Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising, 10104-10107 [2020-03447]

Download as PDF 10104 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 35 / Friday, February 21, 2020 / Proposed Rules Regulatory Notices and Analyses The FAA has determined that this regulation only involves an established body of technical regulations for which frequent and routine amendments are necessary to keep them operationally current, is non-controversial and unlikely to result in adverse or negative comments. It, therefore: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation as the anticipated impact is so minimal. Since this is a routine matter that will only affect air traffic procedures and air navigation, it is certified that this rule, when promulgated, would not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. Environmental Review This proposal will be subject to an environmental analysis in accordance with FAA Order 1050.1F, ‘‘Environmental Impacts: Policies and Procedures’’ prior to any FAA final regulatory action. 1. The authority citation for 14 CFR part 71 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(f), 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959–1963 Comp., p. 389. [Amended] khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Paragraph 6005 Class E Airspace Areas Extending Upward From 700 Feet or More Above the Surface of the Earth. * * * * * AGL WI E5 Siren, WI [Amended] Burnett County Airport, WI VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:42 Feb 20, 2020 Jkt 250001 BILLING CODE 4910–13–P FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION Federal Trade Commission. Regulatory review; request for public comment. AGENCY: PART 71—DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1 of FAA Order 7400.11D, Airspace Designations and Reporting Points, dated August 8, 2019, and effective September 15, 2019, is amended as follows: [FR Doc. 2020–03299 Filed 2–20–20; 8:45 am] Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising The Proposed Amendment Accordingly, pursuant to the authority delegated to me, the Federal Aviation Administration proposes to amend 14 CFR part 71 as follows: ■ Issued in Fort Worth, Texas, on February 10, 2020. Steve Szukala, Acting Manager, Operations Support Group, ATO Central Service Center. 16 CFR Part 255 List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71 Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air). § 71.1 (Lat. 45°49′24″ N, long. 92°22′25″ W) That airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface within a 6.5-mile radius of the Burnett County Airport, and within 2 miles each side of the 045° bearing from the airport extending from the 6.5-mile radius to 9.5 miles northeast of the airport, and within 2 miles each side of the 137° bearing from the airport extending from the 6.5-mile radius to 9.9 miles southeast of the airport, and within 2 miles each side of the 225° bearing from the airport extending from the 6.5-mile radius to 9.5 miles southwest of the airport, and within 2 miles each side of the 317° bearing from the airport extending from the 6.5-mile radius to 9.5 miles northwest of the airport. ACTION: The Federal Trade Commission (‘‘FTC’’ or ‘‘Commission’’) requests public comments on its Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising (‘‘Endorsement Guides’’ or ‘‘Guides’’). The Commission is soliciting the comments as part of its systematic review of all current Commission regulations and guides. DATES: Written comments must be received on or before April 21, 2020. ADDRESSES: Interested parties may file a comment online or on paper by following the instructions in the Request for Comment part of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ‘‘Endorsement Guides, P204500’’ on your comment, and file your comment online through https:// www.regulations.gov. If you prefer to file your comment on paper, mail your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite CC–5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW, 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 20024. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael Ostheimer (202–326–2699), mostheimer@ftc.gov, Division of Advertising Practices, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20580. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In December 1972, the Commission published for public comment proposed Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising, 37 FR 25548 (1972). Interested parties submitted extensive comments. On May 21, 1975, the Commission promulgated, under the Federal Trade Commission Act (‘‘FTC Act’’), 15 U.S.C. 41–58, three sections of the 1972 proposal as final guidelines (16 CFR 255.0, 255.3 and 255.4) and republished three others, in modified form, for additional public comment. 40 FR 22127 (1975). The Commission received public comment on the three re-proposed guidelines, as well as on one of the final guidelines. On January 18, 1980, the Commission promulgated three new sections as final guidelines (16 CFR 255.1, 255.2 and 255.5) and modified one example to one of the final guidelines adopted in May 1975 (16 CFR 255.0 Example 4). 45 FR 3870 (1980). As part of its periodic regulatory review, the Commission sought public comment on the Endorsement Guides in January 2007. 72 FR 2214 (2007). In November 2008, the Commission discussed the comments it received in 2007, proposed certain revisions to the Guides, and requested comment on those proposed revisions. 73 FR 72374 (2008). In October 2009, the Commission substantively amended the Guides. 74 FR 53124 (2009). The Guides are designed to assist businesses and others in conforming their endorsement and testimonial advertising practices to the requirements of Section 5 of the FTC Act. The Guides interpret laws the Commission administers, and thus are advisory in nature. The Commission, however, can take action under the FTC Act if an endorsement or testimonial is inconsistent with the Guides. In any such enforcement action, the Commission must prove that the challenged act or practice is unfair or deceptive in violation of Section 5 of the FTC Act. The Guides define both endorsements and testimonials broadly to mean any advertising message that consumers are likely to believe reflects the opinions, beliefs, findings, or experience of a party other than the E:\FR\FM\21FEP1.SGM 21FEP1 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 35 / Friday, February 21, 2020 / Proposed Rules sponsoring advertiser. 16 CFR 255.0(a) and (b). The Guides state that endorsements must reflect the honest opinions, findings, beliefs, or experience of the endorser. 16 CFR 255.1(a). Furthermore, endorsements may not contain any representations that would be deceptive, or could not be substantiated, if made directly by the advertiser. Id. The Guides advise that an advertisement employing a consumer endorsement on a central or key attribute of a product will be interpreted as representing that the endorser’s experience is representative of what consumers will generally achieve. 