial institutions 
generally use less expensive or more efficient means of electronic 
storage and retrieval. The Agencies believe there has been an increase 
in the ability of small institutions to rely on third-party vendors to 
reduce their costs of handling compliance with a revised threshold.
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    \30\ See 31 CFR 1022.320(a)-(f). The requirement applies to 
transactions occurring after December 31, 2001. The threshold for 
the requirement to report suspicious transactions is $2,000.
    \31\ See 31 CFR 1022.210(a)-(e). An MSB must implement the 
program on or before the later of July 24, 2002 and the end of the 
90-day period beginning on the day following the date the business 
is established.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

III. Application of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules to CVC and 
Digital Assets That Have Legal Tender Status

A. The Meaning of ``Money'' as Applicable to the Recordkeeping and 
Travel Rules

    The Recordkeeping Rule applies to funds transfers (i.e., 
transactions involving banks) and transmittals of funds (i.e., 
transactions involving nonbank financial institutions). The term 
``funds transfer'' is defined, as in Article 4A of the Uniform 
Commercial Code (``UCC''), to include ``[t]he series of transactions, 
beginning with the originator's payment order, made for the purpose of 
making payment to the beneficiary of the order.'' \32\ The 
Recordkeeping Rule in turn defines ``payment order'' similarly to the 
UCC Article 4A definition, stating that a payment order is ``[a]n 
instruction of a sender to a receiving bank . . . to pay, or to cause 
another bank or foreign bank to pay, a fixed or determinable amount of 
money to a beneficiary.'' \33\ (Emphasis added.)
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    \32\ 31 CFR 1010.100(w); see also U.C.C. 4A-104(a).
    \33\ 31 CFR 1010.100(ll); see also U.C.C. 4A-103(a)(1).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Recordkeeping Rule's definition of ``transmittal of funds'' 
parallels the UCC Article 4A definition of ``funds transfer,'' with 
minor adjustments that allow the definition to apply to nonbank 
financial institutions. Specifically, the Recordkeeping Rule defines 
transmittal of funds as ``[a] series of transactions beginning with the 
transmittor's transmittal order, made for the purpose of making payment 
to the recipient. . . .'' \34\ The Recordkeeping Rule's definition of 
``transmittal order'' in turn parallels the UCC Article 4A definition 
of payment order, stating that ``[t]he term transmittal order includes 
a payment order and is an instruction of a sender to a receiving 
financial institution . . . to pay, a fixed or determinable amount of 
money to a recipient . . . .'' \35\ (Emphasis added.)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \34\ 31 CFR 1010.100(ddd).
    \35\ 31 CFR 1010.100(eee).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Accordingly, funds transfers and transmittals of funds involve an 
instruction to pay a ``fixed or determinable amount of money.'' The 
Recordkeeping Rule does not explicitly define the word ``money.'' 
However, in the preamble to the Federal Register document adopting the 
Recordkeeping Rule, the Agencies explained that ``terms . . . that are 
not defined specifically in the regulation, but are defined in relevant 
provisions of the UCC, will have the meaning given them in the UCC, 
unless otherwise indicated.'' \36\ Under the UCC, the term ``money'' is 
defined as ``a medium of exchange currently authorized or adopted by a 
domestic or foreign government.'' \37\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \36\ 60 FR 220, 222 (Jan. 3, 1995).
    \37\ U.C.C. 1-201(b)(24) (2001); see also U.C.C. 4A-105(d) 
(2012) (stating that Article 1 general definitions are applicable 
throughout Article 4A).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In guidance issued in November 2010, FinCEN similarly explained 
that the Travel Rule ``uses terms that are intended to parallel those 
used in UCC Article 4A, but that are applicable to all financial 
institutions, as defined within the Bank Secrecy Act's implementing 
regulations.'' Similar to the Recordkeeping Rule, FinCEN's implementing 
regulations explain that a transmittal order ``includes a payment order 
and is an instruction of a sender to a receiving financial institution, 
transmitted orally, electronically, or in writing, to pay, or cause 
another financial institution or foreign financial agency to pay, a 
fixed or determinable amount of money to a recipient[.]'' \38\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \38\ 31 CFR 1010.100(eee).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

B. FinCEN's Prior Guidance on CVC, and This Proposed Rule's Further 
Clarification of the Definition of ``Money'' as Applicable to the 
Recordkeeping and Travel Rules

    Since the Agencies issued the Recordkeeping Rule, and FinCEN issued 
the Travel Rule, a number of CVCs, such as Bitcoin and Ethereum, have 
been created. CVC is a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that 
either has an equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for 
currency, but lacks legal tender status. Generally, CVCs can be 
exchanged instantaneously anywhere in the world through peer-to-peer 
payment systems (a distributed ledger) that allow any two parties to 
transact directly with each other without the need for an intermediary 
financial institution. However, in practice, many persons hold and 
transmit CVC using a third-party financial institution such as a 
``hosted wallet'' or an exchange.
    Public use of CVCs has grown significantly in recent years. 
Estimated transactions in Bitcoin alone were approximately $366 billion 
dollars in 2019 and $312 billion through in 2020 through August.\39\ 
Furthermore, the market capitalization of Bitcoin alone was 
approximately $216 billion as of August 2020.\40\
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    \39\ Estimates based on data from blockchain.com, https://www.blockchain.com/charts/estimated-transaction-volume-usd.
    \40\ See Coingecko, Top 100 Coins by Market Capitalization, 
https://www.coingecko.com/en.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Treasury, including FinCEN, has closely monitored illicit 
finance risks posed by CVCs. The Agencies note that malign actors have 
used CVCs to facilitate international terrorist financing, weapons 
proliferation, sanctions evasion, and transnational money laundering, 
as well as to buy and sell controlled substances, stolen and fraudulent 
identification documents and access devices, counterfeit goods, malware 
and other computer hacking tools, firearms, and toxic chemicals.\41\ 
For example, North Korean cyber actors, such as the Lazarus Group, have 
continuously engaged in efforts to steal and extort CVC as a means of 
generating and laundering large amounts of revenue for the regime.\42\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \41\ See, e.g., United States. v. Cazes, No. 1:17CR-00144, 
Indictment ] 2 (E.D. Ca. filed June 1, 2017) (alleging that 
``AlphaBay [was] a dark-web marketplace designed to enable users to 
buy and sell illegal goods, including controlled substances, stolen 
and fraudulent identification documents and access devices, 
counterfeit goods, malware and other computer hacking tools, 
firearms, and toxic chemicals . . . AlphaBay required its users to 
transact in digital currencies, including Bitcoin, Monero, and 
Ethereum.''); Dep't of the Treasury Press Release--Remarks of Sigal 
Mandelker, Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence 
(May 13, 2019), https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm687; 
Press Release, Dep't of Justice, ``Two Chinese Nationals Charged 
with Laundering Over $100 Million in Cryptocurrency from Exchange 
Hack'' at 1 (Mar. 2, 2020) (``North Korea continues to attack the 
growing worldwide ecosystem of virtual currency as a means to bypass 
the sanctions imposed on it by the United States and the United 
Nations Security Council.''), https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/two-chinese-nationals-charged-laundering-over-100-million-cryptocurrency-exchange-hack. For vulnerabilities of digital assets 
to securities fraud, see SEC--Investor Alert: Ponzi Schemes Using 
Virtual Currencies, SEC Pub. No. 153 (7/13), http://www.sec.gov/investor/alerts/ia_virtualcurrencies.pdf (accessed June 23, 2020); 
CFTC--Investor Alert: Watch Out for Fraudulent Digital Asset and 
``Crypto'' Trading websites, https://www.cftc.gov/LearnAndProtect/AdvisoriesAndArticles/watch_out_for_digital_fraud.html (accessed 
Aug. 28, 2020).
    \42\ Dep't of the Treasury Press Release--Remarks of Sigal 
Mandelker, Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence 
(May 13, 2019), https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm687.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    To mitigate illicit finance risks posed by CVC, the FATF has 
advised that countries should consider so-called virtual assets as 
``property,'' ``proceeds,''

