Emergency Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological and Ethnological Material From Yemen, 7209-7214 [2020-02553]

Download as PDF 7209 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 26 / Friday, February 7, 2020 / Rules and Regulations State party Cultural property * Jordan ..................... * * * * * Archaeological material representing Jordan’s cultural heritage from the Paleolithic period (c. 1.5 million B.C.) to the middle of the Ottoman period in Jordan (A.D. 1750). * * * * * * * * * such restrictions be imposed, until September 11, 2024, unless renewed. These restrictions are being imposed pursuant to determinations of the United States Department of State made under the terms of the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act. * Dated: February 4, 2020. Mark A. Morgan, Acting Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Approved: Timothy E. Skud, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. DATES: [FR Doc. 2020–02552 Filed 2–5–20; 4:15 pm] FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Effective on February 5, 2020. For legal aspects, Lisa L. Burley, Chief, Cargo Security, Carriers and Restricted Merchandise Branch, Regulations and Rulings, Office of Trade, (202) 325– 0300, otrrculturalproperty@cbp.dhs.gov. For operational aspects, Genevieve S. Dozier, Management and Program Analyst, Commercial Targeting and Analysis Center, Trade Policy and Programs, Office of Trade, (202) 945– 2952, CTAC@cbp.dhs.gov. BILLING CODE 9111–14–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY 19 CFR Part 12 [CBP Dec. 20–01] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: RIN 1515–AE50 Background Emergency Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological and Ethnological Material From Yemen The Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act, Public Law 97– 446, 19 U.S.C. 2601 et seq. (‘‘the Cultural Property Implementation Act’’ or ‘‘Act’’), implements the 1970 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property (823 U.N.T.S. 231 (1972)) (‘‘the Convention’’). Pursuant to the Cultural Property Implementation Act, the United States may enter into international agreements with another State Party to the Convention to impose import restrictions on eligible archaeological and ethnological material under procedures and requirements prescribed by the Act. Under certain limited circumstances, the Cultural Property Implementation Act authorizes the imposition of import restrictions on an emergency basis (19 U.S.C. 2603). The emergency restrictions are effective for no more than five years from the date of the State Party’s request and may be extended for three years where it is determined that the emergency condition continues to apply with respect to the covered material (19 U.S.C. 2603(c)(3)). These restrictions may also be continued pursuant to an agreement concluded U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security; Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: This final rule amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations to reflect the imposition of emergency import restrictions on certain archaeological and ethnological material from the Republic of Yemen (Yemen). The Assistant Secretary for Educational and Cultural Affairs, United States Department of State, has determined that conditions warrant the imposition of emergency restrictions on categories of archaeological material and ethnological material of the Islamic cultural heritage of Yemen. This document contains the Designated List of Archaeological and Ethnological Material of Yemen that describes the types of objects or categories of archaeological and ethnological material to which the import restrictions apply. The emergency import restrictions imposed on certain archaeological and ethnological material from Yemen will be in effect for a five-year period from the date on which Yemen requested that SUMMARY: jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES Decision No. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:12 Feb 06, 2020 Jkt 250001 PO 00000 Frm 00019 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 * * CBP Dec. 20–02. * within the meaning of the Act (19 U.S.C. 2603(c)(4)). Pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 2602(a), the government of the Republic of Yemen (Yemen), a State Party to the Convention, requested on September 11, 2019, that import restrictions be imposed on certain archaeological and ethnological material, the pillage of which jeopardizes the cultural heritage of Yemen. The Cultural Property Implementation Act authorizes the President (or designee) to apply import restrictions on an emergency basis if the President determines that an emergency condition applies with respect to any archaeological or ethnological material of any