16 CFR 255.2(a). If an advertiser does not have adequate substantiation that the endorser’s experience is representative, the advertisement should contain a clear and conspicuous disclosure. Id. The Guides define an expert endorser as someone who, as a result of experience, study or training, possesses knowledge of a particular subject that is superior to that generally acquired by ordinary individuals. 16 CFR 255.0(d). An expert endorser’s qualifications must, in fact, give him or her the expertise that he or she is represented as possessing with respect to the endorsement. 16 CFR 255.3(a). Moreover, an expert endorsement must be supported by an actual exercise of expertise, and the expert’s evaluation of the product must have been at least as extensive as someone with the same degree of expertise would normally need to conduct in order to support the conclusions presented. 16 CFR 255.3(b). Among other things, the Guides also state that: (1) Advertisements presenting endorsements by what are represented to be actual consumers should utilize actual consumers, or clearly and conspicuously disclose that the persons are not actual consumers, 16 CFR 255.2(c); (2) an organization’s endorsement must be reached by a process sufficient to ensure that the endorsement fairly reflects the collective judgment of the organization, 16 CFR 255.4; and (3) when there is a connection between the endorser and the seller of the advertised product that might materially affect the weight or credibility of the endorsement (i.e., the connection is not reasonably expected by the audience), such connection must be fully disclosed, 16 CFR 255.5. II. Regulatory Review Program The Commission periodically reviews all Commission rules and guides. These reviews seek information about the costs and benefits of the Commission’s rules and guides and their economic impact. The information obtained assists the VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:42 Feb 20, 2020 Jkt 250001 Commission in identifying rules and guides that warrant modification or rescission. Therefore, the Commission solicits comment on, among other things, the economic impact of and the continuing need for its Endorsement Guides; possible conflict between the Guides and state, local, federal, or international laws; and the effect of any technological, economic, environmental, or other industry changes on the Guides. III. Request for Comment The Commission is particularly interested in comments and supporting data on the following questions. These questions are designed to assist the public and should not be construed as a limitation on the issues on which public comment may be submitted. In their replies to each of these questions, commenters should provide any available evidence and data, such as empirical data, consumer perception studies, or consumer complaints, that support the commenter’s asserted position. (1) Is there a continuing need for the Endorsement Guides as currently promulgated? (2) Are any specific provisions of the Guides no longer necessary, and, if so, which provisions and why are they no longer necessary? (3) Are the deceptive or unfair practices addressed by the Guides prevalent in the marketplace? Are the Guides effective in addressing those practices? Are there deceptive or unfair practices involving endorsements that are not covered by the Guides? Are there alternatives, such as individual enforcement actions under the FTC Act, which would be more effective or equally effective in addressing those practices? Do the Endorsement Guides describe any practices that are not deceptive or unfair, and if so, which practices and why are they not deceptive or unfair? (4) What is the degree of compliance with the Endorsement Guides? What effect, if any, does this have on the continuing need for the Guides? Do covered businesses and others following the Guides’ suggestions self-regulate or have voluntary standards or guidance, such as through trade associations, that overlap with the Guides? If so, to what extent, if any, do the Guides support industry self-regulation or voluntary standards? (5) What benefits, if any, have the Endorsement Guides provided to consumers? Do the Guides impose any significant costs on consumers? PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 10105 (6) What impact, if any, have the Guides had on the flow of truthful or deceptive information to consumers? (7) What changes, if any, should be made to the Endorsement Guides to increase their benefits to consumers? How would these changes affect consumer benefits or business costs? (8) What burdens or costs, including costs of compliance, have the Guides imposed on businesses? What burdens or costs have the Guides imposed on small businesses in particular? What burdens or costs have the Guides imposed on endorsers? What benefits have the Guides provided to businesses? What benefits have the Guides provided to endorsers? (9) What changes, if any, should be made to the Guides to reduce the burdens or costs imposed on businesses or endorsers? How would these changes affect the benefits provided by the Guides to consumers, businesses, and endorsers? (10) Do the Guides overlap or conflict with federal, state, or local laws or regulations? Do the Guides overlap or conflict with any international laws or regulations? (11) Have consumer perceptions regarding endorsements changed since the Guides were last revised and, if so, do these changes warrant revising the Guides? (12) What modifications to the Guides, if any, should be made to address technological, economic, or environmental changes that have occurred since the Guides were last revised? (13) FTC staff periodically updates a business guidance document, ‘‘The FTC’s Endorsement Guides: What People Are Asking.’’ Is there guidance in the current version of that document that should be incorporated into the Guides? If so, what and why? Is there guidance in the current version of that document that should not be incorporated into the Guides? If so, what and why? (14) How well are advertisers and endorsers disclosing unexpected material connections on social media platforms? Does this depend on the type of material connection? What disclosures of material connections are sufficiently clear (i.e., understandable) to consumers when used in social media? What disclosures of material connection currently being used in social media are likely not understood by consumers? Does the sufficiency or insufficiency vary by platform, type of material connection (e.g., a paid post versus a free product), or other factors, and, if so, how? To the extent that these connections are not being adequately E:\FR\FM\21FEP1.SGM 21FEP1 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with PROPOSALS 10106 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 35 / Friday, February 21, 2020 / Proposed Rules disclosed, do the problems tend to be in the substance of the disclosures or in their conspicuousness (e.g., placement, visibility, or audibility)? Should the Guides provide more detail on what disclosures of material connections are sufficiently clear or unclear in different social media formats? Does the fact that Commission Guides are generally reviewed every ten years affect your answer as to whether providing more detail would be helpful? (15) The FTC has received complaints that young children may not adequately understand disclosures of material connections. To what extent would knowledge of a material connection affect the weight or credibility that young children give to an endorsement? At what age are children capable of making a connection between credibility and a material connection? Does this age differ from the age at which children are capable of identifying advertising? Why or why not and, if so, how? To what extent do young children understand disclosures of material connections? What should advertisers and endorsers appealing to young children know about their intended audience’s understanding of a particular endorsement, advertising format, or disclosure? How can disclosures of material connections in media consumed by young children be made clearer or more effective? How, if at all, are your answers to the above questions impacted by parental involvement in the media consumption of young children? What disclosures of material connections should advertisers and endorsers appealing to young children provide to parents? (16) Some marketers give incentives (e.g., free or discounted products) to consumers in exchange for posting reviews of their products or services without specifically requiring that the reviews be favorable. Do such incentives skew or bias the resulting reviews? Why or why not? If so, how and to what extent do incentives skew or bias the resulting reviews, and what factors may make such impacts more or less likely? Should such incentives be disclosed? Why or why not and if so, how? Does the nature or value of the incentive matter? If so, how? Do such incentives skew composite ratings? Why or why not and if so, how? Do such incentives impact the order in which products or services are presented to consumers on retail or other review platforms? Why or why not and if so, how? (17) Some consumer reviewers who receive incentives in exchange for their reviews disclose their material connections in their reviews. Are such disclosures adequate when incentivized VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:42 Feb 20, 2020 Jkt 250001 reviews are included in composite ratings? Why or why not? Are composite ratings that are based in whole or in part on such incentivized reviews misleading? If such composite ratings are misleading: (1) Are there disclosures that could adequately address this concern and if so, what disclosures; and (2) how should the Guides address composite ratings if disclosures are not sufficient or there is not an opportunity for the marketer to make adequate disclosures (e.g., when the reviews and composite ratings appear on a third party’s website)? (18) Some marketers actively solicit customer feedback and send satisfied customers down one path to relevant review sites and send customers with negative sentiment down another path, sometimes into some sort of customer service resolution process. What are the costs and benefits of this practice? Should it be addressed in the Guides and, if so, how? (19) Some advertisers contend that consumers who use social media understand that influencers who promote products are generally doing so only because they are paid or given something by the marketer, regardless of what or whether disclosures appear in social media posts. What evidence is there to support or contradict this assertion and does the answer differ depending on the nature of the material connection? In particular cases, what factors might be considered to determine whether a material connection is unexpected? Do consumer expectations vary by the age of the audience, the product category, the nature of the influencer, the format or substance of the endorsement, or otherwise, and if so, how? (20) Some endorsers (including the authors of some product reviews) include affiliate links that can be used to purchase the products they are endorsing. Should the Guides address such links, and if so, how? To what extent do consumers expect that these endorsers are compensated for purchases through those links? If so, what compensation arrangements do consumers ordinarily expect? To what extent would knowing of such compensation affect the weight or credibility given to those endorsements? Is there a distinction in terms of either consumer expectations or the weight ascribed to an endorsement between affiliate links to a product’s marketer and affiliate links to one or more retailers? If so, how, why, and how should that be addressed? (21) What disclosures, if any, do advertisers or the operators of review websites or review platforms need to PO 00000 Frm 00011 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 make about the creation, collection, processing, or publication of reviews or ratings in order to prevent those reviews or ratings from being deceptive or unfair? (22) What other fact patterns or scenarios should be addressed by the Guides and why? You can file a comment online or on paper. For the Commission to consider your comment, we must receive it on or before April 21, 2020. Write ‘‘Endorsement Guides, P204500’’ on your comment. Your comment— including your name and your state— will be placed on the public record of this proceeding, including, to the extent practicable, on the https:// www.regulations.gov website. Postal mail addressed to the Commission is subject to delay due to heightened security screening. As a result, we encourage you to submit your comments online. To make sure that the Commission considers your online comment, you must file it through https://www.regulations.gov, by following the instruction on the webbased form. If you file your comment on paper, write ‘‘Endorsement Guides, P204500’’ on your comment and on the envelope, and mail or deliver it to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite CC– 5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 400 7th Street SW, 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 20024. If possible, please submit your paper comment to the Commission by courier or overnight service. Because your comment will be placed on the publicly accessible website https://www.regulations.gov, you are solely responsible for making sure that your comment does not include any sensitive personal information, such as your or anyone’s Social Security number; date of birth; driver’s license number or other state identification number or foreign country equivalent; passport number; financial account number; or credit or debit card number. You are also solely responsible for ensuring your comment does not include any sensitive health information, such as medical records or other individually identifiable health information. In