[[Page 68011]]

``funds,'' ``funds or other assets,'' or other ``corresponding value'' 
and, consequently, should apply relevant FATF anti-money laundering/
counter-terrorist-financing measures to virtual assets.\43\ Consistent 
with the FATF guidance, in May 2019, FinCEN issued guidance advising 
that CVC-based transfers effectuated by a nonbank financial institution 
may fall within the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules, on the grounds that 
such transfers involve the making of a ``transmittal order'' by the 
sender--i.e., an instruction to pay ``a determinable amount of money to 
a recipient''--a criterion for application of the rules.\44\ However, 
FinCEN understands that at least one industry group has asserted that 
the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules do not apply to transactions 
involving CVC, in part because the group asserts that CVC is not 
``money'' as defined by the rules.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \43\ Interpretive Note to FATF Recommendation 15 at 70.
    \44\ FinCEN Guidance--Application of FinCEN's Regulations to 
Certain Business Models Involving Convertible Virtual Currencies at 
11-12 (May 9, 2019); see also 31 CFR 1010.100(eee) (defining 
transmittal order) and 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition to CVCs, foreign governments--including Iran, 
Venezuela, and Russia--have created or expressed interest in creating 
digital currencies that could be used to engage in sanctions evasion. 
For example, the Venezuelan government developed a state-backed digital 
currency called the ``petro,'' which the government publicly indicated 
was designed for the purpose of evading U.S sanctions.\45\ The 
President subsequently issued Executive Order 13827, prohibiting any 
U.S. persons from involvement in the petro digital currency.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \45\ E.O. 13827, Taking Additional Steps to Address the 
Situation in Venezuela, (March 19, 2018); see also FinCEN Advisory--
Updated Advisory on Widespread Public Corruption in Venezuela at 11 
(May 3, 2019), https://www.fincen.gov/sites/default/files/advisory/2019-05-03/Venezuela%20Advisory%20FINAL%20508.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This proposed rule would define ``money'' in 31 CFR 1010.100(ll) 
and (eee) to make explicitly clear that both payment orders and 
transmittal orders include any instruction by the sender to transmit 
CVC or any digital asset having legal tender status to a recipient.\46\ 
The proposed rule would therefore supersede the UCC's definition of 
``money'' for purposes of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules. The 
Agencies believe this action is appropriate to provide clarity 
concerning the application of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \46\ The regulatory definitions of ``money'' and ``convertible 
virtual currency'' that this rulemaking proposes to add to the 
definitions of ``payment order'' and ``transmittal order'' at 31 CFR 
1010.100(ll) and (eee) are specific to those provisions and not 
intended to have any impact on, inter alia, the definition of 
``currency'' in 31 CFR 1010.100(m). Furthermore, nothing in this 
document shall constitute a determination that any asset that is 
within the regulatory definitions of ``money'' or ``convertible 
virtual currency'' that this rulemaking proposes to add to the 
definitions of ``payment order'' and ``transmittal order'' is 
currency for the purposes of the federal securities laws, 15 U.S.C. 
78c(47), or the federal derivatives laws, 7 U.S.C. 1-26, and the 
regulations promulgated thereunder.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    FinCEN is aware that the CVC industry is working on developing 
systems and processes to achieve full compliance with the Travel Rule 
as applied to virtual currency transactions as a result of the 
distinctive characteristics of CVCs. The Agencies welcome comment on 
these efforts and any costs related thereto.

IV. Section-by-Section Analysis

A. Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule Thresholds

    This proposed rule would lower the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel 
Rule thresholds set forth in 31 CFR 1020.410 and 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and 
(f) for financial institutions. The thresholds would be lowered from 
$3,000 to $250, but only with respect to funds transfers and 
transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States. As 
set forth in the proposed revised sections below, a funds transfer or 
transmittal of funds would be considered to begin or end outside the 
United States if the financial institution knows or has reason to know 
that the transmittor, transmittor's financial institution, recipient, 
or recipient's financial institution is located in, is ordinarily 
resident in, or is organized under the laws of a jurisdiction other 
than the United States or a jurisdiction within the United States.
    For this purpose, a financial institution would have ``reason to 
know'' that a transaction begins or ends outside the United States only 
to the extent such information could be determined based on the 
information the financial institution receives in the transmittal 
order, collects from the transmittor to effectuate the transmittal of 
funds, or otherwise collects from the transmittor or recipient to 
comply with regulations implementing the BSA.
    Financial institutions are already required to retain the address 
of the transmittor and recipient under the Recordkeeping Rule for 
transactions subject to the current threshold, and may, as a matter of 
their own business practices, retain the addresses of other 
participants in a funds transfer or transmittal of funds. This proposed 
rule would not impose any new requirements to retain address 
information, other than those resulting from a change to the applicable 
thresholds.

B. Definition of ``Money''

    This proposed rule also would revise the definitions of payment 
order and transmittal order set forth in the BSA regulations so that 
the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule would explicitly apply to 
domestic and cross-border transactions in CVC and digital assets having 
legal tender status.
    Both the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule refer to a ``payment 
order'' (in the case of banks) and a ``transmittal order'' (in the case 
of financial institutions other than banks). These terms, in turn, use 
the term ``money.'' This proposed rule would clarify the meaning of 
money in 31 CFR 1010.100(ll) (payment order) and 1010.100(eee) 
(transmittal order), explaining that money includes (1) a medium of 
exchange currently authorized or adopted by a domestic or foreign 
government, including any digital asset that has legal tender status in 
any jurisdiction \47\ and (2) CVC. The proposed rule would define CVC 
as a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that either has an 
equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for currency, but 
lacks legal tender status.\48\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \47\ ``Money'' would also include a monetary unit of account 
established by an intragovernmental organization or by agreement 
between two or more countries.
    \48\ CVC is therefore a type of ``value that substitutes for 
currency.'' See 31 CFR 1010.100(ff)(5)(i)(A).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

V. Request for Comment

    The Agencies welcome comment on all aspects of this proposed rule. 
The Agencies encourage all interested parties to provide their views.
    With respect to the effect of lowering the threshold for the 
requirement in 31 CFR 1020.410 and 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f) to 
collect, retain, and transmit information on funds transfers and 
transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States, the 
Agencies in particular request comment on the following questions from 
financial institutions and members of the public:
    (1) To what extent would the proposed rule impose a burden on 
financial institutions, including with respect to information 
technology implementation costs? To what extent would the burden be 
different for thresholds such as $0, $500, or $1,000 for funds 
transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the 
United States? What would be the

