Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 57231-57235 [2020-20293]

Download as PDF jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 179 / Tuesday, September 15, 2020 / Notices of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana (previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana); Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Six component reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; and the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota. • Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains were removed is the aboriginal land of the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana (previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana); Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Six component reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band); VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:57 Sep 14, 2020 Jkt 250001 Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; and the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains may be to the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana (previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana); Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Six component reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; and the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Judith Stoddart, Associate Provost for University Collections and Arts Initiatives, Michigan State University, 466 W Circle Drive, East Lansing, MI 48824–1044, telephone (517) 432–2524, email stoddart@ msu.edu, by October 15, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to The Tribes may proceed. PO 00000 Frm 00051 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 57231 Michigan State University is responsible for notifying The Tribes, The Consulted Tribes and Groups, and The Invited Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: August 14, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–20295 Filed 9–14–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030669; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Michigan State University has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to Michigan State University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Michigan State University at the address in this notice by October 15, 2020. ADDRESSES: Judith Stoddart, Associate Provost for University Collections and Arts Initiatives, Michigan State University, 466 W Circle Drive, East Lansing, MI 48824–1044, telephone (517) 432–2524, email stoddart@ msu.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\15SEN1.SGM 15SEN1 57232 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 179 / Tuesday, September 15, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Huron-Sanilac, Ingham, Lapeer, Livingston, Saginaw, Sanilac, Shiawassee, St. Clair, and Tuscola Counties, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by Michigan State University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; and two non-federally recognized Indian groups, the Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, and the Grand River Band of Ottawa Indians (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes and Groups’’). An invitation to consult was extended to the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana (previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana); Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:57 Sep 14, 2020 Jkt 250001 Wisconsin; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Six component reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as Seneca Nation of New York); SenecaCayuga Nation (previously listed as Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Shawnee Tribe; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the Wyandotte Nation (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Invited Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains In 1920, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed from the shore of Lake Huron in Huron-Sanilac County, MI, after they were discovered eroding out of the north side of a creek that used to run into the Lake. On August 1, 2006, the human remains (FA 039–06, 661–06) became the subject of a complaint filed with the Howard City Police Department. Until the complainant alerted the police, the human remains had been kept in an attic, where they had been placed by the complainant’s father. The father, who had removed the human remains, believed the remains were part of a burial ground associated with an American Indian camp located on the south side of the creek. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between 1957–1961, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from the Root PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 site (20IN2), Ingham County, MI. The human remains (567.10(A1.10), 567.11(A1.11), 567.13(A1.13), 567.14(A1.14)) and associated funerary objects were originally disturbed by a group of Girl Scouts while playing on a sandy knoll near the Grand River south of Lansing, MI. Michigan State University Museum was alerted to this discovery, and excavated the human remains under the direction of Professor of Anthropology Dr. Moreau S. Maxwell and Director of Michigan State University Museum Rollin Baker. Additional help came from Birt Darling and other members of the Upper Grand Valley Chapter of the Michigan Archeological Society. Dr. Maxwell is documented as having collected the human remains. No known individuals were identified. The 25 associated funerary objects are four lots of unidentified animal bone (A1.13/ 567.13, A1.14/567.14, 567.10, A1.27/ 567), three lots of charcoal (A1.13/ 567.13, A1.14/567.14, A1.11/567.11), one lot of stone flakes and worked stone (567), two lots of pottery sherds (567, 567.10), one tooth (567), one lot of worked bones (567), one unidentified animal bone (567), one unidentified animal bone (A1.13/567.13), one nut shell (567), and 10 unworked rocks (A1.11/567.11). In 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Scott Mound site (20LP349), Lapeer County, MI. The human remains (4559) were discovered by Glen J. Martin of Davison, MI, on private land owned by a Mr. Scott of Washburn Road. After Mr. Martin had partially excavated the human remains, he contacted Michigan State University Museum Curator of Anthropology Dr. William Lovis who, at the time, was excavating the Childers site. On December 4, 1976, Mr. Martin donated the human remains to Michigan State University Museum. