Proposed Establishment of the Verde Valley Viticultural Area, 11894-11900 [2020-04012]

Download as PDF 11894 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 40 / Friday, February 28, 2020 / Proposed Rules received by mail/hand delivery/courier (for written/paper submissions) will be considered timely if they are postmarked or the delivery service acceptance receipt is on or before that date. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Electronic Submissions Submit electronic comments in the following way: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Comments submitted electronically, including attachments, to https:// www.regulations.gov will be posted to the docket unchanged. Because your comment will be made public, you are solely responsible for ensuring that your comment does not include any confidential information that you or a third party may not wish to be posted, such as medical information, your or anyone else’s Social Security number, or confidential business information, such as a manufacturing process. Please note that if you include your name, contact information, or other information that identifies you in the body of your comments, that information will be posted on https://www.regulations.gov. • If you want to submit a comment with confidential information that you do not wish to be made available to the public, submit the comment as a written/paper submission and in the manner detailed (see ‘‘Written/Paper Submissions’’ and ‘‘Instructions’’). Written/Paper Submissions Submit written/paper submissions as follows: • Mail/Hand delivery/Courier (for written/paper submissions): Dockets Management Staff (HFA–305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. • For written/paper comments submitted to the Dockets Management Staff, FDA will post your comment, as well as any attachments, except for information submitted, marked and identified, as confidential, if submitted as detailed in ‘‘Instructions.’’ Instructions: All submissions received must include the Docket No. FDA– 2019–N–3325 for ‘‘Laboratory Accreditation for Analyses of Foods.’’ Received comments, those filed in a timely manner (see ADDRESSES), will be placed in the docket and, except for those submitted as ‘‘Confidential Submissions,’’ publicly viewable at https://www.regulations.gov or at the Dockets Management Staff between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. • Confidential Submissions—To submit a comment with confidential VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:07 Feb 27, 2020 Jkt 250001 information that you do not wish to be made publicly available, submit your comments only as a written/paper submission. You should submit two copies total. One copy will include the information you claim to be confidential with a heading or cover note that states ‘‘THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION.’’ The Agency will review this copy, including the claimed confidential information, in its consideration of comments. The second copy, which will have the claimed confidential information redacted/blacked out, will be available for public viewing and posted on https://www.regulations.gov. Submit both copies to the Dockets Management Staff. If you do not wish your name and contact information to be made publicly available, you can provide this information on the cover sheet and not in the body of your comments and you must identify this information as ‘‘confidential.’’ Any information marked as ‘‘confidential’’ will not be disclosed except in accordance with 21 CFR 10.20 and other applicable disclosure law. For more information about FDA’s posting of comments to public dockets, see 80 FR 56469, September 18, 2015, or access the information at: https:// www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-201509-18/pdf/2015-23389.pdf. Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or the electronic and written/paper comments received, go to https:// www.regulations.gov and insert the docket number, found in brackets in the heading of this document, into the ‘‘Search’’ box and follow the prompts and/or go to the Dockets Management Staff, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Timothy McGrath, Staff Director, Food and Feed Laboratory Operations, Office of Regulatory Affairs, Food and Drug Administration, 12420 Parklawn Dr., Rm. 3142, Rockville, MD 20857, 301– 796–6591, email: timothy.mcgrath@ fda.hhs.gov. With regard to the information collection: Domini Bean, Office of Operations, Food and Drug Administration, Three White Flint North, 10A–12M, 11601 Landsdown St., North Bethesda, MD 20852, 301–796– 5733, email: PRAStaff@fda.hhs.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the Federal Register of November 4, 2019 (84 FR 59452), we published a proposed rule entitled ‘‘Laboratory Accreditation for Analyses of Foods’’ with a 120-day comment period on the provisions of the proposed rule and on the information collection provisions that PO 00000 Frm 00029 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 are subject to review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3501–3521). FDA has received a request for a 30day extension of the comment period on the proposed rule to allow interested persons additional time to consider the proposal. FDA has considered the request and is granting the extension of the comment period to allow interested persons additional opportunity to consider the proposal. We also are extending the comment period for the information collection provisions to make the comment period for the information collection provisions the same as the comment period for the provisions of the proposed rule. To clarify, FDA is requesting comment on all issues raised by the proposed rule. The Agency believes that this extension allows adequate time for any interested persons to fully consider the proposal and submit comments. Dated: February 21, 2020. Lowell J. Schiller, Principal Associate Commissioner for Policy. [FR Doc. 2020–03944 Filed 2–27–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4164–01–P DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau 27 CFR Part 9 [Docket No. TTB–2020–0002; Notice No. 187] RIN 1513–AC54 Proposed Establishment of the Verde Valley Viticultural Area Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, Treasury. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. AGENCY: The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) proposes to establish the approximately 200 squaremile ‘‘Verde Valley’’ viticultural area in Yavapai County, Arizona. The proposed viticultural area is not located within, nor does it contain, any other established viticultural area. TTB designates viticultural areas to allow vintners to better describe the origin of their wines and to allow consumers to better identify wines they may purchase. TTB invites comments on this proposed addition to its regulations. DATES: Comments must be received by April 28, 2020. ADDRESSES: You may electronically submit comments to TTB on this proposal, and view copies of this SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\28FEP1.SGM 28FEP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 40 / Friday, February 28, 2020 / Proposed Rules document, its supporting materials, and any comments TTB receives on it within Docket No. TTB–2020–0002 as posted on Regulations.gov (https:// www.regulations.gov), the Federal erulemaking portal. Please see the ‘‘Public Participation’’ section of this document below for full details on how to comment on this proposal via Regulations.gov, U.S. mail, or hand delivery, and for full details on how to view or obtain copies of this document, its supporting materials, and any comments related to this proposal. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karen A. Thornton, Regulations and Rulings Division, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 1310 G Street NW, Box 12, Washington, DC 20005; phone 202–453–1039, ext. 175. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Background on Viticultural Areas TTB Authority Section 105(e) of the Federal Alcohol Administration Act (FAA Act), 27 U.S.C. 205(e), authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to prescribe regulations for the labeling of wine, distilled spirits, and malt beverages. The FAA Act provides that these regulations should, among other things, prohibit consumer deception and the use of misleading statements on labels and ensure that labels provide the consumer with adequate information as to the identity and quality of the product. The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) administers the FAA Act pursuant to section 1111(d) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, codified at 6 U.S.C. 531(d). The Secretary has delegated the functions and duties in the administration and enforcement of these provisions to the TTB Administrator through Treasury Order 120–01, dated December 10, 2013 (superseding Treasury Order 120–01, dated January 24, 2003). Part 4 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR part 4) authorizes TTB to establish definitive viticultural areas and regulate the use of their names as appellations of origin on wine labels and in wine advertisements. Part 9 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR part 9) sets forth standards for the preparation and submission of petitions for the establishment or modification of American viticultural areas (AVAs) and lists the approved AVAs. Definition Section 4.25(e)(1)(i) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.25(e)(1)(i)) defines a viticultural area for American wine as a delimited grape-growing region having distinguishing features, as described in VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:07 Feb 27, 2020 Jkt 250001 part 9 of the regulations, and a name and a delineated boundary, as established in part 9 of the regulations. These designations allow vintners and consumers to attribute a given quality, reputation, or other characteristic of a wine made from grapes grown in an area to the wine’s geographic origin. The establishment of AVAs allows vintners to describe more accurately the origin of their wines to consumers and helps consumers to identify wines they may purchase. Establishment of an AVA is neither an approval nor an endorsement by TTB of the wine produced in that area. Requirements Section 4.25(e)(2) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.25(e)(2)) outlines the procedure for proposing an AVA and provides that any interested party may petition TTB to establish a grapegrowing region as an AVA. Section 9.12 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 9.12) prescribes standards for petitions for the establishment or modification of AVAs. Petitions to establish an AVA must include the following: • Evidence that the area within the proposed AVA boundary is nationally or locally known by the AVA name specified in the petition; • An explanation of the basis for defining the boundary of the proposed AVA; • A narrative description of the features of the proposed AVA affecting viticulture, such as climate, geology, soils, physical features, and elevation, that make the proposed AVA distinctive and distinguish it from adjacent areas outside the proposed AVA boundary; • The appropriate United States Geological Survey (USGS) map(s) showing the location of the proposed AVA, with the boundary of the proposed AVA clearly drawn thereon; and • A detailed narrative description of the proposed