[[Page 68012]]

impact on the burden if the proposed threshold change were extended to 
all transactions, including domestic transactions?
    (2) To what extent would the burden of the proposed rule on 
financial institutions and the public be mitigated were the Agencies to 
select a threshold of $250 but not require nonbank financial 
institutions to collect a social security number or employer 
identification number (``EIN'') for non-established customers engaging 
in transmittals of funds between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end 
outside the United States?
    (3) To what extent would the burden of the proposed rule be reduced 
if the Agencies issued specific guidance about appropriate forms of 
identification to be used in conjunction with identity verification, 
including in regards to whether there are circumstances in which 
verification may be done remotely and what documents are acceptable as 
proof?
    (4) To what extent would the burden of the proposed rule on 
financial institutions and the public be mitigated if the Agencies were 
to include in the regulation the standard described in Section IV.A for 
determining when an institution would be subject to the $250 threshold 
for cross-border transfers, i.e., that ``reason to know'' that a 
transaction begins or ends outside the United States exists when such 
information could be determined based on the information the financial 
institution receives in the transmittal order, collects from the 
transmittor to effectuate the transmittal of funds, or otherwise 
collects from the transmittor or recipient to comply with regulations 
implementing the BSA?
    The Agencies request comment from law enforcement with respect to 
the following related questions:
    (1) To what extent would the proposed rule benefit law enforcement? 
To what extent would these benefits be different for thresholds such as 
$0, $500, or $1,000 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that 
begin or end outside the United States? What would be the impact on the 
benefits to law enforcement if the proposed threshold change were 
extended to all transactions, including domestic transactions?
    (2) To what extent would the benefit of the proposed rule to law 
enforcement be compromised were the Agencies to select a threshold of 
$250 but not require that nonbank financial institutions collect a 
social security number or EIN for non-established nonbank customers 
engaging in transmittals of funds between $250 and $3,000 that begin or 
end outside the United States?
    With respect to the effect of clarifying the meaning of ``money'' 
in the definitions of ``payment order'' and ``transmittal order'' in 31 
CFR 1010.100, the Agencies in particular request comment on the 
following questions from law enforcement, financial institutions, and 
members of the public:
    (1) Describe the additional costs, if any, from complying with the 
Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule in light of the clarification 
included in the proposed rule, including with respect to information 
technology costs.
    (2) What mechanisms have persons that engage in CVC transactions 
developed to comply with the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule and 
what is the impact of adopting these solutions on the CVC industry, 
including on other BSA compliance efforts?

VI. Regulatory Analysis

A. Executive Orders 13563, 12866, and 13771

    Executive Orders 13563 and 12866 direct agencies to assess costs 
and benefits of available regulatory alternatives and, if regulation is 
necessary, to select regulatory approaches that maximize net benefits 
(including potential economic, environmental, and public health and 
safety effects; distributive impacts; and equity). Executive Order 
13563 emphasizes the importance of quantifying both costs and benefits, 
of reducing costs, of harmonizing rules, and of promoting flexibility. 
This proposed rule has been designated a ``significant regulatory 
action'' under section 3(f) of Executive Order 12866. Accordingly, the 
proposed rule has been reviewed by the Office of Management and Budget 
(``OMB'').
    FinCEN believes the primary cost of complying with the proposed 
rule is captured in its Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3507(d)) 
(``PRA'') burden estimates described in detail below, which amount to 
3,315,844 hours. FinCEN estimated in its recent OMB control number 
renewal for SAR requirements that the average labor cost of storing 
SARs and supporting documentation, weighed against the relevant labor 
required, was $24 per hour.\49\ FinCEN assesses that this is a 
reasonable estimate for the labor cost of the requirements imposed by 
this rule. Therefore a reasonable minimum estimate for the burden of 
administering the proposed rule is approximately $79.58 million 
annually (3,315,844 hours multiplied by $24 per hour). However, the PRA 
burden does not include certain costs, such as information technology 
implementation costs solely resulting from the need to comply with this 
proposed rule. FinCEN specifically requests comment regarding the costs 
associated with implementing these requirements.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \49\ 85 FR 31598, at 31604 and 31607 (May 26, 2020).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The benefits from the proposed rule include enhanced law 
enforcement ability to investigate, prosecute and disrupt the financing 
of international terrorism and other priority transnational security 
threats, as well as other types of transnational financial crime. The 
cost of terrorist attacks can be immense. For instance, one public 
report estimated the cost of terrorism globally at $33 billion in 2018, 
though this cost was primarily borne outside the United States.\50\ The 
cost of a major terrorist attack, such as the September 11 attacks, can 
reach tens of billions of dollars.\51\ Of course, it is difficult to 
quantify the contribution of a particular rule to a reduction in the 
risk of a terrorist attack. However, even if the proposed rule produced 
very small reductions in the probability of a major terrorist attack, 
the benefits would exceed the costs. For instance, if the proposed rule 
reduced by 0.26 percent the annual probability of a major terrorist 
attack with an economic impact of $30 billion, the benefits would be 
greater than the PRA burden costs described above.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \50\ See Institute for Econoimcs and Peace, Global Terrorsim 
Index, 2019 (Nov. 2019), http://visionofhumanity.org/app/uploads/2019/11/GTI-2019web.pdf.
    \51\ For example, the New York Comptroller estimated in 2002 
that the direct physical and human cost of the September 11 attacks 
on New York was over $30.5 billion. See City of New York 
Comptroller, One Year Later: The Fiscal Impact of 9/11 on New York 
City (Sept. 4, 2002), https://comptroller.nyc.gov/wp-content/uploads/documents/impact-9-11-year-later.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Of course, the proposed rule would not simply reduce the 
probability of terrorism but also would contribute to the ability of 
law enforcement to investigate a wide array of other priority 
transnational threats and financial crimes, including proliferation 
financing, sanctions evasion, and money laundering.
    FinCEN considered several alternatives to the proposed rule. First, 
FinCEN considered the possibility of modifying the proposed rule by 
applying the FATF's suggested de minimis threshold of $1,000 to 
transactions that begin or end outside the United States. However, this 
threshold would exclude over 88 percent of the transactions in FinCEN's

[[Page 68013]]

dataset of transactions potentially linked to terrorism. Given the 
intended goal of the proposed rule to increase the availability of 
information to address priority transnational threats, including 
terrorism, FinCEN believes a lower threshold would be appropriate.
    Second, FinCEN considered the possibility of implementing the 
proposed rule with a threshold of $0 for transactions beginning or 
ending outside of the United States. FinCEN's terrorism-related 
transaction analysis suggests that transactions potentially related to 
terrorism occur at values below the $250 level. Although FinCEN 
believes that a $0 threshold would lead to enhanced benefits in terms 
of capturing a larger universe of transactions, requiring collection 
and verification of transaction information for low-value transactions 
could impose a substantial burden on small financial institutions, such 
as small money services businesses. Nonetheless, FinCEN will carefully 
consider comments to determine whether a $0 threshold would be 
appropriate in a final rule. FinCEN will also consider in a final rule 
the extent to which the burden could be minimized by providing guidance 
on appropriate verification procedures for lower-value transactions.
    Third, FinCEN considered applying the requirements of the proposed 
rule to all transactions, including those that begin and end within the 
United States. However, FinCEN's analysis identified that only 
approximately 17,000 of the approximately 1.29 million transactions 
included within its terrorism analysis dataset involved domestic-only 
transactions. Applying the requirements to all domestic transactions 
would therefore capture a relatively small number of additional 
transactions while resulting in significant additional recordkeeping 
burden for financial institutions. FinCEN believes that, at this time, 
it would therefore be appropriate to limit the proposed rule to 
transactions that begin or end outside the United States. Again, based 
on comments received, FinCEN will consider in a final rule the extent 
to which the benefits of extending the scope of the changes to the 
thresholds of the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule to include 
domestic transactions would exceed the burdens.
    With respect to the clarification of the definition of ``money,'' 
FinCEN considered the alternative of leaving the regulation as it was, 
but believed doing so would perpetuate uncertainty about the 
applicability of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules to transactions 
involving CVC.
    FinCEN requests comment on the benefits, and any estimates of 
costs, associated with the requirements of the proposed rule and the 
proposed alternatives.
    Executive Order 13771 requires an agency to identify at least two 
existing regulations to be repealed whenever it publicly proposes for 
notice and comment or otherwise promulgates a new regulation. As 
described above, the proposed amendments to the Recordkeeping Rule and 
Travel Rule involve a national security function. Therefore, Executive 
Order 13771 does not apply.