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, 29 individuals were removed from the Childers site (20LP98), Lapeer County, MI. The human remains (4589, 4589.4A, 4589.5, 4589.5B) and associated funerary objects were disturbed during the construction of a house basement. On March 24, 1977, Michigan State University Museum conducted a salvage excavation to recover the human remains and associated funerary objects for the Museum. No known individuals were identified. The 122 associated funerary objects are one abrader (4589.0), one bone (white-tailed) (4589.0), five lots of chipped stone E:\FR\FM\15SEN1.SGM 15SEN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 179 / Tuesday, September 15, 2020 / Notices (4589.0), one lot of copper (4589.0), two fire-cracked rocks (4589.0), one lot of fossils (4589.0), one lot of grave fill (4589.0), four lots of sherds (4589.0), one sherd (4589.0), one lot of soil samples (4589.0), one lot of beads (4589.4), one lot of bone (unidentified animal) (4589.4), three bones (unidentified animal) (4589.4), four chipped stones (4589.4), one lot of firecracked rock (4589.4), one harpoon (4589.4), six lithics (4589.4), one projectile point (4589.4), one lot of pigment stained sand samples (4589.4), three lots of sherds (4589.4), one pipe bowl fill (4589.41), one awl (turkey) (4589.5), one lot of bones (black bear) (4589.5), one bone (bullfrog) (4589.5), one bone (red shouldered hawk) (4589.5), one bone (unidentified animal) (4589.5), one lot of bones (unidentified animal) (4589.5), one bone (white-tailed deer) (4589.5), one drill tip (4589.5), one lot of fire-cracked rocks (4589.5), seven fire-cracked rocks (4589.5), two lots of flakes and rocks (4589.5), one bone pin or needle (4589.5), one lot of sherds (4589.5), one lot of skull fragments (bear) (4589.5), one lot of slate fragments (4589.5), one lot of ossified tendons (bird) (4589.5), one tool (black bear) (4589.5), one lot of incisor teeth (beaver) (4589.5), one elbow pipe (4589.4.1), one lot of antler drift, one lot of bones (black bear), one lot of bones (deer), one lot of bones (gar), two lots of bones (unidentified animal), one lot of lithics, one lot of slate pieces, one lot of incisor teeth (beaver), one adze, one antler (white-tailed deer), one antler pressure flaker, three axe preforms, one biface tip, one bone (black bear), one bone (canis species), one bone (grebe radius), one bone (grebe ulna), one bone (large mammal), two bones (turkey), one bone (wapiti), one bone (white-tailed deer), one bone (wild turkey), two celts, five discs, one end scraper, one quartzite flake, six flakes, one gorget preform, six lithics, one point, one triangular bone projectile point, three notched projectile points, one vessel, and one whetstone. On November 22, 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from an unidentified location in Lapeer County, MI. The Michigan State Police were alerted, assigned the discovery a case number (38–2792–86), and transferred the human remains to Michigan State University, where they were analyzed by Anthropology Professor Dr. Norman Sauer. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from an unidentified location in Lapeer County, VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:57 Sep 14, 2020 Jkt 250001 MI. The Michigan State Police transferred the human remains (3513– 73) to Michigan State University’s Forensic Anthropology Laboratory, where they were analyzed. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On June 21, 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Horizon Hills Lot 17 site (no. 2221; 20LV371) in Green Oak Township, Livingston County, MI. The human remains (2221) were brought to the Michigan State Police Crime Lab. On July 13, 1962, the Crime Lab’s Detective Sgt. Arthur Kivela transferred the human remains to Michigan State University Museum. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between August 14, 1991 and October 10, 1991, human remains representing, at minimum, eight individuals were removed from the Casassa site (20SA1021), Saginaw County, MI. The human remains were excavated by Great Lakes Research of Williamston, Michigan (later reorganized as Great Lakes Research Associates, Inc.) as part of a pipeline project undertaken by Great Lakes Gas Transmission Ltd. Upon discovery of the human remains, the Michigan State Police and the Saginaw County coroner were contacted. After obtaining disinterment permits from the Saginaw County Department of Public Health, the remains were transferred to Michigan State University, where they were analyzed by Anthropology Professor Dr. Norman Sauer. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In October/November 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from the Mount Lion site (20SA202), Saginaw County, MI. The human remains (3277.1), which had been discovered during field plowing, were collected by Donald W. Foster with the permission of the landowner. On November 30, 1966, the human remains and associated funerary object were brought to Donald R. Hagge, M.D., of Northville, MI, for analysis, and in October of 1968, Mr. Foster donated the human remains and funerary object to Michigan State University Museum. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a mountain lion skull (3277). In the 1980s, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from the Frazer-Tyra site (20SA9), also known as the Watson Caches, Armstrong Cache, Frazer I and II Caches, in Saginaw PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 57233 County, MI. The human remains (6888– 01, 6888–02, 6888–03, 6888–04, 6888– 05) and associated funerary objects were discovered during road construction by the landowner (possibly Mr. Frazer), who alerted Michigan State Police (either Bridgeport or Saginaw Post). The State Police, in turn, contacted Michigan State Archaeologist John Halsey, who confirmed that the human remains were ancient. Although the State Police claimed that they collected all the human remains from the site, Mr. Halsey directed consultant James Payne to excavate the site with a group of volunteers. In 1988, the human remains and funerary objects were transferred to Michigan State University. No known individuals were identified. The 34 associated funerary objects are one axe head and handle (6888–01), one blue tube bead (6888–01), one gun flint spall (6888–01), one lead ball (6888–01), six nails or spikes (6888–01), one brooch fragment (6888–02), one bead (6888–03), one painted sherd (6888–03), one stoneware sherd (6888–04), one lot of bone (unidentified animal) (6888–05), 14 flakes (6888–05), one nail or spike (6888–05), one projectile point ear (6888–05), one historic sherd (6888–05), one lot of sherds (6888–05), and one wood fragment (6888–05). During the fall and winter of 1994, human remains representing, at minimum, nine individuals were removed from the McLaughlin site (20SL2), Sanilac County, MI. The human remains were disturbed during construction of a house basement. The property owner, Frederick Mclaughlin, the police, and a team from the Office of the State Archaeologist collected the partially preserved human remains. Only one individual was excavated in situ; the other individuals were represented by bone fragments scattered around the worksite. The human remains were brought to Michigan State University for analysis by Anthropology Professor Dr. Norman Sauer. On April 26, 2019, the human remains were found in Michigan State University’s Forensic Anthropology Laboratory. In November 2019, the State Archaeologist confirmed Michigan State University’s possession of the remains. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from the Jarrard site (20SE125), Antrim Township, Section 16, Shiawassee County, MI. At an unknown date, the human remains and associated funerary objects were transferred to Michigan State University by Frank Mortimer. The associated funerary objects went to the Michigan State E:\FR\FM\15SEN1.SGM 15SEN1 57234 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 179 / Tuesday, September 15, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES University Museum, and the human remains went to Michigan State University’s Forensic Anthropology Laboratory. No known individuals were identified. The 34 associated funerary objects (3911) are one lot of bones (unidentified animal), one lot of flakes, two balls, one biface perform tip, one burin, seven chips, one concretion, one retouched flake, four utilized flakes, four worked flakes, one hammerstone, one point base, one scraper, two end scrapers, one shell, one sherd, one piece of worked granite, one piece of worked quartz, and two worked stones. Sometime prior to October 4, 2017, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI, and transferred to Michigan State University. On October 4, 2017, the human remains (F.3.72, C72–4625) were found in Michigan State University’s Forensic Anthropology Laboratory. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On November 13, 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Cass City, Tuscola County, MI. The human remains were discovered by property owner James Tuckey while digging and setting a water line near his house. Mr. Tuckey contacted the Cass City Police, which transferred them to Michigan State University’s Forensic Anthropology Laboratory, where they were analyzed. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Determinations Made by Michigan State University Officials of Michigan State University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on archeological context, biological evidence, museum and lab records. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 73 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 216 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:57 Sep 14, 2020 Jkt 250001 of Federal Claims, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land (Livingston County) from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas). • Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana (previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana); Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Six component reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band); Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the Wyandotte Nation. • According to other authoritative government sources, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; and the Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects may be to the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana (previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana); Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Six component reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band); Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band Potawatomi E:\FR\FM\15SEN1.SGM 15SEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 179 / Tuesday, September 15, 2020 / Notices Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the Wyandotte Nation (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Judith Stoddart, Associate Provost for University Collections and Arts Initiatives, Michigan State University, 466 W Circle Drive, East Lansing, MI 48824–1044, telephone (517) 432–2524, email stoddart@ msu.edu, by October 15, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. Michigan State University is responsible for notifying The Tribes, The Consulted Tribes and Groups, and The Invited Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: August 14, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–20293 Filed 9–14–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030674; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES ACTION: Michigan State University has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:57 Sep 14, 2020 Jkt 250001 and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to Michigan State University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Michigan State University at the address in this notice by October 15, 2020. ADDRESSES: Judith Stoddart, Associate Provost for University Collections and Arts Initiatives, Michigan State University, 466 W Circle Drive, East Lansing, MI 48824–1044, telephone (517) 432–2524, email stoddart@ msu.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. The human remains were removed from Mackinac County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Michigan State University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 57235 the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; and two nonfederally recognized Indian groups, the Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, and the Grand River Band of Ottawa Indians (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes and Groups’’). An invitation to consult was extended to the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana (previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana); Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Six component reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Seneca Nation of Indians (previously listed as Seneca Nation of New York); SenecaCayuga Nation (previously listed as Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Shawnee Tribe; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of Seneca (previously listed as Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New York); Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the Wyandotte E:\FR\FM\15SEN1.SGM 15SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 179 (Tuesday, September 15, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 57231-57235]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-20293]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0030669; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State University, East 
Lansing, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: Michigan State University has completed an inventory of human 
remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations and has 
determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian 
Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Representatives of any Indian 
Tribes or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice 
that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and 
associated funerary objects should submit a written request to Michigan 
State University. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to Michigan State University at the address in this notice 
by October 15, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Judith Stoddart, Associate Provost for University 
Collections and Arts Initiatives, Michigan State University, 466 W 
Circle Drive, East Lansing, MI 48824-1044, telephone (517) 432-2524, 
email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and