addition, your comment should not include any ‘‘[t]rade secret or any commercial or financial information which . . . is privileged or confidential’’—as provided in Section 6(f) of the FTC Act, 15 U.S.C. 46(f), and E:\FR\FM\21FEP1.SGM 21FEP1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 35 / Friday, February 21, 2020 / Proposed Rules FTC Rule 4.10(a)(2), 16 CFR 4.10(a)(2)— including in particular competitively sensitive information such as costs, sales statistics, inventories, formulas, patterns, devices, manufacturing processes, or customer names. Comments containing material for which confidential treatment is requested must be filed in paper form, must be clearly labeled ‘‘Confidential,’’ and must comply with FTC Rule 4.9(c). In particular, the written request for confidential treatment that accompanies the comment must include the factual and legal basis for the request, and must identify the specific portions of the comment to be withheld from the public record. See FTC Rule 4.9(c). Your comment will be kept confidential only if the General Counsel grants your request in accordance with the law and the public interest. Once your comment has been posted publicly at www.regulations.gov—as legally required by FTC Rule 4.9(b)—we cannot redact or remove your comment, unless you submit a confidentiality request that meets the requirements for such treatment under FTC Rule 4.9(c), and the General Counsel grants that request. Visit the FTC website to read this request for comment and the news release describing it. The FTC Act and other laws that the Commission administers permit the collection of public comments to consider and use in this proceeding as appropriate. The Commission will consider all timely and responsive public comments that it receives on or before April 21, 2020. For information on the Commission’s privacy policy, including routine uses permitted by the Privacy Act, see https://www.ftc.gov/site-information/ privacy-policy. By direction of the Commission. April J. Tabor, Acting Secretary. [FR Doc. 2020–03447 Filed 2–20–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6750–01–P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 35 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with PROPOSALS [Docket No. AD20–6–000] Request for Technical Conference and Petition for Rulemaking: Energy Trading Institute Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of request for technical conference and petition for rulemaking. AGENCY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:42 Feb 20, 2020 Jkt 250001 The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has received a petition from the Energy Trading Institute requesting that the Commission hold a technical conference and conduct a rulemaking to update the requirements adopted in Order No. 741 and Commission’s regulations addressing credit and risk management in the markets operated by Independent System Operators and Regional Transmission Organizations. DATES: Comments are due March 12, 2020. SUMMARY: Comments, identified by docket number, may be filed in the following ways: • Electronic Filing through http:// www.ferc.gov. Documents created electronically using word processing software should be filed in native applications or print-to-PDF format and not in a scanned format. • Mail/Hand Delivery: Those unable to file electronically may mail or handdeliver comments to: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Secretary of the Commission, 888 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20426. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tina Ham (Legal Information), Office of the General Counsel, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20426, Telephone: (202) 502–8887, Tina.Ham@ferc.gov. Michael Hill (Policy Information), Office of Energy Policy and Innovation, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20426, Telephone: (202) 502–8703, Michael.Hill@ ferc.gov. James Burchill (Policy Information), Office of Energy Policy and Innovation, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20426, Telephone: (202) 502–6144, James.Burchill@ ferc.gov. Anne Marie Hirschberger (Legal Information), Office of the General Counsel, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20426, Telephone: (202) 502–8387, AnneMarie.Hirschberger@ferc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On December 16, 2019, the Energy Trading Institute filed in the above-captioned docket a petition requesting that the Commission hold a technical conference and conduct a rulemaking to update the requirements adopted in Order No. 741 1 ADDRESSES: 1 Credit Reforms in Organized Wholesale Electric Markets, Order No. 741, 133 FERC ¶ 61,060 (2010) (Order No. 741), order on reh’g, Order No. 741–A, PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 10107 and section 35.47 of the Commission’s regulations 2 addressing credit and risk management in the markets operated by Independent System Operators and Regional Transmission Organizations. Dated: February 11, 2020. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2020–03272 Filed 2–20–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717–01–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 130 [Docket No. FDA–1995–N–0062 (Formerly 1995N–0294)] RIN 0910–AC54 Food Standards; General Principles and Food Standards Modernization; Reopening of the Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Proposed rule; reopening of the comment period. ACTION: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is reopening the comment period for the proposed rule, published in the Federal Register of May 20, 2005, entitled ‘‘Food Standards; General Principles and Food Standards Modernization,’’ to establish a set of general principles for food standards for FDA to use when considering whether to establish, revise, or eliminate a food standard. The proposed rule was issued jointly with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and, while FDA will continue to engage with USDA regarding the proposed rule, we are reopening the comment period to receive new data, information, or further comments only on FDA-specific aspects of the proposed rule, including FDA’s 13 general principles. DATES: We are reopening the comment period on the proposed rule that published in the Federal Register of May 20, 2005 (70 FR 29214). Submit either electronic or written comments by April 21, 2020. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments as follows. Please note that late, untimely filed comments will not be considered. Electronic comments must be submitted on or before April 21, 2020. The https://www.regulations.gov SUMMARY: 134 FERC ¶ 61,126 (2011), reh’g denied, Order No. 741–B, 135 FERC ¶ 61,242 (2011). 2 18 CFR 35.47 (2019). E:\FR\FM\21FEP1.SGM 21FEP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 35 (Friday, February 21, 2020)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 10104-10107]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-03447]


