Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Extension, 14939-14941 [2020-05266]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 51 / Monday, March 16, 2020 / Notices May 4, 2020, to be placed on the list of registered speakers. Written Statements: Written statements will be accepted throughout the advisory process; however, for timely consideration by SAB members, statements should be received in the SAB Staff Office by March 23, 2020, for consideration at the public teleconference on March 30, 2020. Written statements should be received in the SAB Staff Office by May 4, 2020, for consideration at the public teleconference on May 11, 2020. Written statements should be supplied to the DFO at the contact information above via email (preferred) or in hard copy with original signature. Submitters are requested to provide a signed and unsigned version of each document because the SAB Staff Office does not publish documents with signatures on its websites. Members of the public should be aware that their personal contact information, if included in any written comments, may be posted to the SAB website. Copyrighted material will not be posted without explicit permission of the copyright holder. Accessibility: For information on access or services for individuals with disabilities, please contact Dr. Armitage at the phone number or email address noted above, preferably at least ten days prior to the meeting, to give the EPA as much time as possible to process your request. Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, March 11, 2020. Yao-Chin Chao, Assistant Secretary of the Board. [FR Doc. 2020–05277 Filed 3–13–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Extension Federal Trade Commission. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), the Federal Trade Commission (FTC or Commission) is seeking public comment on its proposal to extend for an additional three years the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) clearance for information collection requirements in its Informal Dispute Settlement Procedures Rule (the Dispute Settlement Rule or the Rule). The current clearance expires on May 31, 2020. The notificants listed below have applied under the Change in Bank Control Act (Act) (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)) and § 225.41 of the Board’s Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.41) to acquire shares of a bank or bank holding company. The factors that are considered in acting on the applications are set forth in paragraph 7 of the Act (12 U.S.C. 1817(j)(7)). The applications listed below, as well as other related filings required by the Board, if any, are available for immediate inspection at the Federal Reserve Bank indicated. The applications will also be available for inspection at the offices of the Board of Governors. Interested persons may express their views in writing on the Comments must be received on or before May 15, 2020. ADDRESSES: Interested parties may file a comment online or on paper by following the instructions in the Request for Comments part of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ‘‘Dispute Settlement Rule; PRA Comment: FTC File No. P072108’’ on your comment, and file your comment online at https:// www.regulations.gov by following the instructions on the web-based form. If you prefer to file your comment on paper, mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite V. Khanna Johnston, Deputy Director, EPA Science Advisory Board Staff Office. [FR Doc. 2020–05253 Filed 3–13–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM lotter on DSKBCFDHB2PROD with NOTICES standards enumerated in paragraph 7 of the Act. Comments regarding each of these applications must be received at the Reserve Bank indicated or the offices of the Board of Governors, Ann E. Misback, Secretary of the Board, 20th and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20551–0001, not later than March 31, 2020. A. Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond (Adam M. Drimer, Assistant Vice President) 701 East Byrd Street, Richmond, Virginia 23219. Comments can also be sent electronically to or Comments.applications@rich.frb.org: 1. Kenneth R. Lehman, Fort Lauderdale, Florida; to acquire voting shares of The Freedom Bank of Virginia, Fairfax, Virginia. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:29 Mar 13, 2020 Jkt 250001 SUMMARY: DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00068 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 14939 CC–5610 (Annex J), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW, 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex J), Washington, DC 20024. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christine M. Todaro, Attorney, Division of Marketing Practices, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20580, (202) 326– 3711. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Informal Dispute Settlement Procedures Rule (the Dispute Settlement Rule or the Rule), 16 CFR 703. OMB Control Number: 3084–0113. Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection. Likely Respondents: Warrantors (Automobile Manufacturers) and Informal Dispute Settlement Mechanisms. Estimated Annual Burden Hours: 9,055 (derived from 6,121 recordkeeping hours in addition to 2,040 reporting hours and 894 disclosure hours). Estimated Annual Labor Costs: $209,595. Estimated Annual Capital or Other Non-labor Costs: $314,566. Abstract: The Dispute Settlement Rule is one of three rules 1 that the FTC implemented pursuant to requirements of the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, 15 U.S.C. 2301 et seq. (Warranty Act or Act).2 The Dispute Settlement Rule, 16 CFR 703, specifies the minimum standards which must be met by any informal dispute settlement mechanism (IDSM) that is incorporated into a written consumer product warranty and which the consumer is required to use before pursuing legal remedies under the Act in court (known as the ‘‘prior resort requirement’’).3 The Dispute Settlement Rule standards for IDSMs include requirements concerning the mechanism’s structure (e.g., funding, staffing, and neutrality), the qualifications of staff or decision makers, the mechanism’s procedures for resolving disputes (e.g., notification, investigation, time limits for decisions, 1 The other two rules relate to the information that must appear in any written warranty offered on a consumer product costing more than $15 and the pre-sale availability of warranty terms. 2 40 FR 60168 (Dec. 31, 1975). 3 The Dispute Settlement Rule applies only to those firms that choose to require consumers to use an IDSM. Neither the Rule nor the Act requires warrantors to set up IDSMs. A warrantor is free to set up an IDSM that does not comply with the Rule as long as the warranty does not contain a prior resort requirement. E:\FR\FM\16MRN1.SGM 16MRN1 14940 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 51 / Monday, March 16, 2020 / Notices lotter on DSKBCFDHB2PROD with NOTICES and follow-up), recordkeeping, and annual audits. The Rule requires that IDSMs establish written operating procedures and provide copies of those procedures upon request. Under the PRA, 44 U.S.C. 3501–3521, the FTC is requesting that OMB renew the clearance (OMB Control Number 3084–0113) for the PRA burden associated with the Rule. Burden statement: The primary burden from the Dispute Settlement Rule comes from the recordkeeping requirements that apply to IDSMs that are incorporated into a consumer product warranty through a prior resort clause. Currently, there are two IDSMs operating under the Rule: The BBB AUTO LINE and the National Center for Dispute Settlement (NCDS). Although the Rule’s information collection requirements have not changed since 2017, staff has adjusted its previous estimates upward for its 2020 calculations because the two IDSMs indicate that, on average, more disputes have been handled since the previous submission to OMB (10,727 disputes/ year projected in 2017; 12,241disputes/ year projected in 2020). The calculations underlying staff’s new estimates follow. Recordkeeping: The Rule requires IDSMs to maintain records of each consumer warranty dispute. Both the BBB AUTOLINE and NCDS report the number of disputes closed each year. Staff is using those numbers to project what will happen over the next three years of OMB clearance for the Rule. The BBB AUTO LINE handles an average of 9,894 disputes each year.4 NCDS handles an average of 2,347 disputes each year.5 Based on these figures, staff estimates that the average number of IDSM disputes covered by the Rule is approximately 12,241. Case files must include information such as the consumer’s contact information, the make and model of the product at issue, all letters or other correspondence submitted by the consumer or warrantor, and all evidence collected to resolve the dispute. Because maintaining individual case records is a necessary function for any IDSM, much of the burden would be incurred in the ordinary course of business. Nonetheless, staff estimates that 4 According to its annual audits, the BBB AUTO LINE closed 9,748 disputes in 2016, 10,615 in 2017, and 9,318 in 2018. This includes disputes for at least one manufacturer that does not include a prior resort requirement. Therefore, this number likely overstates the number of disputes covered by the Rule. 5 According to NCDS’ annual audits, the number of disputes both within its jurisdiction and closed each year are 2,269 (2016); 2,332 (2017); and 2,439 (2018). VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:29 Mar 13, 2020 Jkt 250001 maintaining individual case files imposes an additional burden of 30 minutes per case. Accordingly, the total annual recordkeeping burden is approximately 6,121 hours ((12,241 disputes × 30 minutes of burden/dispute) ÷ 60 minutes/hour). Reporting: The Rule requires IDSMs to update indexes, complete semiannual statistical summaries, and submit an annual audit report to the FTC. Staff estimates that covered entities spend approximately 10 minutes per case for these activities, resulting in a total annual burden of approximately 2,040 hours ((12,241 disputes × 10 minutes of burden/dispute) ÷ 60 minutes/hour). Disclosure (a) Warrantors’ Disclosure Burden Similar to 2017, staff has determined that it would be appropriate to account for the disclosure burden as it relates to warrantors based on two types of additional information that warrantors are required to disclose under the Rule: (1) Information concerning the IDSM and its procedures; and (2) information that makes consumers aware of the existence of the IDSM.6 A review of the annual audits of the BBB AUTO LINE and the NCDS indicates that there are approximately twenty-three automobile manufacturers covered by the Rule. Staff assumes that each manufacturer spends an average of thirty hours a year creating, revising, and distributing the informational materials necessary to comply with the Rule, resulting in an annual disclosure burden of 690 hours (23 manufacturers × 30 hours). (b) IDSMs’ Disclosure Burden Under the Rule, the IDSMs are required to provide to interested consumers, upon request, copies of the various types of information the IDSM possesses, including its annual audits. In addition, consumers who have filed disputes with the IDSM also have a right to copies of their records. IDSMs are permitted to charge for providing both types of information. Based on discussions with representatives of the two IDSMs, staff estimates that the burden imposed by these disclosure requirements is approximately 179 hours per year. This estimate draws from the average number of disputes closed each year with the IDSMs (12,241) and the assumption that twenty percent of consumers request copies of the records pertaining to their disputes (approximately 2,448 6 16 PO 00000 CFR 703.2(b). Frm 00069 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 disputes).7 Staff estimates that copying such records would require approximately 5 minutes per dispute.8 Staff estimates a total disclosure burden of approximately 204 hours ((2,448 disputes × 5 minutes of burden/dispute) ÷ 60 minutes/hour) for the IDSMs. Accordingly, the total PRA-related annual hours burden attributed to the Rule is approximately 9,055 (6,121 hours for recordkeeping plus 2,040 hours for reporting plus 690 hours for warrantors’ disclosures and 204 hours for IDSM disclosures). Total annual labor cost: $209,595. Recordkeeping: Staff assumes that IDSMs use clerical staff to comply with the recordkeeping requirements contained in the Rule at an hourly rate of approximately $17. Thus, the labor cost associated with the 6,121 annual burden hours for recordkeeping is approximately $104,057 (6,121 burden hours × $17 per hour 9). Reporting: Staff assumes that IDSMs also use clerical support staff at an hourly rate of $17 to comply with the reporting requirements. Thus, the labor cost associated with the 2,040 annual burden hours for reporting is approximately $34,680 (2,040 burden hours × $17 per hour). Disclosure: Staff assumes that the work required to comply with the warrantors’ disclosure requirements entails an equal mix of legal, clerical, and graphic design work. Staff assumes that one third of the total disclosure hours for warrantors (230 hours) require legal work at a rate of $250 per hour, one third require graphic design at a rate of $26 per hour, and one third require clerical work at a rate of $17 per hour. This results in a disclosure labor burden of $67,390 for warrantors ((230 × $250) + (230 × $26) + (230 × $17)). In addition, staff assumes that IDSMs use clerical support at an hourly rate of $17 to reproduce records and, therefore, the labor cost associated with the 204 annual hours of disclosure burden for IDSMs is approximately $3,468 (204 burden hours × $17 per hour). Accordingly, the combined total annual labor cost for PRA-related burden under the Rule is approximately $209,595 ($104,057 for recordkeeping + $34,680 for reporting + $70,858 for disclosures). Total annual capital or other nonlabor costs: $314,566. 7 This assumes each dispute is associated with one consumer. 8 In addition, some case files are provided to consumers electronically, which further reduces the paperwork burden borne by the IDSMs. 9 The wage rate is derived from occupational data found in the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages (May 2018). E:\FR\FM\16MRN1.SGM 16MRN1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 51 / Monday, March 16, 2020 / Notices lotter on DSKBCFDHB2PROD with NOTICES Total capital and start-up costs: The Rule imposes no appreciable current capital or start-up costs. The vast majority of warrantors have already developed systems to retain the records and provide the disclosures required by the Rule. Rule compliance does not require the use of any capital goods, other than ordinary office equipment, to which providers already have access. The Rule imposes one additional cost on IDSMs operating under the rule, which is the annual audit requirement. According to representatives of the IDSMs, the vast majority of costs associated with this requirement consist of the fees paid to the auditors and their staffs. Representatives of the IDSMs previously estimated a combined cost of $300,000 associated with the audits. Staff retains that estimate. Other