[[Page 57232]]

Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an 
inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the 
control of Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. The human 
remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Huron-
Sanilac, Ingham, Lapeer, Livingston, Saginaw, Sanilac, Shiawassee, St. 
Clair, and Tuscola Counties, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by Michigan State University professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills Indian Community, 
Michigan; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; 
Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, 
Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little 
Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish 
Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the 
Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); 
Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Saginaw 
Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa 
Indians, Michigan; and two non-federally recognized Indian groups, the 
Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, and the Grand River Band 
of Ottawa Indians (hereafter referred to as ``The Consulted Tribes and 
Groups'').
    An invitation to consult was extended to the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe 
of Indians of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of 
Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Chippewa Cree 
Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana (previously listed as 
Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana); Citizen 
Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe 
of Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi 
Community, Wisconsin; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo 
Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe 
of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians 
of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Little Shell Tribe of 
Chippewa Indians of Montana; Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin; Miami 
Tribe of Oklahoma; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Six component 
reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand 
Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band); 
Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Prairie 
Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi 
Nation, Kansas); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sac & Fox 
Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; 
Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Seneca Nation of Indians 
(previously listed as Seneca Nation of New York); Seneca-Cayuga Nation 
(previously listed as Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma); Shawnee Tribe; 
Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of 
Wisconsin; Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Tonawanda Band of 
Seneca (previously listed as Tonawanda Band of Seneca Indians of New 
York); Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and 
the Wyandotte Nation (hereafter referred to as ``The Invited Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1920, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals 
were removed from the shore of Lake Huron in Huron-Sanilac County, MI, 
after they were discovered eroding out of the north side of a creek 
that used to run into the Lake. On August 1, 2006, the human remains 
(FA 039-06, 661-06) became the subject of a complaint filed with the 
Howard City Police Department. Until the complainant alerted the 
police, the human remains had been kept in an attic, where they had 
been placed by the complainant's father. The father, who had removed 
the human remains, believed the remains were part of a burial ground 
associated with an American Indian camp located on the south side of 
the creek. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    Between 1957-1961, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from the Root site (20IN2), Ingham County, MI. 
The human remains (567.10(A1.10), 567.11(A1.11), 567.13(A1.13), 
567.14(A1.14)) and associated funerary objects were originally 
disturbed by a group of Girl Scouts while playing on a sandy knoll near 
the Grand River south of Lansing, MI. Michigan State University Museum 
was alerted to this discovery, and excavated the human remains under 
the direction of Professor of Anthropology Dr. Moreau S. Maxwell and 
Director of Michigan State University Museum Rollin Baker. Additional 
help came from Birt Darling and other members of the Upper Grand Valley 
Chapter of the Michigan Archeological Society. Dr. Maxwell is 
documented as having collected the human remains. No known individuals 
were identified. The 25 associated funerary objects are four lots of 
unidentified animal bone (A1.13/567.13, A1.14/567.14, 567.10, A1.27/
567), three lots of charcoal (A1.13/567.13, A1.14/567.14, A1.11/
567.11), one lot of stone flakes and worked stone (567), two lots of 
pottery sherds (567, 567.10), one tooth (567), one lot of worked bones 
(567), one unidentified animal bone (567), one unidentified animal bone 
(A1.13/567.13), one nut shell (567), and 10 unworked rocks (A1.11/
567.11).
    In 1976, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from the Scott Mound site (20LP349), Lapeer County, MI. 
The human remains (4559) were discovered by Glen J. Martin of Davison, 
MI, on private land owned by a Mr. Scott of Washburn Road. After Mr. 
Martin had partially excavated the human remains, he contacted Michigan 
State University Museum Curator of Anthropology Dr. William Lovis who, 
at the time, was excavating the Childers site. On December 4, 1976, Mr. 
Martin donated the human remains to Michigan State University Museum. 
No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects 
are present.
    In 1977, human remains representing, at minimum, 29 individuals 
were removed from the Childers site (20LP98), Lapeer County, MI. The 
human remains (4589, 4589.4A, 4589.5, 4589.5B) and associated funerary 
objects were disturbed during the construction of a house basement. On 
March 24, 1977, Michigan State University Museum conducted a salvage 
excavation to recover the human remains and associated funerary objects 
for the Museum. No known individuals were identified. The 122 
associated funerary objects are one abrader (4589.0), one bone (white-
tailed) (4589.0), five lots of chipped stone