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FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION

16 CFR Part 255


Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in 
Advertising

AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission.

ACTION: Regulatory review; request for public comment.

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SUMMARY: The Federal Trade Commission (``FTC'' or ``Commission'') 
requests public comments on its Guides Concerning the Use of 
Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising (``Endorsement Guides'' or 
``Guides''). The Commission is soliciting the comments as part of its 
systematic review of all current Commission regulations and guides.

DATES: Written comments must be received on or before April 21, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Interested parties may file a comment online or on paper by 
following the instructions in the Request for Comment part of the 
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ``Endorsement Guides, 
P204500'' on your comment, and file your comment online through https://www.regulations.gov. If you prefer to file your comment on paper, mail 
your comment to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office 
of the Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite CC-5610 (Annex B), 
Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: 
Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 
400 7th Street SW, 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 
20024.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  Michael Ostheimer (202-326-2699), 
[email protected], Division of Advertising Practices, Bureau of 
Consumer Protection, Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue 
NW, Washington, DC 20580.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Background

    In December 1972, the Commission published for public comment 
proposed Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in 
Advertising, 37 FR 25548 (1972). Interested parties submitted extensive 
comments. On May 21, 1975, the Commission promulgated, under the 
Federal Trade Commission Act (``FTC Act''), 15 U.S.C. 41-58, three 
sections of the 1972 proposal as final guidelines (16 CFR 255.0, 255.3 
and 255.4) and republished three others, in modified form, for 
additional public comment. 40 FR 22127 (1975). The Commission received 
public comment on the three re-proposed guidelines, as well as on one 
of the final guidelines. On January 18, 1980, the Commission 
promulgated three new sections as final guidelines (16 CFR 255.1, 255.2 
and 255.5) and modified one example to one of the final guidelines 
adopted in May 1975 (16 CFR 255.0 Example 4). 45 FR 3870 (1980).
    As part of its periodic regulatory review, the Commission sought 
public comment on the Endorsement Guides in January 2007. 72 FR 2214 
(2007). In November 2008, the Commission discussed the comments it 
received in 2007, proposed certain revisions to the Guides, and 
requested comment on those proposed revisions. 73 FR 72374 (2008). In 
October 2009, the Commission substantively amended the Guides. 74 FR 
53124 (2009).
    The Guides are designed to assist businesses and others in 
conforming their endorsement and testimonial advertising practices to 
the requirements of Section 5 of the FTC Act. The Guides interpret laws 
the Commission administers, and thus are advisory in nature. The 
Commission, however, can take action under the FTC Act if an 
endorsement or testimonial is inconsistent with the Guides. In any such 
enforcement action, the Commission must prove that the challenged act 
or practice is unfair or deceptive in violation of Section 5 of the FTC 
Act. The Guides define both endorsements and testimonials broadly to 
mean any advertising message that consumers are likely to believe 
reflects the opinions, beliefs, findings, or experience of a party 
other than the

