Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN, 51486-51488 [2020-18232]

Download as PDF jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 51486 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 162 / Thursday, August 20, 2020 / Notices B.C.—A.D. 1300, based on radiocarbon dates and pottery types. In the 1980s, and possibly earlier, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed from ‘‘Snead Island Mound’’ or ‘‘Snead’s Island’’ in Manatee County, FL. On September 14,1989, Mrs. A.W. Pervis, Jr. donated one fragmented, complete skull belonging to an adult male and tibia and femur remains from ‘‘Snead’s Island’’ to the Museum. The sites Snead Island 1 (8MA18), Snead Island III (8MA20), Snead Island Burial Mound (8MA85), and possibly Emerson Point (8MA1137) have been reported to contain human remains. Walter Montague Tallant is reported to have excavated at 8MA18 and 8MA85. Based on artifact types, the earliest occupation of 8MA18 predated A.D. 700 and continued into the Historic Period. Stokes Brushed pottery associated with the Seminoles was found at 8MA18, and a fish camp that employed Cubans and Seminoles reportedly operated there in the 1840s. The 8MA85 site is described as a sand burial mound with plain, nondiagnostic pottery. At an unknown date, but probably 1937, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from ‘‘Tidy Island’’ in Manatee County, FL. Walter Montague Tallant is believed to have excavated five or six human remains from two burial mounds on Tidy Island in 1937. The human remains include one incomplete cranium belonging to an adult of unknown sex, one radius, and two incomplete crania belonging to adults of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The Cow Point Midden (8MA12) on Tidy Island is the likely source of these human remains. The site contains a shell midden and two burial mounds. It is dated to approximately 500 B.C.—A.D. 800 or later, based on the ceramics. In 1938, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from ‘‘Treasure Island’’ in Sarasota County, FL. One incomplete cranium belonging to an adult of unknown sex and inscribed ‘‘1938, W.C.C’’ was given to the Museum by an unknown person at an unknown date. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The ‘‘Treasure Island’’ site in Sarasota County might actually be the John’s Pass Mound (8PI4) on Treasure Island in Pinellas County, a burial mound dated to the Safety Harbor Period (A.D. 900— 1700). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:01 Aug 19, 2020 Jkt 250001 ‘‘Phillippi Creek.’’ One complete cranium belonging to an adult of unknown sex was given to the Museum by an unknown person at an unknown date. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. According to the FMSF, two archeological sites are reported along the Phillippi Creek in Sarasota County. However, neither the Phillippi Flake Scatter (8SO616) nor the Prodie Midden Site (8SO617) is known to contain human remains. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from ‘‘Riverview Landing.’’ One frontal belonging to an adult, probably male, as well as other teeth and human remains were given to the Museum by an unknown person at an unknown date. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Riverview Pointe in Manatee County may be the general location where the human remains were removed. The Riverview Pointe Midden (8MA981) contains no human remains, unlike the nearby Shaw’s Point (8MA7) site. The latter site reportedly contains early Deptford, Weeden Island, Safety Harbor, and Leon-Jefferson pottery from the Early Woodland to early Historic Period (ca. 500 B.C.–A.D. 1700). At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from ‘‘Midway Island’’ in Collier County, FL. On January 15, 2013, one complete skull belonging to an adult male and marked ‘‘Coll Co 1961’’ and three mandibles were placed under the control of the Museum by Mrs. Patty Tallant Hare, Walter Montague Tallant’s daughter. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The ‘‘Midway Island’’ site could not be found in the FMSF. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, 46 individuals were removed by unknown persons from unknown counties in the State of Florida. The Museum does not possess any accession information for these remains. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Determinations Made by the Bishop Museum of Science and Nature Inc. Officials of the Bishop Museum of Science and Nature Inc. have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 68 individuals of Native American ancestry. PO 00000 Frm 00084 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Matthew D. Woodside, Chief Curator, Bishop Museum of Science and Nature Inc., P.O. Box 9265, Bradenton, FL 34205, telephone (941) 216–3477, email mwoodside@bishopscience.org, by September 21, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to The Tribes may proceed. The Bishop Museum of Science and Nature Inc. is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: July 21, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–18235 Filed 8–19–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030623; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has completed an inventory of associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Federally-recognized Indian Tribes, and has determined that a cultural affiliation between the associated funerary objects and present-day Federally-recognized Indian Tribes can reasonably be traced. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Federally-recognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of the associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the TVA. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the associated funerary objects to the Federallyrecognized Indian Tribes stated in this notice may proceed. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\20AUN1.SGM 20AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 162 / Thursday, August 20, 2020 / Notices Lineal descendants or representatives of any Federallyrecognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of the associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the TVA at the address in this notice by September 21, 2020. DATES: Dr. Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632– 7458, email tomaher@tva.gov. ADDRESSES: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of associated funerary objects under the control of Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN. Transfer of control of the human remains with which these funerary objects are associated, as well as additional associated funerary objects, has already occurred. The associated funerary objects listed in this notice were discovered during a recent review of the TVA archeological collection housed at the Alabama Museum of Natural History. The associated funerary objects were removed from archeological sites in Jackson and Marshall Counties, AL. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the funerary objects was made by TVA professional staff in consultation with representatives of the AbsenteeShawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Cherokee Nation; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians; Poarch Band of Creeks (previously listed as Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Thlopthlocco Tribal Town; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:01 Aug 19, 2020 Jkt 250001 (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). History and Description of the Associated Funerary Objects The four sites listed in this notice— 1JA27, 1JA102, 1MS55, and 1MS91— were excavated as part of TVA’s Guntersville Reservoir project by the Alabama Museum of Natural History (AMNH) at the University of Alabama, using labor and funds provided by the Works Progress Administration. Details regarding these excavations and sites may be found in a report, ‘‘An Archaeological Survey of Guntersville Basin on the Tennessee River in Northern Alabama,’’ by William S. Webb and Charles G. Wilder. Human remains and other associated funerary objects from 1JA27 were listed in a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register on September 5, 2017 (82 FR 41985– 41987). Human remains and other associated funerary objects from 1JA102 and 1MS91 were listed in a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register on September 1, 2016 (81 FR 60381–60383). Human remains and other associated funerary objects from 1MS55 were listed in a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register on April 29, 2019 (84 FR 18080–18081). Transfer of control of the cultural items listed in those notices to the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas; Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation has already occurred. The associated funerary objects listed in this notice were discovered during a recent review of the TVA archeological collection housed at AMNH. From March to April of 1938, a Furrs Cordmarked rim and a Bell Plain Effigy Bottle were removed from burial units 2 and 3, respectively, at the Hardin site (1JA27) in Jackson County, AL, after TVA acquired the site on October 16, 1936. Excavations revealed two primary occupations during the Late Woodland Flint River phase (A.D. 500–1000) and the Mississippian Henry Island phase (A.D. 1200–1450). The associated funerary objects listed in this notice were originally found with the human remains that were from the Henry Island phase. From September 1938 to January 1939, one Bell Plain effigy bowl was removed from burial unit 10 at 1JA102, Sublet Ferry site, in Jackson County, AL. Excavations commenced after TVA acquired a permit for archeological exploration on June 11, 1938. Excavations revealed this site to be a shell midden overlying a dark midden PO 00000 Frm 00085 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 51487 soil. Both Woodland and Mississippian occupations were identified. The associated funerary object listed in this notice was from the Henry Island phase of the Mississippian period. From September 1937 to May 1938, one Bell Plain jar was removed from burial unit 39 at the Henry Island site, 1MS55, in Marshall County, AL. TVA purchased the site on November 2, 1936. This site was composed of two earthen mounds and an associated village midden. Although there are no radiocarbon dates from this site, artifacts from the excavation suggest occupations during the Copena (A.D. 100–500), Flint River (A.D. 500–1000), Henry Island (A.D. 1200–1500), and Crow Creek (A.D. 1500–1650) phases. The associated funerary object listed in this notice was removed from a Henry Island phase burial. From June 1938 to May 1939, one brass bell was removed from burial unit 25 (Unit I), and 17 glass beads, one carbonized textile sample and one carbonized basketry sample were removed from burial unit 5 (Unit II) at the Columbus City Landing site, 1MS91. This site is northeast of the city of Guntersville in Marshall County, AL. Excavation commenced after TVA purchased the land on March 8, 1937. There were excavations in both the village (Unit I) and adjacent mounds (Unit II). Artifacts recovered from this excavation revealed that the primary occupations were during the Middle Woodland (A.D. 100–500), Mississippian (A.D. 1200–1500), and historic periods. The associated funerary objects listed in this notice were removed from historic Native American burials. A relationship of shared group identity