[[Page 57233]]

(4589.0), one lot of copper (4589.0), two fire-cracked rocks (4589.0), 
one lot of fossils (4589.0), one lot of grave fill (4589.0), four lots 
of sherds (4589.0), one sherd (4589.0), one lot of soil samples 
(4589.0), one lot of beads (4589.4), one lot of bone (unidentified 
animal) (4589.4), three bones (unidentified animal) (4589.4), four 
chipped stones (4589.4), one lot of fire-cracked rock (4589.4), one 
harpoon (4589.4), six lithics (4589.4), one projectile point (4589.4), 
one lot of pigment stained sand samples (4589.4), three lots of sherds 
(4589.4), one pipe bowl fill (4589.41), one awl (turkey) (4589.5), one 
lot of bones (black bear) (4589.5), one bone (bullfrog) (4589.5), one 
bone (red shouldered hawk) (4589.5), one bone (unidentified animal) 
(4589.5), one lot of bones (unidentified animal) (4589.5), one bone 
(white-tailed deer) (4589.5), one drill tip (4589.5), one lot of fire-
cracked rocks (4589.5), seven fire-cracked rocks (4589.5), two lots of 
flakes and rocks (4589.5), one bone pin or needle (4589.5), one lot of 
sherds (4589.5), one lot of skull fragments (bear) (4589.5), one lot of 
slate fragments (4589.5), one lot of ossified tendons (bird) (4589.5), 
one tool (black bear) (4589.5), one lot of incisor teeth (beaver) 
(4589.5), one elbow pipe (4589.4.1), one lot of antler drift, one lot 
of bones (black bear), one lot of bones (deer), one lot of bones (gar), 
two lots of bones (unidentified animal), one lot of lithics, one lot of 
slate pieces, one lot of incisor teeth (beaver), one adze, one antler 
(white-tailed deer), one antler pressure flaker, three axe preforms, 
one biface tip, one bone (black bear), one bone (canis species), one 
bone (grebe radius), one bone (grebe ulna), one bone (large mammal), 
two bones (turkey), one bone (wapiti), one bone (white-tailed deer), 
one bone (wild turkey), two celts, five discs, one end scraper, one 
quartzite flake, six flakes, one gorget preform, six lithics, one 
point, one triangular bone projectile point, three notched projectile 
points, one vessel, and one whetstone.
    On November 22, 1986, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from an unidentified location in Lapeer 
County, MI. The Michigan State Police were alerted, assigned the 
discovery a case number (38-2792-86), and transferred the human remains 
to Michigan State University, where they were analyzed by Anthropology 
Professor Dr. Norman Sauer. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from an unidentified location in Lapeer 
County, MI. The Michigan State Police transferred the human remains 
(3513-73) to Michigan State University's Forensic Anthropology 
Laboratory, where they were analyzed. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On June 21, 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from the Horizon Hills Lot 17 site (no. 2221; 
20LV371) in Green Oak Township, Livingston County, MI. The human 
remains (2221) were brought to the Michigan State Police Crime Lab. On 
July 13, 1962, the Crime Lab's Detective Sgt. Arthur Kivela transferred 
the human remains to Michigan State University Museum. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Between August 14, 1991 and October 10, 1991, human remains 
representing, at minimum, eight individuals were removed from the 
Casassa site (20SA1021), Saginaw County, MI. The human remains were 
excavated by Great Lakes Research of Williamston, Michigan (later 
reorganized as Great Lakes Research Associates, Inc.) as part of a 
pipeline project undertaken by Great Lakes Gas Transmission Ltd. Upon 
discovery of the human remains, the Michigan State Police and the 
