Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes, 11000-11003 [2020-03864]

Download as PDF 11000 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 38 / Wednesday, February 26, 2020 / Proposed Rules khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with PROPOSALS area, including the following specific questions: 14. Are there examples of potential risks related to misrepresentations involving FDIC deposit insurance coverage that the FDIC should address, including those related to deposit products through use of the internet or other emerging technologies? 15. What changes can be made to the FDIC sign and advertising statement requirements that could deal with preventing misrepresentations regarding FDIC deposit insurance? 16. Are there ways that certain nonbanks should be able to advertise or otherwise represent a legitimate business relationship with an FDICinsured institution that would be clear to consumers and consistent with the provision on misrepresentation? 17. In allowing the use of their name or mark, should banks be responsible for ensuring the proper use of the FDIC’s logo, advertising and representations by nonbanks with whom the banks do business? Technological Solutions The FDIC regularly receives reports of fraudulent communications made to consumers that appear to be from FDICinsured entities, but actually originate from fraudsters. These types of scams may involve a variety of electronic communication channels, including emails, websites, text messages, and social media posts. Some scam messages might ask the recipient to ‘‘confirm’’ or ‘‘update’’ confidential personal financial information, such as bank account numbers, Social Security numbers, dates of birth and other valuable details. Other scams might ask for payments or deposits to be sent, for example, by money order, Automated Clearing House (‘‘ACH’’) credit, wire transfer service, peer-to-peer payment service, gift cards, or digital currency. Banks also face risks that fraudsters may be using their names and brands to perpetrate such frauds. The FDIC is exploring whether technological or other solutions might enable consumers to validate when they are interacting with a FDIC-insured financial institution, and not a fraudster, when visiting websites and using apps on mobile devices. The FDIC seeks comments on how technology might be utilized to allow consumers to distinguish FDIC-insured banks and savings association from nonbanks across various web and digital channels, including the following specific questions: 18. Do consumers look for the FDIC name or logo when using financial institution websites and apps to confirm VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:50 Feb 25, 2020 Jkt 250001 the validity of insured institutions’ authenticity? Do they look for the logo when deciding to open new deposit accounts? During every interaction? 19. What technological options or other approaches could be utilized to allow consumers to distinguish FDICinsured banks and savings associations from nonbanks across web and digital channels? What are the benefits and drawbacks of each approach? Is it necessary or desirable for the FDIC to try to ‘‘solve’’ this by rule, or can private sector initiatives better address this issue? 20. If the FDIC develops a technological solution to allow consumers to distinguish FDIC-insured banks and savings associations from nonbanks across web and digital channels, what challenges would institutions have in implementing such solutions? How would any solution work with third parties that have established legitimate business relationships with banks or savings associations? 21. If the FDIC develops a technological solution to allow consumers to distinguish FDIC-insured banks and savings associations from nonbanks across web and digital channels, should its use be limited to FDIC-insured banks, or should third parties that market or facilitate access to deposit products (e.g., prepaid program managers, fintechs) be permitted or required to use such a logo in certain circumstances? Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Dated at Washington, DC, on February 20, 2020. Annmarie H. Boyd, Assistant Executive Secretary. [FR Doc. 2020–03689 Filed 2–25–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6714–01–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2020–0091; Product Identifier 2020–NM–012–AD] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). AGENCY: The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00005 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 737–8 and 737–9 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report that certain exterior fairing panels on the top of the engine nacelle and strut (the thumbnail fairing and mid strut fairing panels) may not have the quality of electrical bonding necessary to ensure adequate shielding of the underlying wiring from the electromagnetic effects of lightning strikes or high intensity radiated fields (HIRF), which could potentially lead to a dual engine power loss event from a critical lightning or HIRF exposure event. This proposed AD would require a detailed inspection of the thumbnail fairing panels and mid strut fairing panels for excessive rework of the metallic (aluminum foil) inner surface layer, replacement of any excessively reworked panels, and modification of the thumbnail fairing assembly to ensure adequate bonding. The FAA is proposing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products. The FAA must receive comments on this proposed AD by March 27, 2020. ADDRESSES: You may send comments, using the procedures found in 14 CFR 11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. • Fax: 202–493–2251. • Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M– 30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. • Hand Delivery: Deliver to Mail address above between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this NPRM, contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Contractual & Data Services (C&DS), 2600 Westminster Blvd., MC 110–SK57, Seal Beach, CA 90740–5600; telephone 562–797–1717; internet https:// www.myboeingfleet.com. You may view this service information at the FAA, Transport Standards Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 206–231–3195. It is also available on the internet at https://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020–0091. DATES: Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the internet at https:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020– 0091; or in person at Docket Operations E:\FR\FM\26FEP1.SGM 26FEP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 38 / Wednesday, February 26, 2020 / Proposed Rules between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this NPRM, the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The street address for Docket Operations is listed above. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after receipt. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christopher Baker, Aerospace Engineer, Propulsion Section, FAA, Seattle ACO Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA 98198; phone and fax: 206– 231–3552; email: christopher.r.baker@ faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited The FAA invites you to send any written relevant data, views, or arguments about this proposal. Send your comments to an address listed under the ADDRESSES section. Include ‘‘Docket No. FAA–2020–0091; Product Identifier 2020–NM–012–AD’’ at the beginning of your comments. The FAA specifically invites comments on the overall regulatory, economic, environmental, and energy aspects of this NPRM. The FAA will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend this NPRM because of those comments. Except for Confidential Business Information (CBI) as described in the following paragraph, and other information as described in 14 CFR 11.35, the FAA will post all comments received, without change, to https:// www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you provide. The FAA will also post a report summarizing each substantive verbal contact received about this NPRM. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Confidential Business Information CBI is commercial or financial information that is both customarily and actually treated as private by its owner. Under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552), CBI is exempt from public disclosure. If your comments responsive to this NPRM contain commercial or financial information that is customarily treated as private, that you actually treat as private, and that is relevant or responsive to this NPRM, it is important that you clearly designate the submitted comments as CBI. Please mark each page of your submission containing CBI as ‘‘PROPIN.’’ The FAA will treat such marked submissions as confidential under the FOIA, and they will not be placed in the public docket of this NPRM. Submissions containing CBI should be sent to Christopher Baker, VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:50 Feb 25, 2020 Jkt 250001 Aerospace Engineer, Propulsion Section, FAA, Seattle ACO Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA 98198; phone and fax: 206–231–3552; email: christopher.r.baker@faa.gov. Any commentary that the FAA receives which is not specifically designated as CBI will be placed in the public docket for this rulemaking. Discussion The FAA has received a report from Boeing indicating that exterior fairing panels on the top of the engine nacelle and strut (the thumbnail fairing and mid strut fairing panels) may not have the quality of electrical bonding necessary to ensure adequate shielding of the underlying wiring from the electromagnetic effects of lightning strikes or HIRF. Excessive rework of the surface of the metallic (aluminum foil) inner layer of those panels can result in cuts to that layer. This metallic layer functions as part of the shielding for aircraft wiring, including wiring associated with the engine control systems. Cuts to the metallic layer, depending on their size and location, could create the potential for HIRF exposure or lightning attachment to induce spurious signals onto the underlying airplane wiring, including wiring associated with the engine control systems. Such spurious signals could cause a loss of engine thrust control. This loss of thrust control could simultaneously affect both engines in two different ways. The wiring for both engines could be independently exposed to the electromagnetic effects from the same HIRF or lightning event, or the signals induced on one engine’s control system could be induced onto the other engine’s wiring via common avionics system connections. This condition, if not addressed, could result in a forced off-airport landing or excessive flightcrew workload due to loss of thrust control on both engines. Related Service Information Under 1 CFR Part 51 The FAA reviewed Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 737–54– 1056, dated December 11, 2019. This service information describes procedures for a detailed inspection of the thumbnail fairing panels and mid strut fairing panels for excessive rework of the metallic (aluminum foil) inner surface layer (resulting in foil cuts), replacement of any excessively reworked panels, and modification of the thumbnail fairing assembly to ensure adequate bonding. Modification actions include doing a form-in-place gasket of the thumbnail land assemblies; preparing the mating surfaces between PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 11001 the thumbnail fairing panel and the left and right thumbnail land assemblies; and doing a bond check of the thumbnail fairing panel and the thumbnail land assemblies on the left and right side of the thumbnail fairing panel on both engines. This service information is reasonably available because the interested parties have access to it through their normal course of business or by the means identified in the ADDRESSES section. FAA’s Determination The FAA is proposing this AD because the agency evaluated all the relevant information and determined the unsafe condition described previously is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design. Proposed AD Requirements This proposed AD would require accomplishing the actions specified in the service information described previously, except as discussed under ‘‘Differences Between this Proposed AD and the Service Information.’’ For information on the procedures, see this service information at https:// www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA–2020– 0091. Differences Between This Proposed AD and the Service Information Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 737–54–1056, dated December 11, 2019, specifies a compliance time of 6 months to do the actions. However, for this proposed AD, the actions must be done before further flight. The proposed compliance time is based on the potential for a common-cause failure of both engines. The FAA has determined this compliance time is appropriate to address the identified unsafe condition. Additionally, the effectivity of Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 737– 54–1056, dated December 11, 2019, lists certain line numbers of Model 737–8 and 737–9 airplanes. However, the FAA is not certain that the service bulletin lists all airplanes affected by the unsafe condition identified in this proposed AD. Thus, the applicability of this proposed AD is expanded to include all line numbers for Model 737–8 and 737– 9 airplanes that may be affected by the identified unsafe condition. This will ensure that all potentially affected airplanes are subject to the proposed AD. Costs of Compliance The FAA estimates that this proposed AD affects 128 airplanes of U.S. registry. E:\FR\FM\26FEP1.SGM 26FEP1 11002 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 38 / Wednesday, February 26, 2020 / Proposed Rules The FAA estimates the following costs to comply with this proposed AD: ESTIMATED COSTS Action Labor cost Parts cost Cost per product Cost on U.S. operators Inspection ................................ 5 work-hours × $85 per hour = $425 ..................................... $0 $425 $54,400 The FAA estimates the following costs to do any necessary modifications that would be required based on the results of the proposed inspection. The FAA has no way of determining the number of aircraft that might need these modifications: ON-CONDITION COSTS Action Labor cost Parts cost Modification ................................ Up to 7 work-hours × $85 per hour = Up to $595 ...................... (*) Cost per product Up to $595 *. * The FAA has received no definitive data that would enable the agency to provide parts cost estimates for the on-condition actions specified in this proposed AD. According to the manufacturer, all of the costs of this proposed AD will be covered under warranty, thereby reducing the cost impact on affected persons. The FAA does not control warranty coverage for affected persons. As a result, the FAA has included all known costs in the cost estimate. Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. The FAA is issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: ‘‘General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Regulatory Findings The FAA determined that this proposed AD would not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This proposed AD would not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:50 Feb 25, 2020 Jkt 250001 For the reasons discussed above, I certify this proposed regulation: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866, (2) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. The Proposed Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA proposes to amend 14 CFR part 39 as follows: PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. The FAA amends § 39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness directive (AD): ■ The Boeing Company: Docket No. FAA– 2020–0091; Product Identifier 2020– NM–012–AD. (a) Comments Due Date The FAA must receive comments by March 27, 2020. (b) Affected ADs None. (c) Applicability This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model 737–8 and 737–9 airplanes included PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 in line numbers 5602 through 7901, certificated in any category. (d) Subject Air Transport Association (ATA) of America Code 54, Nacelles/pylons. (e) Unsafe Condition This AD was prompted by a report that certain exterior fairing panels on the top of the engine nacelle and strut (the thumbnail fairing and mid strut fairing panels) may not have the quality of electrical bonding necessary to ensure adequate shielding of the underlying wiring from the electromagnetic effects of lightning strikes or high intensity radiated fields (HIRF), which could potentially lead to a dual engine power loss event from a critical lightning or HIRF exposure event. The FAA is issuing this AD to address this condition, which could result in a forced off-airport landing or excessive flightcrew workload due to loss of thrust control on both engines. (f) Compliance Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, unless already done. (g) Detailed Inspection and Modification Before further flight, do a detailed inspection of the thumbnail fairing panels and mid strut fairing panels for excessive rework of the metallic (aluminum foil) inner surface layer, and, before further flight, do the modification as applicable in accordance with Steps 4., 6. through 9., inclusive, 11., and 12. of the Accomplishment Instructions of Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 737–54–1056, dated December 11, 2019. (h) Special Flight Permit Special flight permits, as described in 14 CFR 21.197 and 21.199, may be issued to operate the airplane to a location where the requirements of this AD can be accomplished, but concurrence by the Manager, Seattle ACO Branch, FAA, is required before issuance of the special flight permit. Requests for a special flight permit E:\FR\FM\26FEP1.SGM 26FEP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 38 / Wednesday, February 26, 2020 / Proposed Rules must be submitted to the FAA with a description of the electromagnetic field radiation sources (type, location, frequency, and power level) along the planned route. Send requests for a special flight permit to the person identified in paragraph (j)(1) of this AD. (i) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (j) Related Information khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with PROPOSALS (1) For more information about this AD, contact Christopher Baker, Aerospace Engineer, Propulsion Section, FAA, Seattle ACO Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA 98198; phone and fax: 206–231– 3552; email: christopher.r.baker@faa.gov. (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Contractual & Data Services (C&DS), 2600 Westminster Blvd., MC 110–SK57, Seal Beach, CA 90740–5600; telephone 562–797–1717; internet https:// www.myboeingfleet.com. You may view this service information at the FAA, Transport Standards Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 206–231–3195. [FR Doc. 