Notice of Inventory Completion: The Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, FL, 35439-35440 [2020-12553]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 112 / Wednesday, June 10, 2020 / Notices History and Description of the Cultural Item DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030254; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Minnesota Museum of American Art, St. Paul, MN AGENCY: ACTION: National Park Service, Interior. Notice. The Minnesota Museum of American Art, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the one cultural item listed in this notice meets the definition of a sacred object and an object of cultural patrimony. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request to the Minnesota Museum of American Art. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural item to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. SUMMARY: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim this cultural item should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Minnesota Museum of American Art at the address in this notice by July 10, 2020. DATES: Kristin Makholm, Executive Director, Minnesota Museum of American Art, 350 Robert Street N, St. Paul, MN 55101, telephone (651) 492– 0309, email kmakholm@mmaa.org. ADDRESSES: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item under the control of the Minnesota Museum of American Art, St. Paul, MN, that meets the definition of a sacred object and an object of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:06 Jun 09, 2020 Jkt 250001 Sometime between 1926 and 1936, while he was superintendent of schools in Wrangell, AK, Axel Rasmussen collected a killer whale shirt. After his death in 1945, his collection of Northwest Coast objects was dispersed. The collection was reassembled by Earl Stendahl, and part of it, including the killer whale shirt, was sold to the Portland Art Museum in Portland, OR. In 1957, the Minnesota Museum of American Art, formerly the Saint Paul Gallery, purchased the killer whale shirt from the Portland Art Museum. The killer whale shirt is both a sacred object and an object of cultural patrimony. Documentation provided by the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes, acting on behalf of itself and the Wrangell Cooperative Association—specifically the Tlingit clan Naanya.aayı´—confirms the Tlingit identity of this cultural item and the clan’s rightful custodianship of it. The Central Council described how the clan came to own the name and crest killer whale Sheiyksh, and demonstrated the traditional uncle-to-nephew hereditary transfer of the item going back to the first Chief Shakes. The shirt itself has Tahltan style beadwork on the collar, signifying that it is from the Stikine and Wrangell area. The Central Council also provided video evidence of Chief Shakes VII wearing the killer whale shirt in a potlach on June 3–4, 1940. The shirt has ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance for the Tlingit people, and under the Tlingit system of communal property ownership, it could not be alienated, appropriated, or conveyed by any individual. The killer whale shirt bonds the Tlingit people to their ancestors, symbolizing the people’s relationship to the being depicted on it. Incorporating the crest design, it provides a physical form in which spiritual beings manifest their presence. In addition, the shirt is needed for current and ongoing cultural and religious practices. Determinations Made by the Minnesota Museum of American Art Officials of the Minnesota Museum of American Art have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the one cultural item described above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), the one cultural item described above has ongoing historical, traditional, or PO 00000 Frm 00028 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 35439 cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object and object of cultural patrimony and the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes and the Wrangell Cooperative Association. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Kristin Makholm, Executive Director, Minnesota Museum of American Art, 350 Robert Street N, St. Paul, MN 55101, telephone (651) 492–0309, email kmakholm@mmaa.org, by July 10, 2020. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the sacred object and object of cultural patrimony to the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes and the Wrangell Cooperative Association may proceed. The Minnesota Museum of American Art is responsible for notifying Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes and the Wrangell Cooperative Association that this notice has been published. Dated: April 28, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–12547 Filed 6–9–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0030350; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: The Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, FL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\10JNN1.SGM 10JNN1 35440 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 112 / Wednesday, June 10, 2020 / Notices jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources at the address in this notice by July 10, 2020. ADDRESSES: Kathryn Miyar, Florida Department of State, Mission San Luis Collections, 2100 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, FL 32304, telephone (850) 245–6301, email kathryn.miyar@ dos.myflorida.com. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, FL. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from the Manasota Key Offshore site, Sarasota County, FL. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians; Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations); and VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:06 Jun 09, 2020 Jkt 250001 The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains From 2016 to 2018, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 individuals were removed from the Manasota Key Offshore site in Sarasota County, FL. In June 2016, the Florida Division of Historical Resources (DHR) Bureau of Archaeological Research (BAR) staff were notified of prehistoric human remains that had washed ashore on Manasota Key in Sarasota County. Underwater archeological staff investigated the incident and discovered the human remains were from an Archaic burial site (7,000 B.P.) now inundated offshore under the Gulf of Mexico. This site is legally protected under Chapter 267 and Section 872.05, Florida Statutes, requiring state archeologists to preserve and protect the site from both human and natural impacts. Underwater archeological excavations were conducted by BAR from 2017 to 2018, in order to develop a protection plan for the underwater cemetery. These excavations resulted in the recovery of in situ remains representing 11 individuals, including seven adults, two infants, and two prenates. No known individuals were identified. The 49 associated funerary objects include 10 fiber cordage fragments, one modified conch shell, two modified oyster drills, one shell pendant, and 35 wooden stake fragments. Determinations Made by the Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources Officials of the Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on contextual information and osteological analysis. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 11 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 49 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribe. PO 00000 Frm 00029 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission in 1978, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes. • The Treaty with the Florida Tribes of Indians in 1823 (Cession 118) and the Treaty with the Seminoles in 1832 (Cession 173) indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects may be to The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Kathryn Miyar, Florida Department of State, Mission San Luis Collections, 2100 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, FL 32304, telephone (850) 245–6301, email kathryn.miyar@ dos.myflorida.com, by July 10, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: May 15, 2020. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2020–12553 Filed 6–9–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management [Docket ID: BOEM–2020–0019] Extension of Post-Sale Evaluation Period for Gulf of Mexico Lease Sale 254 Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice to extend post-sale evaluation period. AGENCY: This Notice extends the postsale evaluation period for the Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 254 (Sale 254) by an additional 30 days. BOEM will complete the post-sale evaluation SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\10JNN1.SGM 10JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 112 (Wednesday, June 10, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 35439-35440]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-12553]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0030350; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: The Florida Department of State/
Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, FL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Florida Department of State, Division of Historical 
Resources, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated 
funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or 
Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is no 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary 
objects and any present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian

[[Page 35440]]

organizations. Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request to the Florida Department of 
State, Division of Historical Resources. If no additional requestors 
come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations 
stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary 
objects should submit a written request with information in support of 
the request to the Florida Department of State, Division of Historical 
Resources at the address in this notice by July 10, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Kathryn Miyar, Florida Department of State, Mission San Luis 
Collections, 2100 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, FL 32304, 
telephone (850) 245-6301, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Florida Department 
of State, Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, FL. The human 
remains and associated funerary objects were removed from the Manasota 
Key Offshore site, Sarasota County, FL.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Florida 
Department of State, Division of Historical Resources professional 
staff in consultation with representatives of the Miccosukee Tribe of 
Indians; Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as the Seminole 
Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa 
Reservations); and The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma (hereafter referred 
to as ``The Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    From 2016 to 2018, human remains representing, at minimum, 11 
individuals were removed from the Manasota Key Offshore site in 
Sarasota County, FL. In June 2016, the Florida Division of Historical 
Resources (DHR) Bureau of Archaeological Research (BAR) staff were 
notified of prehistoric human remains that had washed ashore on 
Manasota Key in Sarasota County. Underwater archeological staff 
investigated the incident and discovered the human remains were from an 
Archaic burial site (7,000 B.P.) now inundated offshore under the Gulf 
of Mexico. This site is legally protected under Chapter 267 and Section 
872.05, Florida Statutes, requiring state archeologists to preserve and 
protect the site from both human and natural impacts. Underwater 
archeological excavations were conducted by BAR from 2017 to 2018, in 
order to develop a protection plan for the underwater cemetery. These 
excavations resulted in the recovery of in situ remains representing 11 
individuals, including seven adults, two infants, and two prenates. No 
known individuals were identified. The 49 associated funerary objects 
include 10 fiber cordage fragments, one modified conch shell, two 
modified oyster drills, one shell pendant, and 35 wooden stake 
fragments.

Determinations Made by the Florida Department of State, Division of 
Historical Resources

    Officials of the Florida Department of State, Division of 
Historical Resources have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on contextual information and 
osteological analysis.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 11 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 49 objects described 
in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day 
Indian Tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission in 1978, the land from which the Native American human 
remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal 
land of The Tribes.
     The Treaty with the Florida Tribes of Indians in 1823 
(Cession 118) and the Treaty with the Seminoles in 1832 (Cession 173) 
indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The 
Tribes.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects may be to The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Kathryn 
Miyar, Florida Department of State, Mission San Luis Collections, 2100 
West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, FL 32304, telephone (850) 245-6301, 
email [email protected], by July 10, 2020. After that 
date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of 
control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The 
Tribes may proceed.
    The Florida Department of State, Division of Historical Resources 
is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: May 15, 2020.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2020-12553 Filed 6-9-20; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4312-52-P