Notice of Inventory Completion: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara, CA, 61968-61977 [2020-21705]

Download as PDF 61968 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 191 / Thursday, October 1, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Approval of a Phase 1 restoration plan and projects within, allows the TIG to develop information needed to fully consider design alternatives in a later restoration plan (phase 2). In the final Phase 1 RP #1, the LA TIG selected six conceptual projects for E&D, using funds as provided for in the DWH Consent Decree. Two of those projects selected to undergo E&D were the Barataria Basin Ridge and Marsh Creation Project Spanish Pass Increment (Spanish Pass project) and the Lake Borgne Marsh Creation Project Increment One (Lake Borgne project). Upon development of E&D alternatives for the two projects, a phase 2 restoration plan was drafted and an OPA and NEPA analysis were conducted on the design alternatives. Notice of availability of the draft Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2 was published in the Federal Register on October 18, 2019 (84 FR 55976). Public comment was encouraged and accepted until November 20, 2019. The LA TIG hosted a public webinar on October 28, 2019 to facilitate public review and comment. The LA TIG considered the public comments received and finalized the Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2, selecting construction designs for implementation of both projects. A summary of the public comments received and the LA TIG’s responses to those comments are presented in the final Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2. Overview of the LA TIG Final Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2 The Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2 is being released in accordance with OPA NRDA regulations found in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at 15 CFR part 990, NEPA and its implementing regulations found at 40 CFR parts 1500–1508, the Final PDARP/PEIS, and the Consent Decree. The Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2 provides OPA and NEPA analyses for a reasonable range of design alternatives for the Spanish Pass and Lake Borgne projects, and identifies the LA TIG’s selected design alternatives, those which the LA TIG believes best meet the objectives of the Spanish Pass and Lake Borgne projects. In accordance with NEPA, as part of the final Phase 2 RP/ EA #1.2, the Trustees issued a FONSI. The FONSI is available in Appendix F of the Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2. The Spanish Pass project is a component of an overall large-scale restoration strategy for the Barataria Basin that would reestablish, through multiple increments, ridge and intertidal marsh habitats degraded due to sea level rise, land subsidence, diminished sediment supply, and storm events. The total construction cost for VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:13 Sep 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 the Spanish Pass project is approximately $101,359,000 which will be funded from the Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats restoration type allocation provided for in the Consent Decree. The Lake Borgne project is a component of an overall large-scale restoration strategy for the southwestern shoreline of Lake Borgne that would reestablish, through multiple increments, the bay rim and intertidal marsh habitat. The estimated total construction cost for this increment is $101,823,000 will be funded also from the Wetlands, Coastal, and Nearshore Habitats restoration type allocation. Additional restoration planning for the Louisiana Restoration Area will continue. Administrative Record The documents comprising the Administrative Record for the Phase 2 RP/EA #1.2 can be viewed electronically at https://www.doi.gov/ deepwaterhorizon/adminrecord. Authority The authority for this action is the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (33 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.), its implementing Natural Resource Damage Assessment regulations found at 15 CFR part 990, and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) and its implementing regulations found at 40 CFR parts 1500–1508. Mary Josie Blanchard, Director of Gulf of Mexico Restoration, Department of Interior. [FR Doc. 2020–21750 Filed 9–30–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030957; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00050 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History at the address in this notice by November 2, 2020. DATES: Luke Swetland, President and CEO, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, telephone (805) 682–4711. ADDRESSES: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Santa Barbara, Ventura, San Luis Obispo, and Los Angeles Counties, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California and other Chumash representatives of nonfederally recognized Indian groups. E:\FR\FM\01OCN1.SGM 01OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 191 / Thursday, October 1, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES History and Description of the Remains Santa Barbara County In 1925 and 1988, human remains representing, at minimum two individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and G. Unzueta from Rincon Point (site CA–SBA–1). The individuals are represented by a partial cranium removed by Rogers and a partial skeleton removed by Unzueta. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Based on artifact types, the site dates to Phase 2a of the Middle Period (approximately 2,100 to 1,800 years ago). In 1928 and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and Phil Orr from Rincon Point (CA–SBA–119). The individuals are represented by crania, mandibles, fragmentary postcranial remains, and a tibia fragment. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are one turtle shell and one lot of ochre-stained soil. The site dates to either the late Early Period (approximately 3,000 to 4,000 years ago) or Phase 1 of the Middle Period (approximately 2,500 to 2,100 years ago). In June 1988, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed by SBMNH staff and volunteers from Rincon Point, ‘‘Shuku’’ (site CA–VEN–62A), after trenching for construction behind a private residence. The individuals are represented by one complete skeleton, postcranial elements, a cranial fragment, an ilium fragment and tooth of a subadult, and teeth from one infant and one adult. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sometime before 1935, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Higgins site (CA–SBA–6). L.M. Higgins, a property owner, donated the human remains of two individuals to the SBMNH in 1935. There is no data on when or by whom the third individual was removed. The individuals are represented by partial sets of human remains. No known individuals were identified. The 10 associated funerary objects are nine beads and one shell fragment. In 1925 and 1949, human remains representing, at minimum, 34 individuals were removed from Carpinteria (site CA–SBA–7). David Banks Rogers excavated 28 individuals in 1925, and Phil C. Orr excavated two individuals in 1949, during salvage work. An additional four individuals VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:13 Sep 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 from this site were discovered during physical examination of the collection. The human remains include 22 individuals represented by cranial elements, including one sub-adult; five individuals represented by partial sets of human remains; one individual represented by a humerus; two individuals represented by a group of cranial and minimal postcranial remains; and four individuals represented by a group of long bones and long bone fragments, including one sub-adult. No known individuals were identified. The seven associated funerary objects are one chert biface fragment; one sandstone bowl; one small pestle; one lot of red pigment; one chert knife; one chert chopper; and one sandstone mano. Sometime before October of 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from ‘‘Kolok’’ (site CA–SBA– 13). The individuals are represented by cranial elements. Mr. Kohlsadt, the property owner, donated the human remains to the SBMNH in October 1926. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sometime before 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Susan Denny from Drake (site CA–SBA–14). Denny, the property owner, donated the human remains to the SBMNH in 1966. The individual is represented by a partial set of remains. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1924 and sometime before 1935, human remains representing, at minimum, 29 individuals were removed from Fernald Point (CA–SBA–17). David Banks Rogers excavated 28 individuals in 1924, and George Hammond donated one individual to the SBMNH in 1935. The human remains include 18 individuals represented by cranial elements, including one elderly individual; eight individuals represented by postcranial elements, including one sub-adult; and three individuals represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between 1933 and 1934, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Clark Estate (site CA–SBA–20). Five individuals are represented by partial sets of remains, one of which consist only of postcranial elements. One individual is represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. PO 00000 Frm 00051 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61969 In 1924, 1989, and 1992, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from ‘‘Syuxtun’’ site (CA–SBA–27). David Banks Rogers excavated one individual in 1924. Further excavations were conducted by Cultural Resources Management professionals in 1989 and 1992. The individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1970 and 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were removed from Burton Mound (site CA–SBA–28). The property owner and a third party removed three of the individuals during development of the site; students from Santa Barbara City College excavated five individuals during a field school; and one additional set of partial human remains were found, reported to police, and turned over to the museum in 2001. The human remains include one individual represented by a partial cranium; one individual represented by postcranial elements; six individuals represented by cranial and postcranial fragments, including one sub-adult; and one individual represented by a single tooth. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On various dates, human remains representing, at minimum, 18 individuals were removed from ‘‘Mispu’’ (site CA–SBA–30 and CA– SBA–31). David Banks Rogers, Phil C. Orr, Santa Barbara City college staff and students, and private parties conducted the excavations. The human remains include six individuals represented by cranial elements; two individuals represented by postcranial elements; eight individuals represented by cranial and postcranial elements; and two individuals represented by unidentified fragments. No known individuals were identified. The 185 associated funerary objects are: 23 shell beads; 101 shell fragments; seven shells; 15 shell barrel beads; eight bone fragments; one piece of asphaltum; one steatite tube; 24 visible shell beads (in soil matrix within cranium), four pieces of charcoal; and one fragment of worked bone. In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by David Banks Rogers from Barger No. 1 (site CA–SBA–35). The individual is represented by a mandible fragment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In July 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from ‘‘Ushtahash’’ (site CA–SBA–37). This E:\FR\FM\01OCN1.SGM 01OCN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 61970 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 191 / Thursday, October 1, 2020 / Notices individual is represented by a cranium. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1924, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Modoc Road (site CA–SBA–38). Three individuals are represented by cranial elements and four individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1936, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Lee Ramirez from Cieneguitas (site CA–SBA–39), and were donated to the SBMNH in 1938. The individual is represented by a partial cranium. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a single lead shot. In June of 1933, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Twin Mounds (site CA–SBA–45). The individuals are represented by phalanges and teeth. No known individuals were identified. The 292 associated funerary objects are: Six steatite disc beads; one fragmented polished bone hairpin; 10 strands of beads; 125 shell beads; 13 shell bead fragments; two tubular steatite beads; 134 shell beads and bangles; and one mother-of-pearl ornament. In 1928, 1933, and 1941, human remains representing, at minimum, 45 individuals were removed from Mescalitan Island, ‘‘Helo’’ (site CA– SBA–46). Most of the human remains were excavated by Phil C. Orr, and some of the human remains were excavated by Harold E. Childes. The human remains include 15 individuals represented by complete or relatively complete skeletons, including one individual found interred atop an inlaid whale scapula and one individual identified as a child; three individuals represented by skeletons which have been preserved within a plaster jacket, two of whom are infants; 26 individuals represented by incomplete skeletons; and one individual represented by a cranium in which is embedded a projectile point. No known individuals were identified. The 7793 associated funerary objects are: 4807 Olivella biplicata beads; 58 Olivella biplicata bead fragments; 32 limpet beads; 63 limpet bead fragments; 22 abalone pendants; four cowry beads; 37 fish scales; 2279 shell fragments; 331 bone (faunal) fragments; 16 strands of shell beads; one lump of red ochre; 21 steatite beads; seven steatite ornaments; two steatite pendants; 24 Megathura VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:13 Sep 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 crenulata ornaments; 22 inlaid bone tubes; 11 teeth inlaid with Olivella biplicata beads; four steatite bead blanks; 22 projectile points; one abalone ornament; three stone tube beads; 10 bifaces; five abalone beads; one turtle shell rattle; three shell beads; one steatite pipe with bone mouthpiece; one seed; one scraper; one quartz crystal; one grave marker made from whale bone; one steatite bowl; and one sandstone charmstone. Sometime before the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Frank Williams and Robert Phelan from the south side of Goleta Slough (site CA– SBA–47). The individual is represented by a fragmented cranium. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1941, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr from ‘‘Heliyik’’ (site CA–SBA–48). One individual is represented by an incomplete and fragmentary skeleton, and the second individual is represented by a partial cranium. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1941, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from the Bishop site (CA–SBA–49). The individual is represented by a relatively complete cranium. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1925, human remains representing, at minimum, 17 individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Campbell No. 2 (site CA–SBA–52). The human remains include nine individuals represented by cranial elements; three individuals represented by postcranial elements; and five individuals represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are one Astrea undosa shell and one large Hinnites multirugosus shell. In 1925, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by David Banks Rogers from Campbell No. 1 (site CA–SBA–53). The individual is represented by a rib fragment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Corona del Mar (site CA–SBA–54). No documentation accompanies these human remains. The individual is represented by a cranial fragment. No PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1925, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from William No. 2 (site CA–SBA–57). Three individuals are represented by cranial elements, and one individual is represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a ‘‘lemon-shaped’’ stone. In 1925 and sometime between 1964 and 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed from Williams No. 1 (site CA– SBA–58). Four sets of human remains were excavated by David Banks Rogers and three sets of human remains were donated anonymously to the SBMNH in 1993. The human remains include two individuals represented by cranial elements; one individual represented by postcranial elements; and four individuals represented by both cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are one tabular piece of siltstone bifacially flaked on one edge and one biface. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 individuals were removed from ‘‘S’axpilil’’ (site CA–SBA–60). Most of the human remains were excavated by Phil C. Orr. Two sets of human remains were given to Midland School, Los Olilvos, in 1970 by Mrs. Shepherd and were subsequently donated to the SBMNH in 2011 by Ben Munger. The individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The 167 associated funerary objects are: One limpet ornament; one strand of Olivella biplicata beads; 113 Olivella biplicata beads; nine abalone beads and ornaments; two Olivella biplicata beads; one fluorite bead; 37 blue glass trade beads; two red glass trade beads; and one limpet shell container. In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Winchester No. 2 (site CA–SBA–69). One individual is represented by a fragmented mandible and a tibia fragment, and the second individual is represented by a long bone fragment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1926 and sometime before 2001, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were removed from Winchester No. 3 (site CA–SBA–71). David Banks Rogers excavated seven sets of human remains in 1926. An additional set of human remains was reported to the police, and E:\FR\FM\01OCN1.SGM 01OCN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 191 / Thursday, October 1, 2020 / Notices was turned over to the SBMNH in 2001. The human remains include four individuals represented by cranial elements; two individuals represented by postcranial elements; and two individuals represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The three associated funerary objects are one Olivella biplicata bead; one strand of beads or ornaments made from Haliotis shell; and one chipped stone knife. In 1926 and 1932, human remains representing, at minimum, 23 individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Tecolote No. 1 (site CA–SBA–72). The human remains include 11 individuals represented by cranial elements; 11 individuals are represented by postcranial elements; and one individual represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The 504 associated funerary objects are: 15 chert projectile points; 351 Olivella biplicata shell beads; one stone ring; one strand of assorted beads; 68 hair ornaments; 10 hair ornament fragments; 37 asphaltum skirt weights; one bone tube fragment; two bone fragments; 13 limpet ornaments; one perforated Olivella biplicata shell; two fragments of unmodified shell; one strand of Olivella biplicata and stone beads; and one piece of ochre. In 1926, 1929, and the 1980s, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were removed from Tecolote No. 2 (site CA–SBA–73). Five sets of human remains were excavated by David Banks Rogers in 1926; one set of human remains was donated to SBMNH in or around 1926; two sets of human remains were removed by construction workers in 1929; and one set of human remains was removed during unauthorized surface collection in the 1980s. The human remains include six individuals represented by cranial elements; one individual represented by postcranial elements; and two individuals represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sometime before 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were illegally removed by looters from Eagle Canyon (site CA– SBA–76). The Santa Barbara County Sherriff’s Department transferred the human remains to the SBMNH in 1981. Both individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1925 and sometime before 1936, 1979, and 2001, human remains representing, at minimum, five VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:13 Sep 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 individuals were removed from Mikiw (site CA–SBA–78). Two sets of human remains were excavated by David Banks Rogers in 1925, and three sets of human remains were acquired through private donations in 1936, 1979, and 2001. The human remains include three individuals represented by cranial elements; one individual represented by a few cranial and postcranial elements; and one individual represented by a single long bone fragment. No known individuals are identified. The one associated funerary object is a chert projectile point. In the 1920s, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed by William A. Edwards from Los Gatos (site CA– SBA–80). The human remains were donated to the SBMNH in 1992. The individuals are represented by numerous fragmentary cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between 1925 and 1926 and in May of 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, 33 individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and Harold Cocke from Las Llagas No. 1 (site CA– SBA–81). All the individuals are represented by partial sets of remains. No known individuals were identified. The 188 associated funerary objects are: Eight chert projectile points; one strand of Olivella biplicata beads; 13 mother of pearl ornaments; three sandstone bowls; one shell gorget; 12 strands of assorted shell beads; one sandstone pestle; one bone awl; 140 assorted shell beads; one clam shell ornament; one limpet ornament; four large bone beads; one shell necklace; one strands of limpet hair ornaments. In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Las Llagas No. 2 (site CA–SBA–82). One individual is represented by cranial elements, five individuals by minimal postcranial elements, and two individuals by a single tooth each, one of which has been identified as a subadult’s tooth. No known individuals were identified. The 543 associated funerary objects are 539 asphaltum skirt weights; two beads; and two shell fragments. Between 1925 and 1926 and on an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals were removed from El Capitan (site CA–SBA–84 and CA–SBA– 117). Five sets of human remains were excavated by David Banks Rogers, one set of human remains were transferred by The University of California, Davis, and one set of human remains was PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61971 excavated by an unknown person and transferred to the SBMNH in 1991. Three individuals are represented by cranial elements, two individuals are represented by cranial elements and a single postcranial element, and one individual is represented by a long bone fragment in which is embedded a splinter of chert. No known individuals were identified. The 34 associated funerary objects are one charmstone; three bone whistles; 11 ablalone ornaments; 11 shell hair ornaments; one strand of limpet hair ornaments; one strand of assorted beads; one staurotide ornament; four shell ornaments; and one quartz crystal. In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Refugio No. 1 (site CA–SBA–86). All three individuals are represented by partial sets of human remains. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Qasil (site CA–SBA–87). All six individuals are represented by partial sets of human remains. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the 1950s, human remains representing, at minimum, 12 individuals were removed from Teqepsh (site CA–SBA–477). Based on limited documentation, Albert Mohr and Martin Baumoff carried out the excavation for the University of California Archaeological Survey and the Smithsonian Institution. One individual is represented by a cranium, two individuals are represented by fragmented postcranial elements, and nine individuals are represented by partial sets of human remains. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sometime before 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Osbi (site CA–SBA–512 and CA–SBA– 513). All three individuals are represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Mrs. Klein, a private collector, from site CA–SBA–562 in Santa Barbara County, CA. This individual is represented by an incomplete skeleton. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1930, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed by Henry Abel and J. G. James E:\FR\FM\01OCN1.SGM 01OCN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 61972 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 191 / Thursday, October 1, 2020 / Notices from Salisbury Potrero (site CA–SBA– 1279). Three sets of human remains were donated to the SBMNH in 1963 and two sets of human remains were donated by Henry Abel’s daughter, Sally Speers, in 2006. All five individuals are represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On unknown dates, human remains representing, at minimum, 54 individuals were removed from unknown locations in Santa Barbara County, CA. These human remains lack sufficient provenience information to associate them with a specific site or locality. One set of human remains was discovered by a construction crew near the Education Building on the SBMNH campus on April 21, 2011, during work to improve handicap accessibility. A second set of human remains was collected by C. Otis Miller in 1931, from a burial (at an unidentified site) near the water’s edge on More Ranch, in Goleta. The human remains include 11 individuals represented by cranial elements; 19 individuals represented by postcranial elements; 10 individuals represented by cranial and postcranial elements; and 14 individuals represented by teeth. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In May 1927 and sometime before 1960 and 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, 14 individuals were removed from Coches Prietos, Liyam (site CA–SCRI–1), on Santa Cruz Island. Twelve sets of human remains are attributed to excavations conducted by Ronald Olson and David Banks Rogers in May 1927. Two additional sets of human remains were donated to the SBMNH, one in 1960 and one in 1987. Seven individuals are represented by cranial elements and one individual by cranial and minimal postcranial elements. Three individuals are represented by minimal postcranial elements, and three individuals by a single tooth each. No known individuals were identified. The 66 associated funerary objects are: Three pile perch teeth; two stone concretions; two bone fishhooks; two lots of pigment; one small steatite olla; four limpet shell pigment containers; one lot of cordage; one bone whistle; two bone fish barbs; one fragment of a bone implement; eight projectile points; 32 Haliotis ornaments; three strands of beads; one large stone drill; one stone scraper; and two canoe planks. In 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, 10 individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Arch Rock (site CA–SCRI–158), on Santa Cruz Island. Two individuals, VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:13 Sep 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 including one very old individual, are represented by cranial and minimal postcranial elements. Three individuals are represented by a single postcranial element each one element belongs to a sub-adult. Another element has a projectile point embedded in it. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a cowry shell lip ornament. In June 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and Ronald Olson from Christy Beach Site 4W, Ch’oloshush (CA–SCRI–236), on Santa Cruz Island. Three of the individuals are represented by cranial elements, and the other two individuals by minimal postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The 169 associated funerary objects are: One sample of pigment; one abalone shell containing black pigment; one abalone shell containing red pigment; one chert drill; three plank canoe fragments; 11 fragments of asphaltum basketry impressions; one piece of seagrass cordage; one projectile point; two strands of beads; 147 fragments of shell and shell beads. In 1936, 1947, and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and Phil C. Orr from Prisoner’s Harbor, Xaxas (site CA– SCRI–240), on Santa Cruz Island. Seven individuals are represented by cranial elements, and the other individual, a sub-adult, is represented by two teeth. No known individuals were identified. The 1514 associated funerary objects are: Four crystals; four gravers; two seal teeth; nine shell discs; two spiral shell beads; 80 gravers; one stone pipe; two glass beads; one shell container; one abalone ornament; 484 shell beads; two fluorite beads; 22 bone tool or ornament fragments; one soap root brush; one steatite bowl fragment; one projectile point; two asphaltum plugs; one asphaltum handle; one stone scraper; 36 tube beads; two musket ramrod thimbles; and 855 glass trade beads. In 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were by removed by Ronald Olson and David Banks Rogers from site CA–SCRI–253 (Christy Beach Site 4, Ch’oloshush), on Santa Cruz Island. Two individuals are represented by cranial elements, one individual is represented by a femur, and one individual is represented by three teeth. No known individuals were identified. The 68 associated funerary objects are: One projectile point; one pestle; four strands of shell beads; one strand of stone beads; six shell fragments; 10 shells; 19 shell beads; one bone barb; and 25 fishhook blanks. PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, 42 individuals were removed by Ronald Olson and David Banks Rogers from sites CA–SCRI–257 and CA–SCRI–191 (Christy Beach Site 3), on Santa Cruz Island. Eighteen individuals—one is a sub-adult—are represented only by cranial elements. Nineteen individuals –one is a subadult—are represented by postcranial elements. Five individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The 41 associated funerary objects are: two staurotide beads; four bone beads; one claw bead; one fishhook; 15 limpet ornaments; three bone tools; and 15 abalone ornaments. In August 1932, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Dr. Richard Van Valkenburgh from site CA–SCRI– 333 (El Monto´n, Fraser Point, Forney Cove), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Dr. Roy L. Moodie. The human remains are represented by a complete skeleton. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In August 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Dr. Carey Stanton from site CA–SCRI–383 (Christy Beach), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains were donated to the SBMNH in January 1991. The human remains are represented by two teeth and fragments of cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The 15 associated funerary objects are one steatite bowl and 14 pieces of stone debris. In 1983, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed illegally from site CA–SCRI– 436 (West Valdez No. 1), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains were confiscated by the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Department and transferred to the SBMNH in July 1986. The human remains are represented by two teeth. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1927 and sometime between 1982 and 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from site CA–SCRI–437 (West Valdez No. 2), on Santa Cruz Island. One set of human remains was removed by David Banks Rogers. Two additional sets of human remains that had been removed illegally, were confiscated by the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Department and transferred to the SBMNH in July 1986. The human remains are represented by postcranial elements. No known individuals were E:\FR\FM\01OCN1.SGM 01OCN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 191 / Thursday, October 1, 2020 / Notices identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Around 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed illegally from site CA–SCRI–444 (Hazard’s No. 1), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains were confiscated by the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Department and transferred to the SBMNH in July 1986. The human remains are represented by a single cranial fragment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In July 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from site CA–SCRI–445 (Valdez), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In July 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and Ronald Olson from site CA–SCRI–496 (Willows), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In July 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by David Banks Rogers from a site at Baby’s Harbor (SCRI–178), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Around 1929, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by David Banks Rogers from a site at Albert’s Anchorage, on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by a ranch worker from a site called Mount Diablo, on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by a partial cranium. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the early 1980s, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed illegally from an unrecorded site near Alamos, on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by cranial elements. They were confiscated by the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Department and transferred to the SBMNH in July 1986. No known individuals were VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:13 Sep 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from unprovenanced locations on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by teeth, cranial elements, and an incomplete skeleton. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1947, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI– 1 (Garan˜on Point), on Santa Rosa Island. The human remains are represented by a relatively complete skeleton. No known individuals were identified. The 737 associated funerary objects are one shell dish; one shell strand; eight shell beads; three bone fragments; one pearl; 28 faunal remains; 653 shell bead fragments; 23 whale bone implements; and 19 shell ornaments. Between 1948 and 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, 177 individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI–2A and CA–SRI–2B (Skull Gulch) and CA–SRI–2 (Unspecified Cemetery) on Santa Cruz Island. Of the 24 individuals removed from CA–SRI– 2A: Eight individuals are represented by cranial elements; four individuals are represented by complete skeletons; three individuals are represented by relatively complete skeletons; six individuals which include one subadult and three fetuses—are represented by postcranial elements; two individuals are represented by teeth; and one individual is represented by an infant burial encased in latex. Of the 140 individuals removed from CA–SRI– 2B: 96 individuals are represented by cranial elements; four individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements; 11 individuals are represented by postcranial elements; three individuals—which include one infant and one sub-adult—are represented by partial skeletons; five individuals are represented by relatively complete skeletons; 13 individuals are represented by complete skeletons; two individuals are represented by fetal/ infant skeletons; one individual is represented by human remains encased in plaster with artifacts; and five individuals are represented by teeth. Of the 13 individuals removed from CA– SRI–2 (Unspecified Cemetery): 11 individuals are represented by postcranial elements; one individual is represented by a vertebral column; and one individual is represented by a long bone fragment. The human remains cannot be assigned to a specific cemetery due to insufficient data. No known individuals were identified. The PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61973 7584 associated funerary objects are: 5790 beads and bead fragments; 45 bead strands; 13 asphaltum samples; four projectile points; one bone bead; five shell fishhooks; one abalone container; five seed samples; 40 shell fragments; two knives; eight stone beads; six fish vertebrae; four midden samples; one bone bipoint; 25 pendants/ornaments; 818 gravers; 16 bladelets; 26 pieces of ochre; one ochre sample; 18 bone fragments; 480 pieces of charcoal; one charcoal sample; one steatite bowl; one bag of faunal material; two donut stones; one sea mammal tooth; 10 chert drills; one tooth; three pieces of seagrass matting; one seagrass skirt; one bag of skirt weights; one pebble; two bone artifacts; one wood handle; one worked wood piece; one shark tooth; 12 wood fragments; one sandstone pestle; one container; one bone pry bar; one scraper; one piece of seagrass cordage; three shell artifacts; one flake; six chipped stone fragments; 24 Olivella biplicata shells; and 196 pieces of charcoal, bone, and shell. In 1949, 1950, and 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, 64 individuals, were removed from CA– SRI–3A and CA–SRI–3B (Tecolote Point), on Santa Rosa Island. 50 individuals are represented by cranial elements; three individuals are represented by complete skeletons; five individuals are represented by partial skeletons; and six individuals are represented by cranial elements with postcranial elements. The 1056 associated with funerary objects are: 654 beads and bead fragments; three bead strands; one bone strigil; five samples of pigment-stained sand; five abalone shells and shell fragments; two shell dishes; 151 Olivella biplicata beads with traces of red pigment; five donut stones; 118 asphaltum fragments; one bone hairpin; one abalone dish with pigmentstained sand; one crab claw; three mussel fragments; three limpet shells, 66 pieces of charcoal; one obsidian drill/knife; two bone bipoints; two pieces of modified bone; two awls; three wedges; six chert flakes; one incised gull ulna pin; six bone pry bars; four asphaltum basketry impressions; one shell ornament; five bone tools; one stone tool in asphaltum; one chert bipoint; one hipped stone drill; and one stone tool. In 1947, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI– 4 (Arlington Dunes), on Santa Rosa Island. Both individuals are represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. E:\FR\FM\01OCN1.SGM 01OCN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 61974 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 191 / Thursday, October 1, 2020 / Notices In 1948 and 1949 and in the 1960s, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI–5A and CA–SRI–5C (Survey Point) and CA– SRI–5 (Unspecified Cemetery), on Santa Rosa Island. Two individuals were collected from an eroding midden at CA–SRI–5 (Unspecified Cemetery), located along the mouth of Arlington Canyon, on Santa Rosa Island. The human remains were brought to the SBMNH in 2010. Eight individuals from CA–SRI–5A are represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The 614 associated funerary objects are three bone whistles; 37 shell ornaments; 474 shell beads and bead fragments; 64 shell beads and ornaments; seven bead strands; three bead and ornament strands; one bird bone fragment; one chipped stone knife; one bone awl; 19 ornaments; one bone whistle; two pendants; and one donut stone. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from CA– SRI–6 (Arlington Point), on Santa Rosa Island. One individual is represented by postcranial fragments and two individuals are represented by a relatively complete postcranial skeleton and a second right femur fragment. The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Mrs. Margaret Wooley in 1994. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 individuals were removed from CA– SRI–9A (Arlington Cave), on Santa Rosa Island. Three individuals—which include one sub-adult—are represented by cranial elements; one individual is represented by a postcranial fragment; three individuals are represented by relatively complete skeletons; and four individuals—which include one skeleton incased in plaster and two infant skeletons incased in plaster and matrix are represented by complete skeletons. The 66 associated funerary objects are two doughnut stones, 56 shell beads, three Haliotis dishes, four unmodified shells, and one basket holding the infant burial that is encased in plaster. In 1948, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI– 24, on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by a partial skeleton. The 11 associated funerary objects are: Two shell bead strands; one abalone ornament; six shell beads; and two small stones. VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:13 Sep 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 In 1948, 1949, 1951, 1957, and 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, 108 individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI– 41A (Can˜ada Verde Dunes), on Santa Rosa Island. 63 individuals—which include 13 sub-adults—are represented by cranial elements; seven individuals— which include one infant and one subadult—are represented by post-cranial elements; 13 individuals—which include two sub-adults—are represented by cranial elements with post-cranial elements; one individual is represented by a tooth and postcranial elements; six individuals are represented by complete skeletons; four individuals—which include two sub-adults—are represented by a relatively complete skeleton; 13 individuals—which include one infant and one-sub-adult—are represented by a partial skeleton; and one individual is represented by several undifferentiated fragments. The 13053 associated funerary objects are: 11925 shell beads and bead fragments; 12 incised bone fragments; three bone bipoints; 99 clam shell pendants; one piece of red pigment; 112 abalone pendants/ ornaments; two bone tools; three samples of charcoal; five shell bead strands; five bone whistles; 10 abalone shell rings; 24 shell pendants; 14 bone awls; four unmodified land snail; 26 bone pendants/ornaments; 128 stone beads; 10 steatite pendants; 383 bone beads and bead fragments; one decorated pendant with ochre staining; 20 charcoal pieces; 16 chert projectile points and point fragments; nine pieces of asphaltum; two bone whistle fragments; four steatite rings; two abalone shell fragments; three steatite elbow pipes; one abalone spangle; 10 animal bones/teeth; one steatite charmstone; one Olivella bead headband (in fragments); one projectile point hafted in elk antler; two bone tubes; one stone bead strand; one serpentine pendant; two tarring pebbles; 13 fragments of engraved bone tools; one donut stone; nine shell fragments; one shell with ochre; 18 bone fragments with ochre staining; one flaked chert tool; three pieces of unworked chert; one crab claw; 28 abalone shell beads and ornaments inlaid into asphaltum; 31 limpet shell ornaments; one bone disc; three ochre samples; 15 bird bones with asphaltum; two perforated stones; one striated pebble; one chipped stone hammer; one chert drill; one abrader; one chert knife/scraper; one unsorted midden sample; one Thais shell; one bone pin; seven abalone dishes/ containers; 15 quartz crystals; one chert flake; 28 charcoal/asphaltum fragments; PO 00000 Frm 00056 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 and 24 pieces of shell, stone, bone, and charcoal. In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI– 41B (Can˜ada Verde), on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by a partial cranium. The eight associated funerary objects are one bone bead, one clam shell bead, one unmodified Olivella biplicata shell bead, one spireground Olivella biplicata shell bead, one Olivella biplicata shell disc bead, and three Olivella biplicata shell barrel beads. In 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI– 41C (Can˜ada Verde, Cemetery C), on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by a cranium and mandible. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI– 41X (Can˜ada Verde, Cemetery X), on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by a relatively complete skeleton. The 268 associated funerary objects are 205 shell artifacts, 13 awls, one bone tool, five fragments of unmodified bone, 10 cores, 24 projectile points, one knife, one steatite cup, one doughnut stone, one asphaltum cake, four samples of pigment-stained sand, and two bone hairpins. In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI– 43A (Fox), on Santa Rosa Island. Two individuals—which include one subadult—are represented by cranial and postcranial elements; one individual is represented by postcranial remains; and three individuals are represented by complete skeletons. The 10 associated funerary objects are one abalone shell, two projectile points, one doughnut stone, one swordfish sword with carved handle, three tarring pebbles, and two bone tools. In August 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, 20 individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from CA–SRI–60 (Rancho House Canyon, Hichimin), on Santa Rosa Island. 11 individuals—which include one sub-adult—are represented by cranial elements; seven individuals— which include one sub-adult—are represented by postcranial elements, one of which has an arrowhead embedded in it; and two individuals— a sub-adult and an infant—are represented by teeth. The 1550 associated funerary objects are 851 Olivella beads and bead fragments/ E:\FR\FM\01OCN1.SGM 01OCN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 191 / Thursday, October 1, 2020 / Notices blanks; one asphaltum skirt weight; two biface fragments; two chert flakes; 34 drills; two clam shell ornaments; 45 abalone ornament fragments; two Megathura crenulata ornaments; one worked abalone rim fragment; one bone bipoint; two bone artifacts; three abalone tube beads; one dentalium tube bead; one unworked shell fragment; four chert knives; one arrowhead; two fishhook blanks; 296 bladelet drills; one bone pin; one bone whistle; one piece of twisted cordage; eight large clam tube beads; one strand of abalone beads; 226 shell bead fragments; seven fragments of eel grass matting; four bone tools; one abalone fishhook; one pierced piece of steatite; one rim fragment of a cup; one strand of stone and shell beads; two limpet ornaments; one abalone ornament; one bone awl; five chert points; one piece of hand forged metal; and 36 pendants and ornaments. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from CA–SRI– 61 (Skunk Point), on Santa Rosa Island. The human remains were given to Harold J. Bell of Camarillo by the thenforeman of the Vail and Vickers Ranch, and were subsequently donated to the SBMNH by Patricia Bell in 1987. The human remains are represented by a cranium and mandible. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1927 and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers (1927) and Phil C. Orr (1950) from CA–SRI–62 (Johnson’s Lee, ‘‘Nilal’uy’’), on Santa Rosa Island. Three individuals—which include two subadults—are represented by cranial elements; three individuals—which include one infant—are represented by postcranial elements; one individual, a sub-adult, is represented by cranial elements with postcranial elements; and four individuals—which include one sub-adult—are represented by complete skeletons. No known individuals were identified. The 176 associated funerary objects are one fragment of a pearshaped donut stone; one glass bead; one abalone fishhook; one maul; four worked bone artifacts; two unworked bone artifacts; one donut stone; four pieces of unwoven eel grass which were wrapped around the burials; 96 shell beads and bead blanks/fragments; one charcoal sample; one sandstone basket mortar; one abalone shell fragment; one abalone pendant; one Mitra idae shell; one abalone shell; one fishhook fragment; one pestle; one fish jaw ornament; 55 bone tube fragments; and one stone ornament. VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:13 Sep 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from CA– SRI–63 (Johnson’s East), on Santa Rosa Island. Beginning in 1950, the site was heavily impacted by the construction of a U.S. Air Force base. The remains were possibly recovered by Air Force personnel; however, there were no field notes from this salvage work that could be located. The four individuals are represented by partial crania, one of which is burned. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On October 4, 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI–72 (South of SE Anchorage), on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from CA–SRI–78 (Water Canyon), Santa Rosa Island. One very old individual is represented by a mandible; one individual is represented by cranial elements and 13 teeth; and one individual is represented by a phalanx. The eight associated funerary objects are one strand of shell, bone, and stone beads and seven shell bead fragments. In 1949, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from CA–SRI–128 (Pemberton No. 1 Well), on Santa Rosa Island. Two sets of human remains are attributed to Orr’s excavations in 1949 and one set of human remains was likely salvaged by oil drilling crews. The three individuals are represented by partial crania. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI– 168 (Mess Cave), on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by six rib fragments and strands of human hair. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In late 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA–SRI–173 (Arlington Springs), on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by two partial femora, including one encased in a soil matrix. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, 22 individuals were removed by W. Banning Vail from an PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61975 unknown location a few miles west of Ranch House, on Santa Rosa Island. These human remains were donated by Vail to the SBMNH in 1983. The human remains include cranial elements, teeth, postcranial elements, and additional unidentified fragments of bone. The minimum number of individuals was determined by the presence of 22 right scapulae. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals, were removed from unknown sites on Santa Rosa Island (NA–CA–SRI–XX–12–1 through NA– CA–SRI–XX–12–5). One set of remains was donated by Margaret Wooley in 1994. One set of remains was donated to the SBMNH in 2001 by Ed McGowan, who had obtained them from the estate of geologist Helmut Ehrenspeck, in the 1970s. One set of remains was donated to the SBMNH in 2001 by Cinda Shedore, who had obtained them from a rancher on Santa Rosa Island. One set of remains was donated to the SBMNH in 2008 by E.R. Blakley. One set of remains was discovered by Raymond Winters’s uncle in the 1940s and was later donated to the Museum by Mr. Winters in 2007. Four individuals are represented by cranial elements and one individual is represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The 82 associated funerary objects are one Olivella biplicata barrel bead, one strand of shell beads, 77 bead fragments, one Haliotis pendant, one Tivela stultorum ornament, and one worked ground stone artifact. Ventura County On a date prior to 1998, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from Simomo (site CA–VEN–24). The human remains were donated to the SBMNH in 1998 by Ed Mercurio. The individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sometime between May 7 and June 26, 1942, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr from Soule Ranch (site CA–VEN–61). The individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The 110 associated funerary objects are one bone awl, one bone tube bead, three abalone beads, two stone bowls, 14 decorated bone tube fragments, 53 Olivella beads, one biface, one stone weight, one perforated tooth, one strand of shell E:\FR\FM\01OCN1.SGM 01OCN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 61976 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 191 / Thursday, October 1, 2020 / Notices beads with a tooth, five whistle fragements, one bone implement, 20 bone tube fragments, one stone sphere, one steatite mortar, one Trivia californiana shell, one Cerithidea sp. horn shell, one turtle shell in fragments, and one bone hairpin. Sometime in the 1960s, human remains representing, at minimum, 12 individuals were removed by Robert O. Browne from the Browne site (CA– VEN–150). The human remains were transferred to the SBMNH in 2005. The individuals—which include one subadult—are represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date before 1998, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Chumash Park (site CA–VEN–165). The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Ed Mercurio in 1998. The individual is represented by a fragmented mandible with fragmented postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1937, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by John G. Dalton from an unknown location near Ojai. The individual is represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In August 1931, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by C. Otis Miller from Lake Sherwood. The individual is represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1983, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed by Ken Ritzi from an unknown location in Oxnard. The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Ken Ritzi in 2012. The individual is represented by a femur fragment. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a pestle. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from an unknown location in Ventura County. The individuals are represented by one mandible and three unassociated loose teeth. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. San Luis Obispo County In late October or early November 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:13 Sep 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 from Shell Beach (site CA–SLO–58). The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Gregory Garman of Centralia College. The individual is represented by a fragmentary cranium and mandible with minimal postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Morro Bay Mesa. The human remains were labeled with ‘‘N. of Main St., Moro Bay Mesa, Overlooking Moro Rock.’’ The individual is represented by a cranium and mandible. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In March 1935, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from near Morro Bay and the Standard Oil Plant. The human remains were discovered by Mrs. Bennie Martinez, who donated them to the SBMNH. The individual is represented by a cranium. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sometime prior to 1954, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site CA– SLO–834, one mile east of Atascadero, San Luis Obispo County, CA. The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Major George Mansfield in 1954. The individual is represented by a vertebra. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Los Angeles County On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Solstice Canyon. The human remains were found in Phil Orr’s personal collection, and were donated to the SBMNH. The individual is represented by a cranium and a mandible. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Sometime prior to 1998, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from unknown locations in Los Angeles County. According to the labeling, the origin of the human remains is, variously, ‘‘Agoura’’ and the ‘‘Santa Monica Mtns. Coast, west of Zuma Beach.’’ The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Ed Mercurio in 1998. One individual is represented by teeth, and the other individual is represented by a fragmentary cranium. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The majority of the human remains and associated funerary objects listed in PO 00000 Frm 00058 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 this notice date to three periods in prehistory recognized by archeologists working the Santa Barbara Channel region: Early Period (9,000 to 3,000 years ago), Middle Period (3,000 to 800 years ago), and Late Period (800 to 200 years ago). Linguistic, archeological, and biological evidence demonstrate many millennia of Chumash cultural presence in the Santa Barbara region, beginning in the Early Period. A cultural affiliation study completed for the National Park Service in 1999 demonstrated that Chumash communities in the twentieth century possess continuity with identifiable earlier groups that inhabited the Santa Barbara Channel region at the time of European contact and settlement. The only federally recognized tribe of Chumash Indians today is the Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians. Some individual members of the federally recognized Tejon Indian Tribe also possess Chumash ancestry. Determinations Made by the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History Officials of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 1,011 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 36,943 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Luke Swetland, President and CEO, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, telephone (805) 682–4711, by November 2, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians E:\FR\FM\01OCN1.SGM 01OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 191 / Thursday, October 1, 2020 / Notices of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California may proceed. The Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California that this notice has been published. Dated: September 22, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–21705 Filed 9–30–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701–TA–432 and 731– TA–1024–1028 (Third Review) and AA1921– 188 (Fifth Review)] Prestressed Concrete Steel Wire Strand From Brazil, India, Japan, Korea, Mexico, and Thailand; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Commission hereby gives notice of the scheduling of expedited reviews pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930 (‘‘the Act’’) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on prestressed concrete steel wire strand (‘‘PC strand’’) from Brazil, India, Korea, Mexico, and Thailand, and the antidumping finding on PC strand from Japan, as well as revocation of the countervailing duty order on PC strand from India, would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury. DATES: June 5, 2020. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tyler Berard (202–205–3354), Office of Investigations, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20436. Hearingimpaired persons can obtain information on this matter by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on 202– 205–1810. Persons with mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should contact the Office of the Secretary at 202–205–2000. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its internet server (https:// www.usitc.gov). The public record for these reviews may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at https://edis.usitc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background.—On June 5, 2020, the jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 22:13 Sep 30, 2020 Jkt 253001 Commission determined that the domestic interested party group response to its notice of institution (85 FR 12331, March 2, 2020) of the subject five-year reviews was adequate and that the respondent interested party group response was inadequate. The Commission did not find any other circumstances that would warrant conducting full reviews.1 Accordingly, the Commission determined that it would conduct expedited reviews pursuant to section 751(c)(3) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1675(c)(3)). For further information concerning the conduct of these reviews and rules of general application, consult the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure, part 201, subparts A and B (19 CFR part 201), and part 207, subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207). Please note the Secretary’s Office will accept only electronic filings at this time. Filings must be made through the Commission’s Electronic Document Information System (EDIS, https:// edis.usitc.gov). No in-person paperbased filings or paper copies of any electronic filings will be accepted until further notice. Staff report.—A staff report containing information concerning the subject matter of the reviews will be placed in the nonpublic record on September 28, 2020, and made available to persons on the Administrative Protective Order service list for these reviews. A public version will be issued thereafter, pursuant to section 207.62(d)(4) of the Commission’s rules. Written submissions.—As provided in section 207.62(d) of the Commission’s rules, interested parties that are parties to the reviews and that have provided individually adequate responses to the notice of institution,2 and any party other than an interested party to the reviews may file written comments with the Secretary on what determinations the Commission should reach in the reviews. Comments are due on or before October 5, 2020 and may not contain new factual information. Any person that is neither a party to the five-year reviews nor an interested party may submit a brief written statement (which shall not contain any new factual information) pertinent to the reviews by 1 A record of the Commissioners’ votes is available from the Office of the Secretary and at the Commission’s website. 2 The Commission has found the joint response to its notice of institution filed on behalf of three domestic producers (Insteel Wire Products Company, Sumiden Wire Products Corporation, and WMC Steel, LLC) to be individually adequate. Comments from other interested parties will not be accepted (see 19 CFR 207.62(d)(2)). PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 61977 October 5, 2020. However, should the Department of Commerce (‘‘Commerce’’) extend the time limit for its completion of the final results of its reviews, the deadline for comments (which may not contain new factual information) on Commerce’s final results is three business days after the issuance of Commerce’s results. If comments contain business proprietary information (BPI), they must conform with the requirements of sections 201.6, 207.3, and 207.7 of the Commission’s rules. The Commission’s Handbook on Filing Procedures, available on the Commission’s website at https:// www.usitc.gov/documents/handbook_ on_filing_procedures.pdf, elaborates upon the Commission’s procedures with respect to filings. In accordance with sections 201.16(c) and 207.3 of the rules, each document filed by a party to the reviews must be served on all other parties to the reviews (as identified by either the public or BPI service list), and a certificate of service must be timely filed. The Secretary will not accept a document for filing without a certificate of service. Determination.—The Commission has determined these reviews are extraordinarily complicated and therefore has determined to exercise its authority to extend the review period by up to 90 days pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 1675(c)(5)(B). Authority: These reviews are being conducted under authority of title VII of the Tariff Act of 1930; this notice is published pursuant to section 207.62 of the Commission’s rules. By order of the Commission. Issued: September 28, 2020. Lisa Barton, Secretary to the Commission. [FR Doc. 2020–21737 Filed 9–30–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7020–02–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701–TA–437 and 731– TA–1060–1061 (Third Review)] Carbazole Violet Pigment 23 From China and India; Institution of FiveYear Reviews United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it has instituted reviews pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930 (‘‘the Act’’), as amended, to determine whether revocation of the countervailing duty order on carbazole SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\01OCN1.SGM 01OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 191 (Thursday, October 1, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 61968-61977]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-21705]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0030957; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Santa Barbara Museum of Natural 
History, Santa Barbara, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History has completed an 
inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in 
consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation 
between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-
day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants 
or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request to the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. If no 
additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human 
remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, 
Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History 
at the address in this notice by November 2, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Luke Swetland, President and CEO, Santa Barbara Museum of 
Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, 
telephone (805) 682-4711.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Santa Barbara 
Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara, CA. The human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed from Santa Barbara, Ventura, 
San Luis Obispo, and Los Angeles Counties, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Santa 
Barbara Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation 
with representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians 
of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California and other Chumash 
representatives of non-federally recognized Indian groups.