2020–03864 Filed 2–25–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2020–0171; Product Identifier 2018–SW–028–AD] RIN 2120–AA64 (1) The Manager, Seattle ACO Branch, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the manager of the certification office, send it to the attention of the person identified in paragraph (j)(1) of this AD. Information may be emailed to: 9ANM-Seattle-ACO-AMOC-Requests@faa.gov. (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office/ certificate holding district office. (3) An AMOC that provides an acceptable level of safety may be used for any repair, modification, or alteration required by this AD if it is approved by The Boeing Company Organization Designation Authorization (ODA) that has been authorized by the Manager, Seattle ACO Branch, FAA, to make those findings. To be approved, the repair method, modification deviation, or alteration deviation must meet the certification basis of the airplane, and the approval must specifically refer to this AD. Issued on February 19, 2020. Gaetano A. Sciortino, Deputy Director for Strategic Initiatives, Compliance & Airworthiness Division, Aircraft Certification Service. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Airworthiness Directives; Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. Helicopters Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). AGENCY: The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. (Bell) Model 214ST helicopters. This proposed AD was prompted by the discovery of bolts with nonconforming external thread root radii. This proposed AD would require removing the affected bolts from service and would prohibit installing an affected bolt on any helicopter. The FAA is proposing this AD to address the unsafe condition on these products. DATES: The FAA must receive comments on this proposed AD by April 13, 2020. ADDRESSES: You may send comments, using the procedures found in 14 CFR 11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. • Fax: 202–493–2251. • Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M– 30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590. • Hand Delivery: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M– 30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this NPRM, contact Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., P.O. Box 482, Fort Worth, TX 76101; telephone 817–280–3391; fax 817–280–6466; or at https:// www.bellcustomer.com. You may view the referenced service information at the FAA, Office of the Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Room 6N–321, Fort Worth, TX 76177. SUMMARY: Examining the AD Docket You may examine the AD docket on the internet at https:// www.regulations.gov by searching for VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:50 Feb 25, 2020 Jkt 250001 PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 11003 and locating Docket No. FAA–2020– 0171; or in person at Docket Operations between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. The AD docket contains this NPRM, any comments received, and other information. The street address for Docket Operations is listed above. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after receipt. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Haytham Alaidy, Aviation Safety Engineer, DSCO Branch, Compliance and Airworthiness Division, FAA, 10101 Hillwood Pkwy., Fort Worth, TX 76177; phone: 817–222–5224; fax: 817– 222–4960; email haytham.alaidy@ faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Comments Invited The FAA invites you to send any written relevant data, views, or arguments about this proposal. Send your comments to an address listed under the ADDRESSES section. Include ‘‘FAA–2020–0171; Product Identifier 2018–SW–028–AD’’ at the beginning of your comments. The FAA specifically invites comments on the overall regulatory, economic, environmental, and energy aspects of this NPRM. The FAA will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend this NPRM because of those comments. The FAA will post all comments received, without change, to https:// www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you provide. The FAA will also post a report summarizing each substantive verbal contact received about this NPRM. Discussion The FAA proposes to adopt a new AD for Bell Model 214ST helicopters with certain serial-numbered spindle to yoke bolts (bolts) part number (P/N) 214– 010–262–103 installed. Bell indicates that a former bolt supplier manufactured a number of P/N 214– 010–262–103 bolts with nonconforming external thread root radii. This proposed AD would apply to Model 214ST helicopters with a non-conforming bolt installed and would require removing each bolt from service. The proposed AD would also prohibit installing a nonconforming bolt on any helicopter. The proposed actions are intended to prevent the spindle separating from the yoke and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. Related Service Information The FAA reviewed Bell Helicopter Textron Alert Service Bulletin 214ST– E:\FR\FM\26FEP1.SGM 26FEP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 38 (Wednesday, February 26, 2020)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 11000-11003]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-03864]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2020-0091; Product Identifier 2020-NM-012-AD]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) 
for certain The Boeing Company Model 737-8 and 737-9 airplanes. This 
proposed AD was prompted by a report that certain exterior fairing 
panels on the top of the engine nacelle and strut (the thumbnail 
fairing and mid strut fairing panels) may not have the quality of 
electrical bonding necessary to ensure adequate shielding of the 
underlying wiring from the electromagnetic effects of lightning strikes 
or high intensity radiated fields (HIRF), which could potentially lead 
to a dual engine power loss event from a critical lightning or HIRF 
exposure event. This proposed AD would require a detailed inspection of 
the thumbnail fairing panels and mid strut fairing panels for excessive 
rework of the metallic (aluminum foil) inner surface layer, replacement 
of any excessively reworked panels, and modification of the thumbnail 
fairing assembly to ensure adequate bonding. The FAA is proposing this 
AD to address the unsafe condition on these products.