AVA boundary based on USGS map markings. Verde Valley Petition TTB received a petition from the Verde Valley Wine Consortium, on behalf of the local grape growers and winemakers, proposing to establish the approximately 200 square-mile ‘‘Verde Valley’’ AVA in Yavapai County, Arizona. The petition notes that the entire geological feature known as ‘‘Verde Valley’’ encompasses approximately 714 square miles, most of which is National Forest land. The proposed AVA, however, encompasses a much smaller area and excludes much of the public lands that are unavailable for viticulture. Although an effort was PO 00000 Frm 00030 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 11895 made to exclude as many public lands from the proposed AVA as possible, including Montezuma’s Castle and Montezuma’s Well National Monuments and the Prescott and Coconino National Forests, approximately 33 percent of the land within the proposed Verde Valley AVA is still part of either the Prescott or Coconino National Forests. The petition states that it was not practical to draw a boundary that would exclude all Federal land because several of the vineyards within the proposed AVA are ‘‘islands’’ of private land surrounded on all sides by Federal land. The petition states that even with the amount of Federal land remaining within the proposed AVA, there is still plenty of privately owned land available for vineyards within the proposed boundaries. The proposed AVA currently has 24 commercial vineyards, covering a total of approximately 125 acres. According to the petition, several existing vineyards are planning to expand by a total of an estimated 40 acres in the near future. In addition, there are 11 wineries located within the proposed AVA. According to the petition, the distinguishing features of the proposed Verde Valley AVA are its climate, soils, and topography. The petition also included information about the geology of the proposed AVA. However, because the petition did not compare the geology of the proposed AVA to that of the surrounding regions and did not describe the effect geology has on viticulture, TTB does not consider geology to be a distinguishing feature of the proposed AVA. Unless otherwise noted, all information and data pertaining to the proposed AVA contained in this proposed rule come from the petition for the proposed Verde Valley AVA and its supporting exhibits. Name Evidence The proposed Verde Valley AVA is located within the larger valley of the Verde River in central Arizona. According to the petition, the region of the proposed AVA has been referred to as ‘‘Verde Valley’’ since 1583, when the Spanish explorer Antonio de Espejo recorded his travels in the area. With the passing of the Homestead Act in 1862, which granted land in the area to settlers who were willing make productive use of the land, pioneers began moving to the region and settled the town of Camp Verde. Later, Fort Verde was built to provide military protection for the residents. The petition included several examples of written works that refer to the ‘‘Verde Valley.’’ An early geological study of the region, published in 1890, E:\FR\FM\28FEP1.SGM 28FEP1 11896 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 40 / Friday, February 28, 2020 / Proposed Rules was entitled, ‘‘Thenardite, mirabilite, glauberite, halite, and associates, of the Verde Valley, Arizona Territory.’’ 1 A 1963 publication by the U.S. Department of Interior was titled, ‘‘Geology and Ground Water in the Verde Valley–The Mongollon Rim Region, Arizona.’’ 2 In 2012, the Lonely Planet travel site included the Verde Valley region in its Top 10 list of U.S. travel destinations for 2013. The article notes, ‘‘Between Phoenix and the Grand Canyon, the Verde Valley is taking off as Arizona’s go-to destination, and not just among the spa and crystal Sedona fans of years past.’’ 3 Finally, an article about the wine industry in Arizona, published in a 2013 edition of the In Business magazine, states that the majority of Arizona’s wine grapes are grown in ‘‘the greater Willcox area and the Verde Valley.’’ 4 The petition also included several photographs of local businesses and organizations that use the term ‘‘Verde Valley’’ in their names. For example, the Verde Valley Fire District, Verde Valley Medical Center, and Verde Valley Montessori School all serve the region of the proposed AVA. The local newspaper, the Verde Independent, is published by Verde Valley Newspapers, Inc. A local hotel is named the Verde Valley Inn, and a ballet studio is named Verde Valley Ballet. Finally, the petition included a page from the local telephone directory which lists several other businesses that use ‘‘Verde Valley’’ in their names, such as Verde Valley Plumbing, Verde Valley RV Resort and Campground, and Verde Valley Self Storage. Boundary Evidence The proposed Verde Valley AVA is located in Yavapai County, Arizona, approximately 100 miles north of the Phoenix metropolitan area. The Verde River flows through the center of the valley from northwest to southeast, and steep foothills rise up around the valley. The northern boundary separates the proposed AVA from the Coconino National Forest. The northern boundary primarily follows the 3,800-foot elevation contour because, according to the petition, the terrain becomes too steep for cultivation above that elevation. The proposed eastern boundary follows a series of elevation contours to separate the proposed AVA from extremely steep terrain, as well as from the public lands within the Coconino National Forest and Montezuma’s Well and Montezuma’s Castle National Monuments. The proposed southern boundary follows section lines on the U.S.G.S. topographic maps because, according to the petition, there were no other consistent features on the map to follow. The petition states that most of the land south of the proposed boundary is uninhabited and is part of the Coconino National Forest. The proposed western boundary primarily follows the 3,800foot elevation contour, to exclude the steeper terrain of the Black Hills range and the public lands within the Prescott National Forest. Distinguishing Features The distinguishing features of the proposed Verde Valley AVA are its climate, soils, and topography. Climate The petition included information on the annual precipitation amounts, temperatures in degrees Fahrenheit (F), and growing degree day 5 (GDD) accumulations within the proposed Verde Valley AVA. TABLE 1—AVERAGE ANNUAL PRECIPITATION AMOUNTS [2012–2017] Location (direction from proposed AVA) Proposed AVA .................. Fry Lake (North) ............... Bar M Canyon (East) ........ Baker Butte (South) .......... Prescott (West) ................. Average annual precipitation amounts (inches) 13.83 29.40 26.86 27.88 18.10 Average annual rainfall amounts within the proposed Verde Valley AVA are significantly lower than in the surrounding regions. Due to the low rainfall amounts, vineyard owners within the proposed AVA must use irrigation to ensure adequate hydration for their vines. The petition states that there are sufficient sources of groundwater within the proposed AVA for irrigation, and vineyard owners also employ water conservation methods such as drip irrigation and the use of agriculturally approved reclaimed water. TABLE 2—TEMPERATURES [2012–2017] Annual mean temperature (degrees F) Location (direction from proposed AVA) jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Proposed AVA ......................................................................... Fry Lake (North) ...................................................................... Bar M Canyon (East) ............................................................... Baker Butte (South) ................................................................. Prescott (West) ........................................................................ Maximum temperature (degrees F) 64.1 49.0 50.4 53.3 57.7 Minimum temperature (degrees F) 117.0 94.0 98.0 94.0 104.0 12.0 ¥11.0 ¥10.0 6.0 2.0 Annual growing degree days accumulations 5,580 1,797 1,727 2,668 3,544 Temperatures within the proposed Verde Valley AVA are warmer than in each of the surrounding regions and provide suitable heat and sunlight for photosynthesis. The warm daytime temperatures lead to high annual GDD accumulations. According to the petition, the temperatures and GDD accumulations within the proposed AVA are best suited for growing warmclimate grapes such as Syrah, Cabernet 1 Blake, W.P. Thenardite, mirabilite, glauberite, halite, and associates, of the Verde Valley, Arizona Territory. (1890) American Journal of Science, vol. 39, number 229, pp. 43–45. 2 Twenter, Floyd R., and Metzger, D.G. Geology and Ground Water in the Verde Valley–The Mongollon Rim Region, Arizona. Washington: Government Printing Office. 1963. 3 Reid, Robert. Top 10 travel destinations for 2013. Lonely Planet. December 2012. https:// www.lonelyplanet.com/travel-tips-and-articles/ 77583. 4 Stanton, Alison. Arizona’s Growing Wine Industry. In Business. October 2013, pp. 20–21. http://inbusinessphx.com/in-business/arizonasgrowing-wine-industry. 5 See Albert J. Winkler, General Viticulture (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1974), pages 61–64. In the Winkler climate classification system, annual heat accumulation during the growing season, measured in annual GDDs, defines climatic regions. One GDD accumulates for each degree Fahrenheit that a day’s mean temperature is above 50 degrees F, the minimum temperature required for grapevine growth. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:07 Feb 27, 2020 Jkt 250001 PO 00000 Frm 00031 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 E:\FR\FM\28FEP1.SGM 28FEP1 11897 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 40 / Friday, February 28, 2020 / Proposed Rules Sauvignon, Petite Sirah, Zinfandel, Malvasia Bianca, and Viognier. Finally, the petition included a discussion of the difference between the daytime high temperatures and nighttime low temperatures within the proposed AVA and the surrounding regions. The petition referred to these temperature differences as ‘‘diurnal temperature swings.’’ Although temperatures in the proposed AVA are high during the daytime, cool nighttime air drains into the proposed AVA from the surrounding higher elevations and lowers the nighttime temperatures. As a result, the difference between daytime high temperatures and nighttime low temperatures within the proposed AVA can exceed 30 degrees F, which is a greater difference than found in any of the surrounding regions. According to the petition, such a significant drop in nighttime temperatures delays grape ripening, lessens the respiration of acids, and increases phenolic development in the grapes. The following tables show the mean diurnal temperature swings for each month during the growing season for the years 2014 to 2016. TABLE 3—DIURNAL TEMPERATURE SWINGS FOR 2014 [Degrees F] Month Location (direction from proposed AVA) April Within proposed AVA ............................... Fry Lake (North) ....................................... Bar M Canyon (East) ............................... Baker Butte (South) ................................. Prescott (West) ........................................ May 37.7 28.3 31.7 19.7 30.3 June 38.8 30.0 32.9 20.9 30.5 July 41.3 35.4 38.7 23.2 33.3 August 32.1 27.7 30.0 21.9 25.8 29.5 23.7 26.8 18.7 25.0 September 31.0 24.1 27.3 16.2 26.6 TABLE 4—DIURNAL TEMPERATURE SWINGS FOR 2015 [Degrees F] Month Location (direction from proposed AVA) April Within proposed AVA ............................... Fry Lake (North) ....................................... Bar M Canyon (East) ............................... Baker Butte (South) ................................. Prescott (West) ........................................ May 37.3 26.6 33.0 19.9 30.2 June 33.0 22.7 30.6 18.7 26.1 July 38.0 30.4 35.7 20.8 31.2 August 32.2 25.1 28.0 19.6 24.6 34.4 26.5 29.4 20.5 26.1 September 33.9 26.3 30.4 18.4 28.7 TABLE 5—DIURNAL TEMPERATURE SWINGS FOR 2016 [Degrees F] Month Location (direction from proposed AVA) April Within proposed AVA ............................... Fry Lake (North) ....................................... Bar M Canyon (East) ............................... Baker Butte (South) ................................. Prescott (West) ........................................ 35.4 24.9 28.7 18.5 27.6 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Soils The soils within the proposed Verde Valley AVA are primarily alluvial soils. According to the petition, the majority of the soils within the proposed AVA are of the Altar, Mule, Cornville, Anthony, Retriever, House Mountain, Cowan, and Arizo soil series. The composition of these soils ranges from very fine sandy loam to gravelly loam with silt and limestone. Traces of the Supai, Verde, and Martin Limestone formations can also be found throughout the proposed AVA. The petition states that the soils of the proposed AVA generally provide appropriate water drainage and have above-moderate levels of nutrients, VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:07 Feb 27, 2020 Jkt 250001 May June 36.0 26.6 30.6 19.5 28.1 July 39.5 32.7 37.0 23.1 31.1 although low calcium and magnesium levels are common. Additionally, the high bicarbonate levels in the groundwater of the proposed AVA have been found to increase soil pH and inhibit nutrient uptake in the vines. The petition states that these unfavorable vineyard conditions can be mitigated through rootstock, varietal, and clonal selections that can tolerate and even benefit from these nutrient deficiencies. To the north and east of the proposed Verde Valley AVA, along the Mongollon Rim, the soils are described in the petition as ‘‘stony.’’ The most prominent soil series in these two regions are Brolliar stony loam and Siesta stony silt loam. According to the petition, the remainder of the soil to the north and PO 00000 Frm 00032 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 August 36.8 29.2 32.3 22.1 28.1 29.8 24.4 27.2 18.0 24.4 September 32.2 25.0 28.9 16.7 26.3 east of the proposed AVA is comprised of approximately 22 other defined soil series, most of which have the terms ‘‘stony’’ or ‘‘very stony’’ in their names. To the west and southwest of the proposed AVA, in the Black Hills, the soils are also typically stony. Major soil series in these regions include Brolliar very stony clay loam, Soldier cobbly loam, Lonti-Wineg, and Lynx. Topography The proposed Verde Valley AVA is located within the basin of the Verde River. The petition describes the shape of this basin as a ‘‘bowl with a crack in it to the south where the river flows out of the valley.’’ The edges of the ‘‘bowl’’ gently slope down towards the valley E:\FR\FM\28FEP1.SGM 28FEP1 11898 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 40 / Friday, February 28, 2020 / Proposed Rules floor at angles of 2 to 15 percent. Elevations within the proposed AVA range from approximately 3,000 feet to 5,000 feet, although most of the proposed AVA is below 3,900 feet. The proposed AVA is surrounded on all sides by higher elevations and steeper slopes. To the north and northeast of the proposed AVA, elevations rise up to 8,000 feet along the edge of the Mongollon Rim. To the west and southwest of the proposed AVA are the Black Mountains, which have steep slopes and elevations up to approximately 7,800 feet. According to the petition, the proposed Verde Valley AVA’s topography affects viticulture. Gentle slopes allow for easier vineyard management than steep slopes. Furthermore, because the proposed AVA is lower than the surrounding regions, cold air drains from the higher elevations into the proposed AVA during the spring and fall. As a result, the risk of frost damage increases in the proposed AVA, particularly in vineyards adjacent to the river. The petition states that vineyard owners attempt to mitigate the risk of frost by using inversion fans and protective sprays and by planting late-budding varietals of grapes. Summary of Distinguishing Features The evidence provided in the petition indicates that the climate, soil, and topography of the proposed Verde Valley AVA distinguish it from the surrounding regions in each direction. The following table summarizes the features of the proposed AVA and the surrounding regions. SUMMARY OF DISTINGUISHING FEATURES Region Climate Soils Topography Proposed Verde Valley AVA .......... Average of 13.83 inches of rain annually; average GDD accumulations of 5,580; hot summers and moderate winters; growing season diurnal temperature swings of 30 degrees or higher. Higher annual rainfall amounts; lower GDD accumulations; cooler summers and colder winters; smaller diurnal temperature difference swings. Higher annual rainfall amounts; lower GDD accumulations; cooler summers and colder winters; smaller diurnal temperature difference swings. Higher annual rainfall amounts; lower GDD accumulations; cooler summers and moderate winters; smaller diurnal temperature difference swings. Higher annual rainfall amounts; lower GDD accumulations; cooler summers and moderate winters; smaller diurnal temperature difference swings. Alluvial soils composed of loams ranging from very fine sandy loams to gravelly loams with silt and limestone. Gentle slopes with angles of 2 to 15 percent; elevations between 3,000 and 5,000 feet. Stony soils primarily of the Brollar stony loam and Siesta stony silt series. Steep slopes with elevations up to 8,000 feet. Stony soils primarily of the Brolliar stony loam and Siesta stony silt series. Steep slopes with elevations up to 8,000 feet. Stony soils primarily of the Brolliar very stony clay loam, Soldier cobbly loam, Lonti-Wineg, and Lynx series. Steep slopes with elevations up to 7,800 feet. Stony soils primarily of the Brolliar very stony clay loam, Soldier cobbly loam, Lonti-Wineg, and Lynx series. Steep slopes with elevations up to 7,800 feet. North .............................................. East ................................................ South .............................................. West ............................................... TTB Determination TTB concludes that the petition to establish the approximately 200-square mile Verde Valley AVA merits consideration and public comment, as invited in this proposed rule. Boundary Description See the narrative description of the boundary of the petitioned-for AVA in the proposed regulatory text published at the end of this proposed rule. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Maps The petitioner provided the required maps, and they are listed below in the proposed regulatory text. You may also view the proposed Verde Valley AVA boundary on the AVA Map Explorer on the TTB website, at https://www.ttb.gov/ wine/ava-map-explorer. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:07 Feb 27, 2020 Jkt 250001 Impact on Current Wine Labels Part 4 of the TTB regulations prohibits any label reference on a wine that indicates or implies an origin other than the wine’s true place of origin. For a wine to be labeled with an AVA name, at least 85 percent of the wine must be derived from grapes grown within the area represented by that name, and the wine must meet the other conditions listed in § 4.25(e)(3) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.25(e)(3)). If the wine is not eligible for labeling with an AVA name and that name appears in the brand name, then the label is not in compliance and the bottler must change the brand name and obtain approval of a new label. Similarly, if the AVA name appears in another reference on the label in a misleading manner, the bottler would have to obtain approval of a new label. Different rules apply if a wine has PO 00000 Frm 00033 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 a brand name containing an AVA name that was used as a brand name on a label approved before July 7, 1986. See § 4.39(i)(2) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.39(i)(2)) for details. If TTB establishes this proposed AVA, its name, ‘‘Verde Valley,’’ will be recognized as a name of viticultural significance under § 4.39(i)(3) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.39(i)(3)). The text of the proposed regulation clarifies this point. Consequently, if this proposed rule is adopted as a final rule, wine bottlers using the name ‘‘Verde Valley’’ in a brand name, including a trademark, or in another label reference as to the origin of the wine, would have to ensure that the product is eligible to use the AVA name as an appellation of origin. E:\FR\FM\28FEP1.SGM 28FEP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 40 / Friday, February 28, 2020 / Proposed Rules Public Participation Comments Invited TTB invites comments from interested members of the public on whether it should establish the proposed AVA. TTB is also interested in receiving comments on the sufficiency and accuracy of the name, boundary, soils, climate, and other required information submitted in support of the petition. Please provide any available specific information in support of your comments. Because of the potential impact of the establishment of the proposed Verde Valley AVA on wine labels that include the term ‘‘Verde Valley,’’ as discussed above under Impact on Current Wine Labels, TTB is particularly interested in comments regarding whether there will be a conflict between the proposed area name and currently used brand names. If a commenter believes that a conflict will arise, the comment should describe the nature of that conflict, including any anticipated negative economic impact that approval of the proposed AVA will have on an existing viticultural enterprise. TTB is also interested in receiving suggestions for ways to avoid conflicts, for example, by adopting a modified or different name for the AVA. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Submitting Comments You may submit comments on this proposed rule by using one of the following three methods (please note that TTB has a new address for comments submitted by U.S. Mail): • Federal e-Rulemaking Portal: You may send comments via the online comment form posted with this proposed rule within Docket No. TTB– 2020–0002 on ‘‘Regulations.gov,’’ the Federal e-rulemaking portal, at http:// www.regulations.gov. A direct link to that docket is available under Notice No. 187 on the TTB website at https:// www.ttb.gov/wine/winerulemaking.shtml. Supplemental files may be attached to comments submitted via Regulations.gov. For complete instructions on how to use Regulations.gov, visit the site and click on the ‘‘Help’’ tab. • U.S. Mail: You may send comments via postal mail to the Director, Regulations and Rulings Division, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 1310 G Street NW, Box 12, Washington, DC 20005. • Hand Delivery/Courier: You may hand-carry your comments or have them hand-carried to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 1310 G Street NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20005. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:07 Feb 27, 2020 Jkt 250001 Please submit your comments by the closing date shown above in this proposed rule. Your comments must reference Notice No. 187 and include your name and mailing address. Your comments also must be made in English, be legible, and be written in language acceptable for public disclosure. TTB does not acknowledge receipt of comments, and TTB considers all comments as originals. In your comment, please clearly indicate if you are commenting on your own behalf or on behalf of an association, business, or other entity. If you are commenting on behalf of an entity, your comment must include the entity’s name, as well as your name and position title. If you comment via Regulations.gov, please enter the entity’s name in the ‘‘Organization’’ blank of the online comment form. If you comment via postal mail or hand delivery/courier, please submit your entity’s comment on letterhead. You may also write to the Administrator before the comment closing date to ask for a public hearing. The Administrator reserves the right to determine whether to hold a public hearing. Confidentiality All submitted comments and attachments are part of the public record and subject to disclosure. Do not enclose any material in your comments that you consider to be confidential or inappropriate for public disclosure. Public Disclosure TTB will post, and you may view, copies of this proposed rule, selected supporting materials, and any online or mailed comments received about this proposal within Docket No. TTB–2020– 0002 on the Federal e-rulemaking portal, Regulations.gov, at https:// www.regulations.gov. A direct link to that docket is available on the TTB website at https://www.ttb.gov/wine/ wine-rulemaking.shtml under Notice No. 187. You may also reach the relevant docket through the Regulations.gov search page at https:// www.regulations.gov. For information on how to use Regulations.gov, click on the site’s ‘‘Help’’ tab. All posted comments will display the commenter’s name, organization (if any), city, and State, and, in the case of mailed comments, all address information, including email addresses. TTB may omit voluminous attachments or material that the Bureau considers unsuitable for posting. You may also view copies of this proposed rule, all related petitions, maps and other supporting materials, PO 00000 Frm 00034 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 11899 and any electronic or mailed comments that TTB receives about this proposal by appointment at the TTB Information Resource Center, 1310 G Street NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20005. You may also obtain copies at 20 cents per 8.5- x 11-inch page. Please note that TTB is unable to provide copies of USGS maps or any similarly-sized documents that may be included as part of the AVA petition. Contact TTB’s Regulations and Rulings Division at the above address, by email using the web form at https://www.ttb.gov/contact-rrd, or by telephone at 202–453–1039, ext. 175, to schedule an appointment or to request copies of comments or other materials. Regulatory Flexibility Act TTB certifies that this proposed regulation, if adopted, would not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. The proposed regulation imposes no new reporting, recordkeeping, or other administrative requirement. Any benefit derived from the use of an AVA name would be the result of a proprietor’s efforts and consumer acceptance of wines from that area. Therefore, no regulatory flexibility analysis is required. Executive Order 12866 It has been determined that this proposed rule is not a significant regulatory action as defined by Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 1993. Therefore, no regulatory assessment is required. Drafting Information Karen A. Thornton of the Regulations and Rulings Division drafted this proposed rule. List of Subjects in 27 CFR Part 9 Wine. Proposed Regulatory Amendment For the reasons discussed in the preamble, TTB proposes to amend title 27, chapter I, part 9, Code of Federal Regulations, as follows: PART 9—AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS 1. The authority citation for part 9 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 27 U.S.C. 205. Subpart C—Approved American Viticultural Areas 2. Subpart C is amended by adding § 9.llto read as follows: ■ E:\FR\FM\28FEP1.SGM 28FEP1 11900 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with PROPOSALS § 9.ll Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 40 / Friday, February 28, 2020 / Proposed Rules Verde Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is ‘‘Verde Valley’’. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, ‘‘Verde Valley’’ is a term of viticultural significance. (b) Approved maps. The 9 United States Geological Survey (USGS) 1:24,000 scale topographic maps used to determine the boundary of the Verde Valley viticultural area are titled: (1) Camp Verde, Ariz., 1969; (2) Clarkdale, Ariz., 1973; (3) Cornville, Ariz., 1968; (4) Cottonwood, Ariz., 1973; (5) Lake Montezuma, Ariz., 1969; (6) Middle Verde, Ariz., 1969; (7) Munds Draw, Ariz., 1973; (8) Page Springs, Ariz., 1969; and (9) Sedona, Ariz., 1969. (c) Boundary. The Verde Valley viticultural area is located in Yavapai County, Arizona. The boundary of the Verde Valley viticultural area is as described below: (1) The beginning point of the boundary is at the intersection of the 3,800-foot elevation contour and the northern boundary of Section 32, T17N/ R3E, on the Clarkdale Quadrangle. From the beginning point, proceed east along the northern boundary of Section 32 until its intersection with the Verde River; then (2) Proceed north along the Verde River to its intersection with the western boundary of Section 21, T17N/ R3E; then (3) Proceed north along the western boundaries of Sections 21 and 16 to the intersection with the 3,800-foot elevation contour; then (4) Proceed southerly then easterly along the 3,800-foot elevation contour, crossing onto the Page Springs Quadrangle, to its intersection with Bill Gray Road in Section 18, T16N/R4E; then (5) Proceed north along Bill Gray Road to its intersection with an unnamed, unimproved road known locally as Forest 761B Road in Section 32, T17N/R4E; then (6) Proceed east, then northeast, along Forest 761B Road to its intersection with Red Canyon Road in Section 26, T17N/R4E; then (7) Proceed south along Red Canyon Road to its intersection with U.S. Highway 89 Alt. in Section 35, T17N/ R4E; then (8) Proceed east over U.S. Highway 89 Alt. in a straight line to and unnamed, unimproved road known locally as Angel Valley Road, and proceed southeasterly along Angel Valley Road as it becomes a light-duty road, crossing over Oak Creek, and continuing along the southernmost segment of Angel VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:07 Feb 27, 2020 Jkt 250001 Valley Road to its terminus at a structure on Deer Pass Ranch in Section 12, T16N/R4E; then (9) Proceed south in a straight line to the 3,800-foot elevation contour in Section 12, T16/NR4E; then (10) Proceed south-southeasterly along the 3,800-foot elevation contour, crossing over the southwestern corner of the Sedona Quadrangle and onto the Lake Montezuma Quadrangle, to the intersection of the contour line with an unnamed creek in Section 6, T15N/R5E; then (11) Proceed southwesterly along the unnamed creek until its intersection with the 3,600-foot elevation contour in Section 1, T15N/R4E; then (12) Proceed southerly along the 3,600-foor elevation contour, crossing briefly onto the Cornville Quadrangle and then back onto the Lake Montezuma Quadrangle, to the intersection of the elevation contour with an unnamed secondary highway known locally as Cornville Road in Section 7, T15N/R5E; then (13) Proceed southeast along Cornville Road to its intersection with the 3,600foot elevation contour in Section 20, T15N/R5 E; then (14) Proceed easterly, then southerly, along the elevation contour to its intersection with the boundary of the Montezuma Castle National Monument in Section 36, T15N/R5E; then (15) Proceed west, southeast, southwest, and then east along the boundary of the Montezuma Castle National Monument to its intersection with range line separating R5E and R6E; then (16) Proceed south along the R5E/R6E range line, crossing onto the Camp Verde Quadrangle, to the intersection of the range line and the southeastern corner of Section 12, T14N/R5E; then (17) Proceed west along the southern boundaries of Sections 12, 11, 10, and 9 to the intersection of the southern boundary of Section 9 and the Montezuma Castle National Monument; then (18) Proceed along the boundary of the Montezuma Castle National Monument in a counterclockwise direction to the intersection of the monument boundary and the 3,300-foot elevation contour in Section 16, T14N/ R5E; then (19) Proceed southerly, then southeasterly, along the 3,300-foot elevation contour to its intersection with the eastern boundary of Section 18, T13N/R6E; then (20) Proceed south along the eastern boundary of Section 18 to its intersection with the southern boundary of Section 18; then PO 00000 Frm 00035 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 (21) Proceed west along the southern boundaries of Sections 19, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18, T13N/R53, and Section 13, T13N/R4E, to the intersection with the 3,800-foot elevation contour in Section 13, T13N/R4E; then (22) Proceed northwesterly along the 3,800-foot elevation contour, crossing over the Middle Verde and Cornville Quadrangles and onto the Cottonwood Quadrangle, to the intersection of the elevation contour with an unnamed creek in Del Monte Gulch in Section 5, T15N/R3E; then (23) Proceed westerly along the unnamed creek to its intersection with the 5,000-foot elevation contour in Section 26, T16N/R2E; then (24) Proceed northerly along the 5,000-foot elevation contour, crossing over the Clarkdale Quadrangle and onto the Munds Draw Quadrangle, to the intersection of the elevation contour with a pipeline in Section 4, T16N/R2E; then (25) Proceed southeasterly along the pipeline, crossing onto the Clarkdale Quadrangle, and continuing northeasterly along the pipeline to its intersection with the 3,800-foot elevation contour in Section 32, T17N/ R3E; then (26) Proceed northerly along the 3,800-foot contour, returning to the beginning point. Signed: November 26, 2019. Mary G. Ryan, Acting Administrator. Approved: February 4, 2020. Timothy E. Skud, Deputy Assistant Secretary (Tax, Trade, and Tariff Policy). [FR Doc. 2020–04012 Filed 2–27–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4810–31–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 [Docket Number USCG–2020–0078] RIN 1625–AA08 Special Local Regulation; Sail Grand Prix 2020 Race Event; San Francisco, CA Coast Guard, DHS. Notice of proposed rulemaking. AGENCY: ACTION: The Coast Guard is proposing to establish a temporary special local regulation in the navigable waters of San Francisco Bay in San Francisco, CA in support of the San Francisco Sail SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\28FEP1.SGM 28FEP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 40 (Friday, February 28, 2020)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 11894-11900]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-04012]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau

27 CFR Part 9

[Docket No. TTB-2020-0002; Notice No. 187]
RIN 1513-AC54


Proposed Establishment of the Verde Valley Viticultural Area

AGENCY: Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, Treasury.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) proposes to 
establish the approximately 200 square-mile ``Verde Valley'' 
viticultural area in Yavapai County, Arizona. The proposed viticultural 
area is not located within, nor does it contain, any other established 
viticultural area. TTB designates viticultural areas to allow vintners 
to better describe the origin of their wines and to allow consumers to 
better identify wines they may purchase. TTB invites comments on this 
proposed addition to its regulations.

DATES: Comments must be received by April 28, 2020.

ADDRESSES: You may electronically submit comments to TTB on this 
proposal, and view copies of this

[[Page 11895]]

document, its supporting materials, and any comments TTB receives on it 
within Docket No. TTB-2020-0002 as posted on Regulations.gov (https://www.regulations.gov), the Federal e-rulemaking portal. Please see the 
``Public Participation'' section of this document below for full 
details on how to comment on this proposal via Regulations.gov, U.S. 
mail, or hand delivery, and for full details on how to view or obtain 
copies of this document, its supporting materials, and any comments 
related to this proposal.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karen A. Thornton, Regulations and 
Rulings Division, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 1310 G 
Street NW, Box 12, Washington, DC 20005; phone 202-453-1039, ext. 175.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background on Viticultural Areas

TTB Authority

    Section 105(e) of the Federal Alcohol Administration Act (FAA Act), 
27 U.S.C. 205(e), authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to prescribe 
regulations for the labeling of wine, distilled spirits, and malt 
beverages. The FAA Act provides that these regulations should, among 
other things, prohibit consumer deception and the use of misleading 
statements on labels and ensure that labels provide the consumer with 
adequate information as to the identity and quality of the product. The 
Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) administers the FAA Act 
pursuant to section 1111(d) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, 
codified at 6 U.S.C. 531(d). The Secretary has delegated the functions 
and duties in the administration and enforcement of these provisions to 
the TTB Administrator through Treasury Order 120-01, dated December 10, 
2013 (superseding Treasury Order 120-01, dated January 24, 2003).
    Part 4 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR part 4) authorizes TTB to 
establish definitive viticultural areas and regulate the use of their 
names as appellations of origin on wine labels and in wine 
advertisements. Part 9 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR part 9) sets 
forth standards for the preparation and submission of petitions for the 
establishment or modification of American viticultural areas (AVAs) and 
lists the approved AVAs.

Definition

    Section 4.25(e)(1)(i) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.25(e)(1)(i)) 
defines a viticultural area for American wine as a delimited grape-
growing region having distinguishing features, as described in part 9 
of the regulations, and a name and a delineated boundary, as 
established in part 9 of the regulations. These designations allow 
vintners and consumers to attribute a given quality, reputation, or 
other characteristic of a wine made from grapes grown in an area to the 
wine's geographic origin. The establishment of AVAs allows vintners to 
describe more accurately the origin of their wines to consumers and 
helps consumers to identify wines they may purchase. Establishment of 
an AVA is neither an approval nor an endorsement by TTB of the wine 
produced in that area.

Requirements

    Section 4.25(e)(2) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.25(e)(2)) 
outlines the procedure for proposing an AVA and provides that any 
interested party may petition TTB to establish a grape-growing region 
as an AVA. Section 9.12 of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 9.12) prescribes 
standards for petitions for the establishment or modification of AVAs. 
Petitions to establish an AVA must include the following:
     Evidence that the area within the proposed AVA boundary is 
nationally or locally known by the AVA name specified in the petition;
     An explanation of the basis for defining the boundary of 
the proposed AVA;
     A narrative description of the features of the proposed 
AVA affecting viticulture, such as climate, geology, soils, physical 
features, and elevation, that make the proposed AVA distinctive and 
distinguish it from adjacent areas outside the proposed AVA boundary;
     The appropriate United States Geological Survey (USGS) 
map(s) showing the location of the proposed AVA, with the boundary of 
the proposed AVA clearly drawn thereon; and
     A detailed narrative description of the proposed AVA 
boundary based on USGS map markings.

Verde Valley Petition

    TTB received a petition from the Verde Valley Wine Consortium, on 
behalf of the local grape growers and winemakers, proposing to 
establish the approximately 200 square-mile ``Verde Valley'' AVA in 
Yavapai County, Arizona. The petition notes that the entire geological 
feature known as ``Verde Valley'' encompasses approximately 714 square 
miles, most of which is National Forest land. The proposed AVA, 
however, encompasses a much smaller area and excludes much of the 
public lands that are unavailable for viticulture. Although an effort 
was made to exclude as many public lands from the proposed AVA as 
possible, including Montezuma's Castle and Montezuma's Well National 
Monuments and the Prescott and Coconino National Forests, approximately 
33 percent of the land within the proposed Verde Valley AVA is still 
part of either the Prescott or Coconino National Forests. The petition 
states that it was not practical to draw a boundary that would exclude 
all Federal land because several of the vineyards within the proposed 
AVA are ``islands'' of private land surrounded on all sides by Federal 
land. The petition states that even with the amount of Federal land 
remaining within the proposed AVA, there is still plenty of privately 
owned land available for vineyards within the proposed boundaries.
    The proposed AVA currently has 24 commercial vineyards, covering a 
total of approximately 125 acres. According to the petition, several 
existing vineyards are planning to expand by a total of an estimated 40 
acres in the near future. In addition, there are 11 wineries located 
within the proposed AVA.
    According to the petition, the distinguishing features of the 
proposed Verde Valley AVA are its climate, soils, and topography. The 
petition also included information about the geology of the proposed 
AVA. However, because the petition did not compare the geology of the 
proposed AVA to that of the surrounding regions and did not describe 
the effect geology has on viticulture, TTB does not consider geology to 
be a distinguishing feature of the proposed AVA. Unless otherwise 
noted, all information and data pertaining to the proposed AVA 
contained in this proposed rule come from the petition for the proposed 
Verde Valley AVA and its supporting exhibits.