[[Page 61969]]

History and Description of the Remains

Santa Barbara County

    In 1925 and 1988, human remains representing, at minimum two 
individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and G. Unzueta from 
Rincon Point (site CA-SBA-1). The individuals are represented by a 
partial cranium removed by Rogers and a partial skeleton removed by 
Unzueta. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present. Based on artifact types, the site dates to Phase 
2a of the Middle Period (approximately 2,100 to 1,800 years ago).
    In 1928 and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, four 
individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and Phil Orr from Rincon 
Point (CA-SBA-119). The individuals are represented by crania, 
mandibles, fragmentary postcranial remains, and a tibia fragment. No 
known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects 
are one turtle shell and one lot of ochre-stained soil. The site dates 
to either the late Early Period (approximately 3,000 to 4,000 years 
ago) or Phase 1 of the Middle Period (approximately 2,500 to 2,100 
years ago).
    In June 1988, human remains representing, at minimum, seven 
individuals were removed by SBMNH staff and volunteers from Rincon 
Point, ``Shuku'' (site CA-VEN-62A), after trenching for construction 
behind a private residence. The individuals are represented by one 
complete skeleton, postcranial elements, a cranial fragment, an ilium 
fragment and tooth of a sub-adult, and teeth from one infant and one 
adult. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Sometime before 1935, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from Higgins site (CA-SBA-6). L.M. Higgins, a 
property owner, donated the human remains of two individuals to the 
SBMNH in 1935. There is no data on when or by whom the third individual 
was removed. The individuals are represented by partial sets of human 
remains. No known individuals were identified. The 10 associated 
funerary objects are nine beads and one shell fragment.
    In 1925 and 1949, human remains representing, at minimum, 34 
individuals were removed from Carpinteria (site CA-SBA-7). David Banks 
Rogers excavated 28 individuals in 1925, and Phil C. Orr excavated two 
individuals in 1949, during salvage work. An additional four 
individuals from this site were discovered during physical examination 
of the collection. The human remains include 22 individuals represented 
by cranial elements, including one sub-adult; five individuals 
represented by partial sets of human remains; one individual 
represented by a humerus; two individuals represented by a group of 
cranial and minimal postcranial remains; and four individuals 
represented by a group of long bones and long bone fragments, including 
one sub-adult. No known individuals were identified. The seven 
associated funerary objects are one chert biface fragment; one 
sandstone bowl; one small pestle; one lot of red pigment; one chert 
knife; one chert chopper; and one sandstone mano.
    Sometime before October of 1926, human remains representing, at 
minimum, two individuals were removed from ``Kolok'' (site CA-SBA-13). 
The individuals are represented by cranial elements. Mr. Kohlsadt, the 
property owner, donated the human remains to the SBMNH in October 1926. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    Sometime before 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed by Susan Denny from Drake (site CA-SBA-14). 
Denny, the property owner, donated the human remains to the SBMNH in 
1966. The individual is represented by a partial set of remains. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1924 and sometime before 1935, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 29 individuals were removed from Fernald Point (CA-SBA-17). 
David Banks Rogers excavated 28 individuals in 1924, and George Hammond 
donated one individual to the SBMNH in 1935. The human remains include 
18 individuals represented by cranial elements, including one elderly 
individual; eight individuals represented by postcranial elements, 
including one sub-adult; and three individuals represented by cranial 
and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Between 1933 and 1934, human remains representing, at minimum, six 
individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Clark Estate (site 
CA-SBA-20). Five individuals are represented by partial sets of 
remains, one of which consist only of postcranial elements. One 
individual is represented by cranial elements. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1924, 1989, and 1992, human remains representing, at minimum, 
three individuals were removed from ``Syuxtun'' site (CA-SBA-27). David 
Banks Rogers excavated one individual in 1924. Further excavations were 
conducted by Cultural Resources Management professionals in 1989 and 
1992. The individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial 
elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In 1970 and 1971, human remains representing, at minimum, nine 
individuals were removed from Burton Mound (site CA-SBA-28). The 
property owner and a third party removed three of the individuals 
during development of the site; students from Santa Barbara City 
College excavated five individuals during a field school; and one 
additional set of partial human remains were found, reported to police, 
and turned over to the museum in 2001. The human remains include one 
individual represented by a partial cranium; one individual represented 
by postcranial elements; six individuals represented by cranial and 
postcranial fragments, including one sub-adult; and one individual 
represented by a single tooth. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    On various dates, human remains representing, at minimum, 18 
individuals were removed from ``Mispu'' (site CA-SBA-30 and CA-SBA-31). 
David Banks Rogers, Phil C. Orr, Santa Barbara City college staff and 
students, and private parties conducted the excavations. The human 
remains include six individuals represented by cranial elements; two 
individuals represented by postcranial elements; eight individuals 
represented by cranial and postcranial elements; and two individuals 
represented by unidentified fragments. No known individuals were 
identified. The 185 associated funerary objects are: 23 shell beads; 
101 shell fragments; seven shells; 15 shell barrel beads; eight bone 
fragments; one piece of asphaltum; one steatite tube; 24 visible shell 
beads (in soil matrix within cranium), four pieces of charcoal; and one 
fragment of worked bone.
    In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from Barger No. 1 (site CA-SBA-35). 
The individual is represented by a mandible fragment. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In July 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from ``Ushtahash'' (site CA-SBA-37). This

[[Page 61970]]

individual is represented by a cranium. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1924, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from Modoc Road (site CA-SBA-38). 
Three individuals are represented by cranial elements and four 
individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1936, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by Lee Ramirez from Cieneguitas (site CA-SBA-39), and were 
donated to the SBMNH in 1938. The individual is represented by a 
partial cranium. No known individuals were identified. The one 
associated funerary object is a single lead shot.
    In June of 1933, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Twin Mounds (site 
CA-SBA-45). The individuals are represented by phalanges and teeth. No 
known individuals were identified. The 292 associated funerary objects 
are: Six steatite disc beads; one fragmented polished bone hairpin; 10 
strands of beads; 125 shell beads; 13 shell bead fragments; two tubular 
steatite beads; 134 shell beads and bangles; and one mother-of-pearl 
ornament.
    In 1928, 1933, and 1941, human remains representing, at minimum, 45 
individuals were removed from Mescalitan Island, ``Helo'' (site CA-SBA-
46). Most of the human remains were excavated by Phil C. Orr, and some 
of the human remains were excavated by Harold E. Childes. The human 
remains include 15 individuals represented by complete or relatively 
complete skeletons, including one individual found interred atop an 
inlaid whale scapula and one individual identified as a child; three 
individuals represented by skeletons which have been preserved within a 
plaster jacket, two of whom are infants; 26 individuals represented by 
incomplete skeletons; and one individual represented by a cranium in 
which is embedded a projectile point. No known individuals were 
identified. The 7793 associated funerary objects are: 4807 Olivella 
biplicata beads; 58 Olivella biplicata bead fragments; 32 limpet beads; 
63 limpet bead fragments; 22 abalone pendants; four cowry beads; 37 
fish scales; 2279 shell fragments; 331 bone (faunal) fragments; 16 
strands of shell beads; one lump of red ochre; 21 steatite beads; seven 
steatite ornaments; two steatite pendants; 24 Megathura crenulata 
ornaments; 22 inlaid bone tubes; 11 teeth inlaid with Olivella 
biplicata beads; four steatite bead blanks; 22 projectile points; one 
abalone ornament; three stone tube beads; 10 bifaces; five abalone 
beads; one turtle shell rattle; three shell beads; one steatite pipe 
with bone mouthpiece; one seed; one scraper; one quartz crystal; one 
grave marker made from whale bone; one steatite bowl; and one sandstone 
charmstone.
    Sometime before the 1930s, human remains representing, at minimum, 
one individual were removed by Frank Williams and Robert Phelan from 
the south side of Goleta Slough (site CA-SBA-47). The individual is 
represented by a fragmented cranium. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1941, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed by Phil C. Orr from ``Heliyik'' (site CA-SBA-48). One 
individual is represented by an incomplete and fragmentary skeleton, 
and the second individual is represented by a partial cranium. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1941, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by Phil C. Orr from the Bishop site (CA-SBA-49). The 
individual is represented by a relatively complete cranium. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1925, human remains representing, at minimum, 17 individuals 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from Campbell No. 2 (site CA-SBA-
52). The human remains include nine individuals represented by cranial 
elements; three individuals represented by postcranial elements; and 
five individuals represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No 
known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects 
are one Astrea undosa shell and one large Hinnites multirugosus shell.
    In 1925, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from Campbell No. 1 (site CA-SBA-
53). The individual is represented by a rib fragment. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Corona del Mar (site CA-SBA-54). No 
documentation accompanies these human remains. The individual is 
represented by a cranial fragment. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1925, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from William No. 2 (site CA-SBA-57). 
Three individuals are represented by cranial elements, and one 
individual is represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known 
individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a 
``lemon-shaped'' stone.
    In 1925 and sometime between 1964 and 1966, human remains 
representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed from Williams 
No. 1 (site CA-SBA-58). Four sets of human remains were excavated by 
David Banks Rogers and three sets of human remains were donated 
anonymously to the SBMNH in 1993. The human remains include two 
individuals represented by cranial elements; one individual represented 
by postcranial elements; and four individuals represented by both 
cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. 
The two associated funerary objects are one tabular piece of siltstone 
bifacially flaked on one edge and one biface.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 
individuals were removed from ``S'axpilil'' (site CA-SBA-60). Most of 
the human remains were excavated by Phil C. Orr. Two sets of human 
remains were given to Midland School, Los Olilvos, in 1970 by Mrs. 
Shepherd and were subsequently donated to the SBMNH in 2011 by Ben 
Munger. The individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial 
elements. No known individuals were identified. The 167 associated 
funerary objects are: One limpet ornament; one strand of Olivella 
biplicata beads; 113 Olivella biplicata beads; nine abalone beads and 
ornaments; two Olivella biplicata beads; one fluorite bead; 37 blue 
glass trade beads; two red glass trade beads; and one limpet shell 
container.
    In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from Winchester No. 2 (site CA-SBA-
69). One individual is represented by a fragmented mandible and a tibia 
fragment, and the second individual is represented by a long bone 
fragment. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In 1926 and sometime before 2001, human remains representing, at 
minimum, eight individuals were removed from Winchester No. 3 (site CA-
SBA-71). David Banks Rogers excavated seven sets of human remains in 
1926. An additional set of human remains was reported to the police, 
and

