Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM, 48554-48556 [2020-17486]

Download as PDF 48554 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 155 / Tuesday, August 11, 2020 / Notices cranial vault (frontal, left and right parietal partial occipital bones), and belong to a male 40–50 years old. No known individual was identified. The 32 associated funerary objects are 28 potsherds, three lithic implements, and one ceramic disk or gaming piece. The presence of pottery suggests a Woodland/Mississippian date for the human remains. Geographical, oral traditional, and archeological information, in addition to the known historical presence of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation in the area encompassing the State of Alabama, support a relationship of shared group identity which can be reasonably traced between the present-day Muscogee (Creek) Nation and the pre-contact confederacy known as the Lower Creeks, who established Etulwas (tribal towns) along the Chattahoochee River in the region of present-day Lee County. Determinations Made by the Bruce Museum, Inc. Officials of the Bruce Museum, Inc. have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 32 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request Kirsten J. Reinhardt, NAGPRA Coordinator, Bruce Museum Inc.,1 Museum Drive, Greenwich, CT 06830, telephone (914) 671–9321, email kreinhardt@brucemuseum.org, by September 10, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Muscogee (Creek) Nation may proceed. The Bruce Museum, Inc. is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:02 Aug 10, 2020 Jkt 250001 Dated: July 7, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–17488 Filed 8–10–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030596; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest (USFS Gila National Forest) have completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science at the address in this notice by September 10, 2020. ADDRESSES: Stephen E. Nash, Director of Anthropology and Senior Curator of Archaeology, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205, telephone (303) 370–6056, email Stephen.Nash@dmns.org. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, some of which are under the control of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO, and some of which are under the control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Catron County, NM. The human remains of 49 individuals and 30 associated funerary objects were removed from private lands, and the human remains of five individuals were removed from Federal land belonging to the Gila National Forest. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Denver Museum of Nature & Science professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. History and Description of the Remains Between 1977 and 1993, human remains representing, at minimum, 54 individuals were removed from LA 3009 (a.k.a. the W.S. Ranch Site), LA 33704 (a.k.a. the Eva Faust Site), WS–5 (no known LA number), LA 29372 (a.k.a. WS–17 and HO Bar Site), LA 2949 (a.k.a. Apache Creek Pueblo), and LA 4437 (a.k.a. Devil’s Park Pueblo) in Catron County, NM, during excavations by the University of Texas at Austin, under the direction of Dr. James Neely. Following excavation, these human remains and associated funerary objects were curated at the Texas Archaeological Research Laboratory (TARL) in Austin, TX. Since 2017, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (DMNS) has had possession of the human remains and associated funerary objects removed during the excavations from private lands, and has had custody of the human remains removed during the excavations from Federal land E:\FR\FM\11AUN1.SGM 11AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 155 / Tuesday, August 11, 2020 / Notices belonging to the Gila National Forest. No known individuals were identified. Site number LA 3099 (a.k.a. the WS Ranch Site, McKeen Site, and NM 5:9:2) is located on both private lands and Federal land belonging to the Gila National Forest. Made up of at least six masonry room blocks that surround two or more great kivas, arranged around a possible plaza, it was excavated by the University of Texas from 1977 to 1993. The human remains of 45 individuals and 30 associated funerary objects were collected from private lands belonging to the WS Ranch Site, and the human remains of one individual were collected from Federal land belonging to the Gila National Forest. The 30 associated funerary objects are three bone tools, eight chipped stone tools, two ground stone tools, two miscellaneous stone objects, three whole ceramic vessels, four cloth fragments, one twine fragment, one hide fragment, one shell bracelet, three shells, one matrix sample, and one pigment sample. Based upon material culture, architecture, and site organization, this site has been identified as an Upland Mogollon pithouse and pueblo community that was occupied ca. A.D. 600–1300. Site number LA 33704 (a.k.a. the Eva Faust Site) is located on private lands. A Late Pithouse (A.D. 600–1000) to early Pueblo (A.D. 1000–1175) Reserve/ Three Circle Phase site, it was partially excavated by the University of Texas in 1986. The human remains of one individual were collected from LA 33704. Based upon material culture, architecture, and site organization, the site has been identified as an Upland Mogollon pithouse and pueblo community that was occupied ca. A.D. 600–1175. The WS–5 site is located on private lands. It was heavily damaged in the 1970s by looters, whose bulldozer cuts exposed the central masonry room block of a purported early Pueblo structure. The human remains of two individuals were recovered in 1986. Based on material culture, architecture, and site organization, this site has been identified as an Upland Mogollon pueblo community that was occupied ca. A.D. 1000–1175. WS–17 (a.k.a. LA29372, the HO BAR site) is located on private lands. It is a Late Archaic/Early Pithouse period site. The human remains of one individual were collected. Based upon material culture, architecture, and site organization, the site has been identified as an Upland Mogollon pithouse community that was occupied ca. A.D. 600–1175. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:02 Aug 10, 2020 Jkt 250001 LA2949 (a.k.a. Apache Creek Pueblo) is located on Federal land belonging to the Gila National Forest. It is an Early/ Late Pueblo site containing numerous room blocks and a kiva component. The human remains of two individuals were collected. Based upon material culture, architecture, and site organization, Apache Creek Pueblo has been identified as an Upland Mogollon pueblo community that was occupied ca. A.D. 1100–1250. LA4437 (a.k.a. Devil’s Park Pueblo) is located on Federal land belonging to the Gila National Forest. It is an Early Pueblo site containing visible masonry room blocks and a kiva. The human remains of two individuals were collected. Based upon material culture, architecture, and site organization, Devil’s Park Pueblo has been identified as an Upland Mogollon pueblo community that was occupied ca. A.D. 1100–1175. Archeologists have used the term Upland Mogollon to define the archeological complex represented by the sites described in this notice. Material culture characteristics of these traditions include a temporal progression from earlier pit houses to later masonry pueblos, villages organized in room blocks of contiguous dwellings and associated with plazas, rectangular kivas, polished and painted decorated ceramics, unpainted corrugated ceramics, inhumation burials, cradleboard cranial deformation, grooved stone axes, and bone artifacts. Archeologists have observed strong similarities between these archeological groups and presentday Puebloan Tribes. The similarities in ceramic traditions, burial practices, architectural forms, and settlement patterns have led archeologists to believe the prehistoric inhabitants of the Mogollon Rim region migrated north and west to the Hopi mesas and north and east to the Zuni River Valley. Certain objects found in Upland Mogollon archeological sites strongly resemble ritual paraphernalia used by Puebloan Tribes in continuing religious practices. Based on their material culture, architecture, and organizational structure, WS Ranch Site, Eva Faust Site, WS–5, WS–17, Apache Creek Pueblo, and Devil’s Park Pueblo have been identified as Upland Mogollon masonry pueblo and pithouse complexes that were occupied between ca. A.D. 200 and 1300. Continuities between ethnographic and archeological materials, Native American oral traditions, geography, and expert opinion, support the determination by the Denver Museum of Nature & Science PO 00000 Frm 00056 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 48555 and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest, that the 54 individuals and 30 associated funerary objects in this notice are culturally affiliated with all 24 Puebloan tribes in the American Southwest. Determinations Made by the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest Officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 54 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 30 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kewa Pueblo, New Mexico (previously listed as Pueblo of Santo Domingo); Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico (previously listed as Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo (previously listed as Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo of Texas); and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Stephen E. Nash, Director of Anthropology and Senior Curator of Archaeology, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, E:\FR\FM\11AUN1.SGM 11AUN1 48556 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 155 / Tuesday, August 11, 2020 / Notices CO 80205, telephone (303) 370–6056, email Stephen.Nash@dmns.org, by September 10, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest are responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: July 7, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–17486 Filed 8–10–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Consultation National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030600; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Bruce Museum Inc., Greenwich, CT National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Bruce Museum has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Bruce Museum. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Bruce Museum at the address in this notice by September 10, 2020. ADDRESSES: Kirsten J. Reinhardt, NAGPRA Coordinator, Bruce Museum Inc., 1 Museum Drive, Greenwich, CT 06830, telephone (914) 671–9321, email kreinhardt@brucemuseum.org. SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:02 Aug 10, 2020 Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Bruce Museum, Greenwich, CT. The human remains were removed from the Shorakapock Site in Inwood Hill Park, New York County, NY. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Jkt 250001 A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Bruce Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians; and the Stockbridge Munsee Community, Wisconsin (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains Around 1930, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from the Shorakapock Site in Inwood Hill Park, New York County, NY. The human remains are believed to have been removed by Charles L. Howes, whose brother was Bruce Museum curator Paul G. Howes. A Bruce Museum accession card referencing a donation by Charles Howes to the museum in 1930 states, ‘‘Colonial relics, bullets, buttons, etc. from a dump at Inwood Hill Park, NY. Near Indian shell heap.’’ Human remains consisting of a cranial vault (I.01535.01) belong to a female 20–30 years old. These human remains were varnished and stabilized with copper wire in the Bruce Museum laboratory by curator Paul G. Howes. Human remains consisting of two mandible fragments with dentition, three maxillary fragments with dentition (one of them a shovel-shaped incisor), five loose teeth, one loose root, and six small cranium fragments (I.01535.02) belong to an adult male of unknown age. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains were determined to be Native American by Connecticut State Archaeologist, Nicholas Bellantoni, who with Ed Sarabia, Tlingit, Indian Affairs Coordinator, Connecticut Commission on Indian PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Affairs; performed a skeletal and dentition analysis on October 25, 1995. Although the exact date or pre-contact period associated with this site is unknown, as no reliable temporal indictors were recovered or recorded, the Shorakapock site is well documented in the New York archeological and historical literature. Records from 17th and 18th century documents indicate at least five settlements may been located within or near the Inwood Hill Park vicinity. According to The Cultural Landscape Foundation, the site was inhabited by the Lenape tribe through the seventeenth century and was farmed by European settlers during the 17th and 18th centuries. In the 1930s, Works Progress Administration workers built or paved many of the roads at the site, often following earlier circulation patterns, and in 1954, a boulder and plaque were placed on the former location of a historic tulip tree under which Peter Minuit reportedly purchased Manhattan from the Lenape. Geographical, oral traditional, and historical information support a relationship of shared group identity which can be reasonably traced between the present-day Delaware Nation, Delaware Tribe of Indians, and the Stockbridge Munsee Community, and the pre-contact Eastern Lenni Lenape who inhabited Manhattan Island, New York County, New York, including the Shorakapock site in Inwood Hill Park, at the northernmost tip of the island. Determinations Made by the Bruce Museum Inc. Officials of the Bruce Museum Inc. have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request Kirsten J. Reinhardt, NAGPRA Coordinator, Bruce Museum Inc., 1 Museum Drive, Greenwich, CT 06830, telephone (914) 671–9321, email kreinhardt@ brucemuseum.org, by September 10, 2020. After that date, if no additional E:\FR\FM\11AUN1.SGM 11AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 155 (Tuesday, August 11, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 48554-48556]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-17486]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0030596; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & 
Science, Denver, CO, and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest 
Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest (USFS Gila 
National Forest) have completed an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate 
Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and have determined 
that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and 
associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any 
Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this 
notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains 
and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the 
Denver Museum of Nature & Science. If no additional requestors come 
forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native 
Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science at the 
address in this notice by September 10, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Stephen E. Nash, Director of Anthropology and Senior Curator 
of Archaeology, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., 
Denver, CO 80205, telephone (303) 370-6056, email 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects, some of which are under the control of the 
Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO, and some of which are 
under the control of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest 
Service, Gila National Forest, Silver City, NM. The human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed from Catron County, NM. The 
human remains of 49 individuals and 30 associated funerary objects were 
removed from private lands, and the human remains of five individuals 
were removed from Federal land belonging to the Gila National Forest.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Denver 
Museum of Nature & Science professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; 
and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.