DATES: The FAA must receive comments on this proposed AD by March 27, 
2020.

ADDRESSES: You may send comments, using the procedures found in 14 CFR 
11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
     Fax: 202-493-2251.
     Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket 
Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New 
Jersey Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20590.
     Hand Delivery: Deliver to Mail address above between 9 
a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.
    For service information identified in this NPRM, contact Boeing 
Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Contractual & Data Services (C&DS), 
2600 Westminster Blvd., MC 110-SK57, Seal Beach, CA 90740-5600; 
telephone 562-797-1717; internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You may 
view this service information at the FAA, Transport Standards Branch, 
2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA. For information on the 
availability of this material at the FAA, call 206-231-3195. It is also 
available on the internet at https://www.regulations.gov by searching 
for and locating Docket No. FAA-2020-0091.

Examining the AD Docket

    You may examine the AD docket on the internet at https://www.regulations.gov by searching for and locating Docket No. FAA-2020-
0091; or in person at Docket Operations

[[Page 11001]]

between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal 
holidays. The AD docket contains this NPRM, the regulatory evaluation, 
any comments received, and other information. The street address for 
Docket Operations is listed above. Comments will be available in the AD 
docket shortly after receipt.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christopher Baker, Aerospace Engineer, 
Propulsion Section, FAA, Seattle ACO Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des 
Moines, WA 98198; phone and fax: 206-231-3552; email: 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Comments Invited

    The FAA invites you to send any written relevant data, views, or 
arguments about this proposal. Send your comments to an address listed 
under the ADDRESSES section. Include ``Docket No. FAA-2020-0091; 
Product Identifier 2020-NM-012-AD'' at the beginning of your comments. 
The FAA specifically invites comments on the overall regulatory, 
economic, environmental, and energy aspects of this NPRM. The FAA will 
consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend this 
NPRM because of those comments.
    Except for Confidential Business Information (CBI) as described in 
the following paragraph, and other information as described in 14 CFR 
11.35, the FAA will post all comments received, without change, to 
https://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you 
provide. The FAA will also post a report summarizing each substantive 
verbal contact received about this NPRM.

Confidential Business Information

    CBI is commercial or financial information that is both customarily 
and actually treated as private by its owner. Under the Freedom of 
Information Act (FOIA) (5 U.S.C. 552), CBI is exempt from public 
disclosure. If your comments responsive to this NPRM contain commercial 
or financial information that is customarily treated as private, that 
you actually treat as private, and that is relevant or responsive to 
this NPRM, it is important that you clearly designate the submitted 
comments as CBI. Please mark each page of your submission containing 
CBI as ``PROPIN.'' The FAA will treat such marked submissions as 
confidential under the FOIA, and they will not be placed in the public 
docket of this NPRM. Submissions containing CBI should be sent to 
Christopher Baker, Aerospace Engineer, Propulsion Section, FAA, Seattle 
ACO Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA 98198; phone and fax: 
206-231-3552; email: [email protected]. Any commentary that 
the FAA receives which is not specifically designated as CBI will be 
placed in the public docket for this rulemaking.