[[Page 61971]]

was turned over to the SBMNH in 2001. The human remains include four 
individuals represented by cranial elements; two individuals 
represented by postcranial elements; and two individuals represented by 
cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. 
The three associated funerary objects are one Olivella biplicata bead; 
one strand of beads or ornaments made from Haliotis shell; and one 
chipped stone knife.
    In 1926 and 1932, human remains representing, at minimum, 23 
individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from Tecolote No. 1 
(site CA-SBA-72). The human remains include 11 individuals represented 
by cranial elements; 11 individuals are represented by postcranial 
elements; and one individual represented by cranial and postcranial 
elements. No known individuals were identified. The 504 associated 
funerary objects are: 15 chert projectile points; 351 Olivella 
biplicata shell beads; one stone ring; one strand of assorted beads; 68 
hair ornaments; 10 hair ornament fragments; 37 asphaltum skirt weights; 
one bone tube fragment; two bone fragments; 13 limpet ornaments; one 
perforated Olivella biplicata shell; two fragments of unmodified shell; 
one strand of Olivella biplicata and stone beads; and one piece of 
ochre.
    In 1926, 1929, and the 1980s, human remains representing, at 
minimum, nine individuals were removed from Tecolote No. 2 (site CA-
SBA-73). Five sets of human remains were excavated by David Banks 
Rogers in 1926; one set of human remains was donated to SBMNH in or 
around 1926; two sets of human remains were removed by construction 
workers in 1929; and one set of human remains was removed during 
unauthorized surface collection in the 1980s. The human remains include 
six individuals represented by cranial elements; one individual 
represented by postcranial elements; and two individuals represented by 
cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    Sometime before 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were illegally removed by looters from Eagle Canyon (site 
CA-SBA-76). The Santa Barbara County Sherriff's Department transferred 
the human remains to the SBMNH in 1981. Both individuals are 
represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1925 and sometime before 1936, 1979, and 2001, human remains 
representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed from Mikiw 
(site CA-SBA-78). Two sets of human remains were excavated by David 
Banks Rogers in 1925, and three sets of human remains were acquired 
through private donations in 1936, 1979, and 2001. The human remains 
include three individuals represented by cranial elements; one 
individual represented by a few cranial and postcranial elements; and 
one individual represented by a single long bone fragment. No known 
individuals are identified. The one associated funerary object is a 
chert projectile point.
    In the 1920s, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed by William A. Edwards from Los Gatos (site CA-
SBA-80). The human remains were donated to the SBMNH in 1992. The 
individuals are represented by numerous fragmentary cranial and 
postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    Between 1925 and 1926 and in May of 1962, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 33 individuals were removed by David Banks 
Rogers and Harold Cocke from Las Llagas No. 1 (site CA-SBA-81). All the 
individuals are represented by partial sets of remains. No known 
individuals were identified. The 188 associated funerary objects are: 
Eight chert projectile points; one strand of Olivella biplicata beads; 
13 mother of pearl ornaments; three sandstone bowls; one shell gorget; 
12 strands of assorted shell beads; one sandstone pestle; one bone awl; 
140 assorted shell beads; one clam shell ornament; one limpet ornament; 
four large bone beads; one shell necklace; one strands of limpet hair 
ornaments.
    In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from Las Llagas No. 2 (site CA-SBA-
82). One individual is represented by cranial elements, five 
individuals by minimal postcranial elements, and two individuals by a 
single tooth each, one of which has been identified as a sub-adult's 
tooth. No known individuals were identified. The 543 associated 
funerary objects are 539 asphaltum skirt weights; two beads; and two 
shell fragments.
    Between 1925 and 1926 and on an unknown date, human remains 
representing, at minimum, six individuals were removed from El Capitan 
(site CA-SBA-84 and CA-SBA-117). Five sets of human remains were 
excavated by David Banks Rogers, one set of human remains were 
transferred by The University of California, Davis, and one set of 
human remains was excavated by an unknown person and transferred to the 
SBMNH in 1991. Three individuals are represented by cranial elements, 
two individuals are represented by cranial elements and a single 
postcranial element, and one individual is represented by a long bone 
fragment in which is embedded a splinter of chert. No known individuals 
were identified. The 34 associated funerary objects are one charmstone; 
three bone whistles; 11 ablalone ornaments; 11 shell hair ornaments; 
one strand of limpet hair ornaments; one strand of assorted beads; one 
staurotide ornament; four shell ornaments; and one quartz crystal.
    In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from Refugio No. 1 (site CA-SBA-86). 
All three individuals are represented by partial sets of human remains. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    In 1926, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from Qasil (site CA-SBA-87). All six 
individuals are represented by partial sets of human remains. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In the 1950s, human remains representing, at minimum, 12 
individuals were removed from Teqepsh (site CA-SBA-477). Based on 
limited documentation, Albert Mohr and Martin Baumoff carried out the 
excavation for the University of California Archaeological Survey and 
the Smithsonian Institution. One individual is represented by a 
cranium, two individuals are represented by fragmented postcranial 
elements, and nine individuals are represented by partial sets of human 
remains. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Sometime before 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from Osbi (site CA-SBA-512 and CA-SBA-513). 
All three individuals are represented by cranial elements. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by Mrs. Klein, a private collector, from site CA-SBA-562 
in Santa Barbara County, CA. This individual is represented by an 
incomplete skeleton. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1930, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals 
were removed by Henry Abel and J. G. James

[[Page 61972]]

from Salisbury Potrero (site CA-SBA-1279). Three sets of human remains 
were donated to the SBMNH in 1963 and two sets of human remains were 
donated by Henry Abel's daughter, Sally Speers, in 2006. All five 
individuals are represented by cranial elements. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On unknown dates, human remains representing, at minimum, 54 
individuals were removed from unknown locations in Santa Barbara 
County, CA. These human remains lack sufficient provenience information 
to associate them with a specific site or locality. One set of human 
remains was discovered by a construction crew near the Education 
Building on the SBMNH campus on April 21, 2011, during work to improve 
handicap accessibility. A second set of human remains was collected by 
C. Otis Miller in 1931, from a burial (at an unidentified site) near 
the water's edge on More Ranch, in Goleta. The human remains include 11 
individuals represented by cranial elements; 19 individuals represented 
by postcranial elements; 10 individuals represented by cranial and 
postcranial elements; and 14 individuals represented by teeth. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In May 1927 and sometime before 1960 and 1987, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 14 individuals were removed from Coches 
Prietos, Liyam (site CA-SCRI-1), on Santa Cruz Island. Twelve sets of 
human remains are attributed to excavations conducted by Ronald Olson 
and David Banks Rogers in May 1927. Two additional sets of human 
remains were donated to the SBMNH, one in 1960 and one in 1987. Seven 
individuals are represented by cranial elements and one individual by 
cranial and minimal postcranial elements. Three individuals are 
represented by minimal postcranial elements, and three individuals by a 
single tooth each. No known individuals were identified. The 66 
associated funerary objects are: Three pile perch teeth; two stone 
concretions; two bone fishhooks; two lots of pigment; one small 
steatite olla; four limpet shell pigment containers; one lot of 
cordage; one bone whistle; two bone fish barbs; one fragment of a bone 
implement; eight projectile points; 32 Haliotis ornaments; three 
strands of beads; one large stone drill; one stone scraper; and two 
canoe planks.
    In 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, 10 individuals 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from Arch Rock (site CA-SCRI-158), 
on Santa Cruz Island. Two individuals, including one very old 
individual, are represented by cranial and minimal postcranial 
elements. Three individuals are represented by a single postcranial 
element each one element belongs to a sub-adult. Another element has a 
projectile point embedded in it. No known individuals were identified. 
The one associated funerary object is a cowry shell lip ornament.
    In June 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, five 
individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and Ronald Olson from 
Christy Beach Site 4W, Ch'oloshush (CA-SCRI-236), on Santa Cruz Island. 
Three of the individuals are represented by cranial elements, and the 
other two individuals by minimal postcranial elements. No known 
individuals were identified. The 169 associated funerary objects are: 
One sample of pigment; one abalone shell containing black pigment; one 
abalone shell containing red pigment; one chert drill; three plank 
canoe fragments; 11 fragments of asphaltum basketry impressions; one 
piece of seagrass cordage; one projectile point; two strands of beads; 
147 fragments of shell and shell beads.
    In 1936, 1947, and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, 
eight individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and Phil C. Orr 
from Prisoner's Harbor, Xaxas (site CA-SCRI-240), on Santa Cruz Island. 
Seven individuals are represented by cranial elements, and the other 
individual, a sub-adult, is represented by two teeth. No known 
individuals were identified. The 1514 associated funerary objects are: 
Four crystals; four gravers; two seal teeth; nine shell discs; two 
spiral shell beads; 80 gravers; one stone pipe; two glass beads; one 
shell container; one abalone ornament; 484 shell beads; two fluorite 
beads; 22 bone tool or ornament fragments; one soap root brush; one 
steatite bowl fragment; one projectile point; two asphaltum plugs; one 
asphaltum handle; one stone scraper; 36 tube beads; two musket ramrod 
thimbles; and 855 glass trade beads.
    In 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals 
were by removed by Ronald Olson and David Banks Rogers from site CA-
SCRI-253 (Christy Beach Site 4, Ch'oloshush), on Santa Cruz Island. Two 
individuals are represented by cranial elements, one individual is 
represented by a femur, and one individual is represented by three 
teeth. No known individuals were identified. The 68 associated funerary 
objects are: One projectile point; one pestle; four strands of shell 
beads; one strand of stone beads; six shell fragments; 10 shells; 19 
shell beads; one bone barb; and 25 fishhook blanks.
    In 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, 42 individuals 
were removed by Ronald Olson and David Banks Rogers from sites CA-SCRI-
257 and CA-SCRI-191 (Christy Beach Site 3), on Santa Cruz Island. 
Eighteen individuals--one is a sub-adult--are represented only by 
cranial elements. Nineteen individuals -one is a sub-adult--are 
represented by postcranial elements. Five individuals are represented 
by cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were 
identified. The 41 associated funerary objects are: two staurotide 
beads; four bone beads; one claw bead; one fishhook; 15 limpet 
ornaments; three bone tools; and 15 abalone ornaments.
    In August 1932, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed by Dr. Richard Van Valkenburgh from site CA-
SCRI-333 (El Mont[oacute]n, Fraser Point, Forney Cove), on Santa Cruz 
Island. The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Dr. Roy L. 
Moodie. The human remains are represented by a complete skeleton. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In August 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed by Dr. Carey Stanton from site CA-SCRI-383 
(Christy Beach), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains were donated 
to the SBMNH in January 1991. The human remains are represented by two 
teeth and fragments of cranial and postcranial elements. No known 
individuals were identified. The 15 associated funerary objects are one 
steatite bowl and 14 pieces of stone debris.
    In 1983, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed illegally from site CA-SCRI-436 (West Valdez No. 1), on 
Santa Cruz Island. The human remains were confiscated by the Santa 
Barbara County Sheriff's Department and transferred to the SBMNH in 
July 1986. The human remains are represented by two teeth. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1927 and sometime between 1982 and 1986, human remains 
representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from site CA-
SCRI-437 (West Valdez No. 2), on Santa Cruz Island. One set of human 
remains was removed by David Banks Rogers. Two additional sets of human 
remains that had been removed illegally, were confiscated by the Santa 
Barbara County Sheriff's Department and transferred to the SBMNH in 
July 1986. The human remains are represented by postcranial elements. 
No known individuals were