non-labor costs: As discussed above, staff assumes that approximately twenty percent of dispute files (approximately 2,448 files) are requested by consumers. Staff also estimates that only five percent of consumers will request a copy of the IDSM’s audit report (approximately 612 audit reports).10 Staff bases this assumption on the number of consumer requests received by the IDSMs in the past and the fact that the IDSMs’ annual audits are available online. Staff estimates that the average disputerelated file contains 35 pages and a typical annual audit file contains approximately 200 pages. Staff estimates copying costs of 7 cents per page. Thus, the total annual copying cost for dispute-related files is approximately $5,998 (35 pages per file × $0.07 per page × 2,448 disputes) and the total annual copying cost for annual audit reports is approximately $8,568 (200 pages per audit report × $0.07 per page × 612 audit reports). Accordingly, the total cost attributed to copying under the Rule is approximately $14,566. Thus, the total non-labor cost under the Rule is approximately $314,566 ($300,000 for auditor fees + $14,566 for copying costs). Request for Comments Pursuant to Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA, the FTC invites comments on: (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of 10 This estimate assumes each dispute is associated with one consumer. VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:29 Mar 13, 2020 Jkt 250001 the methodology and assumptions used; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize the burden of maintaining records, providing reports to the government and providing disclosures to consumers. All comments must be received on or before May 15, 2020. You can file a comment online or on paper. For the FTC to consider your comment, we must receive it on or before May 15, 2020. Write ‘‘Dispute Settlement Rule; PRA Comment: FTC File No. P072108’’ on your comment. Postal mail addressed to the Commission is subject to delay due to heightened security screening. As a result, we encourage you to submit your comments online. To make sure that the Commission considers your online comment, you must file it through the https://www.regulations.gov website by following the instructions on the webbased form provided. Your comment— including your name and your state— will be placed on the public record of this proceeding, including the https:// www.regulations.gov website. If you file your comment on paper, write ‘‘Dispute Settlement Rule; PRA Comment: FTC File No. P072108’’ on your comment and on the envelope, and mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite CC– 5610 (Annex J), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW, 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex J), Washington, DC 20024. If possible, submit your paper comment to the Commission by courier or overnight service. Because your comment will be placed on the public record, you are solely responsible for making sure that your comment does not include any sensitive or confidential information. In particular, your comment should not include any sensitive personal information, such as your or anyone else’s Social Security number; date of birth; driver’s license number or other state identification number, or foreign country equivalent; passport number; financial account number; or credit or debit card number. You are also solely responsible for making sure that your comment does not include any sensitive health information, such as medical records or other individually identifiable health information. In addition, your comment should not include any ‘‘trade secret or any commercial or financial information PO 00000 Frm 00070 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 14941 which . . . is privileged or confidential’’—as provided by Section 6(f) of the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. 46(f), and FTC Rule 4.10(a)(2), 16 CFR 4.10(a)(2)— including in particular competitively sensitive information such as costs, sales statistics, inventories, formulas, patterns, devices, manufacturing processes, or customer names. Comments containing material for which confidential treatment is requested must be filed in paper form, must be clearly labeled ‘‘Confidential,’’ and must comply with FTC Rule 4.9(c). In particular, the written request for confidential treatment that accompanies the comment must include the factual and legal basis for the request, and must identify the specific portions of the comment to be withheld from the public record.11 Your comment will be kept confidential only if the General Counsel grants your request in accordance with the law and the public interest. Once your comment has been posted publicly at www.regulations.gov, we cannot redact or remove your comment unless you submit a confidentiality request that meets the requirements for such treatment under FTC Rule 4.9(c), and the General Counsel grants that request. The FTC Act and other laws that the Commission administers permit the collection of public comments to consider and use in this proceeding as appropriate. The