requesting state (19 U.S.C. 2603). On December 5, 2019, the Assistant Secretary for Educational and Cultural Affairs, United States Department of State, after consultation with and recommendation by the Cultural Property Advisory Committee, made the determinations necessary under the Act for the emergency imposition of import restrictions on certain archaeological material and ethnological material of the Islamic cultural heritage of Yemen. The Designated List below sets forth the categories of material to which the import restrictions apply. Thus, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is amending § 12.104g(b) of title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR 12.104g(b)) accordingly. Importation of covered material from Yemen will be restricted for a five-year period from the date of request by Yemen, through September 11, 2024. Importation of such material from Yemen will continue to be restricted through that date unless the conditions set forth in 19 U.S.C. 2606 and 19 CFR 12.104c are met. Designated List of Archaeological and Ethnological Material of Yemen Table of Contents I. Archaeological Material A. Stone B. Metal C. Ceramic and Clay D. Glass, Faience, and Semi-Precious Stone E. Painting F. Plaster G. Textiles H. Leather, Parchment, and Paper I. Wood, Bone, Ivory, Shell, and Other Organics E:\FR\FM\07FER1.SGM 07FER1 7210 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 26 / Friday, February 7, 2020 / Rules and Regulations II. Ethnological Material A. Stone B. Metal C. Ceramic and Clay D. Glass E. Painting and Drawing F. Textiles, Basketry, and Rope G. Leather and Parchment H. Wood I. Bone and Ivory jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES I. Archaeological Material Archaeological material dates from approximately 200,000 B.C. to A.D. 1750 and represents the following periods, styles, and cultures: Paleolithic, Neolithic, South Arabian, Abyssinian, Sasanian, and Islamic (Umayyad, Abbasid, Ziyadid, Zaydi, Najahid, Sulaihid, Zurayid, Ayyubid, Rasulid, and Tahirid), among others. A chronological outline of pre-Islamic Yemen includes the Paleolithic Period (c. 200,000–8000 B.C.), Neolithic Period (8000–3000 B.C.), Post-Neolithic/Bronze Age (3500–1200 B.C.), South Arabian Period (Sabaean, Minean, Qataban, Hadhramaut, Himyarite) (1200 B.C.– A.D. 570), Abyssinian (c. 4th century A.D.–A.D. 578), and the Sasanian Period (A.D. 570–628). Subsequent archaeological material from the Islamic Period covers A.D. 628–1750. The Designated List set forth below is representative only. Any dates and dimensions are approximate. A. Stone 1. Architectural Elements—Primarily in limestone, marble, and sandstone; including blocks from walls, floors, and ceilings; columns, capitals, bases, lintels, jambs, friezes, and pilasters; doors, door frames, and window fittings; engaged columns, altars, prayer niches, screens, fountains, mosaics, and inlays. May be plain, molded, carved, or inscribed in various languages and scripts. Common decorative motifs include ibex heads and full animals, oxen or bull heads, rosettes, and curvilinear vine and floral patterns, and may be incised or in high relief. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 1750. 2. Non-Architectural Relief Sculpture—In alabaster, limestone, marble, calcite, and other kinds of stone. Types include carved slabs and plaques, funerary and votive stelae, and bases and base revetments. These may be painted, incised, or carved with relief sculpture, decorated with moldings, and/or carry dedicatory or funerary inscriptions. South Arabian Period styles include face plaques and stelae: Funerary images of faces; may be combined with ceramic or plaster sculpture; may be inscribed or painted. Common decorative motifs either incised or in high relief include oxen or VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:12 Feb 06, 2020 Jkt 250001 bull heads, other animals, mythological creatures, human figures, which are usually clothed, and vegetative and floral patterns; may be inscribed in South Arabian script. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 570. 3. Statuary—Primarily in alabaster, also in calcite, limestone, sandstone, softstone (chlorite), and marble. Largeand small-scale, including deities; human figures, which are usually clothed; animals such as bulls, ibex, and camels; and hybrid or mythological creatures. May be inscribed. Includes fragments of statues. Some pieces may also include different material types, including multiple types of stone, metal staffs, shell or bone eyes, and metal, glass, and semi-precious stone jewelry inlay. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.– A.D. 570. 