[[Page 61973]]

identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Around 1984, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed illegally from site CA-SCRI-444 (Hazard's No. 1), on Santa 
Cruz Island. The human remains were confiscated by the Santa Barbara 
County Sheriff's Department and transferred to the SBMNH in July 1986. 
The human remains are represented by a single cranial fragment. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In July 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from site CA-SCRI-445 
(Valdez), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by 
cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In July 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers and Ronald Olson from 
site CA-SCRI-496 (Willows), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are 
represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    In July 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed by David Banks Rogers from a site at Baby's 
Harbor (SCRI-178), on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are 
represented by cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    Around 1929, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from a site at Albert's Anchorage, 
on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by postcranial 
elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In 1981, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by a ranch worker from a site called Mount Diablo, on 
Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by a partial 
cranium. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In the early 1980s, human remains representing, at minimum, five 
individuals were removed illegally from an unrecorded site near Alamos, 
on Santa Cruz Island. The human remains are represented by cranial 
elements. They were confiscated by the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's 
Department and transferred to the SBMNH in July 1986. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from unprovenanced locations on Santa Cruz 
Island. The human remains are represented by teeth, cranial elements, 
and an incomplete skeleton. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1947, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-1 (Gara[ntilde]on Point), on 
Santa Rosa Island. The human remains are represented by a relatively 
complete skeleton. No known individuals were identified. The 737 
associated funerary objects are one shell dish; one shell strand; eight 
shell beads; three bone fragments; one pearl; 28 faunal remains; 653 
shell bead fragments; 23 whale bone implements; and 19 shell ornaments.
    Between 1948 and 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, 177 
individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-2A and CA-SRI-2B 
(Skull Gulch) and CA-SRI-2 (Unspecified Cemetery) on Santa Cruz Island. 
Of the 24 individuals removed from CA-SRI-2A: Eight individuals are 
represented by cranial elements; four individuals are represented by 
complete skeletons; three individuals are represented by relatively 
complete skeletons; six individuals which include one sub-adult and 
three fetuses--are represented by postcranial elements; two individuals 
are represented by teeth; and one individual is represented by an 
infant burial encased in latex. Of the 140 individuals removed from CA-
SRI-2B: 96 individuals are represented by cranial elements; four 
individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements; 11 
individuals are represented by postcranial elements; three 
individuals--which include one infant and one sub-adult--are 
represented by partial skeletons; five individuals are represented by 
relatively complete skeletons; 13 individuals are represented by 
complete skeletons; two individuals are represented by fetal/infant 
skeletons; one individual is represented by human remains encased in 
plaster with artifacts; and five individuals are represented by teeth. 
Of the 13 individuals removed from CA-SRI-2 (Unspecified Cemetery): 11 
individuals are represented by postcranial elements; one individual is 
represented by a vertebral column; and one individual is represented by 
a long bone fragment. The human remains cannot be assigned to a 
specific cemetery due to insufficient data. No known individuals were 
identified. The 7584 associated funerary objects are: 5790 beads and 
bead fragments; 45 bead strands; 13 asphaltum samples; four projectile 
points; one bone bead; five shell fishhooks; one abalone container; 
five seed samples; 40 shell fragments; two knives; eight stone beads; 
six fish vertebrae; four midden samples; one bone bipoint; 25 pendants/
ornaments; 818 gravers; 16 bladelets; 26 pieces of ochre; one ochre 
sample; 18 bone fragments; 480 pieces of charcoal; one charcoal sample; 
one steatite bowl; one bag of faunal material; two donut stones; one 
sea mammal tooth; 10 chert drills; one tooth; three pieces of seagrass 
matting; one seagrass skirt; one bag of skirt weights; one pebble; two 
bone artifacts; one wood handle; one worked wood piece; one shark 
tooth; 12 wood fragments; one sandstone pestle; one container; one bone 
pry bar; one scraper; one piece of seagrass cordage; three shell 
artifacts; one flake; six chipped stone fragments; 24 Olivella 
biplicata shells; and 196 pieces of charcoal, bone, and shell.
    In 1949, 1950, and 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, 64 
individuals, were removed from CA-SRI-3A and CA-SRI-3B (Tecolote 
Point), on Santa Rosa Island. 50 individuals are represented by cranial 
elements; three individuals are represented by complete skeletons; five 
individuals are represented by partial skeletons; and six individuals 
are represented by cranial elements with postcranial elements. The 1056 
associated with funerary objects are: 654 beads and bead fragments; 
three bead strands; one bone strigil; five samples of pigment-stained 
sand; five abalone shells and shell fragments; two shell dishes; 151 
Olivella biplicata beads with traces of red pigment; five donut stones; 
118 asphaltum fragments; one bone hairpin; one abalone dish with 
pigment-stained sand; one crab claw; three mussel fragments; three 
limpet shells, 66 pieces of charcoal; one obsidian drill/knife; two 
bone bipoints; two pieces of modified bone; two awls; three wedges; six 
chert flakes; one incised gull ulna pin; six bone pry bars; four 
asphaltum basketry impressions; one shell ornament; five bone tools; 
one stone tool in asphaltum; one chert bipoint; one hipped stone drill; 
and one stone tool.
    In 1947, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-4 (Arlington Dunes), on Santa 
Rosa Island. Both individuals are represented by cranial elements. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.

[[Page 61974]]

    In 1948 and 1949 and in the 1960s, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 11 individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-5A and 
CA-SRI-5C (Survey Point) and CA-SRI-5 (Unspecified Cemetery), on Santa 
Rosa Island. Two individuals were collected from an eroding midden at 
CA-SRI-5 (Unspecified Cemetery), located along the mouth of Arlington 
Canyon, on Santa Rosa Island. The human remains were brought to the 
SBMNH in 2010. Eight individuals from CA-SRI-5A are represented by 
cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The 614 
associated funerary objects are three bone whistles; 37 shell 
ornaments; 474 shell beads and bead fragments; 64 shell beads and 
ornaments; seven bead strands; three bead and ornament strands; one 
bird bone fragment; one chipped stone knife; one bone awl; 19 
ornaments; one bone whistle; two pendants; and one donut stone.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from CA-SRI-6 (Arlington Point), on Santa Rosa 
Island. One individual is represented by postcranial fragments and two 
individuals are represented by a relatively complete postcranial 
skeleton and a second right femur fragment. The human remains were 
donated to the SBMNH by Mrs. Margaret Wooley in 1994. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 
individuals were removed from CA-SRI-9A (Arlington Cave), on Santa Rosa 
Island. Three individuals--which include one sub-adult--are represented 
by cranial elements; one individual is represented by a postcranial 
fragment; three individuals are represented by relatively complete 
skeletons; and four individuals--which include one skeleton incased in 
plaster and two infant skeletons incased in plaster and matrix are 
represented by complete skeletons. The 66 associated funerary objects 
are two doughnut stones, 56 shell beads, three Haliotis dishes, four 
unmodified shells, and one basket holding the infant burial that is 
encased in plaster.
    In 1948, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-24, on Santa Rosa Island. This 
individual is represented by a partial skeleton. The 11 associated 
funerary objects are: Two shell bead strands; one abalone ornament; six 
shell beads; and two small stones.
    In 1948, 1949, 1951, 1957, and 1961, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 108 individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-41A 
(Ca[ntilde]ada Verde Dunes), on Santa Rosa Island. 63 individuals--
which include 13 sub-adults--are represented by cranial elements; seven 
individuals--which include one infant and one sub-adult--are 
represented by post-cranial elements; 13 individuals--which include two 
sub-adults--are represented by cranial elements with post-cranial 
elements; one individual is represented by a tooth and postcranial 
elements; six individuals are represented by complete skeletons; four 
individuals--which include two sub-adults--are represented by a 
relatively complete skeleton; 13 individuals--which include one infant 
and one-sub-adult--are represented by a partial skeleton; and one 
individual is represented by several undifferentiated fragments. The 
13053 associated funerary objects are: 11925 shell beads and bead 
fragments; 12 incised bone fragments; three bone bipoints; 99 clam 
shell pendants; one piece of red pigment; 112 abalone pendants/
ornaments; two bone tools; three samples of charcoal; five shell bead 
strands; five bone whistles; 10 abalone shell rings; 24 shell pendants; 
14 bone awls; four unmodified land snail; 26 bone pendants/ornaments; 
128 stone beads; 10 steatite pendants; 383 bone beads and bead 
fragments; one decorated pendant with ochre staining; 20 charcoal 
pieces; 16 chert projectile points and point fragments; nine pieces of 
asphaltum; two bone whistle fragments; four steatite rings; two abalone 
shell fragments; three steatite elbow pipes; one abalone spangle; 10 
animal bones/teeth; one steatite charmstone; one Olivella bead headband 
(in fragments); one projectile point hafted in elk antler; two bone 
tubes; one stone bead strand; one serpentine pendant; two tarring 
pebbles; 13 fragments of engraved bone tools; one donut stone; nine 
shell fragments; one shell with ochre; 18 bone fragments with ochre 
staining; one flaked chert tool; three pieces of unworked chert; one 
crab claw; 28 abalone shell beads and ornaments inlaid into asphaltum; 
31 limpet shell ornaments; one bone disc; three ochre samples; 15 bird 
bones with asphaltum; two perforated stones; one striated pebble; one 
chipped stone hammer; one chert drill; one abrader; one chert knife/
scraper; one unsorted midden sample; one Thais shell; one bone pin; 
seven abalone dishes/containers; 15 quartz crystals; one chert flake; 
28 charcoal/asphaltum fragments; and 24 pieces of shell, stone, bone, 
and charcoal.
    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-41B (Ca[ntilde]ada Verde), on 
Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by a partial cranium. 
The eight associated funerary objects are one bone bead, one clam shell 
bead, one unmodified Olivella biplicata shell bead, one spire-ground 
Olivella biplicata shell bead, one Olivella biplicata shell disc bead, 
and three Olivella biplicata shell barrel beads.
    In 1951, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-41C (Ca[ntilde]ada Verde, 
Cemetery C), on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by a 
cranium and mandible. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-41X (Ca[ntilde]ada Verde, 
Cemetery X), on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by a 
relatively complete skeleton. The 268 associated funerary objects are 
205 shell artifacts, 13 awls, one bone tool, five fragments of 
unmodified bone, 10 cores, 24 projectile points, one knife, one 
steatite cup, one doughnut stone, one asphaltum cake, four samples of 
pigment-stained sand, and two bone hairpins.
    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals 
were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-43A (Fox), on Santa Rosa 
Island. Two individuals--which include one sub-adult--are represented 
by cranial and postcranial elements; one individual is represented by 
postcranial remains; and three individuals are represented by complete 
skeletons. The 10 associated funerary objects are one abalone shell, 
two projectile points, one doughnut stone, one swordfish sword with 
carved handle, three tarring pebbles, and two bone tools.
    In August 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, 20 
individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers from CA-SRI-60 (Rancho 
House Canyon, Hichimin), on Santa Rosa Island. 11 individuals--which 
include one sub-adult--are represented by cranial elements; seven 
individuals--which include one sub-adult--are represented by 
postcranial elements, one of which has an arrowhead embedded in it; and 
two individuals--a sub-adult and an infant--are represented by teeth. 
The 1550 associated funerary objects are 851 Olivella beads and bead 
fragments/