B. Regulatory Flexibility Act

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act (``RFA'') (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) 
requires an agency either to provide an initial regulatory flexibility 
analysis with a proposed rule or certify that the proposed rule will 
not have a significant impact on a substantial number of small 
entities. This proposed regulation on its face would apply to all 
financial institutions. However, because of the nature of the 
requirements contained therein, only banks (including credit unions), 
money transmitters, and other MSBs would be impacted. Although the 
Agencies believe that the proposed regulatory changes would affect a 
substantial number of small entities, the Agencies also believe these 
changes would be unlikely to have a significant economic impact on such 
entities. The Agencies, however, recognize the limitations in readily 
available data about potential costs and benefits and have prepared an 
initial regulatory flexibility analysis pursuant to the RFA. The 
Agencies welcome comments on all aspects of the initial regulatory 
flexibility analysis. A final regulatory flexibility analysis will be 
conducted after consideration of comments received during the comment 
period.
i. Statement of the Need for, and Objectives of, the Proposed 
Regulation
    The proposed changes to the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule 
would reduce from $3,000 to $250 the threshold for the requirement to 
collect, retain, and transmit information on funds transfers and 
transmittal of funds for transactions that begin or end outside the 
United States. These changes are necessary because funds transfers and 
transmittals of funds related to terrorist financing, narcotics 
trafficking, and other crimes are occurring well below the current 
$3,000 threshold. It therefore would benefit law enforcement for this 
additional information to be collected, retained, and transmitted by 
financial institutions.
    The clarifications regarding the meaning of ``money'' in the 
definitions of ``payment order'' and ``transmittal order'' in 31 CFR 
1010.100 address urgent concerns regarding illicit finance, including 
the financing of international terrorism, sanctions evasion, and 
weapons proliferation through CVC. In the absence of clarification, 
some entities may not be aware of or may choose not to comply with the 
Recordkeeping Rule and the Travel Rule when engaging in transactions 
involving CVC. The Agencies are also clarifying that ``money'' includes 
digital assets with legal tender status.
ii. Small Entities Affected by the Proposed Regulation
    The proposed changes to the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule 
would apply to all financial institutions regulated under the BSA.\52\ 
However, as a practical matter, because the requirements of this 
proposed rule are only triggered by funds transfers and transmittals of 
funds, the proposal would impact mostly banks and money transmitters. 
As described in the PRA section that follows, based upon current data 
there are 5,306 banks, 5,236 credit unions, and 12,692 money 
transmitters that would be impacted by the proposed rule changes. Based 
upon current data, for the purposes of the RFA, there are at least 
3,817 small Federally-regulated banks and 4,681 small credit 
unions.\53\ The Agencies believe that most money transmitters are small 
entities.\54\ Because the proposed rule would apply to all of these 
small financial

[[Page 68014]]