[[Page 10105]]

sponsoring advertiser. 16 CFR 255.0(a) and (b).
    The Guides state that endorsements must reflect the honest 
opinions, findings, beliefs, or experience of the endorser. 16 CFR 
255.1(a). Furthermore, endorsements may not contain any representations 
that would be deceptive, or could not be substantiated, if made 
directly by the advertiser. Id.
    The Guides advise that an advertisement employing a consumer 
endorsement on a central or key attribute of a product will be 
interpreted as representing that the endorser's experience is 
representative of what consumers will generally achieve. 16 CFR 
255.2(a). If an advertiser does not have adequate substantiation that 
the endorser's experience is representative, the advertisement should 
contain a clear and conspicuous disclosure. Id.
    The Guides define an expert endorser as someone who, as a result of 
experience, study or training, possesses knowledge of a particular 
subject that is superior to that generally acquired by ordinary 
individuals. 16 CFR 255.0(d). An expert endorser's qualifications must, 
in fact, give him or her the expertise that he or she is represented as 
possessing with respect to the endorsement. 16 CFR 255.3(a). Moreover, 
an expert endorsement must be supported by an actual exercise of 
expertise, and the expert's evaluation of the product must have been at 
least as extensive as someone with the same degree of expertise would 
normally need to conduct in order to support the conclusions presented. 
16 CFR 255.3(b).
    Among other things, the Guides also state that: (1) Advertisements 
presenting endorsements by what are represented to be actual consumers 
should utilize actual consumers, or clearly and conspicuously disclose 
that the persons are not actual consumers, 16 CFR 255.2(c); (2) an 
organization's endorsement must be reached by a process sufficient to 
ensure that the endorsement fairly reflects the collective judgment of 
the organization, 16 CFR 255.4; and (3) when there is a connection 
between the endorser and the seller of the advertised product that 
might materially affect the weight or credibility of the endorsement 
(i.e., the connection is not reasonably expected by the audience), such 
connection must be fully disclosed, 16 CFR 255.5.

II. Regulatory Review Program

    The Commission periodically reviews all Commission rules and 
guides. These reviews seek information about the costs and benefits of 
the Commission's rules and guides and their economic impact. The 
information obtained assists the Commission in identifying rules and 
guides that warrant modification or rescission. Therefore, the 
Commission solicits comment on, among other things, the economic impact 
of and the continuing need for its Endorsement Guides; possible 
conflict between the Guides and state, local, federal, or international 
laws; and the effect of any technological, economic, environmental, or 
other industry changes on the Guides.