Name Evidence

    The proposed Verde Valley AVA is located within the larger valley 
of the Verde River in central Arizona. According to the petition, the 
region of the proposed AVA has been referred to as ``Verde Valley'' 
since 1583, when the Spanish explorer Antonio de Espejo recorded his 
travels in the area. With the passing of the Homestead Act in 1862, 
which granted land in the area to settlers who were willing make 
productive use of the land, pioneers began moving to the region and 
settled the town of Camp Verde. Later, Fort Verde was built to provide 
military protection for the residents.
    The petition included several examples of written works that refer 
to the ``Verde Valley.'' An early geological study of the region, 
published in 1890,

[[Page 11896]]

was entitled, ``Thenardite, mirabilite, glauberite, halite, and 
associates, of the Verde Valley, Arizona Territory.'' \1\ A 1963 
publication by the U.S. Department of Interior was titled, ``Geology 
and Ground Water in the Verde Valley-The Mongollon Rim Region, 
Arizona.'' \2\ In 2012, the Lonely Planet travel site included the 
Verde Valley region in its Top 10 list of U.S. travel destinations for 
2013. The article notes, ``Between Phoenix and the Grand Canyon, the 
Verde Valley is taking off as Arizona's go-to destination, and not just 
among the spa and crystal Sedona fans of years past.'' \3\ Finally, an 
article about the wine industry in Arizona, published in a 2013 edition 
of the In Business magazine, states that the majority of Arizona's wine 
grapes are grown in ``the greater Willcox area and the Verde Valley.'' 
\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ Blake, W.P. Thenardite, mirabilite, glauberite, halite, and 
associates, of the Verde Valley, Arizona Territory. (1890) American 
Journal of Science, vol. 39, number 229, pp. 43-45.
    \2\ Twenter, Floyd R., and Metzger, D.G. Geology and Ground 
Water in the Verde Valley-The Mongollon Rim Region, Arizona. 
Washington: Government Printing Office. 1963.
    \3\ Reid, Robert. Top 10 travel destinations for 2013. Lonely 
Planet. December 2012. https://www.lonelyplanet.com/travel-tips-and-articles/77583.
    \4\ Stanton, Alison. Arizona's Growing Wine Industry. In 
Business. October 2013, pp. 20-21. http://inbusinessphx.com/in-business/arizonas-growing-wine-industry.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The petition also included several photographs of local businesses 
and organizations that use the term ``Verde Valley'' in their names. 
For example, the Verde Valley Fire District, Verde Valley Medical 
Center, and Verde Valley Montessori School all serve the region of the 
proposed AVA. The local newspaper, the Verde Independent, is published 
by Verde Valley Newspapers, Inc. A local hotel is named the Verde 
Valley Inn, and a ballet studio is named Verde Valley Ballet. Finally, 
the petition included a page from the local telephone directory which 
lists several other businesses that use ``Verde Valley'' in their 
names, such as Verde Valley Plumbing, Verde Valley RV Resort and 
Campground, and Verde Valley Self Storage.

Boundary Evidence

    The proposed Verde Valley AVA is located in Yavapai County, 
Arizona, approximately 100 miles north of the Phoenix metropolitan 
area. The Verde River flows through the center of the valley from 
northwest to southeast, and steep foothills rise up around the valley. 
The northern boundary separates the proposed AVA from the Coconino 
National Forest. The northern boundary primarily follows the 3,800-foot 
elevation contour because, according to the petition, the terrain 
becomes too steep for cultivation above that elevation. The proposed 
eastern boundary follows a series of elevation contours to separate the 
proposed AVA from extremely steep terrain, as well as from the public 
lands within the Coconino National Forest and Montezuma's Well and 
Montezuma's Castle National Monuments. The proposed southern boundary 
follows section lines on the U.S.G.S. topographic maps because, 
according to the petition, there were no other consistent features on 
the map to follow. The petition states that most of the land south of 
the proposed boundary is uninhabited and is part of the Coconino 
National Forest. The proposed western boundary primarily follows the 
3,800-foot elevation contour, to exclude the steeper terrain of the 
Black Hills range and the public lands within the Prescott National 
Forest.

Distinguishing Features

    The distinguishing features of the proposed Verde Valley AVA are 
its climate, soils, and topography.
Climate
    The petition included information on the annual precipitation 
amounts, temperatures in degrees Fahrenheit (F), and growing degree day 
\5\ (GDD) accumulations within the proposed Verde Valley AVA.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \5\ See Albert J. Winkler, General Viticulture (Berkeley: 
University of California Press, 1974), pages 61-64. In the Winkler 
climate classification system, annual heat accumulation during the 
growing season, measured in annual GDDs, defines climatic regions. 
One GDD accumulates for each degree Fahrenheit that a day's mean 
temperature is above 50 degrees F, the minimum temperature required 
for grapevine growth.

              Table 1--Average Annual Precipitation Amounts
                               [2012-2017]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Average  annual
                                                          precipitation
        Location (direction from proposed AVA)               amounts
                                                            (inches)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Proposed AVA..........................................             13.83
Fry Lake (North)......................................             29.40
Bar M Canyon (East)...................................             26.86
Baker Butte (South)...................................             27.88
Prescott (West).......................................             18.10
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Average annual rainfall amounts within the proposed Verde Valley 
AVA are significantly lower than in the surrounding regions. Due to the 
low rainfall amounts, vineyard owners within the proposed AVA must use 
irrigation to ensure adequate hydration for their vines. The petition 
states that there are sufficient sources of groundwater within the 
proposed AVA for irrigation, and vineyard owners also employ water 
conservation methods such as drip irrigation and the use of 
agriculturally approved reclaimed water.

                                              Table 2--Temperatures
                                                   [2012-2017]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Annual mean          Maximum            Minimum         Annual growing
 Location  (direction from proposed      temperature        temperature        temperature        degree days
                AVA)                     (degrees F)        (degrees F)        (degrees F)       accumulations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Proposed AVA........................               64.1              117.0               12.0              5,580
Fry Lake (North)....................               49.0               94.0              -11.0              1,797
Bar M Canyon (East).................               50.4               98.0              -10.0              1,727
Baker Butte (South).................               53.3               94.0                6.0              2,668
Prescott (West).....................               57.7              104.0                2.0              3,544
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Temperatures within the proposed Verde Valley AVA are warmer than 
in each of the surrounding regions and provide suitable heat and 
sunlight for photosynthesis. The warm daytime temperatures lead to high 
annual GDD accumulations. According to the petition, the temperatures 
and GDD accumulations within the proposed AVA are best suited for 
growing warm-climate grapes such as Syrah, Cabernet

[[Page 11897]]

Sauvignon, Petite Sirah, Zinfandel, Malvasia Bianca, and Viognier.
    Finally, the petition included a discussion of the difference 
between the daytime high temperatures and nighttime low temperatures 
within the proposed AVA and the surrounding regions. The petition 
referred to these temperature differences as ``diurnal temperature 
swings.'' Although temperatures in the proposed AVA are high during the 
daytime, cool nighttime air drains into the proposed AVA from the 
surrounding higher elevations and lowers the nighttime temperatures. As 
a result, the difference between daytime high temperatures and 
nighttime low temperatures within the proposed AVA can exceed 30 
degrees F, which is a greater difference than found in any of the 
surrounding regions. According to the petition, such a significant drop 
in nighttime temperatures delays grape ripening, lessens the 
respiration of acids, and increases phenolic development in the grapes. 
The following tables show the mean diurnal temperature swings for each 
month during the growing season for the years 2014 to 2016.

                                                      Table 3--Diurnal Temperature Swings for 2014
                                                                       [Degrees F]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                       Month
         Location  (direction from proposed AVA)         -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               April            May            June            July           August         September
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Within proposed AVA.....................................            37.7            38.8            41.3            32.1            29.5            31.0
Fry Lake (North)........................................            28.3            30.0            35.4            27.7            23.7            24.1
Bar M Canyon (East).....................................            31.7            32.9            38.7            30.0            26.8            27.3
Baker Butte (South).....................................            19.7            20.9            23.2            21.9            18.7            16.2
Prescott (West).........................................            30.3            30.5            33.3            25.8            25.0            26.6
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                      Table 4--Diurnal Temperature Swings for 2015
                                                                       [Degrees F]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                       Month
         Location  (direction from proposed AVA)         -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               April            May            June            July           August         September
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Within proposed AVA.....................................            37.3            33.0            38.0            32.2            34.4            33.9
Fry Lake (North)........................................            26.6            22.7            30.4            25.1            26.5            26.3
Bar M Canyon (East).....................................            33.0            30.6            35.7            28.0            29.4            30.4
Baker Butte (South).....................................            19.9            18.7            20.8            19.6            20.5            18.4
Prescott (West).........................................            30.2            26.1            31.2            24.6            26.1            28.7
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                      Table 5--Diurnal Temperature Swings for 2016
                                                                       [Degrees F]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                       Month
         Location  (direction from proposed AVA)         -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               April            May            June            July           August         September
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Within proposed AVA.....................................            35.4            36.0            39.5            36.8            29.8            32.2
Fry Lake (North)........................................            24.9            26.6            32.7            29.2            24.4            25.0
Bar M Canyon (East).....................................            28.7            30.6            37.0            32.3            27.2            28.9
Baker Butte (South).....................................            18.5            19.5            23.1            22.1            18.0            16.7
Prescott (West).........................................            27.6            28.1            31.1            28.1            24.4            26.3
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Soils
    The soils within the proposed Verde Valley AVA are primarily 
alluvial soils. According to the petition, the majority of the soils 
within the proposed AVA are of the Altar, Mule, Cornville, Anthony, 
Retriever, House Mountain, Cowan, and Arizo soil series. The 
composition of these soils ranges from very fine sandy loam to gravelly 
loam with silt and limestone. Traces of the Supai, Verde, and Martin 
Limestone formations can also be found throughout the proposed AVA.
    The petition states that the soils of the proposed AVA generally 
provide appropriate water drainage and have above-moderate levels of 
nutrients, although low calcium and magnesium levels are common. 
Additionally, the high bicarbonate levels in the groundwater of the 
proposed AVA have been found to increase soil pH and inhibit nutrient 
uptake in the vines. The petition states that these unfavorable 
vineyard conditions can be mitigated through rootstock, varietal, and 
clonal selections that can tolerate and even benefit from these 
nutrient deficiencies.
    To the north and east of the proposed Verde Valley AVA, along the 
Mongollon Rim, the soils are described in the petition as ``stony.'' 
The most prominent soil series in these two regions are Brolliar stony 
loam and Siesta stony silt loam. According to the petition, the 
remainder of the soil to the north and east of the proposed AVA is 
comprised of approximately 22 other defined soil series, most of which 
have the terms ``stony'' or ``very stony'' in their names. To the west 
and southwest of the proposed AVA, in the Black Hills, the soils are 
also typically stony. Major soil series in these regions include 
Brolliar very stony clay loam, Soldier cobbly loam, Lonti-Wineg, and 
Lynx.
Topography
    The proposed Verde Valley AVA is located within the basin of the 
Verde River. The petition describes the shape of this basin as a ``bowl 
with a crack in it to the south where the river flows out of the 
valley.'' The edges of the ``bowl'' gently slope down towards the 
valley