Saginaw County coroner were contacted. After obtaining disinterment 
permits from the Saginaw County Department of Public Health, the 
remains were transferred to Michigan State University, where they were 
analyzed by Anthropology Professor Dr. Norman Sauer. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In October/November 1966, human remains representing, at minimum, 
four individuals were removed from the Mount Lion site (20SA202), 
Saginaw County, MI. The human remains (3277.1), which had been 
discovered during field plowing, were collected by Donald W. Foster 
with the permission of the landowner. On November 30, 1966, the human 
remains and associated funerary object were brought to Donald R. Hagge, 
M.D., of Northville, MI, for analysis, and in October of 1968, Mr. 
Foster donated the human remains and funerary object to Michigan State 
University Museum. No known individuals were identified. The one 
associated funerary object is a mountain lion skull (3277).
    In the 1980s, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from the Frazer-Tyra site (20SA9), also known 
as the Watson Caches, Armstrong Cache, Frazer I and II Caches, in 
Saginaw County, MI. The human remains (6888-01, 6888-02, 6888-03, 6888-
04, 6888-05) and associated funerary objects were discovered during 
road construction by the landowner (possibly Mr. Frazer), who alerted 
Michigan State Police (either Bridgeport or Saginaw Post). The State 
Police, in turn, contacted Michigan State Archaeologist John Halsey, 
who confirmed that the human remains were ancient. Although the State 
Police claimed that they collected all the human remains from the site, 
Mr. Halsey directed consultant James Payne to excavate the site with a 
group of volunteers. In 1988, the human remains and funerary objects 
were transferred to Michigan State University. No known individuals 
were identified. The 34 associated funerary objects are one axe head 
and handle (6888-01), one blue tube bead (6888-01), one gun flint spall 
(6888-01), one lead ball (6888-01), six nails or spikes (6888-01), one 
brooch fragment (6888-02), one bead (6888-03), one painted sherd (6888-
03), one stoneware sherd (6888-04), one lot of bone (unidentified 
animal) (6888-05), 14 flakes (6888-05), one nail or spike (6888-05), 
one projectile point ear (6888-05), one historic sherd (6888-05), one 
lot of sherds (6888-05), and one wood fragment (6888-05).
    During the fall and winter of 1994, human remains representing, at 
minimum, nine individuals were removed from the McLaughlin site 
(20SL2), Sanilac County, MI. The human remains were disturbed during 
construction of a house basement. The property owner, Frederick 
Mclaughlin, the police, and a team from the Office of the State 
Archaeologist collected the partially preserved human remains. Only one 
individual was excavated in situ; the other individuals were 
represented by bone fragments scattered around the worksite. The human 
remains were brought to Michigan State University for analysis by 
Anthropology Professor Dr. Norman Sauer. On April 26, 2019, the human 
remains were found in Michigan State University's Forensic Anthropology 
Laboratory. In November 2019, the State Archaeologist confirmed 
Michigan State University's possession of the remains. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1965, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from the Jarrard site (20SE125), Antrim Township, Section 
16, Shiawassee County, MI. At an unknown date, the human remains and 
associated funerary objects were transferred to Michigan State 
University by Frank Mortimer. The associated funerary objects went to 
the Michigan State

