Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin, Sacramento, CA, 40315-40317 [2020-14398]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 129 / Monday, July 6, 2020 / Notices National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made on behalf of the California Department of Transportation by the Fowler Museum at UCLA professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Campo Indian Reservation, California; Capitan Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of California (Barona Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Barona Reservation, California; Viejas (Baron Long) Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Viejas Reservation, California); Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, California; Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, California (previously listed as Santa Ysabel Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Santa Ysabel Reservation); Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Inaja and Cosmit Reservation, California; Jamul Indian Village of California; La Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the La Posta Indian Reservation, California; Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation, California; Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Mesa Grande Reservation, California; Pechanga Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the Pechanga Reservation, California; Rincon Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of Rincon Reservation, California; San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of California; Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation; and the San Luis Rey Band of Luiseno Indians, a non-federally recognized Indian group (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes and Groups’’). History and Description of the Remains In 1960 and 1961, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from Batiquitos Lagoon in San Diego County, CA. They were excavated by R. H. Crabtree and Claude Warren as part of the UCLA Archaeological Survey under contract with the State Division of Beaches and Parks (now the Department of Parks and Recreation) for the Division of Highways (now the California Department of Transportation). The excavation site was in the proposed freeway (referred to at time of excavation as Highway 101, but now is Interstate 5) right-of-way. The collection was analyzed at UCLA and transferred to the Fowler Museum at UCLA for curation. Human remains consist of one sub-adult female individual and fragmentary human remains from a VerDate Sep<11>2014 04:41 Jul 03, 2020 Jkt 250001 second individual (age/sex unknown). No known individuals were identified. The 14 associated funerary objects are 11 unmodified animal bones, one unmodified shell, one shell bead, and one soil sample. (Despite an exhaustive search by Fowler Museum staff, currently, eight additional unmodified animal bones among the associated funerary objects are absent.) Radiocarbon dates between 5340 and 1940 B.C. obtained from two shell samples place the earliest occupation of the Batiquitos Lagoon site in the Early Holocene. That occupation was followed by a temporary abandonment of coastal sites due to strong environmental changes that resulted in the silting of the lagoon and the depletion of natural resources. Oral history of the Kumeyaay describes their oceanic origins and movements on the landscape. Over time, as environmental and social stresses occurred, coastal groups likely became interrelated with inland groups and relied upon each other. These relationships are reflected in their song cycles and sand paintings, as well as in the archeological record. The Kumeyaay locate Batiquitos within their traditional aboriginal territory. Moreover, geographical, oral traditional, archeological, ethnographic, and linguistic lines of evidence all support the existence of a cultural affiliation of the present-day Kumeyaay with the human remains listed in this notice. Determinations Made by the California Department of Transportation Officials of the California Department of Transportation have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 14 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Campo Indian Reservation, California; Capitan Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of California (Barona Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Barona Reservation, California; Viejas (Baron Long) Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Viejas Reservation, California); Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, California; PO 00000 Frm 00132 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 40315 Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, California (previously listed as Santa Ysabel Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Santa Ysabel Reservation); Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Inaja and Cosmit Reservation, California; Jamul Indian Village of California; La Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the La Posta Indian Reservation, California; Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation, California; Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Mesa Grande Reservation, California; San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of California; and the Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Sarah Allred, California Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 942874 MS 27, Sacramento, CA 94271– 0001, telephone (916) 653–0013, email Sarah.Allred@dot.ca.gov, by August 5, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The California Department of Transportation is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes and Groups that this notice has been published. Dated: May 27, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–14399 Filed 7–2–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030387; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin, Sacramento, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin (Reclamation Region 10), has completed SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\06JYN1.SGM 06JYN1 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES 40316 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 129 / Monday, July 6, 2020 / Notices an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to Reclamation Region 10. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Reclamation Region 10 at the address in this notice by August 5, 2020. ADDRESSES: Melanie Ryan, NAGPRA Specialist/Physical Anthropologist, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin, MP–153, 2800 Cottage Way, Sacramento, CA 95825, telephone (916) 978–5526, email emryan@usbr.