[[Page 11898]]

floor at angles of 2 to 15 percent. Elevations within the proposed AVA 
range from approximately 3,000 feet to 5,000 feet, although most of the 
proposed AVA is below 3,900 feet.
    The proposed AVA is surrounded on all sides by higher elevations 
and steeper slopes. To the north and northeast of the proposed AVA, 
elevations rise up to 8,000 feet along the edge of the Mongollon Rim. 
To the west and southwest of the proposed AVA are the Black Mountains, 
which have steep slopes and elevations up to approximately 7,800 feet.
    According to the petition, the proposed Verde Valley AVA's 
topography affects viticulture. Gentle slopes allow for easier vineyard 
management than steep slopes. Furthermore, because the proposed AVA is 
lower than the surrounding regions, cold air drains from the higher 
elevations into the proposed AVA during the spring and fall. As a 
result, the risk of frost damage increases in the proposed AVA, 
particularly in vineyards adjacent to the river. The petition states 
that vineyard owners attempt to mitigate the risk of frost by using 
inversion fans and protective sprays and by planting late-budding 
varietals of grapes.

Summary of Distinguishing Features

    The evidence provided in the petition indicates that the climate, 
soil, and topography of the proposed Verde Valley AVA distinguish it 
from the surrounding regions in each direction. The following table 
summarizes the features of the proposed AVA and the surrounding 
regions.

                                       Summary of Distinguishing Features
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Region                         Climate                   Soils                  Topography
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Proposed Verde Valley AVA............  Average of 13.83 inches  Alluvial soils composed  Gentle slopes with
                                        of rain annually;        of loams ranging from    angles of 2 to 15
                                        average GDD              very fine sandy loams    percent; elevations
                                        accumulations of         to gravelly loams with   between 3,000 and
                                        5,580; hot summers and   silt and limestone.      5,000 feet.
                                        moderate winters;
                                        growing season diurnal
                                        temperature swings of
                                        30 degrees or higher.
North................................  Higher annual rainfall   Stony soils primarily    Steep slopes with
                                        amounts; lower GDD       of the Brollar stony     elevations up to 8,000
                                        accumulations; cooler    loam and Siesta stony    feet.
                                        summers and colder       silt series.
                                        winters; smaller
                                        diurnal temperature
                                        difference swings.
East.................................  Higher annual rainfall   Stony soils primarily    Steep slopes with
                                        amounts; lower GDD       of the Brolliar stony    elevations up to 8,000
                                        accumulations; cooler    loam and Siesta stony    feet.
                                        summers and colder       silt series.
                                        winters; smaller
                                        diurnal temperature
                                        difference swings.
South................................  Higher annual rainfall   Stony soils primarily    Steep slopes with
                                        amounts; lower GDD       of the Brolliar very     elevations up to 7,800
                                        accumulations; cooler    stony clay loam,         feet.
                                        summers and moderate     Soldier cobbly loam,
                                        winters; smaller         Lonti-Wineg, and Lynx
                                        diurnal temperature      series.
                                        difference swings.
West.................................  Higher annual rainfall   Stony soils primarily    Steep slopes with
                                        amounts; lower GDD       of the Brolliar very     elevations up to 7,800
                                        accumulations; cooler    stony clay loam,         feet.
                                        summers and moderate     Soldier cobbly loam,
                                        winters; smaller         Lonti-Wineg, and Lynx
                                        diurnal temperature      series.
                                        difference swings.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

TTB Determination

    TTB concludes that the petition to establish the approximately 200-
square mile Verde Valley AVA merits consideration and public comment, 
as invited in this proposed rule.

Boundary Description

    See the narrative description of the boundary of the petitioned-for 
AVA in the proposed regulatory text published at the end of this 
proposed rule.

Maps

    The petitioner provided the required maps, and they are listed 
below in the proposed regulatory text. You may also view the proposed 
Verde Valley AVA boundary on the AVA Map Explorer on the TTB website, 
at https://www.ttb.gov/wine/ava-map-explorer.

Impact on Current Wine Labels

    Part 4 of the TTB regulations prohibits any label reference on a 
wine that indicates or implies an origin other than the wine's true 
place of origin. For a wine to be labeled with an AVA name, at least 85 
percent of the wine must be derived from grapes grown within the area 
represented by that name, and the wine must meet the other conditions 
listed in Sec.  4.25(e)(3) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.25(e)(3)). 
If the wine is not eligible for labeling with an AVA name and that name 
appears in the brand name, then the label is not in compliance and the 
bottler must change the brand name and obtain approval of a new label. 
Similarly, if the AVA name appears in another reference on the label in 
a misleading manner, the bottler would have to obtain approval of a new 
label. Different rules apply if a wine has a brand name containing an 
AVA name that was used as a brand name on a label approved before July 
7, 1986. See Sec.  4.39(i)(2) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 
4.39(i)(2)) for details.
    If TTB establishes this proposed AVA, its name, ``Verde Valley,'' 
will be recognized as a name of viticultural significance under Sec.  
4.39(i)(3) of the TTB regulations (27 CFR 4.39(i)(3)). The text of the 
proposed regulation clarifies this point. Consequently, if this 
proposed rule is adopted as a final rule, wine bottlers using the name 
``Verde Valley'' in a brand name, including a trademark, or in another 
label reference as to the origin of the wine, would have to ensure that 
the product is eligible to use the AVA name as an appellation of 
origin.

[[Page 11899]]

Public Participation

Comments Invited

    TTB invites comments from interested members of the public on 
whether it should establish the proposed AVA. TTB is also interested in 
receiving comments on the sufficiency and accuracy of the name, 
boundary, soils, climate, and other required information submitted in 
support of the petition. Please provide any available specific 
information in support of your comments.
    Because of the potential impact of the establishment of the 
proposed Verde Valley AVA on wine labels that include the term ``Verde 
Valley,'' as discussed above under Impact on Current Wine Labels, TTB 
is particularly interested in comments regarding whether there will be 
a conflict between the proposed area name and currently used brand 
names. If a commenter believes that a conflict will arise, the comment 
should describe the nature of that conflict, including any anticipated 
negative economic impact that approval of the proposed AVA will have on 
an existing viticultural enterprise. TTB is also interested in 
receiving suggestions for ways to avoid conflicts, for example, by 
adopting a modified or different name for the AVA.

Submitting Comments

    You may submit comments on this proposed rule by using one of the 
following three methods (please note that TTB has a new address for 
comments submitted by U.S. Mail):
     Federal e-Rulemaking Portal: You may send comments via the 
online comment form posted with this proposed rule within Docket No. 
TTB-2020-0002 on ``Regulations.gov,'' the Federal e-rulemaking portal, 
at http://www.regulations.gov. A direct link to that docket is 
available under Notice No. 187 on the TTB website at https://www.ttb.gov/wine/wine-rulemaking.shtml. Supplemental files may be 
attached to comments submitted via Regulations.gov. For complete 
instructions on how to use Regulations.gov, visit the site and click on 
the ``Help'' tab.
     U.S. Mail: You may send comments via postal mail to the 
Director, Regulations and Rulings Division, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and 
Trade Bureau, 1310 G Street NW, Box 12, Washington, DC 20005.
     Hand Delivery/Courier: You may hand-carry your comments or 
have them hand-carried to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, 
1310 G Street NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20005.
    Please submit your comments by the closing date shown above in this 
proposed rule. Your comments must reference Notice No. 187 and include 
your name and mailing address. Your comments also must be made in 
English, be legible, and be written in language acceptable for public 
disclosure. TTB does not acknowledge receipt of comments, and TTB 
considers all comments as originals.
    In your comment, please clearly indicate if you are commenting on 
your own behalf or on behalf of an association, business, or other 
entity. If you are commenting on behalf of an entity, your comment must 
include the entity's name, as well as your name and position title. If 
you comment via Regulations.gov, please enter the entity's name in the 
``Organization'' blank of the online comment form. If you comment via 
postal mail or hand delivery/courier, please submit your entity's 
comment on letterhead.
    You may also write to the Administrator before the comment closing 
date to ask for a public hearing. The Administrator reserves the right 
to determine whether to hold a public hearing.