[[Page 61975]]

blanks; one asphaltum skirt weight; two biface fragments; two chert 
flakes; 34 drills; two clam shell ornaments; 45 abalone ornament 
fragments; two Megathura crenulata ornaments; one worked abalone rim 
fragment; one bone bipoint; two bone artifacts; three abalone tube 
beads; one dentalium tube bead; one unworked shell fragment; four chert 
knives; one arrowhead; two fishhook blanks; 296 bladelet drills; one 
bone pin; one bone whistle; one piece of twisted cordage; eight large 
clam tube beads; one strand of abalone beads; 226 shell bead fragments; 
seven fragments of eel grass matting; four bone tools; one abalone 
fishhook; one pierced piece of steatite; one rim fragment of a cup; one 
strand of stone and shell beads; two limpet ornaments; one abalone 
ornament; one bone awl; five chert points; one piece of hand forged 
metal; and 36 pendants and ornaments.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from CA-SRI-61 (Skunk Point), on Santa Rosa 
Island. The human remains were given to Harold J. Bell of Camarillo by 
the then-foreman of the Vail and Vickers Ranch, and were subsequently 
donated to the SBMNH by Patricia Bell in 1987. The human remains are 
represented by a cranium and mandible. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1927 and 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 
individuals were removed by David Banks Rogers (1927) and Phil C. Orr 
(1950) from CA-SRI-62 (Johnson's Lee, ``Nilal'uy''), on Santa Rosa 
Island. Three individuals--which include two sub-adults--are 
represented by cranial elements; three individuals--which include one 
infant--are represented by postcranial elements; one individual, a sub-
adult, is represented by cranial elements with postcranial elements; 
and four individuals--which include one sub-adult--are represented by 
complete skeletons. No known individuals were identified. The 176 
associated funerary objects are one fragment of a pear-shaped donut 
stone; one glass bead; one abalone fishhook; one maul; four worked bone 
artifacts; two unworked bone artifacts; one donut stone; four pieces of 
unwoven eel grass which were wrapped around the burials; 96 shell beads 
and bead blanks/fragments; one charcoal sample; one sandstone basket 
mortar; one abalone shell fragment; one abalone pendant; one Mitra idae 
shell; one abalone shell; one fishhook fragment; one pestle; one fish 
jaw ornament; 55 bone tube fragments; and one stone ornament.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, four 
individuals were removed from CA-SRI-63 (Johnson's East), on Santa Rosa 
Island. Beginning in 1950, the site was heavily impacted by the 
construction of a U.S. Air Force base. The remains were possibly 
recovered by Air Force personnel; however, there were no field notes 
from this salvage work that could be located. The four individuals are 
represented by partial crania, one of which is burned. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On October 4, 1952, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-72 (South of SE 
Anchorage), on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by 
cranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In 1927, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed by David Banks Rogers from CA-SRI-78 (Water Canyon), Santa 
Rosa Island. One very old individual is represented by a mandible; one 
individual is represented by cranial elements and 13 teeth; and one 
individual is represented by a phalanx. The eight associated funerary 
objects are one strand of shell, bone, and stone beads and seven shell 
bead fragments.
    In 1949, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from CA-SRI-128 (Pemberton No. 1 Well), on Santa Rosa 
Island. Two sets of human remains are attributed to Orr's excavations 
in 1949 and one set of human remains was likely salvaged by oil 
drilling crews. The three individuals are represented by partial 
crania. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-168 (Mess Cave), on Santa Rosa 
Island. This individual is represented by six rib fragments and strands 
of human hair. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    In late 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed by Phil C. Orr from CA-SRI-173 (Arlington 
Springs), on Santa Rosa Island. This individual is represented by two 
partial femora, including one encased in a soil matrix. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, 22 individuals 
were removed by W. Banning Vail from an unknown location a few miles 
west of Ranch House, on Santa Rosa Island. These human remains were 
donated by Vail to the SBMNH in 1983. The human remains include cranial 
elements, teeth, postcranial elements, and additional unidentified 
fragments of bone. The minimum number of individuals was determined by 
the presence of 22 right scapulae. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, five 
individuals, were removed from unknown sites on Santa Rosa Island (NA-
CA-SRI-XX-12-1 through NA-CA-SRI-XX-12-5). One set of remains was 
donated by Margaret Wooley in 1994. One set of remains was donated to 
the SBMNH in 2001 by Ed McGowan, who had obtained them from the estate 
of geologist Helmut Ehrenspeck, in the 1970s. One set of remains was 
donated to the SBMNH in 2001 by Cinda Shedore, who had obtained them 
from a rancher on Santa Rosa Island. One set of remains was donated to 
the SBMNH in 2008 by E.R. Blakley. One set of remains was discovered by 
Raymond Winters's uncle in the 1940s and was later donated to the 
Museum by Mr. Winters in 2007. Four individuals are represented by 
cranial elements and one individual is represented by cranial and 
postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. The 82 
associated funerary objects are one Olivella biplicata barrel bead, one 
strand of shell beads, 77 bead fragments, one Haliotis pendant, one 
Tivela stultorum ornament, and one worked ground stone artifact.

Ventura County

    On a date prior to 1998, human remains representing, at minimum, 
four individuals were removed from Simomo (site CA-VEN-24). The human 
remains were donated to the SBMNH in 1998 by Ed Mercurio. The 
individuals are represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Sometime between May 7 and June 26, 1942, human remains 
representing, at minimum, 16 individuals were removed by Phil C. Orr 
from Soule Ranch (site CA-VEN-61). The individuals are represented by 
cranial and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. 
The 110 associated funerary objects are one bone awl, one bone tube 
bead, three abalone beads, two stone bowls, 14 decorated bone tube 
fragments, 53 Olivella beads, one biface, one stone weight, one 
perforated tooth, one strand of shell

[[Page 61976]]

beads with a tooth, five whistle fragements, one bone implement, 20 
bone tube fragments, one stone sphere, one steatite mortar, one Trivia 
californiana shell, one Cerithidea sp. horn shell, one turtle shell in 
fragments, and one bone hairpin.
    Sometime in the 1960s, human remains representing, at minimum, 12 
individuals were removed by Robert O. Browne from the Browne site (CA-
VEN-150). The human remains were transferred to the SBMNH in 2005. The 
individuals--which include one sub-adult--are represented by cranial 
and postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date before 1998, human remains representing, at 
minimum, one individual were removed from Chumash Park (site CA-VEN-
165). The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Ed Mercurio in 
1998. The individual is represented by a fragmented mandible with 
fragmented postcranial elements. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1937, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by John G. Dalton from an unknown location near Ojai. The 
individual is represented by cranial and postcranial elements. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In August 1931, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed by C. Otis Miller from Lake Sherwood. The 
individual is represented by cranial elements. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1983, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed by Ken Ritzi from an unknown location in Oxnard. The human 
remains were donated to the SBMNH by Ken Ritzi in 2012. The individual 
is represented by a femur fragment. No known individuals were 
identified. The one associated funerary object is a pestle.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from an unknown location in Ventura County. 
The individuals are represented by one mandible and three unassociated 
loose teeth. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.

San Luis Obispo County

    In late October or early November 1968, human remains representing, 
at minimum, one individual were removed from Shell Beach (site CA-SLO-
58). The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Gregory Garman of 
Centralia College. The individual is represented by a fragmentary 
cranium and mandible with minimal postcranial elements. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Morro Bay Mesa. The human remains were 
labeled with ``N. of Main St., Moro Bay Mesa, Overlooking Moro Rock.'' 
The individual is represented by a cranium and mandible. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In March 1935, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from near Morro Bay and the Standard Oil Plant. 
The human remains were discovered by Mrs. Bennie Martinez, who donated 
them to the SBMNH. The individual is represented by a cranium. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Sometime prior to 1954, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from site CA-SLO-834, one mile east of 
Atascadero, San Luis Obispo County, CA. The human remains were donated 
to the SBMNH by Major George Mansfield in 1954. The individual is 
represented by a vertebra. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.

Los Angeles County

    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Solstice Canyon. The human remains were 
found in Phil Orr's personal collection, and were donated to the SBMNH. 
The individual is represented by a cranium and a mandible. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Sometime prior to 1998, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from unknown locations in Los Angeles County. 
According to the labeling, the origin of the human remains is, 
variously, ``Agoura'' and the ``Santa Monica Mtns. Coast, west of Zuma 
Beach.'' The human remains were donated to the SBMNH by Ed Mercurio in 
1998. One individual is represented by teeth, and the other individual 
is represented by a fragmentary cranium. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The majority of the human remains and associated funerary objects 
listed in this notice date to three periods in prehistory recognized by 
archeologists working the Santa Barbara Channel region: Early Period 
(9,000 to 3,000 years ago), Middle Period (3,000 to 800 years ago), and 
Late Period (800 to 200 years ago). Linguistic, archeological, and 
biological evidence demonstrate many millennia of Chumash cultural 
presence in the Santa Barbara region, beginning in the Early Period. A 
cultural affiliation study completed for the National Park Service in 
1999 demonstrated that Chumash communities in the twentieth century 
possess continuity with identifiable earlier groups that inhabited the 
Santa Barbara Channel region at the time of European contact and 
settlement. The only federally recognized tribe of Chumash Indians 
today is the Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians. Some individual 
members of the federally recognized Tejon Indian Tribe also possess 
Chumash ancestry.

Determinations Made by the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History

    Officials of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 1,011 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 36,943 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa 
Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, 
California.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Luke Swetland, President and CEO, Santa 
Barbara Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara, 
CA 93105, telephone (805) 682-4711, by November 2, 2020. After that 
date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians

[[Page 61977]]

of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California may proceed.
    The Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History is responsible for 
notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa 
Ynez Reservation, California that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 22, 2020.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2020-21705 Filed 9-30-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P