Commission will consider all timely and responsive public comments that it receives on or before May 15, 2020. You can find more information, including routine uses permitted by the Privacy Act, in the Commission’s privacy policy, at https:// www.ftc.gov/site-information/privacypolicy. Josephine Liu, Assistant General Counsel for Legal Counsel. [FR Doc. 2020–05266 Filed 3–13–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6750–01–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended, notice is hereby given of the following meeting. The meeting will be closed to the public in accordance with the provisions set forth in sections 552b(c)(4) and 552b(c)(6), Title 5 U.S.C., as amended, and the Determination of 11 See E:\FR\FM\16MRN1.SGM FTC Rule 4.9(c). 16MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 51 (Monday, March 16, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 14939-14941]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-05266]


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FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION


Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; 
Comment Request; Extension

AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), 
the Federal Trade Commission (FTC or Commission) is seeking public 
comment on its proposal to extend for an additional three years the 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) clearance for information 
collection requirements in its Informal Dispute Settlement Procedures 
Rule (the Dispute Settlement Rule or the Rule). The current clearance 
expires on May 31, 2020.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before May 15, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Interested parties may file a comment online or on paper by 
following the instructions in the Request for Comments part of the 
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ``Dispute Settlement 
Rule; PRA Comment: FTC File No. P072108'' on your comment, and file 
your comment online at https://www.regulations.gov by following the 
instructions on the web-based form. If you prefer to file your comment 
on paper, mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade 
Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 
CC-5610 (Annex J), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the 
following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 
Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW, 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex 
J), Washington, DC 20024.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christine M. Todaro, Attorney, 
Division of Marketing Practices, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Federal 
Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20580, 
(202) 326-3711.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 
    Title: Informal Dispute Settlement Procedures Rule (the Dispute 
Settlement Rule or the Rule), 16 CFR 703.
    OMB Control Number: 3084-0113.
    Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection.
    Likely Respondents: Warrantors (Automobile Manufacturers) and 
Informal Dispute Settlement Mechanisms.
    Estimated Annual Burden Hours: 9,055 (derived from 6,121 
recordkeeping hours in addition to 2,040 reporting hours and 894 
disclosure hours).
    Estimated Annual Labor Costs: $209,595.
    Estimated Annual Capital or Other Non-labor Costs: $314,566.
    Abstract: The Dispute Settlement Rule is one of three rules \1\ 
that the FTC implemented pursuant to requirements of the Magnuson-Moss 
Warranty Act, 15 U.S.C. 2301 et seq. (Warranty Act or Act).\2\ The 
Dispute Settlement Rule, 16 CFR 703, specifies the minimum standards 
which must be met by any informal dispute settlement mechanism (IDSM) 
that is incorporated into a written consumer product warranty and which 
the consumer is required to use before pursuing legal remedies under 
the Act in court (known as the ``prior resort requirement'').\3\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ The other two rules relate to the information that must 
appear in any written warranty offered on a consumer product costing 
more than $15 and the pre-sale availability of warranty terms.
    \2\ 40 FR 60168 (Dec. 31, 1975).
    \3\ The Dispute Settlement Rule applies only to those firms that 
choose to require consumers to use an IDSM. Neither the Rule nor the 
Act requires warrantors to set up IDSMs. A warrantor is free to set 
up an IDSM that does not comply with the Rule as long as the 
warranty does not contain a prior resort requirement.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Dispute Settlement Rule standards for IDSMs include 
requirements concerning the mechanism's structure (e.g., funding, 
staffing, and neutrality), the qualifications of staff or decision 
makers, the mechanism's procedures for resolving disputes (e.g., 
notification, investigation, time limits for decisions,

[[Page 14940]]

and follow-up), recordkeeping, and annual audits. The Rule requires 
that IDSMs establish written operating procedures and provide copies of 
those procedures upon request.