Confidentiality

    All submitted comments and attachments are part of the public 
record and subject to disclosure. Do not enclose any material in your 
comments that you consider to be confidential or inappropriate for 
public disclosure.

Public Disclosure

    TTB will post, and you may view, copies of this proposed rule, 
selected supporting materials, and any online or mailed comments 
received about this proposal within Docket No. TTB-2020-0002 on the 
Federal e-rulemaking portal, Regulations.gov, at https://www.regulations.gov. A direct link to that docket is available on the 
TTB website at https://www.ttb.gov/wine/wine-rulemaking.shtml under 
Notice No. 187. You may also reach the relevant docket through the 
Regulations.gov search page at https://www.regulations.gov. For 
information on how to use Regulations.gov, click on the site's ``Help'' 
tab.
    All posted comments will display the commenter's name, organization 
(if any), city, and State, and, in the case of mailed comments, all 
address information, including email addresses. TTB may omit voluminous 
attachments or material that the Bureau considers unsuitable for 
posting.
    You may also view copies of this proposed rule, all related 
petitions, maps and other supporting materials, and any electronic or 
mailed comments that TTB receives about this proposal by appointment at 
the TTB Information Resource Center, 1310 G Street NW, Suite 400, 
Washington, DC 20005. You may also obtain copies at 20 cents per 8.5- x 
11-inch page. Please note that TTB is unable to provide copies of USGS 
maps or any similarly-sized documents that may be included as part of 
the AVA petition. Contact TTB's Regulations and Rulings Division at the 
above address, by email using the web form at https://www.ttb.gov/contact-rrd, or by telephone at 202-453-1039, ext. 175, to schedule an 
appointment or to request copies of comments or other materials.

Regulatory Flexibility Act

    TTB certifies that this proposed regulation, if adopted, would not 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities. The proposed regulation imposes no new reporting, 
recordkeeping, or other administrative requirement. Any benefit derived 
from the use of an AVA name would be the result of a proprietor's 
efforts and consumer acceptance of wines from that area. Therefore, no 
regulatory flexibility analysis is required.

Executive Order 12866

    It has been determined that this proposed rule is not a significant 
regulatory action as defined by Executive Order 12866 of September 30, 
1993. Therefore, no regulatory assessment is required.

Drafting Information

    Karen A. Thornton of the Regulations and Rulings Division drafted 
this proposed rule.

List of Subjects in 27 CFR Part 9

    Wine.

Proposed Regulatory Amendment

    For the reasons discussed in the preamble, TTB proposes to amend 
title 27, chapter I, part 9, Code of Federal Regulations, as follows:

PART 9--AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS

0
1. The authority citation for part 9 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  27 U.S.C. 205.

Subpart C--Approved American Viticultural Areas

0
2. Subpart C is amended by adding Sec.  9.__to read as follows:

[[Page 11900]]

Sec.  9.__   Verde Valley.

    (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this 
section is ``Verde Valley''. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, 
``Verde Valley'' is a term of viticultural significance.
    (b) Approved maps. The 9 United States Geological Survey (USGS) 
1:24,000 scale topographic maps used to determine the boundary of the 
Verde Valley viticultural area are titled:
    (1) Camp Verde, Ariz., 1969;
    (2) Clarkdale, Ariz., 1973;
    (3) Cornville, Ariz., 1968;
    (4) Cottonwood, Ariz., 1973;
    (5) Lake Montezuma, Ariz., 1969;
    (6) Middle Verde, Ariz., 1969;
    (7) Munds Draw, Ariz., 1973;
    (8) Page Springs, Ariz., 1969; and
    (9) Sedona, Ariz., 1969.
    (c) Boundary. The Verde Valley viticultural area is located in 
Yavapai County, Arizona. The boundary of the Verde Valley viticultural 
area is as described below:
    (1) The beginning point of the boundary is at the intersection of 
the 3,800-foot elevation contour and the northern boundary of Section 
32, T17N/R3E, on the Clarkdale Quadrangle. From the beginning point, 
proceed east along the northern boundary of Section 32 until its 
intersection with the Verde River; then
    (2) Proceed north along the Verde River to its intersection with 
the western boundary of Section 21, T17N/R3E; then
    (3) Proceed north along the western boundaries of Sections 21 and 
16 to the intersection with the 3,800-foot elevation contour; then
    (4) Proceed southerly then easterly along the 3,800-foot elevation 
contour, crossing onto the Page Springs Quadrangle, to its intersection 
with Bill Gray Road in Section 18, T16N/R4E; then
    (5) Proceed north along Bill Gray Road to its intersection with an 
unnamed, unimproved road known locally as Forest 761B Road in Section 
32, T17N/R4E; then
    (6) Proceed east, then northeast, along Forest 761B Road to its 
intersection with Red Canyon Road in Section 26, T17N/R4E; then
    (7) Proceed south along Red Canyon Road to its intersection with 
U.S. Highway 89 Alt. in Section 35, T17N/R4E; then
    (8) Proceed east over U.S. Highway 89 Alt. in a straight line to 
and unnamed, unimproved road known locally as Angel Valley Road, and 
proceed southeasterly along Angel Valley Road as it becomes a light-
duty road, crossing over Oak Creek, and continuing along the 
southernmost segment of Angel Valley Road to its terminus at a 
structure on Deer Pass Ranch in Section 12, T16N/R4E; then
    (9) Proceed south in a straight line to the 3,800-foot elevation 
contour in Section 12, T16/NR4E; then
    (10) Proceed south-southeasterly along the 3,800-foot elevation 
contour, crossing over the southwestern corner of the Sedona Quadrangle 
and onto the Lake Montezuma Quadrangle, to the intersection of the 
contour line with an unnamed creek in Section 6, T15N/R5E; then
    (11) Proceed southwesterly along the unnamed creek until its 
intersection with the 3,600-foot elevation contour in Section 1, T15N/
R4E; then
    (12) Proceed southerly along the 3,600-foor elevation contour, 
crossing briefly onto the Cornville Quadrangle and then back onto the 
Lake Montezuma Quadrangle, to the intersection of the elevation contour 
with an unnamed secondary highway known locally as Cornville Road in 
Section 7, T15N/R5E; then
    (13) Proceed southeast along Cornville Road to its intersection 
with the 3,600-foot elevation contour in Section 20, T15N/R5 E; then
    (14) Proceed easterly, then southerly, along the elevation contour 
to its intersection with the boundary of the Montezuma Castle National 
Monument in Section 36, T15N/R5E; then
    (15) Proceed west, southeast, southwest, and then east along the 
boundary of the Montezuma Castle National Monument to its intersection 
with range line separating R5E and R6E; then
    (16) Proceed south along the R5E/R6E range line, crossing onto the 
Camp Verde Quadrangle, to the intersection of the range line and the 
southeastern corner of Section 12, T14N/R5E; then
    (17) Proceed west along the southern boundaries of Sections 12, 11, 
10, and 9 to the intersection of the southern boundary of Section 9 and 
the Montezuma Castle National Monument; then
    (18) Proceed along the boundary of the Montezuma Castle National 
Monument in a counterclockwise direction to the intersection of the 
monument boundary and the 3,300-foot elevation contour in Section 16, 
T14N/R5E; then
    (19) Proceed southerly, then southeasterly, along the 3,300-foot 
elevation contour to its intersection with the eastern boundary of 
Section 18, T13N/R6E; then
    (20) Proceed south along the eastern boundary of Section 18 to its 
intersection with the southern boundary of Section 18; then
    (21) Proceed west along the southern boundaries of Sections 19, 13, 
14, 15, 16, 17, and 18, T13N/R53, and Section 13, T13N/R4E, to the 
intersection with the 3,800-foot elevation contour in Section 13, T13N/
R4E; then
    (22) Proceed northwesterly along the 3,800-foot elevation contour, 
crossing over the Middle Verde and Cornville Quadrangles and onto the 
Cottonwood Quadrangle, to the intersection of the elevation contour 
with an unnamed creek in Del Monte Gulch in Section 5, T15N/R3E; then
    (23) Proceed westerly along the unnamed creek to its intersection 
with the 5,000-foot elevation contour in Section 26, T16N/R2E; then
    (24) Proceed northerly along the 5,000-foot elevation contour, 
crossing over the Clarkdale Quadrangle and onto the Munds Draw 
Quadrangle, to the intersection of the elevation contour with a 
pipeline in Section 4, T16N/R2E; then
    (25) Proceed southeasterly along the pipeline, crossing onto the 
Clarkdale Quadrangle, and continuing northeasterly along the pipeline 
to its intersection with the 3,800-foot elevation contour in Section 
32, T17N/R3E; then
    (26) Proceed northerly along the 3,800-foot contour, returning to 
the beginning point.

    Signed: November 26, 2019.
Mary G. Ryan,
Acting Administrator.

    Approved: February 4, 2020.
Timothy E. Skud,
Deputy Assistant Secretary (Tax, Trade, and Tariff Policy).
[FR Doc. 2020-04012 Filed 2-27-20; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4810-31-P