can reasonably be traced between present-day Indian Tribes and the cultural items of the earlier culture identified as Mississippian. The preponderance of the evidence indicates that the cultural items from the Henry Island phase at 1JA27, 1JA102, and 1MS55 and the historic period at 1MS91 are culturally affiliated with Native Americans descendants of the Koasati/ Kaskinampo. These descendants include the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas); AlabamaQuassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Chronicles from Spanish explorers of the 16th century and French explorers of the 17th and 18th century indicate the presence of chiefdom level tribal entities in the southeastern United States which resemble the Mississippian chiefdoms. Linguistic analysis of place E:\FR\FM\20AUN1.SGM 20AUN1 51488 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 162 / Thursday, August 20, 2020 / Notices names noted by multiple Spanish explorers indicates that Koasati speaking groups inhabited northeastern Alabama. Early maps and research into the historic Native American occupation of northeastern Alabama indicates that the Koasati (as called by the English) or the Kaskinampo (as called by the French) were found at multiple sites in Jackson and Marshall Counties in the 17th and 18th centuries. Oral history, traditions, and expert opinions of the descendants of Koasati/Kaskinampo indicate that this portion of the Tennessee River valley was a homeland of their Tribe. The subsequent involuntary diaspora of these peoples resulted in descendants of the Koasati/ Kaskinampo living among multiple Indian Tribes. Determinations Made by the Tennessee Valley Authority Officials of the Tennessee Valley Authority have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 24 associated funerary objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the associated funerary objects listed in this notice and the AlabamaCoushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Federally-recognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of the associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632–7458, email tomaher@tva.gov, by September 21, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The Tennessee Valley Authority is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:01 Aug 19, 2020 Jkt 250001 Dated: July 13, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. National Park Service Consultation [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030663; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] From 2015 to 2020, consultation on these human remains was carried out between representatives of Mount Holyoke College (Sonya Stephens, President of Mount Holyoke College, Lenore Reilly, Senior Advisor to the President, and Aaron Miller, Associate Curator of Visual and Material Culture and NAGPRA Coordinator at the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum) and representatives of the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin; Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah); and the following nonfederally recognized Indian groups: the Abenaki Nation of New Hampshire; Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook– Abenaki People; Elnu Abenaki Tribe; and the Webster/Dudley Band of the Chaubunagungamaug Nipmuck Indians (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes and Groups’’). [FR Doc. 2020–18232 Filed 8–19–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P Notice of Inventory Completion: Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Mount Holyoke College has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to Mount Holyoke College. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Mount Holyoke College at the address in this notice by September 21, 2020. ADDRESSES: Aaron F. Miller, Mount Holyoke College, 50 College Street, South Hadley, MA 01075–1499, telephone (413) 538–3394, email afmiller@mtholyoke.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA. The human remains were removed from an unidentified location in the vicinity of Holyoke, Hampden County, MA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00086 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 History and Description of the Remains Sometime prior to 1918, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from an unidentified location in the vicinity of Holyoke, Hampden County, MA. On January 10, 1918, Alice E. Hunt and George E. Hunt of Holyoke, MA, donated the human remains to Mount Holyoke College. A letter from the Hunts to Professor Turner mentions the skeleton ‘‘of a squaw aged 35 years.’’ A 1948 article in the Mount Holyoke News referenced the human remains as being ‘‘an Indian Squaw about 150 years old’’ and given by ‘‘a family of doctors in Holyoke who had had her in the family for generations.’’ In 2006, an osteologist examined the human remains and concluded that they belong to a female 20–23 years old, and are of probable Native American ancestry. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In Holyoke and the surrounding area, a great deal of archeological excavation took place in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, during which multiple graves were exhumed. Based on historical and oral traditional information, the area of Holyoke was occupied by the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin. E:\FR\FM\20AUN1.SGM 20AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 162 (Thursday, August 20, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 51486-51488]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-18232]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0030623; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, 
Knoxville, TN