4. Vessels and Containers—Primarily in alabaster, softstone (chlorite), and limestone; may also be marble, basalt, or other stone. Vessels may be conventional shapes such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, platters, and flasks, and also include smaller funerary urns and incense burners. Common forms include, but are not limited to: a. South Arabian Period containers for unguents, powders, and liquids in all shapes and sizes. They are flat-bottomed and often have lids. Some pieces have protruding pierced lug handles, which may or may not be in the shape of an animal, usually a bull or ibex. Vessels may be otherwise decorated or inscribed with South Arabian, or other script. Other forms include pedestal dishes, bowls, saucers, and three-legged cosmetic palettes, as well as small, rectangular, square-sided boxes, usually decorated with bull’s heads, used as containers for smaller bottles. Incense burners from the South Arabian period are usually cuboid and decorated with astral symbols or South Arabian script. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 570. b. Stone vessels continue in similar form through the Sasanian and Islamic Periods, particularly in softstone and alabaster. Includes all vessel types and lamps, usually with geometric incised decoration; may have Arabic script. Approximate date: A.D. 570–1750. 5. Furniture—In marble, alabaster, and other stone. May include thrones, tables, and other examples. Also includes pieces of furniture such as legs and feet that may have been attached to a wooden frame; may be funerary. Includes South Arabian Period libation and sacrificial altars, which are oblong or square slabs with raised rims; altars have a run-off channel for liquid, usually in the form of an animal including bull’s head or ibex. Approximate date: 200,000–1200 B.C. PO 00000 Frm 00020 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 6. Tools and Weapons—In flint/chert, obsidian, limestone, tuff, basalt, and other stones. Prehistoric and protohistoric microliths (small stone tools). Chipped stone types include blades, borers, scrapers, sickles, cores, and arrowheads. Ground stone types include grinders (e.g., mortars, pestles, millstones, whetstones), choppers, axes, hammers, and mace heads. Approximate date: 200,000–1200 B.C. 7. Jewelry, Seals, and Beads—In marble, limestone, and various semiprecious stones, including rock crystal, amethyst, garnet, jasper, agate, steatite, and carnelian. Seals may include animals, human figures, and/or inscriptions in various languages. Beads include cylindrical, spherical, conical, disc, and other types; may have cut, incised, or raised decoration. B. Metal 1. Non-Architectural Relief Sculpture—Includes cast relief plaques or tablets, appliques, stelae, and masks; often in bronze or copper. Decoration includes human and animal figures, geometric, and floral motifs. May be inscribed/cast relief in South Arabian, Arabic, or other script. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 1750. 2. Statuary—Primarily in copper, bronze, silver, or gold; includes fragments of statues. Range from largerthan-life-size to small figurines; forms include human figures, which may be clothed or not; animals such as camels, ibex, oxen, bulls, and lions; or mythological creatures/figures; and trophies such as votive hands. May be painted or inscribed/cast relief in South Arabian, Arabic, or other script. 3. Vessels and Containers—Primarily in copper, bronze, or iron; Islamic Period includes more examples in silver and gold. May include forms such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, strainers, buckets, cauldrons, boxes, oil lamps, incense burners, and scroll or manuscript containers; may occur in the shape of an animal or part of an animal. Decoration may include humans or animal figures, or geometric or floral motifs in relief. Incense burners from this period may be square or cylindrical; front decorated with astral symbols and/ or animals. May be inscribed/cast relief in South Arabian, Arabic, or other script. 4. Furniture—Primarily in bronze and iron; may include thrones, tables, and other examples. Includes pieces of furniture and decorative fittings such as legs and feet that may have been attached to a wooden frame; or thin metal sheets with engraved or impressed designs. E:\FR\FM\07FER1.SGM 07FER1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 26 / Friday, February 7, 2020 / Rules and Regulations 5. Tools and Instruments—In copper, bronze, iron, silver, and gold. Types include hooks, weights, axes, scrapers, trowels, keys, ladles, tools of craftspersons such as carpenters, masons, and metal smiths. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 570. 6. Weapons and Armor—In copper, bronze, and iron. Body armor, such as helmets, cuirasses, shin guards, shields, and horse armor; often decorated with elaborate engraved, embossed, or perforated designs. Launching weapons (spears, javelins, socketed arrowheads); hand-to-hand combat weapons (swords, daggers, jambiyas); and sheaths. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 570. 7. Jewelry and Other Items for Personal Adornment—In iron, bronze, silver, and gold. Metal can be inlaid (with items such as colored stones, and glass). Types include necklaces, amulets and pendants, rings, bracelets, anklets, earrings, diadems, wreaths and crowns, beads, buttons, purses, belts, belt buckles, mirrors, and make-up accessories and tools. 8. Seals and Stamps—In lead, tin, copper, bronze, silver, and gold. Small devices with at least one side engraved with a design for stamping or sealing; includes rings, amulets, and seals with a shank; may include animals, human figures, and/or inscriptions in various languages. 9. Coins—A reference book for ancient, pre-Islamic material in Yemen is M. Huth, Coinage of the Caravan Kingdoms: Ancient Arabian Coins from the Collection of Martin Huth, New York, 2010, pp. 68–152. A reference book for Islamic coinage to A.D. 1750 is S. Album, Checklist of Islamic Coins, Santa Rosa, 2011, pp. 116–127. Some of the best-known types are described below: a. Ancient—In gold, silver, and bronze/copper, with units ranging from tetradrachms down to various fractional levels. i. Earliest coins from Yemen are imitations of silver tetradrachms from Athens; feature a bust of Athena on the obverse and an owl on the reverse. The style of these imitations is distinctive, and they are usually marked with Arabian monograms or graffiti. Approximate date: 500 B.C. and later. ii. Minaeans produced schematic imitations of the Athenian coinage; these coins have angular shapes, often triangular. Style is distinctive with monograms with Arabian letters. Approximate date: 200 B.C. iii. Sabaeans struck distinctive local imitations of Athenian tetradrachms, with or without monograms, often with the curved symbol of Almaqah to the right of the owl, and of smaller units VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:12 Feb 06, 2020 Jkt 250001 than previously. In the 1st century A.D., the head of Athena is replaced with a male bust resembling Augustus; owl on the reverse continues, as do monograms and the curved symbol. In the 2nd and 3rd centuries A.D., a beardless male head appears on the coins with the curved symbol, and a facing bucranium (a bull’s head) appears on the reverse with the curved symbol and monograms. Approximate date: 400 B.C.–A.D. 300. iv. Himyarite coins feature beardless male heads on the obverse coupled with bearded male heads on the reverse. Various South Arabian monograms appear on the coins. Rulers include Yuhabirr, Karib’il Yehun‘im Wattar, Amdan Yuhaqbid, Amdan Bayan, Tha’ran Ya‘ub, Shamnar Yuhan‘am, and unknown kings. Approximate date: 110 B.C.–A.D. 200. v. Qatabians produced imitations of Athenian coins also in 2nd–4th century B.C., with or without monograms; distinctive style. From the 2nd century B.C. to the 2nd century A.D., head of Athena is replaced with male ruler portraits, including those of Yad’ab Dhubyan Yuhargib, Dhub, Hawfi‘Amm Yuhan‘am III, Shahr Yagul, Waraw’il Ghaylan, Shahr Hilal, Yad‘ab Yanaf, and various unknown rulers. Reverses of early types have the owl, while later types have a second portrait on the reverse. Approximate date: 400 B.C.– A.D. 200. vi. Bronze coins from Hadramawt have radiate male portraits in a circle on the obverse and a standing bull on the reverse; Arabian symbols appear. Approximate date: A.D. 200–400. vii. Various South Arabian types imitate Athenian coins, Hellenistic Alexander tetradrachms with a head of Herakles on the obverse and Zeus seated on the reverse, and Ptolemaic coins with a cornucopia on the reverse. Style is distinctive; designs are accompanied by Arabian monograms. b. Islamic Period—In gold, silver, and bronze, and including anonymous mints in Yemen, and coins of unknown rulers attributed to Yemen. Non-exclusive mints are the primary manufacturers of the listed coins, but there may be other production mints. i. ‘Abbasid coins struck in gold, silver, and bronze, at non-exclusive mints San‘a, Zabid, ‘Adan, Dhamar, ‘Aththar, and Baysh mints. Approximate date: A.D. 786–974. ii. Coins of the Amirs of San‘a, struck in gold, at the mint of San‘a. Approximate date: A.D. 909–911. iii. Rassid (1st period) coins struck in gold and silver at Sa‘da, San‘a, Tukhla’, and ‘Aththar. Approximate date: A.D. 898–1014. PO 00000 Frm 00021 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 7211 iv. Coins of the Amirs of Yemen, struck in silver, at an uncertain mint. Approximate date: A.D. 1000–1100. v. Coins of the Amirs of ‘Aththar, struck in gold, at the mint of ‘Aththar. Approximate date: A.D. 957–988. vi. Tarafid coins, struck in silver, at the mint of ‘Aththar. Approximate date: A.D. 991–1004. vii. Ziyadid coins, struck in gold and silver, at non-exclusive