III. Request for Comment

    The Commission is particularly interested in comments and 
supporting data on the following questions. These questions are 
designed to assist the public and should not be construed as a 
limitation on the issues on which public comment may be submitted. In 
their replies to each of these questions, commenters should provide any 
available evidence and data, such as empirical data, consumer 
perception studies, or consumer complaints, that support the 
commenter's asserted position.
    (1) Is there a continuing need for the Endorsement Guides as 
currently promulgated?
    (2) Are any specific provisions of the Guides no longer necessary, 
and, if so, which provisions and why are they no longer necessary?
    (3) Are the deceptive or unfair practices addressed by the Guides 
prevalent in the marketplace? Are the Guides effective in addressing 
those practices? Are there deceptive or unfair practices involving 
endorsements that are not covered by the Guides? Are there 
alternatives, such as individual enforcement actions under the FTC Act, 
which would be more effective or equally effective in addressing those 
practices? Do the Endorsement Guides describe any practices that are 
not deceptive or unfair, and if so, which practices and why are they 
not deceptive or unfair?
    (4) What is the degree of compliance with the Endorsement Guides? 
What effect, if any, does this have on the continuing need for the 
Guides? Do covered businesses and others following the Guides' 
suggestions self-regulate or have voluntary standards or guidance, such 
as through trade associations, that overlap with the Guides? If so, to 
what extent, if any, do the Guides support industry self-regulation or 
voluntary standards?
    (5) What benefits, if any, have the Endorsement Guides provided to 
consumers? Do the Guides impose any significant costs on consumers?
    (6) What impact, if any, have the Guides had on the flow of 
truthful or deceptive information to consumers?
    (7) What changes, if any, should be made to the Endorsement Guides 
to increase their benefits to consumers? How would these changes affect 
consumer benefits or business costs?
    (8) What burdens or costs, including costs of compliance, have the 
Guides imposed on businesses? What burdens or costs have the Guides 
imposed on small businesses in particular? What burdens or costs have 
the Guides imposed on endorsers? What benefits have the Guides provided 
to businesses? What benefits have the Guides provided to endorsers?
    (9) What changes, if any, should be made to the Guides to reduce 
the burdens or costs imposed on businesses or endorsers? How would 
these changes affect the benefits provided by the Guides to consumers, 
businesses, and endorsers?
    (10) Do the Guides overlap or conflict with federal, state, or 
local laws or regulations? Do the Guides overlap or conflict with any 
international laws or regulations?
    (11) Have consumer perceptions regarding endorsements changed since 
the Guides were last revised and, if so, do these changes warrant 
revising the Guides?
    (12) What modifications to the Guides, if any, should be made to 
address technological, economic, or environmental changes that have 
occurred since the Guides were last revised?
    (13) FTC staff periodically updates a business guidance document, 
``The FTC's Endorsement Guides: What People Are Asking.'' Is there 
guidance in the current version of that document that should be 
incorporated into the Guides? If so, what and why? Is there guidance in 
the current version of that document that should not be incorporated 
into the Guides? If so, what and why?
    (14) How well are advertisers and endorsers disclosing unexpected 
material connections on social media platforms? Does this depend on the 
type of material connection? What disclosures of material connections 
are sufficiently clear (i.e., understandable) to consumers when used in 
social media? What disclosures of material connection currently being 
used in social media are likely not understood by consumers? Does the 
sufficiency or insufficiency vary by platform, type of material 
connection (e.g., a paid post versus a free product), or other factors, 
and, if so, how? To the extent that these connections are not being 
adequately

[[Page 10106]]