[[Page 57234]]

University Museum, and the human remains went to Michigan State 
University's Forensic Anthropology Laboratory. No known individuals 
were identified. The 34 associated funerary objects (3911) are one lot 
of bones (unidentified animal), one lot of flakes, two balls, one 
biface perform tip, one burin, seven chips, one concretion, one 
retouched flake, four utilized flakes, four worked flakes, one 
hammerstone, one point base, one scraper, two end scrapers, one shell, 
one sherd, one piece of worked granite, one piece of worked quartz, and 
two worked stones.
    Sometime prior to October 4, 2017, human remains representing, at 
minimum, one individual were removed from Port Huron, St. Clair County, 
MI, and transferred to Michigan State University. On October 4, 2017, 
the human remains (F.3.72, C72-4625) were found in Michigan State 
University's Forensic Anthropology Laboratory. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On November 13, 1978, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Cass City, Tuscola County, MI. The human 
remains were discovered by property owner James Tuckey while digging 
and setting a water line near his house. Mr. Tuckey contacted the Cass 
City Police, which transferred them to Michigan State University's 
Forensic Anthropology Laboratory, where they were analyzed. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.

Determinations Made by Michigan State University

    Officials of Michigan State University have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on archeological context, 
biological evidence, museum and lab records.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 73 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 216 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day 
Indian Tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed is the aboriginal land of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of 
Michigan.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land (Livingston County) 
from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Citizen Potawatomi 
Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; 
Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band 
of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the 
Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); 
Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and the 
Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of 
Potawatomi Nation, Kansas).
     Treaties, Acts of Congress, or Executive Orders indicate 
that the land from which the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the 
Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the 
Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; 
Chippewa Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana 
(previously listed as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's 
Reservation, Montana); Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest 
County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa 
and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; 
Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of 
Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of 
Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of 
Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Shell 
Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana; Little Traverse Bay Bands of 
Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi 
Indians of Michigan; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota (Six component 
reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac Band; Grand 
Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth Band); 
Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously listed 
as the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band 
of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band Potawatomi 
Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, 
Kansas); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; 
Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian 
Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, 
Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa 
Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North 
Dakota; and the Wyandotte Nation.
     According to other authoritative government sources, the 
land from which the Native American human remains and associated 
funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Miami Tribe 
of Oklahoma; Sac & Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & 
Fox Nation, Oklahoma; and the Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in 
Iowa.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects may be to the Bad River 
Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River 
Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Chippewa 
Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana (previously listed 
as Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana); 
Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi 
Community, Wisconsin; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa 
Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay 
Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac 
Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Little 
River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa 
Indians of Montana; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, 
Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of 
Michigan; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota 
(Six component reservations: Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake); Fond du Lac 
Band; Grand Portage Band; Leech Lake Band; Mille Lacs Band; White Earth 
Band); Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (previously 
listed as Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Pokagon 
Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band 
Potawatomi

[[Page 57235]]

Nation (previously listed as Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, 
Kansas); Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; 
Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sac & Fox Nation of 
Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; Sac & Fox 
Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of 
Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Michigan; 
Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of 
Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; 
and the Wyandotte Nation (hereafter referred to as ``The Tribes'').

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to Judith Stoddart, Associate Provost for University 
Collections and Arts Initiatives, Michigan State University, 466 W 
Circle Drive, East Lansing, MI 48824-1044, telephone (517) 432-2524, 
email [email protected], by October 15, 2020. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may 
proceed.
    Michigan State University is responsible for notifying The Tribes, 
The Consulted Tribes and Groups, and The Invited Tribes that this 
notice has been published.

    Dated: August 14, 2020.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2020-20293 Filed 9-14-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P