institutions, the Agencies conclude that this proposed rule would apply 
to a substantial number of small entities.
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    \52\ 31 CFR 1010.400 notes that ``[e]ach financial institution 
(as defined in 31 U.S.C. 5312(a)(2) or (c)(1)) should refer to its 
chapter X part for any additional recordkeeping requirements. Unless 
otherwise indicated, the recordkeeping requirements contained in 
this subpart D apply to all financial institutions.'' See 31 CFR 
1020.410 (banks), 31 CFR 1022.410 (dealers in foreign exchange), 31 
CFR 1022.400 (MSBs), 31 CFR 1023.410 (broker dealers in securities), 
31 CFR 1024.410 (mutual funds), 31 CFR 1025.410 (insurance), 31 CFR 
1026.410 (futures commission merchants and introducing brokers in 
commodities), 31 CFR 1027.410 (dealers in precious metals, precious 
stones, or jewels), 31 CFR 1028.410 (operators of credit card 
systems), 31 CFR 1029.400 (loan or finance companies), and 31 CFR 
1030.400 (housing government sponsored entities).
    \53\ The Small Business Administration (``SBA'') defines a 
depository institution (including a credit union) as a small 
business if it has assets of $600 million or less. The information 
on small banks is published by the Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation (``FDIC'') and was current as of March 31, 2020.
    \54\ The SBA defines an entity engaged in ``Financial 
Transactions Processing, Reserve, and Clearinghouse Activities'' to 
be small if it has assets of $41.5 million or less. FinCEN assesses 
that money transmitters most closely align with this SBA category of 
entities.
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    Although the proposed changes would apply to a substantial number 
of small entities, the Agencies believe that the changes would not have 
a significant economic impact on such entities for the reasons noted 
below. In the first year, the Agencies expect additional expense of 
time and resources to read and understand the regulations and train 
staff and implement technological changes.
    In 2006, the Agencies solicited public comment on the potential 
benefits and burdens of reducing the threshold for the Recordkeeping 
Rule and Travel Rule requirements.\55\ Based on the comments received 
at that time, it appears that almost all banks, regardless of size, 
maintain records of all funds transfers and transmittals of funds 
regardless of the dollar amount, including those transfers/transmittals 
below the $3,000 regulatory threshold. Similarly, in 2006, many money 
transmitters indicated that they maintained records of transfers/
transmittals at approximately the $1,000 level. Since 2006 there have 
been significant advances in technology, likely allowing small entities 
to comply with regulatory recordkeeping requirements at a lower cost.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \55\ 71 FR 35564 (June 21, 2006).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    As noted previously, in May 2019, FinCEN issued guidance advising 
that CVC-based transfers effectuated by a nonbank financial institution 
may fall within the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules, on the grounds that 
such transfers involve the making of a ``transmittal order'' by the 
sender--i.e., an instruction to pay ``a determinable amount of money to 
a recipient''--a criterion for application of the rules.\56\ Therefore, 
the proposed rule would codify FinCEN's existing expectation. In 
addition, FATF's international standards now call for jurisdictions to 
apply their rules equivalent to the Recordkeeping and Travel Rule to 
virtual assets.\57\ Therefore, U.S. financial institutions engaged in 
CVC transactions with an international nexus would likely need to adopt 
such compliance measures regardless of the applicable U.S. rules, as 
other countries have aligned or are aligning their regulatory regimes 
with the FATF recommendations.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \56\ FinCEN Guidance--Application of FinCEN's Regulations to 
Certain Business Models Involving Convertible Virtual Currencies at 
11-12 (May 9, 2019); see also 31 CFR 1010.100(eee) (defining 
transmittal order) and 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f).
    \57\ Interpretive Note to FATF Recommendation 15.
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    As described above, the proposed rule would also clarify the 
Agencies' existing interpretation that the Recordkeeping and Travel 
Rules apply to transactions involving a digital asset with legal tender 
status. The Agencies do not believe that any financial institutions 
currently facilitate transactions involving sovereign digital 
currencies.
iii. Compliance Requirements
    Compliance costs for entities that would be affected by these 
regulations are generally, reporting, recordkeeping, and information 
technology implementation and maintenance costs. Data are not readily 
available to determine the costs specific to small entities and the 
Agencies invite comments about compliance costs, especially those 
affecting small entities.
    These proposed changes (a) reduce the threshold for the 
Recordkeeping and Travel Rule requirements to collect, retain, and 
transmit information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds for 
transactions that begin or end outside the United States; and (b) 
clarify the application of the Recordkeeping and Travel Rule 
requirements to transactions involving CVC or digital assets with legal 
tender status. Banks and other financial institutions therefore would 
need to collect and retain the following information on funds transfers 
and transmittals of funds in amounts at or above the applicable 
threshold, including with respect to transactions involving CVC or 
digital assets with legal tender status: The name and address of the 
originator or transmittor; the amount and date of the transaction; any 
payment instructions received; and the identity of the beneficiary's 
bank or recipient's financial institution. In addition, for 
transactions at or above the applicable threshold, including with 
respect to transactions involving CVC or digital assets with legal 
tender status, an originator's bank or transmittor's financial 
institution would be required to verify the identity of the person 
placing a payment or transmittal order if the order is made in person 
and the person placing the order is not an established customer. An 
intermediary bank or intermediary financial institution, and the 
beneficiary's bank or recipient's financial institution, also would be 
required to retain originals or copies of payment or transmittal 
orders.
    For funds transfers and transmittals of funds at or above the 
applicable threshold, including with respect to transactions involving 
CVC or digital assets with legal tender status, the originator's bank 
or transmittor's financial institution also would be required to 
include information, including all information required under the 
Recordkeeping Rule, in a payment or transmittal order sent by the bank 
or nonbank financial institution to another bank or nonbank financial 
institution in the payment chain. An intermediary bank or financial 
institution would also be required to transmit information to other 
banks or nonbank financial institutions in the payment chain, to the 
extent the information is received by the intermediary bank or 
financial institution.
iv. Duplicative, Overlapping, or Conflicting Federal Rules
    The Agencies are unaware of any Federal rules that duplicate, 
overlap with, or conflict with the proposed changes to the 
Recordkeeping and Travel Rules, except that some financial institutions 
may already collect some of the information required by the proposed 
modifications as part of their existing implementation of their risk-
based AML programs under the BSA and its implementing regulations.
v. Significant Alternatives to the Proposed Regulations
    The Agencies considered several alternatives to the proposed 
regulatory changes. First, the Agencies considered the possibility of 
modifying the proposed rule by applying the FATF's suggested de minimis 
threshold of $1,000 to transactions that begin or end outside the 
United States. However, this threshold would exclude an unacceptably 
large percentage of transactions. It is unclear what impact this 
alternative would have on small entities and it might not reduce the 
impact on affected small entities in a meaningful way.
    Second, the Agencies considered the possibility of implementing the 
proposed rule with a threshold of $0 for transactions that begin or end 
outside of the United States. Although this would expand the data 
available to law enforcement, and the Agencies will carefully consider 
comments to determine whether a $0 threshold would be appropriate in a 
final rule, the Agencies believed that a $0 threshold might impose a 
significant burden on small financial institutions and therefore are 
not proposing a $0 threshold at this time.
    Third, the Agencies considered exempting small banks from the lower 
threshold requirement entirely. However, the Agencies believe that the 
number of transactions beginning or ending outside the United States is 
relatively low for most small banks, which should substantially reduce 
the burden on them from the proposed change in the threshold.

[[Page 68015]]

    Finally, the Agencies considered the possibility of waiving the 
requirement that financial institutions obtain a social security number 
or EIN for funds transfers or transmittals of funds below a certain 
threshold by non-established customers. Adopting this alternative would 
primarily impact MSBs, many of which are small and more likely to deal 
with non-established customers. The Agencies have not adopted this 
alternative at this time because it would increase the likelihood of 
criminals using false identities to transmit funds. Although the 
Agencies have not adopted this alternative at this time, this proposed 
rule requests comment on the benefits and drawbacks of waiving the 
requirement to obtain a social security number or EIN below some 
threshold.
    The Agencies welcome comment on the overall regulatory flexibility 
analysis, especially information about compliance costs and 
alternatives.

C. Unfunded Mandates Act

    Section 202 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (``Unfunded 
Mandates Act''), Public Law 104-4 (March 22, 1995), requires that an 
agency prepare a budgetary impact statement before promulgating a rule 
that may result in expenditure by the state, local, and tribal 
governments, in the aggregate, or by the private sector, of $100 
million or more in any one year. If a budgetary impact statement is 
required, section 202 of the Unfunded Mandates Act also requires an 
agency to identify and consider a reasonable number of regulatory 
alternatives before promulgating a rule. See section VI.A for a 
discussion of the economic impact of this proposed rule.

D. Paperwork Reduction Act

    The recordkeeping requirements contained in this proposed rule (31 
CFR 1010.410 and 31 CFR 1020.410) have been submitted by FinCEN to OMB 
for review in accordance with the PRA. Written comments and 
recommendations for the proposed information collection can be 
submitted by visiting www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAMain. Find this 
particular document by selecting ``Currently under Review--Open for 
Public Comments'' or by using the search function. Comments are welcome 
and must be received by November 27, 2020. In accordance with 
requirements of the PRA and its implementing regulations, 5 CFR part 
1320, the following information concerning the collections of 
information are presented to assist those persons wishing to comment on 
the information collections.
    Currently, financial institutions must collect, retain, and 
transmit certain information as part of funds transfers or transmittals 
of funds involving $3,000 or more (31 CFR 1020.410(a) and 31 CFR 
1010.410(e) and (f)). This proposed rule would modify the thresholds in 
the rules implementing the BSA requiring financial institutions to 
collect and retain information on certain funds transfers and 
transmittals of funds. The modifications would reduce the threshold 
from the current $3,000 to $250 for funds transfers and transmittals of 
funds that begin or end outside the United States. The proposed rule 
likewise would modify the threshold in the rule requiring financial 
institutions to transmit to other financial institutions in the payment 
chain information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds from 
$3,000 to $250 for funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin 
or end outside the United States. The proposed rule would also clarify 
the meaning of ``money,'' making more clear the transactions in 
relation to which financial institutions must comply with the 
Recordkeeping Rule and the Travel Rule.
    Since FinCEN has authority to implement the Recordkeeping Rule and 
Travel Rule with respect to all respondents, FinCEN will be responsible 
for the entire paperwork burden associated with this information 
collection.
i. Threshold Changes to the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules
    This proposed rule would reduce from $3,000 to $250 the threshold 
for the requirement to collect, retain, and transmit information on 
funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the 
United States. This threshold change is necessary because funds 
transfers and transmittals of funds related to terrorist financing, 
drug trafficking, and other crimes often occur well below the current 
threshold. It therefore would benefit law enforcement for this 
additional financial information to be collected, retained, and 
transmitted by financial institutions.
1. 31 CFR 1010.410(e)
    This proposed rule would reduce the threshold for the requirement 
to collect and retain information on transmittals of funds conducted by 
nonbank financial institutions that begin or end outside the United 
States.
    Description of Recordkeepers: Financial institutions other than 
banks that conduct transmittals of funds in an amount between $250 and 
$3,000 that begin or end outside the United States. Although the 
proposed rule on its face would apply to all nonbank financial 
institutions, because of the nature of the requirements contained 
therein, mostly money transmitters and other MSBs that conduct 
transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States would 
be impacted.
    Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 12,692 money transmitters. As of 
June 2020, there were 12,692 MSBs registered with FinCEN that indicated 
they were conducting money transmission.
    Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The 
estimated average burden hours would vary depending on the number of 
transmittals of funds conducted by a nonbank financial institution 
between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end outside the United States. 
Under OMB control number 1506-0058, FinCEN estimates that the 
recordkeeping burden per recordkeeper to maintain records of all 
transmittals of funds of $3,000 or more is 16 hours a year. FinCEN 
estimates that twice as many transmittals of funds conducted by nonbank 
financial institutions are between $250 and $3,000, and begin or end 
outside the United States, in comparison to all transmittals of funds 
over $3,000. For that reason, FinCEN estimates that the proposed rule 
would add an additional 32 hours of burden per recordkeeper a year.\58\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \58\ FinCEN estimates that the costs of the Recordkeeping Rule 
scale linearly with the number of transactions, though there may 
well be economies of scale that reduce the burden. This observation 
applies to the other burden estimates in this section as well.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 406,144 hours. 
(12,692 money transmitters multiplied by 32 hours).
2. 31 CFR 1010.410(f)
    This proposed rule would reduce the threshold for the requirement 
to transmit information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds 
conducted by financial institutions acting as the transmitting 
financial institution or the intermediary financial institution in 
funds transfers and transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the 
United States.
    Description of Recordkeepers: Financial institutions, including 
banks and credit unions, that are the transmitting or intermediary 
financial institution in a transmittal of funds in an amount between 
$250 and $3,000 that begin or end outside the United States. Although 
the proposed rule on its face would apply to all financial 
institutions, because of the nature of the requirements contained 
therein, only