Discussion

    The FAA has received a report from Boeing indicating that exterior 
fairing panels on the top of the engine nacelle and strut (the 
thumbnail fairing and mid strut fairing panels) may not have the 
quality of electrical bonding necessary to ensure adequate shielding of 
the underlying wiring from the electromagnetic effects of lightning 
strikes or HIRF. Excessive rework of the surface of the metallic 
(aluminum foil) inner layer of those panels can result in cuts to that 
layer. This metallic layer functions as part of the shielding for 
aircraft wiring, including wiring associated with the engine control 
systems. Cuts to the metallic layer, depending on their size and 
location, could create the potential for HIRF exposure or lightning 
attachment to induce spurious signals onto the underlying airplane 
wiring, including wiring associated with the engine control systems. 
Such spurious signals could cause a loss of engine thrust control. This 
loss of thrust control could simultaneously affect both engines in two 
different ways. The wiring for both engines could be independently 
exposed to the electromagnetic effects from the same HIRF or lightning 
event, or the signals induced on one engine's control system could be 
induced onto the other engine's wiring via common avionics system 
connections. This condition, if not addressed, could result in a forced 
off-airport landing or excessive flightcrew workload due to loss of 
thrust control on both engines.

Related Service Information Under 1 CFR Part 51

    The FAA reviewed Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 737-54-
1056, dated December 11, 2019. This service information describes 
procedures for a detailed inspection of the thumbnail fairing panels 
and mid strut fairing panels for excessive rework of the metallic 
(aluminum foil) inner surface layer (resulting in foil cuts), 
replacement of any excessively reworked panels, and modification of the 
thumbnail fairing assembly to ensure adequate bonding. Modification 
actions include doing a form-in-place gasket of the thumbnail land 
assemblies; preparing the mating surfaces between the thumbnail fairing 
panel and the left and right thumbnail land assemblies; and doing a 
bond check of the thumbnail fairing panel and the thumbnail land 
assemblies on the left and right side of the thumbnail fairing panel on 
both engines.
    This service information is reasonably available because the 
interested parties have access to it through their normal course of 
business or by the means identified in the ADDRESSES section.

FAA's Determination

    The FAA is proposing this AD because the agency evaluated all the 
relevant information and determined the unsafe condition described 
previously is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same 
type design.

Proposed AD Requirements

    This proposed AD would require accomplishing the actions specified 
in the service information described previously, except as discussed 
under ``Differences Between this Proposed AD and the Service 
Information.'' For information on the procedures, see this service 
information at https://www.regulations.gov by searching for and 
locating Docket No. FAA-2020-0091.

Differences Between This Proposed AD and the Service Information

    Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 737-54-1056, dated 
December 11, 2019, specifies a compliance time of 6 months to do the 
actions. However, for this proposed AD, the actions must be done before 
further flight. The proposed compliance time is based on the potential 
for a common-cause failure of both engines. The FAA has determined this 
compliance time is appropriate to address the identified unsafe 
condition.
    Additionally, the effectivity of Boeing Special Attention Service 
Bulletin 737-54-1056, dated December 11, 2019, lists certain line 
numbers of Model 737-8 and 737-9 airplanes. However, the FAA is not 
certain that the service bulletin lists all airplanes affected by the 
unsafe condition identified in this proposed AD. Thus, the 
applicability of this proposed AD is expanded to include all line 
numbers for Model 737-8 and 737-9 airplanes that may be affected by the 
identified unsafe condition. This will ensure that all potentially 
affected airplanes are subject to the proposed AD.

Costs of Compliance

    The FAA estimates that this proposed AD affects 128 airplanes of 
U.S. registry.

[[Page 11002]]

The FAA estimates the following costs to comply with this proposed AD:

                                                 Estimated Costs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                    Cost per       Cost on U.S.
              Action                        Labor cost            Parts cost        product         operators
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inspection........................  5 work-hours x $85 per                 $0             $425          $54,400
                                     hour = $425.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The FAA estimates the following costs to do any necessary 
modifications that would be required based on the results of the 
proposed inspection. The FAA has no way of determining the number of 
aircraft that might need these modifications:

                                               On-Condition Costs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Action                             Labor cost            Parts cost       Cost per product
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Modification...........................  Up to 7 work-hours x $85 per           (*)   Up to $595 *.
                                          hour = Up to $595.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* The FAA has received no definitive data that would enable the agency to provide parts cost estimates for the
  on-condition actions specified in this proposed AD.