    Under the PRA, 44 U.S.C. 3501-3521, the FTC is requesting that OMB 
renew the clearance (OMB Control Number 3084-0113) for the PRA burden 
associated with the Rule.
    Burden statement: The primary burden from the Dispute Settlement 
Rule comes from the recordkeeping requirements that apply to IDSMs that 
are incorporated into a consumer product warranty through a prior 
resort clause. Currently, there are two IDSMs operating under the Rule: 
The BBB AUTO LINE and the National Center for Dispute Settlement 
(NCDS). Although the Rule's information collection requirements have 
not changed since 2017, staff has adjusted its previous estimates 
upward for its 2020 calculations because the two IDSMs indicate that, 
on average, more disputes have been handled since the previous 
submission to OMB (10,727 disputes/year projected in 2017; 
12,241disputes/year projected in 2020). The calculations underlying 
staff's new estimates follow.
    Recordkeeping: The Rule requires IDSMs to maintain records of each 
consumer warranty dispute. Both the BBB AUTOLINE and NCDS report the 
number of disputes closed each year. Staff is using those numbers to 
project what will happen over the next three years of OMB clearance for 
the Rule. The BBB AUTO LINE handles an average of 9,894 disputes each 
year.\4\ NCDS handles an average of 2,347 disputes each year.\5\ Based 
on these figures, staff estimates that the average number of IDSM 
disputes covered by the Rule is approximately 12,241. Case files must 
include information such as the consumer's contact information, the 
make and model of the product at issue, all letters or other 
correspondence submitted by the consumer or warrantor, and all evidence 
collected to resolve the dispute. Because maintaining individual case 
records is a necessary function for any IDSM, much of the burden would 
be incurred in the ordinary course of business. Nonetheless, staff 
estimates that maintaining individual case files imposes an additional 
burden of 30 minutes per case.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ According to its annual audits, the BBB AUTO LINE closed 
9,748 disputes in 2016, 10,615 in 2017, and 9,318 in 2018. This 
includes disputes for at least one manufacturer that does not 
include a prior resort requirement. Therefore, this number likely 
overstates the number of disputes covered by the Rule.
    \5\ According to NCDS' annual audits, the number of disputes 
both within its jurisdiction and closed each year are 2,269 (2016); 
2,332 (2017); and 2,439 (2018).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Accordingly, the total annual recordkeeping burden is approximately 
6,121 hours ((12,241 disputes x 30 minutes of burden/dispute) / 60 
minutes/hour).
    Reporting: The Rule requires IDSMs to update indexes, complete 
semiannual statistical summaries, and submit an annual audit report to 
the FTC. Staff estimates that covered entities spend approximately 10 
minutes per case for these activities, resulting in a total annual 
burden of approximately 2,040 hours ((12,241 disputes x 10 minutes of 
burden/dispute) / 60 minutes/hour).

Disclosure

(a) Warrantors' Disclosure Burden

    Similar to 2017, staff has determined that it would be appropriate 
to account for the disclosure burden as it relates to warrantors based 
on two types of additional information that warrantors are required to 
disclose under the Rule: (1) Information concerning the IDSM and its 
procedures; and (2) information that makes consumers aware of the 
existence of the IDSM.\6\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \6\ 16 CFR 703.2(b).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A review of the annual audits of the BBB AUTO LINE and the NCDS 
indicates that there are approximately twenty-three automobile 
manufacturers covered by the Rule. Staff assumes that each manufacturer 
spends an average of thirty hours a year creating, revising, and 
distributing the informational materials necessary to comply with the 
Rule, resulting in an annual disclosure burden of 690 hours (23 
manufacturers x 30 hours).

(b) IDSMs' Disclosure Burden

    Under the Rule, the IDSMs are required to provide to interested 
consumers, upon request, copies of the various types of information the 
IDSM possesses, including its annual audits. In addition, consumers who 
have filed disputes with the IDSM also have a right to copies of their 
records. IDSMs are permitted to charge for providing both types of 
information.