History and Description of the Remains

    Between 1977 and 1993, human remains representing, at minimum, 54 
individuals were removed from LA 3009 (a.k.a. the W.S. Ranch Site), LA 
33704 (a.k.a. the Eva Faust Site), WS-5 (no known LA number), LA 29372 
(a.k.a. WS-17 and HO Bar Site), LA 2949 (a.k.a. Apache Creek Pueblo), 
and LA 4437 (a.k.a. Devil's Park Pueblo) in Catron County, NM, during 
excavations by the University of Texas at Austin, under the direction 
of Dr. James Neely. Following excavation, these human remains and 
associated funerary objects were curated at the Texas Archaeological 
Research Laboratory (TARL) in Austin, TX. Since 2017, the Denver Museum 
of Nature & Science (DMNS) has had possession of the human remains and 
associated funerary objects removed during the excavations from private 
lands, and has had custody of the human remains removed during the 
excavations from Federal land

[[Page 48555]]

belonging to the Gila National Forest. No known individuals were 
identified.
    Site number LA 3099 (a.k.a. the WS Ranch Site, McKeen Site, and NM 
5:9:2) is located on both private lands and Federal land belonging to 
the Gila National Forest. Made up of at least six masonry room blocks 
that surround two or more great kivas, arranged around a possible 
plaza, it was excavated by the University of Texas from 1977 to 1993. 
The human remains of 45 individuals and 30 associated funerary objects 
were collected from private lands belonging to the WS Ranch Site, and 
the human remains of one individual were collected from Federal land 
belonging to the Gila National Forest. The 30 associated funerary 
objects are three bone tools, eight chipped stone tools, two ground 
stone tools, two miscellaneous stone objects, three whole ceramic 
vessels, four cloth fragments, one twine fragment, one hide fragment, 
one shell bracelet, three shells, one matrix sample, and one pigment 
sample. Based upon material culture, architecture, and site 
organization, this site has been identified as an Upland Mogollon 
pithouse and pueblo community that was occupied ca. A.D. 600-1300.
    Site number LA 33704 (a.k.a. the Eva Faust Site) is located on 
private lands. A Late Pithouse (A.D. 600-1000) to early Pueblo (A.D. 
1000-1175) Reserve/Three Circle Phase site, it was partially excavated 
by the University of Texas in 1986. The human remains of one individual 
were collected from LA 33704. Based upon material culture, 
architecture, and site organization, the site has been identified as an 
Upland Mogollon pithouse and pueblo community that was occupied ca. 
A.D. 600-1175.
    The WS-5 site is located on private lands. It was heavily damaged 
in the 1970s by looters, whose bulldozer cuts exposed the central 
masonry room block of a purported early Pueblo structure. The human 
remains of two individuals were recovered in 1986. Based on material 
culture, architecture, and site organization, this site has been 
identified as an Upland Mogollon pueblo community that was occupied ca. 
A.D. 1000-1175.
    WS-17 (a.k.a. LA29372, the HO BAR site) is located on private 
lands. It is a Late Archaic/Early Pithouse period site. The human 
remains of one individual were collected. Based upon material culture, 
architecture, and site organization, the site has been identified as an 
Upland Mogollon pithouse community that was occupied ca. A.D. 600-1175.
    LA2949 (a.k.a. Apache Creek Pueblo) is located on Federal land 
belonging to the Gila National Forest. It is an Early/Late Pueblo site 
containing numerous room blocks and a kiva component. The human remains 
of two individuals were collected. Based upon material culture, 
architecture, and site organization, Apache Creek Pueblo has been 
identified as an Upland Mogollon pueblo community that was occupied ca. 
A.D. 1100-1250.
    LA4437 (a.k.a. Devil's Park Pueblo) is located on Federal land 
belonging to the Gila National Forest. It is an Early Pueblo site 
containing visible masonry room blocks and a kiva. The human remains of 
two individuals were collected. Based upon material culture, 
architecture, and site organization, Devil's Park Pueblo has been 
identified as an Upland Mogollon pueblo community that was occupied ca. 
A.D. 1100-1175.
    Archeologists have used the term Upland Mogollon to define the 
archeological complex represented by the sites described in this 
notice. Material culture characteristics of these traditions include a 
temporal progression from earlier pit houses to later masonry pueblos, 
villages organized in room blocks of contiguous dwellings and 
associated with plazas, rectangular kivas, polished and painted 
decorated ceramics, unpainted corrugated ceramics, inhumation burials, 
cradleboard cranial deformation, grooved stone axes, and bone 
artifacts. Archeologists have observed strong similarities between 
these archeological groups and present-day Puebloan Tribes. The 
similarities in ceramic traditions, burial practices, architectural 
forms, and settlement patterns have led archeologists to believe the 
prehistoric inhabitants of the Mogollon Rim region migrated north and 
west to the Hopi mesas and north and east to the Zuni River Valley. 
Certain objects found in Upland Mogollon archeological sites strongly 
resemble ritual paraphernalia used by Puebloan Tribes in continuing 
religious practices.
    Based on their material culture, architecture, and organizational 
structure, WS Ranch Site, Eva Faust Site, WS-5, WS-17, Apache Creek 
Pueblo, and Devil's Park Pueblo have been identified as Upland Mogollon 
masonry pueblo and pithouse complexes that were occupied between ca. 
A.D. 200 and 1300. Continuities between ethnographic and archeological 
materials, Native American oral traditions, geography, and expert 
opinion, support the determination by the Denver Museum of Nature & 
Science and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila 
National Forest, that the 54 individuals and 30 associated funerary 
objects in this notice are culturally affiliated with all 24 Puebloan 
tribes in the American Southwest.

Determinations Made by the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest

    Officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 54 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 30 objects described 
in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Hopi 
Tribe of Arizona; Kewa Pueblo, New Mexico (previously listed as Pueblo 
of Santo Domingo); Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico (previously listed as 
Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San 
Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa 
Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo (previously 
listed as Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo of Texas); and the Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as ``The Tribes'').

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Stephen E. Nash, Director of Anthropology and 
Senior Curator of Archaeology, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 
Colorado Blvd., Denver,

[[Page 48556]]

CO 80205, telephone (303) 370-6056, email [email protected], by 
September 10, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have 
come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed.
    The Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture, Forest Service, Gila National Forest are responsible for 
notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 7, 2020.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2020-17486 Filed 8-10-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P