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has completed an 
inventory of associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Federally-recognized Indian Tribes, and has determined that 
a cultural affiliation between the associated funerary objects and 
present-day Federally-recognized Indian Tribes can reasonably be 
traced. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Federally-
recognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of the associated funerary objects should 
submit a written request to the TVA. If no additional requestors come 
forward, transfer of control of the associated funerary objects to the 
Federally-recognized Indian Tribes stated in this notice may proceed.

[[Page 51487]]


DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Federally-
recognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of the associated funerary objects should 
submit a written request with information in support of the request to 
the TVA at the address in this notice by September 21, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West 
Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902-1401, telephone (865) 
632-7458, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of associated funerary 
objects under the control of Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN. 
Transfer of control of the human remains with which these funerary 
objects are associated, as well as additional associated funerary 
objects, has already occurred. The associated funerary objects listed 
in this notice were discovered during a recent review of the TVA 
archeological collection housed at the Alabama Museum of Natural 
History. The associated funerary objects were removed from 
archeological sites in Jackson and Marshall Counties, AL.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the funerary objects was made by TVA 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Alabama-Coushatta Tribe 
of Texas (previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas); 
Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Cherokee Nation; Coushatta Tribe of 
Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians; Poarch Band of Creeks 
(previously listed as Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); The 
Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) 
Nation; The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Thlopthlocco Tribal Town; and 
the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma (hereafter 
referred to as ``The Consulted Tribes'').