[[Page 68016]]

banks, credit unions, money transmitters, and other MSBs that conduct 
transmittals of funds that begin or end outside the United States would 
be impacted.
    Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 23,234 financial institutions. 
FinCEN estimates that there are approximately 5,306 federally regulated 
banks and 5,236 federally regulated credit unions.\59\ As of June 2020, 
there were 12,692 MSBs registered with FinCEN that indicated they were 
conducting money transmission.
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    \59\ According to the FDIC there were 5,103 FDIC-insured banks 
as of March 31, 2020. According to the Board, there were 203 other 
entities supervised by the Board or other Federal regulators, as of 
June 16, 2020, that fall within the definition of bank. (20 Edge Act 
institutions, 15 agreement corporations, and 168 foreign banking 
organizations). According to the National Credit Union 
Administration, there were 5,236 federally regulated credit unions 
as of December 31, 2019.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The 
estimated average burden hours will vary depending on the number of 
transmittals of funds conducted by banks, credit unions, and money 
transmitters between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end outside the 
United States. Under OMB control number 1506-0058, FinCEN estimates 
that the recordkeeping burden per recordkeeper to transmit information 
relating to all transmittals of funds of $3,000 or more is 12 hours a 
year. FinCEN estimates that twice as many transmittals of funds 
conducted by banks, credit unions, and money transmitters are between 
$250 and $3,000, and begin or end outside the United States, in 
comparison to all transmittals of funds over $3,000. For that reason, 
FinCEN estimates that the proposed rule would add an additional 24 
hours of burden per recordkeeper a year.
    Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 557,616 hours. 
(23,234 financial institutions multiplied by 24 hours).
3. 31 CFR 1020.410
    This proposed rule would reduce the threshold for the requirement 
to collect and retain information on funds transfers conducted by a 
bank acting as the transmitting, intermediary, or recipient bank when 
the funds transfer begins or ends outside the United States.
    Description of Recordkeepers: Banks that are the originator's bank, 
the intermediary bank, or the beneficiary's bank with respect to funds 
transfers in an amount between $250 and $3,000 that begin or end 
outside the United States.
    Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 10,542 banks and credit unions. 
FinCEN estimates that there are approximately 5,306 federally regulated 
banks and 5,236 federally regulated credit unions.
    Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The 
estimated average burden hours will vary depending on the number of 
funds transfers conducted by banks and credit unions between $250 and 
$3,000 that begin or end outside the United States. Under OMB control 
number 1506-0059, FinCEN estimates that the recordkeeping burden per 
recordkeeper to maintain records of all funds transfers of $3,000 or 
more is 100 hours a year. FinCEN estimates that on average twice as 
many funds transfers conducted by banks and credit unions are between 
$250 and $3,000 and begin or end outside the United States, in 
comparison to all transmittals of funds over $3,000. For that reason, 
FinCEN estimates that the proposed rule would add an additional 200 
hours of burden per recordkeeper a year.
    Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 2,108,400 hours. 
(10,542 banks and credit unions multiplied by 200 hours).
4. Total Burden Resulting From Threshold Changes to the Recordkeeping 
and Travel Rules
    Total Estimated Annual Burden Increase Because of Threshold 
Reduction in the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules: 31 CFR 1010.410(e) 
[406,144 hours] + 31 CFR 1010.410(f) [557,616 hours] + 31 CFR 1020.410 
[2,108,400 hours] = 3,072,160 hours.
ii. Clarification of the Meaning of ``Money'' in the Recordkeeping Rule 
and the Travel Rule
    This proposed rule also would clarify the meaning of ``money'' as 
used in the Recordkeeping Rule and the Travel Rule. Specifically, the 
proposed rule would explicitly clarify that these rules apply to 
transactions involving (1) CVC, or (2) any digital asset having legal 
tender status. The clarification related to such transactions is 
necessary because many of these transactions present heightened 
terrorist financing, weapons proliferation, sanctions evasion, and 
money laundering risks due to their global nature, distributed 
structure, limited transparency, and speed. While these transactions 
pose some of the same risks as those made in traditional financial 
systems, in addition, a combination of features unique to CVC allows 
individual users to move value nearly instantaneously to anywhere in 
the world without ever having to pass through a regulated financial 
institution, thus increasing such risks. Although the clarification is 
consistent with FinCEN's interpretation of existing rules, the 
estimates below analyze the costs of compliance with this clarification 
against a baseline in which financial institutions are not complying 
with FinCEN's interpretation of the Recordkeeping Rule and Travel Rule 
for such transactions.
1. 31 CFR 1010.410(e)
    This proposed rule would explicitly include within the requirement 
to collect and retain information on transmittals of funds conducted by 
nonbank financial institutions transactions involving (1) CVC, or (2) 
any digital asset having legal tender status.
    Description of Recordkeepers: Financial institutions other than 
banks that conduct transmittals of funds involving CVCs or digital 
assets with legal tender status. Although the proposed rule on its face 
applies to all nonbank financial institutions, this provision would 
only impact money transmitters and other MSBs that conduct transmittals 
of funds involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender status.
    Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 530 money transmitters and other 
MSBs engaged in CVC transactions, which FinCEN assesses is a reasonable 
estimate of the number of MSBs engaging in transactions involving CVC. 
As of June 2020, there were 12,692 MSBs registered with FinCEN that 
indicated they were conducting money transmission. Of those 12,692 
MSBs, FinCEN estimates that 530 engage in CVC transactions. The FinCEN 
MSB registration form does not require that companies disclose whether 
they engage in CVC transactions. This estimate is therefore based on 
adding the number of MSBs that indicated they engage in CVC 
transactions in an optional field on the MSB registration form, and the 
number that did not so indicate but which, based on FinCEN's research, 
FinCEN believes engage in CVC transactions. FinCEN does not believe 
that any nonbank financial institutions currently facilitate 
transactions involving sovereign digital currencies.
    Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The 
estimated average burden hours will vary depending on the number of 
transmittals of funds conducted by a nonbank financial institution 
engaged in CVC transactions. Under OMB control number 1506-0058, FinCEN 
estimates that the recordkeeping burden per recordkeeper to maintain 
records of traditional transmittals of funds of