disclosed, do the problems tend to be in the substance of the 
disclosures or in their conspicuousness (e.g., placement, visibility, 
or audibility)? Should the Guides provide more detail on what 
disclosures of material connections are sufficiently clear or unclear 
in different social media formats? Does the fact that Commission Guides 
are generally reviewed every ten years affect your answer as to whether 
providing more detail would be helpful?
    (15) The FTC has received complaints that young children may not 
adequately understand disclosures of material connections. To what 
extent would knowledge of a material connection affect the weight or 
credibility that young children give to an endorsement? At what age are 
children capable of making a connection between credibility and a 
material connection? Does this age differ from the age at which 
children are capable of identifying advertising? Why or why not and, if 
so, how? To what extent do young children understand disclosures of 
material connections? What should advertisers and endorsers appealing 
to young children know about their intended audience's understanding of 
a particular endorsement, advertising format, or disclosure? How can 
disclosures of material connections in media consumed by young children 
be made clearer or more effective? How, if at all, are your answers to 
the above questions impacted by parental involvement in the media 
consumption of young children? What disclosures of material connections 
should advertisers and endorsers appealing to young children provide to 
parents?
    (16) Some marketers give incentives (e.g., free or discounted 
products) to consumers in exchange for posting reviews of their 
products or services without specifically requiring that the reviews be 
favorable. Do such incentives skew or bias the resulting reviews? Why 
or why not? If so, how and to what extent do incentives skew or bias 
the resulting reviews, and what factors may make such impacts more or 
less likely? Should such incentives be disclosed? Why or why not and if 
so, how? Does the nature or value of the incentive matter? If so, how? 
Do such incentives skew composite ratings? Why or why not and if so, 
how? Do such incentives impact the order in which products or services 
are presented to consumers on retail or other review platforms? Why or 
why not and if so, how?
    (17) Some consumer reviewers who receive incentives in exchange for 
their reviews disclose their material connections in their reviews. Are 
such disclosures adequate when incentivized reviews are included in 
composite ratings? Why or why not? Are composite ratings that are based 
in whole or in part on such incentivized reviews misleading? If such 
composite ratings are misleading: (1) Are there disclosures that could 
adequately address this concern and if so, what disclosures; and (2) 
how should the Guides address composite ratings if disclosures are not 
sufficient or there is not an opportunity for the marketer to make 
adequate disclosures (e.g., when the reviews and composite ratings 
appear on a third party's website)?
    (18) Some marketers actively solicit customer feedback and send 
satisfied customers down one path to relevant review sites and send 
customers with negative sentiment down another path, sometimes into 
some sort of customer service resolution process. What are the costs 
and benefits of this practice? Should it be addressed in the Guides 
and, if so, how?
    (19) Some advertisers contend that consumers who use social media 
understand that influencers who promote products are generally doing so 
only because they are paid or given something by the marketer, 
regardless of what or whether disclosures appear in social media posts. 
What evidence is there to support or contradict this assertion and does 
the answer differ depending on the nature of the material connection? 
In particular cases, what factors might be considered to determine 
whether a material connection is unexpected? Do consumer expectations 
vary by the age of the audience, the product category, the nature of 
the influencer, the format or substance of the endorsement, or 
otherwise, and if so, how?
    (20) Some endorsers (including the authors of some product reviews) 
include affiliate links that can be used to purchase the products they 
are endorsing. Should the Guides address such links, and if so, how? To 
what extent do consumers expect that these endorsers are compensated 
for purchases through those links? If so, what compensation 
arrangements do consumers ordinarily expect? To what extent would 
knowing of such compensation affect the weight or credibility given to 
those endorsements? Is there a distinction in terms of either consumer 
expectations or the weight ascribed to an endorsement between affiliate 
links to a product's marketer and affiliate links to one or more 
retailers? If so, how, why, and how should that be addressed?
    (21) What disclosures, if any, do advertisers or the operators of 
review websites or review platforms need to make about the creation, 
collection, processing, or publication of reviews or ratings in order 
to prevent those reviews or ratings from being deceptive or unfair?
    (22) What other fact patterns or scenarios should be addressed by 
the Guides and why?
    You can file a comment online or on paper. For the Commission to 
consider your comment, we must receive it on or before April 21, 2020. 
Write ``Endorsement Guides, P204500'' on your comment. Your comment--
including your name and your state--will be placed on the public record 
of this proceeding, including, to the extent practicable, on the 
https://www.regulations.gov website.
    Postal mail addressed to the Commission is subject to delay due to 
heightened security screening. As a result, we encourage you to submit 
your comments online. To make sure that the Commission considers your 
online comment, you must file it through https://www.regulations.gov, 
by following the instruction on the web-based form.
    If you file your comment on paper, write ``Endorsement Guides, 
P204500'' on your comment and on the envelope, and mail or deliver it 
to the following address: Federal Trade Commission, Office of the 
Secretary, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite CC-5610 (Annex B), 
Washington, DC 20580, or deliver your comment to the following address: 
Federal Trade Commission, Office of the Secretary, Constitution Center, 
400 7th Street SW, 5th Floor, Suite 5610 (Annex B), Washington, DC 
20024. If possible, please submit your paper comment to the Commission 
by courier or overnight service.
    Because your comment will be placed on the publicly accessible 
website https://www.regulations.gov, you are solely responsible for 
making sure that your comment does not include any sensitive personal 
information, such as your or anyone's Social Security number; date of 
birth; driver's license number or other state identification number or 
foreign country equivalent; passport number; financial account number; 
or credit or debit card number. You are also solely responsible for 
ensuring your comment does not include any sensitive health 
information, such as medical records or other individually identifiable 
health information. In addition, your comment should not include any 
``[t]rade secret or any commercial or financial information which . . . 
is privileged or confidential''--as provided in Section 6(f) of the FTC 
Act, 15 U.S.C. 46(f), and

[[Page 10107]]

FTC Rule 4.10(a)(2), 16 CFR 4.10(a)(2)--including in particular 
competitively sensitive information such as costs, sales statistics, 
inventories, formulas, patterns, devices, manufacturing processes, or 
customer names.
    Comments containing material for which confidential treatment is 
requested must be filed in paper form, must be clearly labeled 
``Confidential,'' and must comply with FTC Rule 4.9(c). In particular, 
the written request for confidential treatment that accompanies the 
comment must include the factual and legal basis for the request, and 
must identify the specific portions of the comment to be withheld from 
the public record. See FTC Rule 4.9(c). Your comment will be kept 
confidential only if the General Counsel grants your request in 
accordance with the law and the public interest. Once your comment has 
been posted publicly at www.regulations.gov--as legally required by FTC 
Rule 4.9(b)--we cannot redact or remove your comment, unless you submit 
a confidentiality request that meets the requirements for such 
treatment under FTC Rule 4.9(c), and the General Counsel grants that 
request.
    Visit the FTC website to read this request for comment and the news 
release describing it. The FTC Act and other laws that the Commission 
administers permit the collection of public comments to consider and 
use in this proceeding as appropriate. The Commission will consider all 
timely and responsive public comments that it receives on or before 
April 21, 2020. For information on the Commission's privacy policy, 
including routine uses permitted by the Privacy Act, see https://www.ftc.gov/site-information/privacy-policy.

    By direction of the Commission.
April J. Tabor,
Acting Secretary.
[FR Doc. 2020-03447 Filed 2-20-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6750-01-P