    According to the manufacturer, all of the costs of this proposed AD 
will be covered under warranty, thereby reducing the cost impact on 
affected persons. The FAA does not control warranty coverage for 
affected persons. As a result, the FAA has included all known costs in 
the cost estimate.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    The FAA is issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: ``General 
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with 
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing 
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator 
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within 
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition 
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this 
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

    The FAA determined that this proposed AD would not have federalism 
implications under Executive Order 13132. This proposed AD would not 
have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship 
between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution 
of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify this proposed 
regulation:
    (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive 
Order 12866,
    (2) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and
    (3) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

The Proposed Amendment

    Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the 
Administrator, the FAA proposes to amend 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13   [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness 
directive (AD):

The Boeing Company: Docket No. FAA-2020-0091; Product Identifier 
2020-NM-012-AD.

(a) Comments Due Date

    The FAA must receive comments by March 27, 2020.

(b) Affected ADs

    None.

(c) Applicability

    This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model 737-8 and 737-9 
airplanes included in line numbers 5602 through 7901, certificated 
in any category.

(d) Subject

    Air Transport Association (ATA) of America Code 54, Nacelles/
pylons.

(e) Unsafe Condition

    This AD was prompted by a report that certain exterior fairing 
panels on the top of the engine nacelle and strut (the thumbnail 
fairing and mid strut fairing panels) may not have the quality of 
electrical bonding necessary to ensure adequate shielding of the 
underlying wiring from the electromagnetic effects of lightning 
strikes or high intensity radiated fields (HIRF), which could 
potentially lead to a dual engine power loss event from a critical 
lightning or HIRF exposure event. The FAA is issuing this AD to 
address this condition, which could result in a forced off-airport 
landing or excessive flightcrew workload due to loss of thrust 
control on both engines.

(f) Compliance

    Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified, 
unless already done.

(g) Detailed Inspection and Modification

    Before further flight, do a detailed inspection of the thumbnail 
fairing panels and mid strut fairing panels for excessive rework of 
the metallic (aluminum foil) inner surface layer, and, before 
further flight, do the modification as applicable in accordance with 
Steps 4., 6. through 9., inclusive, 11., and 12. of the 
Accomplishment Instructions of Boeing Special Attention Service 
Bulletin 737-54-1056, dated December 11, 2019.

(h) Special Flight Permit

    Special flight permits, as described in 14 CFR 21.197 and 
21.199, may be issued to operate the airplane to a location where 
the requirements of this AD can be accomplished, but concurrence by 
the Manager, Seattle ACO Branch, FAA, is required before issuance of 
the special flight permit. Requests for a special flight permit

[[Page 11003]]

must be submitted to the FAA with a description of the 
electromagnetic field radiation sources (type, location, frequency, 
and power level) along the planned route. Send requests for a 
special flight permit to the person identified in paragraph (j)(1) 
of this AD.

(i) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

    (1) The Manager, Seattle ACO Branch, FAA, has the authority to 
approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found 
in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request 
to your principal inspector or local Flight Standards District 
Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the 
manager of the certification office, send it to the attention of the 
person identified in paragraph (j)(1) of this AD. Information may be 
emailed to: [email protected].
    (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate 
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager 
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding 
district office.
    (3) An AMOC that provides an acceptable level of safety may be 
used for any repair, modification, or alteration required by this AD 
if it is approved by The Boeing Company Organization Designation 
Authorization (ODA) that has been authorized by the Manager, Seattle 
ACO Branch, FAA, to make those findings. To be approved, the repair 
method, modification deviation, or alteration deviation must meet 
the certification basis of the airplane, and the approval must 
specifically refer to this AD.

(j) Related Information

    (1) For more information about this AD, contact Christopher 
Baker, Aerospace Engineer, Propulsion Section, FAA, Seattle ACO 
Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, WA 98198; phone and fax: 
206-231-3552; email: [email protected].
    (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact 
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Contractual & Data Services 
(C&DS), 2600 Westminster Blvd., MC 110-SK57, Seal Beach, CA 90740-
5600; telephone 562-797-1717; internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You may view this service information at the 
FAA, Transport Standards Branch, 2200 South 216th St., Des Moines, 
WA. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, 
call 206-231-3195.

    Issued on February 19, 2020.
Gaetano A. Sciortino,
Deputy Director for Strategic Initiatives, Compliance & Airworthiness 
Division, Aircraft Certification Service.
[FR Doc. 2020-03864 Filed 2-25-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P