History and Description of the Associated Funerary Objects

    The four sites listed in this notice--1JA27, 1JA102, 1MS55, and 
1MS91--were excavated as part of TVA's Guntersville Reservoir project 
by the Alabama Museum of Natural History (AMNH) at the University of 
Alabama, using labor and funds provided by the Works Progress 
Administration. Details regarding these excavations and sites may be 
found in a report, ``An Archaeological Survey of Guntersville Basin on 
the Tennessee River in Northern Alabama,'' by William S. Webb and 
Charles G. Wilder.
    Human remains and other associated funerary objects from 1JA27 were 
listed in a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal 
Register on September 5, 2017 (82 FR 41985-41987). Human remains and 
other associated funerary objects from 1JA102 and 1MS91 were listed in 
a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register on 
September 1, 2016 (81 FR 60381-60383). Human remains and other 
associated funerary objects from 1MS55 were listed in a Notice of 
Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register on April 29, 
2019 (84 FR 18080-18081). Transfer of control of the cultural items 
listed in those notices to the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas; 
Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; and The 
Muscogee (Creek) Nation has already occurred. The associated funerary 
objects listed in this notice were discovered during a recent review of 
the TVA archeological collection housed at AMNH.
    From March to April of 1938, a Furrs Cordmarked rim and a Bell 
Plain Effigy Bottle were removed from burial units 2 and 3, 
respectively, at the Hardin site (1JA27) in Jackson County, AL, after 
TVA acquired the site on October 16, 1936. Excavations revealed two 
primary occupations during the Late Woodland Flint River phase (A.D. 
500-1000) and the Mississippian Henry Island phase (A.D. 1200-1450). 
The associated funerary objects listed in this notice were originally 
found with the human remains that were from the Henry Island phase.
    From September 1938 to January 1939, one Bell Plain effigy bowl was 
removed from burial unit 10 at 1JA102, Sublet Ferry site, in Jackson 
County, AL. Excavations commenced after TVA acquired a permit for 
archeological exploration on June 11, 1938. Excavations revealed this 
site to be a shell midden overlying a dark midden soil. Both Woodland 
and Mississippian occupations were identified. The associated funerary 
object listed in this notice was from the Henry Island phase of the 
Mississippian period.
    From September 1937 to May 1938, one Bell Plain jar was removed 
from burial unit 39 at the Henry Island site, 1MS55, in Marshall 
County, AL. TVA purchased the site on November 2, 1936. This site was 
composed of two earthen mounds and an associated village midden. 
Although there are no radiocarbon dates from this site, artifacts from 
the excavation suggest occupations during the Copena (A.D. 100-500), 
Flint River (A.D. 500-1000), Henry Island (A.D. 1200-1500), and Crow 
Creek (A.D. 1500-1650) phases. The associated funerary object listed in 
this notice was removed from a Henry Island phase burial.
    From June 1938 to May 1939, one brass bell was removed from burial 
unit 25 (Unit I), and 17 glass beads, one carbonized textile sample and 
one carbonized basketry sample were removed from burial unit 5 (Unit 
II) at the Columbus City Landing site, 1MS91. This site is northeast of 
the city of Guntersville in Marshall County, AL. Excavation commenced 
after TVA purchased the land on March 8, 1937. There were excavations 
in both the village (Unit I) and adjacent mounds (Unit II). Artifacts 
recovered from this excavation revealed that the primary occupations 
were during the Middle Woodland (A.D. 100-500), Mississippian (A.D. 
1200-1500), and historic periods. The associated funerary objects 
listed in this notice were removed from historic Native American 
burials.
    A relationship of shared group identity can reasonably be traced 
between present-day Indian Tribes and the cultural items of the earlier 
culture identified as Mississippian. The preponderance of the evidence 
indicates that the cultural items from the Henry Island phase at 1JA27, 
1JA102, and 1MS55 and the historic period at 1MS91 are culturally 
affiliated with Native Americans descendants of the Koasati/Kaskinampo. 
These descendants include the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas 
(previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Alabama-
Quassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; and The Muscogee 
(Creek) Nation.
    Chronicles from Spanish explorers of the 16th century and French 
explorers of the 17th and 18th century indicate the presence of 
chiefdom level tribal entities in the southeastern United States which 
resemble the Mississippian chiefdoms. Linguistic analysis of place

[[Page 51488]]

names noted by multiple Spanish explorers indicates that Koasati 
speaking groups inhabited northeastern Alabama. Early maps and research 
into the historic Native American occupation of northeastern Alabama 
indicates that the Koasati (as called by the English) or the Kaskinampo 
(as called by the French) were found at multiple sites in Jackson and 
Marshall Counties in the 17th and 18th centuries. Oral history, 
traditions, and expert opinions of the descendants of Koasati/
Kaskinampo indicate that this portion of the Tennessee River valley was 
a homeland of their Tribe. The subsequent involuntary diaspora of these 
peoples resulted in descendants of the Koasati/Kaskinampo living among 
multiple Indian Tribes.

Determinations Made by the Tennessee Valley Authority

    Officials of the Tennessee Valley Authority have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 24 associated 
funerary objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to 
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of 
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
associated funerary objects listed in this notice and the Alabama-
Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as Alabama-Coushatta Tribes 
of Texas); Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; 
and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation (hereafter referred to as ``The 
Tribes'').

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Federally-recognized 
Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of the associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Dr. 
Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill 
Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902-1401, telephone (865) 632-7458, email 
[email protected], by September 21, 2020. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed.
    The Tennessee Valley Authority is responsible for notifying The 
Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 13, 2020.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2020-18232 Filed 8-19-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P