[[Page 68017]]

$3,000 or more is 16 hours a year. Above, FinCEN estimated that the 
additional burden from complying with the $250 threshold imposed by the 
proposed rule is 32 hours, for a total burden of 48 hours. Because of 
the large volume of CVC transactions, FinCEN estimates that a nonbank 
financial institution engaged in CVC transactions conducts five times 
as many transmittals of funds in CVC in comparison to the number of 
non-CVC transactions that will be conducted by MSBs as a result of the 
threshold change. For that reason, FinCEN estimates that the proposed 
rule would add an additional 240 hours of burden per recordkeeper a 
year (five multiplied by the new baseline of 48 hours), although this 
is a conservative estimate because the recordkeeping is likely less 
costly for transactions involving CVCs since it is likely to be 
electronic and possible to automate.
    Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 127,200 hours. (530 
money transmitters and other MSBs engaged in CVC transactions 
multiplied by 240 hours).
2. 31 CFR 1010.410(f)
    This proposed rule would explicitly include within the requirement 
to transmit information on funds transfers and transmittals of funds 
conducted by financial institutions acting as the transmittor's 
financial institution or an intermediary financial institution, funds 
transfers and transmittals of funds transactions involving (1) CVC, or 
(2) any digital asset having legal tender status.
    Description of Recordkeepers: Financial institutions, including 
banks, that are the transmittor's financial institution or an 
intermediary financial institution in a transmittal of funds involving 
CVCs or digital assets with legal tender status. Although the proposed 
rule on its face applies to all financial institutions, this provision 
would only impact financial institutions that conduct transmissions of 
funds involving such CVC. FinCEN does not believe that any financial 
institutions currently facilitate transactions involving sovereign 
digital currencies.
    Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 11,072 financial institutions. 
FinCEN estimates that there are approximately 5,306 federally regulated 
banks and 5,236 federally regulated credit unions. FinCEN assesses that 
all of these banks and credit unions engage in transactions involving 
CVCs. As assessed above, 530 MSBs engaged in CVC transactions and would 
be impacted by this rule (5,306 + 5,236 + 530 = 11,702).
    Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The 
estimated average burden hours will vary depending on the number of 
transmittals of funds conducted by banks, credit unions, and MSBs 
involving CVCs below the applicable threshold. Under OMB control number 
1506-0058, FinCEN estimates that the recordkeeping burden per 
recordkeeper to transmit information relating to traditional 
transmittals of funds of $3,000 or more is 12 hours a year. FinCEN 
assessed above that the imposition of the $250 threshold for 
transactions that begin or end outside the United States adds an 
additional 24 hours of burden per recordkeeper a year, for a total of 
36 hours of burden per recordkeeper.
    FinCEN understands that banks, including credit unions, currently 
engage in very few, if any, funds transfers involving CVCs. For that 
reason, FinCEN therefore estimates that the proposed rule would add 
only 1 additional hour of burden per bank recordkeeper a year.
    Because of the large volume of CVC transactions, FinCEN estimates 
that the 530 MSBs will process five times the volume of transmittals of 
funds involving CVC in comparison to the number of non-CVC transactions 
that will be conducted by MSBs as a result of the change in the 
threshold. For that reason, FinCEN estimates that the proposed rule 
would add an additional 180 hours of burden per nonbank recordkeeper a 
year (five multiplied by the new baseline of 36 hours).
    Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 95,400 hours (530 
money transmitters and other MSBs engaged in CVC transactions 
multiplied by 180 hours per recordkeeper) plus 10,542 hours (10,542 
banks and credit unions multiplied by 1 hour per recordkeeper), for a 
total additional annual burden of 105,942 hours.
3. 31 CFR 1020.410
    This proposed rule would explicitly include transactions involving 
CVC or digital assets with legal tender status within the requirement 
to collect and retain information on funds transfers conducted by banks 
acting as the originator's bank, intermediary bank, or beneficiary's 
bank.
    Description of Recordkeepers: Banks that are the originator's bank, 
the intermediary bank, or the beneficiary's bank with respect to funds 
transfers involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender status.
    Estimated Number of Recordkeepers: 10,542 banks and credit unions. 
FinCEN estimates that there are approximately 5,306 federally regulated 
banks and 5,236 federally regulated credit unions.
    Estimated Average Annual Burden Hours per Recordkeeper: The 
estimated average burden hours will vary depending on the number of 
funds transfers involving CVC or digital assets with legal tender 
status conducted by banks and credit unions. Under OMB control number 
1506-0059, FinCEN estimates that the recordkeeping burden per 
recordkeeper to maintain records of funds transfers of $3,000 or more 
is 100 hours a year. FinCEN understands that banks, including credit 
unions, currently engage in very few, if any, funds transfers involving 
CVC. FinCEN does not believe that any banks currently facilitate 
transactions involving sovereign digital currencies. For that reason, 
FinCEN therefore estimates that the proposed rule would add only 1 
additional hour of burden per bank or credit union recordkeeper a year.
    Estimated Total Additional Annual Burden Hours: 10,542 hours. 
(10,542 banks and credit unions multiplied by 1 hour).
4. Total Burden Resulting From Inclusion of CVC Transactions in the 
Recordkeeping and Travel Rules
    Total Estimated Annual Burden Increase Because of Inclusion of CVC 
Transactions in the Recordkeeping and Travel Rules: 31 CFR 1010.410(e) 
[127,200 hours] + 31 CFR 1010.410(f) [105,942 hours] + 31 CFR 1020.410 
[10,542 hours] = 243,684 hours.
iii. Total Annual Burden Hours Estimate as a Result of This Proposed 
Rule
    3,072,160 hours (lower threshold) + 243,684 hours (CVC 
transactions) = 3,315,844 hours.
    The current estimated total burden hours for OMB control number 
1506-0058 is 2,150,200 hours. 31 CFR 1010.410(e) and (f) are both 
included in OMB control number 1506-0058. The total estimated increase 
in burden hours as a result of this proposed rulemaking for this 
control number is 1,196,902 hours. (533,344 hours (31 CFR 1010.410(e)) 
+ 663,558 hours (31 CFR 1010.410(f)).\60\ The new estimated total 
burden hours for OMB control number 1506-0058 would be 3,347,102 hours.
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    \60\ This estimated increase is further broken down as follows: 
31 CFR 1010.410(e) (threshold changes 406,144 + CVC transactions 
127,200 = 533,344), and 31 CFR 1010.410(f) (threshold changes 
557,616 + CVC transactions 105,942 = 663,558).
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    The current estimated total burden hours for OMB control number 
1506-0059 is 2,290,000 hours. 31 CFR 1020.410 is included in OMB 
control number 1506-0059. The total estimated

[[Page 68018]]

increase in burden hours as a result of this proposed rulemaking for 
this control number is 2,118,942 hours. (2,108,400 threshold change + 
10,542 CVC transactions). The new estimated total burden hours for OMB 
control number 1506-0059 would be 4,408,942 hours.
iv. Questions for Comment
    In addition to the questions listed above, FinCEN specifically 
invites comment on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information 
is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of FinCEN, 
including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the 
accuracy of the estimated burden associated with the proposed 
collection of information; (c) how the quality, utility, and clarity of 
the information to be collected may be enhanced; and (d) how the burden 
of complying with the proposed collection of information may be 
minimized, including through the application of automated collection 
techniques or other forms of information technology.