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin, Sacramento, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from lands in Ventura County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects VerDate Sep<11>2014 04:41 Jul 03, 2020 Jkt 250001 was made by Reclamation Region 10 professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. History and Description of the Remains In 1958 and 1959, the human remains of, at minimum, 15 individuals were removed from two sites in Ventura County, CA, owned by the Bureau of Reclamation—Las Casitas I (CA–VEN– 48) and Las Casitas III (CA–VEN–115). The human remains were removed during excavations carried out by the University of Southern California under the direction of William Wallace ahead of Reclamation’s Ventura River Project and construction of the Casitas Dam, Dike, and Reservoir. In 1964, the collections from Las Casitas I and III were transferred from the University of Southern California to the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where they remain in the custody of UCLA’s Fowler Museum. In 2017, Reclamation Region 10 discovered that the collections from Las Casita I and III are under Reclamation’s control and contain human remains and associated funerary objects. The human remains from Las Casitas I (CA–VEN–48; UCLA Number 446) represent nine individuals—eight formal burials and 48 pieces of disarticulated, fragmentary remains. Evidence of rodent activity on the human remains might account for the disparate proveniences of the 48 bone fragments. Among the human remains are two older adult females; one young adult male; two adult males; one older adult male; and two adults of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 95 associated funerary objects are 56 shell beads, 13 pieces of animal bone, 10 sandstone manos, three pieces of worked bone, four pieces of worked ochre, two pieces of chert debitage, one bone scraper, one chert scraper, one chert core, one chert projectile point, one quartzite core/hammerstone, one sandstone ground stone ball, and one stone fragment. (According to the Fowler Museum’s records, there were originally 97 associated funerary objects, but one worked bone and one drilled cowrie shell were lost in a fire in 1970.) The human remains from Las Casitas III (CA–VEN–115; UCLA Number 448) represent six individuals—five formal burials and 15 teeth recovered from a midden context. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are shell beads. (According to the Fowler Museum’s records, as of May 28, 1976, one chert PO 00000 Frm 00133 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 scraper was apparently lost while on loan.) The amount of wear on the dentition and the associated artifacts indicate that the human remains are Native American. In consultation with the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians, of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, Reclamation Region 10 determined that the land from which these human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is within traditional territory of the Chumash, and that the associated funerary objects are consistent with those groups who are ancestral to present day Chumash. Determinations made by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin Office Officials of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin Office have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 15 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 97 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Melanie Ryan, NAGPRA Specialist/Physical Anthropologist, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin, MP–153, 2800 Cottage Way, Sacramento, CA 95825, telephone (916) 978–5526, email emryan@usbr.gov, by August 5, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California may proceed. The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region E:\FR\FM\06JYN1.SGM 06JYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 129 / Monday, July 6, 2020 / Notices 10, California-Great Basin Office is responsible for notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California that this notice has been published. Dated: May 27, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–14398 Filed 7–2–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030386; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Hudson Museum, University of Maine, Orono, ME National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Hudson Museum, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Hudson Museum, University of Maine. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Hudson Museum, University of Maine at the address in this notice by August 5, 2020. ADDRESSES: Gretchen Faulkner, Director, Hudson Museum, University of Maine, 5746 Collins Center for the Arts, Orono, ME 04469, telephone (207) 581–1904, email gretchen.faulkner@ maine.edu. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the Hudson Museum, University of Maine, Orono, ME, that meet the definition of SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Sep<11>2014 04:41 Jul 03, 2020 Jkt 250001 unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items The five items listed below were acquired by William P. Palmer III. In 1982, Palmer bequeathed the items to the University of Maine and they became part of the Hudson Museum’s holdings. HM5510, a Tlingit Shaman’s pipe from Kake Village on Kupreanof Island, Alaska, was collected by George Thornton Emmons and accessioned by the Heye Foundation (catalog number 1/ 2922). On March 15, 1967, the Heye Foundation transferred this piece to Morton D. May. Subsequently, it was acquired by William P. Palmer III. HM3222, a Tlingit Shaman’s guardian figure, was formerly part of the Christian Rub Collection, Santa Barbara, California. It was acquired by William P. Palmer III from Proctor Stafford, Los Angeles, California. HM5574, a Tlingit Shaman’s mask representing the porpoise spirit, was collected by George Thornton Emmons and accessioned by the Heye Foundation (catalog number 11/1751). In June of 1949, the Heye Foundation transferred this piece to Julius Carlebach. Subsequently, Morton D. May acquired it from Carlebach. Later, it was acquired by William P. Palmer III. HM5500 is a Tlingit Shaman’s guardian figure. Records for this object appear to indicate that around 1968, this figure was acquired by William P. Palmer III from Walt Killiam, a dealer in Chester, Connecticut. HM5460, is a Tlingit Raven grave totem. Records for this object indicate that it originally hung in the Elks Lodge, Juneau, Alaska. It was formerly in the collection of Axel Rasmussen, William Spratling, and Proctor Stafford. William P. Palmer III acquired it from Proctor Stafford. In June 2018, a delegation from the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes came to the Hudson Museum, University of Maine to consult on these objects. The group included Harold Jacobs, Sarah Dybdahl, Stephanie Masterman, Herman Davis Sr., Herman Davis, Jr. and Neeka Cook. In conjunction with the Hudson PO 00000 Frm 00134 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 9990 40317 Museum staff and Hudson Museum cooperating curators, it was determined that these objects are culturally affiliated with the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes. Determinations Made by the Hudson Museum, University of Maine Officials of the Hudson Museum, University of Maine have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the five cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Gretchen Faulkner, Director, Hudson Museum, University of Maine, 5746 Collins Center for the Arts, Orono, ME 04469, telephone (207) 581–1904, email gretchen.faulkner@maine.edu, by August 5, 2020. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes may proceed. The Hudson Museum, University of Maine is responsible for notifying the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: May 27, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–14397 Filed 7–2–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P E:\FR\FM\06JYN1.SGM 06JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 129 (Monday, July 6, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 40315-40317]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-14398]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0030387; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, 
Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin, 
Sacramento, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 
Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin (Reclamation Region 10), has 
completed