    Based on discussions with representatives of the two IDSMs, staff 
estimates that the burden imposed by these disclosure requirements is 
approximately 179 hours per year. This estimate draws from the average 
number of disputes closed each year with the IDSMs (12,241) and the 
assumption that twenty percent of consumers request copies of the 
records pertaining to their disputes (approximately 2,448 disputes).\7\ 
Staff estimates that copying such records would require approximately 5 
minutes per dispute.\8\ Staff estimates a total disclosure burden of 
approximately 204 hours ((2,448 disputes x 5 minutes of burden/dispute) 
/ 60 minutes/hour) for the IDSMs.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \7\ This assumes each dispute is associated with one consumer.
    \8\ In addition, some case files are provided to consumers 
electronically, which further reduces the paperwork burden borne by 
the IDSMs.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Accordingly, the total PRA-related annual hours burden attributed 
to the Rule is approximately 9,055 (6,121 hours for recordkeeping plus 
2,040 hours for reporting plus 690 hours for warrantors' disclosures 
and 204 hours for IDSM disclosures).
    Total annual labor cost: $209,595.
    Recordkeeping: Staff assumes that IDSMs use clerical staff to 
comply with the recordkeeping requirements contained in the Rule at an 
hourly rate of approximately $17. Thus, the labor cost associated with 
the 6,121 annual burden hours for recordkeeping is approximately 
$104,057 (6,121 burden hours x $17 per hour \9\).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \9\ The wage rate is derived from occupational data found in the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages (May 
2018).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Reporting: Staff assumes that IDSMs also use clerical support staff 
at an hourly rate of $17 to comply with the reporting requirements. 
Thus, the labor cost associated with the 2,040 annual burden hours for 
reporting is approximately $34,680 (2,040 burden hours x $17 per hour).
    Disclosure: Staff assumes that the work required to comply with the 
warrantors' disclosure requirements entails an equal mix of legal, 
clerical, and graphic design work. Staff assumes that one third of the 
total disclosure hours for warrantors (230 hours) require legal work at 
a rate of $250 per hour, one third require graphic design at a rate of 
$26 per hour, and one third require clerical work at a rate of $17 per 
hour. This results in a disclosure labor burden of $67,390 for 
warrantors ((230 x $250) + (230 x $26) + (230 x $17)).
    In addition, staff assumes that IDSMs use clerical support at an 
hourly rate of $17 to reproduce records and, therefore, the labor cost 
associated with the 204 annual hours of disclosure burden for IDSMs is 
approximately $3,468 (204 burden hours x $17 per hour).
    Accordingly, the combined total annual labor cost for PRA-related 
burden under the Rule is approximately $209,595 ($104,057 for 
recordkeeping + $34,680 for reporting + $70,858 for disclosures).
    Total annual capital or other non-labor costs: $314,566.

[[Page 14941]]

    Total capital and start-up costs: The Rule imposes no appreciable 
current capital or start-up costs. The vast majority of warrantors have 
already developed systems to retain the records and provide the 
disclosures required by the Rule. Rule compliance does not require the 
use of any capital goods, other than ordinary office equipment, to 
which providers already have access.
    The Rule imposes one additional cost on IDSMs operating under the 
rule, which is the annual audit requirement. According to 
representatives of the IDSMs, the vast majority of costs associated 
with this requirement consist of the fees paid to the auditors and 
their staffs. Representatives of the IDSMs previously estimated a 
combined cost of $300,000 associated with the audits. Staff retains 
that estimate.
    Other non-labor costs: As discussed above, staff assumes that 
approximately twenty percent of dispute files (approximately 2,448 
files) are requested by consumers. Staff also estimates that only five 
percent of consumers will request a copy of the IDSM's audit report 
(approximately 612 audit reports).\10\ Staff bases this assumption on 
the number of consumer requests received by the IDSMs in the past and 
the fact that the IDSMs' annual audits are available online. Staff 
estimates that the average dispute-related file contains 35 pages and a 
typical annual audit file contains approximately 200 pages. Staff 
estimates copying costs of 7 cents per page.