List of Subjects in 31 CFR Parts 1010 and 1020

    Administrative practice and procedure, Banks, Banking, Currency, 
Foreign banking, Foreign currencies, Investigations, Penalties, 
Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Terrorism.

    For the reasons set forth in the preamble, Parts 1010 and 1020 of 
Chapter X of Title 31 of the Code of Federal Regulations are proposed 
to be amended as follows:

PART 1010--GENERAL PROVISIONS

0
1. The authority citation for part 1010 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 12 U.S.C. 1829b and 1951-1959; 31 U.S.C. 5311-5314 
and 5316-5332; Title III, sec. 314, Pub. L. 107-56, 115 Stat. 307; 
sec. 701, Pub. L. 114-74, 129 Stat. 599.

0
2. In Sec.  1010.100, revise paragraphs (ll) and (eee) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  1010.100  General definitions.

* * * * *
    (ll) Payment order. (1) An instruction of a sender to a receiving 
bank, transmitted orally, electronically, or in writing, to pay, or to 
cause another bank or foreign bank to pay, a fixed or determinable 
amount of money to a beneficiary if:
    (i) The instruction does not state a condition to payment to the 
beneficiary other than time of payment;
    (ii) The receiving bank is to be reimbursed by debiting an account 
of, or otherwise receiving payment from, the sender; and
    (iii) The instruction is transmitted by the sender directly to the 
receiving bank or to an agent, funds transfer system, or communication 
system for transmittal to the receiving bank.
    (2) For purposes of this paragraph (ll), money means:
    (i) A medium of exchange currently authorized or adopted by a 
domestic or foreign government, including any digital asset that has 
legal tender status in any jurisdiction. The term includes a monetary 
unit of account established by an intragovernmental organization or by 
agreement between two or more countries; or
    (ii) A convertible virtual currency.
    (3) For purposes of this paragraph (ll), convertible virtual 
currency means a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that 
either has an equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for 
currency, but lacks legal tender status.
* * * * *
    (eee) Transmittal order. (1) The term transmittal order includes a 
payment order and is an instruction of a sender to a receiving 
financial institution, transmitted orally, electronically, or in 
writing, to pay, or cause another financial institution or foreign 
financial agency to pay, a fixed or determinable amount of money to a 
recipient if:
    (i) The instruction does not state a condition to payment to the 
recipient other than time of payment;
    (ii) The receiving financial institution is to be reimbursed by 
debiting an account of, or otherwise receiving payment from, the 
sender; and
    (iii) The instruction is transmitted by the sender directly to the 
receiving financial institution or to an agent or communication system 
for transmittal to the receiving financial institution.
    (2) For purposes of this paragraph (eee), the term ``money'' means:
    (i) A medium of exchange currently authorized or adopted by a 
domestic or foreign government, including any digital asset that has 
legal tender status in any jurisdiction. The term includes a monetary 
unit of account established by an intragovernmental organization or by 
agreement between two or more countries; or
    (ii) A convertible virtual currency.
    (3) For purposes of this paragraph (eee), convertible virtual 
currency means a medium of exchange (such as cryptocurrency) that 
either has an equivalent value as currency, or acts as a substitute for 
currency, but lacks legal tender status.
* * * * *
0
3. In Sec.  1010.410, revise the introductory text of paragraphs (e) 
and (f) to read as follows:


Sec.  1010.410  Records to be made and retained by financial 
institutions.

* * * * *
    (e) Nonbank financial institutions. Each agent, agency, branch, or 
office located within the United States of a financial institution 
other than a bank is subject to the requirements of this paragraph (e) 
with respect to a transmittal of funds in the amount of $3,000 or more. 
A financial institution other than a bank also is subject to the 
requirements of this paragraph (e) with respect to a transmittal of 
funds in the amount of $250 or more that begins or ends outside the 
United States. For purposes of this paragraph (e), a transmittal of 
funds will be considered to begin or end outside the United States if a 
financial institution other than a bank knows or has reason to know 
that the transmittor, transmittor's financial institution, recipient, 
or recipient's financial institution is located in, is ordinarily 
resident in, or is organized under the laws of a jurisdiction other 
than the United States or a jurisdiction within the United States.
* * * * *
    (f) Any transmittor's financial institution or intermediary 
financial institution located within the United States shall include in 
any transmittal order for a transmittal of funds in the amount of 
$3,000 or more, information as required in this paragraph (f). A 
financial institution also is subject to the requirements of this 
paragraph (f) with respect to a transmittal of funds in the amount of 
$250 or more that begins or ends outside the United States. For 
purposes of this paragraph (f), a transmittal of funds will be 
considered to begin or end outside the United States if a financial 
institution knows or has reason to know that the transmittor, 
transmittor's financial institution, recipient, or recipient's 
financial institution is located in, is ordinarily resident in, or is 
organized under the laws of a jurisdiction other than the United States 
or a jurisdiction within the United States.
* * * * *

PART 1020--RULES FOR BANKS

0
4. The authority citation for part 1020 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 12 U.S.C. 1829b and 1951-1959; 31 U.S.C. 5311-5314 
and 5316-5332; title III, sec. 314, Pub. L. 107-56, 115 Stat. 307; 
sec. 701, Pub. L. 114-74, 129 Stat. 599.

0
5. In Sec.  1020.410, revise the introductory text of paragraph (a) to 
read as follows:

[[Page 68019]]

Sec.  1020.410  Records to be made and retained by banks.

    (a) Each agent, agency, branch, or office located within the United 
States of a bank is subject the requirements of this paragraph (a) with 
respect to a funds transfer in the amount of $3,000 or more. A bank 
also is subject to the requirements of this paragraph (a) with respect 
to a funds transfer in the amount of $250 or more that begins or ends 
outside the United States. For purposes of this paragraph, a funds 
transfer will be considered to begin or end outside the United States 
if a bank knows or has reason to know that the originator, originator's 
bank, beneficiary, or beneficiary's bank is located in, is ordinarily 
resident in, or is organized under the laws of a jurisdiction other 
than the United States or a jurisdiction within the United States. For 
funds transfers subject to the requirements of this paragraph (a), each 
agent, agency, branch, or office located within the United States of a 
bank is required to retain either the original or a copy or 
reproduction of each of the following:
* * * * *

    In concurrence: By the Department of the Treasury.
Michael G. Mosier,
Deputy Director, Financial Crimes Enforcement Network.

    By order of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve 
System.
Ann Misback,
Secretary of the Board.
[FR Doc. 2020-23756 Filed 10-23-20; 11:15 am]
BILLING CODE 4810-02-P; 6210-01-P