[[Page 40316]]

an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in 
consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian 
organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation 
between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-
day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants 
or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request to Reclamation Region 10. If no additional requestors 
come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native 
Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the Reclamation Region 10 at the address in 
this notice by August 5, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Melanie Ryan, NAGPRA Specialist/Physical Anthropologist, 
Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin, MP-
153, 2800 Cottage Way, Sacramento, CA 95825, telephone (916) 978-5526, 
email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the U.S. Department of 
the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-
Great Basin, Sacramento, CA. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from lands in Ventura County, CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by Reclamation Region 10 professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash 
Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1958 and 1959, the human remains of, at minimum, 15 individuals 
were removed from two sites in Ventura County, CA, owned by the Bureau 
of Reclamation--Las Casitas I (CA-VEN-48) and Las Casitas III (CA-VEN-
115). The human remains were removed during excavations carried out by 
the University of Southern California under the direction of William 
Wallace ahead of Reclamation's Ventura River Project and construction 
of the Casitas Dam, Dike, and Reservoir.
    In 1964, the collections from Las Casitas I and III were 
transferred from the University of Southern California to the 
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where they remain in the 
custody of UCLA's Fowler Museum. In 2017, Reclamation Region 10 
discovered that the collections from Las Casita I and III are under 
Reclamation's control and contain human remains and associated funerary 
objects.
    The human remains from Las Casitas I (CA-VEN-48; UCLA Number 446) 
represent nine individuals--eight formal burials and 48 pieces of 
disarticulated, fragmentary remains. Evidence of rodent activity on the 
human remains might account for the disparate proveniences of the 48 
bone fragments. Among the human remains are two older adult females; 
one young adult male; two adult males; one older adult male; and two 
adults of indeterminate sex. No known individuals were identified. The 
95 associated funerary objects are 56 shell beads, 13 pieces of animal 
bone, 10 sandstone manos, three pieces of worked bone, four pieces of 
worked ochre, two pieces of chert debitage, one bone scraper, one chert 
scraper, one chert core, one chert projectile point, one quartzite 
core/hammerstone, one sandstone ground stone ball, and one stone 
fragment. (According to the Fowler Museum's records, there were 
originally 97 associated funerary objects, but one worked bone and one 
drilled cowrie shell were lost in a fire in 1970.)
    The human remains from Las Casitas III (CA-VEN-115; UCLA Number 
448) represent six individuals--five formal burials and 15 teeth 
recovered from a midden context. No known individuals were identified. 
The two associated funerary objects are shell beads. (According to the 
Fowler Museum's records, as of May 28, 1976, one chert scraper was 
apparently lost while on loan.)
    The amount of wear on the dentition and the associated artifacts 
indicate that the human remains are Native American. In consultation 
with the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians, of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California, Reclamation Region 10 determined that the land 
from which these human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed is within traditional territory of the Chumash, and that the 
associated funerary objects are consistent with those groups who are 
ancestral to present day Chumash.

Determinations made by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of 
Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin Office

    Officials of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of 
Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-Great Basin Office have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 15 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 97 objects described 
in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa 
Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, 
California.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Melanie Ryan, NAGPRA Specialist/Physical 
Anthropologist, Bureau of Reclamation, Interior Region 10, California-
Great Basin, MP-153, 2800 Cottage Way, Sacramento, CA 95825, telephone 
(916) 978-5526, email [email protected], by August 5, 2020. After that 
date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California may proceed.
    The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, 
Interior Region

[[Page 40317]]

10, California-Great Basin Office is responsible for notifying the 
Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez 
Reservation, California that this notice has been published.

    Dated: May 27, 2020.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2020-14398 Filed 7-2-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P