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    \10\ This estimate assumes each dispute is associated with one 
consumer.
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    Thus, the total annual copying cost for dispute-related files is 
approximately $5,998 (35 pages per file x $0.07 per page x 2,448 
disputes) and the total annual copying cost for annual audit reports is 
approximately $8,568 (200 pages per audit report x $0.07 per page x 612 
audit reports). Accordingly, the total cost attributed to copying under 
the Rule is approximately $14,566.
    Thus, the total non-labor cost under the Rule is approximately 
$314,566 ($300,000 for auditor fees + $14,566 for copying costs).
Request for Comments
    Pursuant to Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA, the FTC invites 
comments on: (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is 
necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, 
including whether the information will have practical utility; (2) the 
accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed 
collection of information, including the validity of the methodology 
and assumptions used; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and 
clarity of the information to be collected; and (4) ways to minimize 
the burden of maintaining records, providing reports to the government 
and providing disclosures to consumers. All comments must be received 
on or before May 15, 2020.
    You can file a comment online or on paper. For the FTC to consider 
your comment, we must receive it on or before May 15, 2020. Write 
``Dispute Settlement Rule; PRA Comment: FTC File No. P072108'' on your 
comment. Postal mail addressed to the Commission is subject to delay 
due to heightened security screening. As a result, we encourage you to 
submit your comments online. To make sure that the Commission considers 
your online comment, you must file it through the https://www.regulations.gov website by following the instructions on the web-
based form provided. Your comment--including your name and your state--
will be placed on the public record of this proceeding, including the 
https://www.regulations.gov website.
    If you file your comment on paper, write ``Dispute Settlement Rule; 
PRA Comment: FTC File No. P072108'' on your comment and on the 
envelope, and mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade 
Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 
CC-5610 (Annex J), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the 
following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 
Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW, 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex 
J), Washington, DC 20024. If possible, submit your paper comment to the 
Commission by courier or overnight service.
    Because your comment will be placed on the public record, you are 
solely responsible for making sure that your comment does not include 
any sensitive or confidential information. In particular, your comment 
should not include any sensitive personal information, such as your or 
anyone else's Social Security number; date of birth; driver's license 
number or other state identification number, or foreign country 
equivalent; passport number; financial account number; or credit or 
debit card number. You are also solely responsible for making sure that 
your comment does not include any sensitive health information, such as 
medical records or other individually identifiable health information. 
In addition, your comment should not include any ``trade secret or any 
commercial or financial information which . . . is privileged or 
confidential''--as provided by Section 6(f) of the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. 
46(f), and FTC Rule 4.10(a)(2), 16 CFR 4.10(a)(2)--including in 
particular competitively sensitive information such as costs, sales 
statistics, inventories, formulas, patterns, devices, manufacturing 
processes, or customer names.
    Comments containing material for which confidential treatment is 
requested must be filed in paper form, must be clearly labeled 
``Confidential,'' and must comply with FTC Rule 4.9(c). In particular, 
the written request for confidential treatment that accompanies the 
comment must include the factual and legal basis for the request, and 
must identify the specific portions of the comment to be withheld from 
the public record.\11\ Your comment will be kept confidential only if 
the General Counsel grants your request in accordance with the law and 
the public interest. Once your comment has been posted publicly at 
www.regulations.gov, we cannot redact or remove your comment unless you 
submit a confidentiality request that meets the requirements for such 
treatment under FTC Rule 4.9(c), and the General Counsel grants that 
request.
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    \11\ See FTC Rule 4.9(c).
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    The FTC Act and other laws that the Commission administers permit 
the collection of public comments to consider and use in this 
proceeding as appropriate. The Commission will consider all timely and 
responsive public comments that it receives on or before May 15, 2020. 
You can find more information, including routine uses permitted by the 
Privacy Act, in the Commission's privacy policy, at https://www.ftc.gov/site-information/privacy-policy.

Josephine Liu,
Assistant General Counsel for Legal Counsel.
[FR Doc. 2020-05266 Filed 3-13-20; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 6750-01-P