mint Zabid. Approximate date: A.D. 955–1050s. viii. Khawlanid coins, struck in silver, at the mint of San‘a. Approximate date: A.D. 1046–1047. ix. Najjahid coins, struck in gold, at the mints Zabid and Dathina. Approximate date: A.D. 1021–1158. x. Sulayhid coins, struck in gold and debased silver, at non-exclusive mints Zabid, ‘Aththar, ‘Adan, Dhu Jibla. Approximate date: A.D. 1047–1137. xi. Zuray’id coins, struck in gold, at the mints of ‘Adan and Dhu Jibla. Approximate date: A.D. 1111–1174. xii. Coins of Mahdid of Zabid, struck in silver, at the mint of Zabid. Approximate date: A.D. 1159–1174. xiii. Rassid (2nd period) coins, struck in gold and silver, at non-exclusive mints Zufar, San‘a, Sa‘da, Huth, Dhirwah, Kahlan, Muda’, ‘Ayyan, Bukur, al-Jahili, and Dhamar. Approximate date: A.D. 1185–1390. xiv. Ayyubid coins, struck in gold, silver, and bronze, at the mints of Zabid, ‘Adan, Ta‘izz, San‘a, al-Dumluwa, Bukur, and Mayban. Approximate date: A.D. 1174–1236. xv. Rasulid coins, struck in gold, silver, and bronze, at non-exclusive mints ‘Adan, Zabid, al-Mahjam, Ta‘izz, San‘a, Tha’bat, and Hajja. Approximate date: A.D. 1229–1439. xvi. Tahirid coins, struck in silver, at the mint of ‘Adan. Approximate date: A.D. 1517–1538. xvii. Rassid (3rd period) coins, struck in silver and bronze, at the mints of San‘a, Zafir, and Thula. Approximate date: A.D. 1506–1572. xviii. Ottoman coins, struck in gold, silver and bronze, at the mints of Zabid, San‘a, ‘Adan, Kawkaban, Ta‘izz, Sa‘da, al-Mukha, and Malhaz. Approximate date: A.D. 1520–1750. C. Ceramic and Clay 1. Architectural Elements—Baked clay (terracotta) elements used to decorate buildings. Elements include acroteria, antefixes, painted and relief plaques, revetments, carved and molded brick, and wall ornaments and panels. 2. Non-Architectural Relief Sculpture—Types include carved slabs and plaques, funerary and votive stelae, and bases and base revetments. Common decorative motifs include ibex E:\FR\FM\07FER1.SGM 07FER1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES 7212 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 26 / Friday, February 7, 2020 / Rules and Regulations heads and full animals, oxen or bull heads, rosettes, and curvilinear vine and floral patterns, and may be incised or in high relief; inscribed with South Arabian, Arabic, or other script. Includes face plaques and stelae: Funerary images of faces; may be combined with ceramic or plaster sculpture; may be inscribed or painted. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 1750. 3. Statuary—Range from large to small figurines; forms include human figures, usually clothed; animals such as camels, ibex, oxen, bulls, and lions; or mythological creatures/figures; and trophies such as votive hands. May be glazed or painted; may include South Arabian script. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 570. 4. Vessels—Include utilitarian types and fine tableware, incense burners, and oil lamps. a. Post-Neolithic/Bronze Age— Includes hand built grey-brown or reddish-brown coarseware with large black or white inclusions, occasionally burnished; and fineware, which can have slipwash or burnish with incised or punctate decoration. Some pieces may also have imprints of basketry. Common forms include but are not limited to platters and shallow bowls with flat bases, deep bowls and basins with rounded bases, rimmed hemispheric bowls with rounded bases, hole-mouthed jars, necked jars, and large storage jars. Approximate date: 3500–900 B.C. b. South Arabian Period—Includes hand built reddish-brown, yellow, and gray fabrics, which may be unfinished, burnished, or slip-glazed; the most common is red-burnished slip with carinated vessel shapes. Common forms include but are not limited to small rimmed jugs with flat base; small beakers and goblets; rimmed bowls, jars, and vases with ring bases; cooking pots with flat bases and straight walls; hemispherical bowls with ledge handles, often with black burnished slip; plates/platters with flat bases; goblets; amphorae; and oil lamps. Decoration includes paint, punctuation, incised or pressed designs including South Arabian script, and raised dots. Imported Roman terra sigillata ware, Nabatean painted pottery, Iranian fine orange painted ware, and Indian red polished ware are also common. Incense burners from this period may be square or cylindrical; decorated with astral symbols or South Arabian script. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 570. c. Sasanian-Islamic Period—Includes stoneware, pottery, and porcelain, which may be unglazed utilitarian wares or glazed types; local types include but are not limited to reddish, VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:12 Feb 06, 2020 Jkt 250001 pink, and white fabrics with glaze styles including turquoise slip-painted, bright yellow glaze, green-painted glaze, salad ware (light green), pseudo-celadon glazed, brown-painted, and blue glazed on white slip; may include Arabic calligraphy. Imported types are also common and include Abbasid Period alkaline blue Sasanian-Islamic jars (A.D. 700–1100); Abbasid Period opaque white glazed bowls, either plain or decorated with cobalt (A.D. 800–900); and sgraffiatto types in various forms with red fabric and incised and painted designs on white slip including floral, geometric, human, and animal motifs (A.D. 1100–1400); other types from China, Arabo-Persian Gulf, Indian Ocean, and East Africa are also present. Oil lamps from this period typically have rounded bodies with a hole on the top and in the nozzle, and may have handles or lugs and figural motifs; include glazed ceramic lamps, which may have a straight or round bulbous body with flared top, and several branches. Approximate date: A.D. 570– 1750. D. Glass, Faience, and Semi-Precious Stone 1. Architectural Elements—Mosaics; designs include landscapes, scenes of deities, humans, or animals, and activities such as hunting and fishing. There may also be vegetative, floral, or geometric motifs; often with religious imagery. Approximate date: A.D. 500– 1750. 2. Vessels—Forms include small jars, bowls, animal-shaped vessels, goblets, spherical forms, candle holders, perfume and unguent jars, and lamps; may have cut, incised, raised, enameled, molded, or painted decoration; various colors. South Arabian Period and early Islamic Period types may be engraved and/or colorless or blue, green, or orange; may include floral, and/or geometric motifs; may include Arabic calligraphy. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 1750. 3. Jewelry—Forms include beads that may be cylindrical, spherical, conical, disc, and others; may have cut, incised, or raised decoration; various colors; molded and carved glass gemstones; may include other types of glass inlay. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.–A.D. 1750. E. Painting 1. Rock Art—Incised, pecked, or painted drawings on natural rock surfaces. Decoration includes crosses; humans; animals, particularly camels, ibex, and snakes; and geometric and/or floral designs; includes fragments. May include pre-Islamic graffiti, commonly PO 00000 Frm 00022 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 in South Arabian script. Approximate date: 12,000 B.C.–A.D. 100. 2. Wall Painting—Decoration includes crosses; humans; animals, particularly camels, ibex, and snakes; and geometric and/or floral designs; includes fragments. Painted on wood, stone, and plaster. May be on domestic or public walls or tombs. F. Plaster 1. Stucco—Stucco reliefs, plaques, stelae, and inlays or other architectural decoration in stucco. 2. Face Plaques and Stelae—Funerary images of faces; may be combined with stone or ceramic sculpture; may be inscribed or painted. G. Textiles —Linen cloth used for mummy wrapping. Approximate date: 500 B.C.– A.D. 500. H. Leather, Parchment, and Paper 1. Books and Manuscripts—Either scrolls, sheets, or bound volumes; including both secular texts and Islamic religious texts such as Qurans. Text is often written on vellum or other parchment (cattle, sheep, goat, or camel) and then gathered in leather bindings. Paper may also be used. Types include books and manuscripts, often written in brown ink, and then further embellished with colorful floral or geometric motifs; covers may also be stamped, gilded, or inset with metal, glass, and semiprecious stones. 2. Items for Personal Adornment— Primarily in leather, including belts, sandals, shoes, armor, necklaces, bracelets, and other types of jewelry. I. Wood, Bone, Ivory, Shell, and Other Organics 1. Architectural and NonArchitectural Relief Sculpture—Carved and inlaid wood panels, rooms, beams, balconies, stages, panels, ceilings, and doors, frequently decorated with religious, floral, or geometric motifs; may have script in Arabic. Bone, ivory, and shell reliefs, plaques, stelae, and inlays may be carved or sculpted; commonly include human or animal figures, floral, and/or geometric motifs. 2. Statuary and Figurines—Primarily small-size figurines; forms include human figures, which may be clothed or not; animals such as camels, ibex; oxen, bulls, and lions; or mythological creatures/figures. May be painted or inscribed/cast relief in South Arabian, Arabic, or other script. 3. Furniture—Primarily in wood; may include thrones, other chairs, tables, and other examples. E:\FR\FM\07FER1.SGM 07FER1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 26 / Friday, February 7, 2020 / Rules and Regulations 4. Personal Ornaments and Objects of Daily Use—Types include amulets, combs, pins, spoons, small containers, bracelets, buckles, and beads. Wood, bone, ivory, and shell were also used either alone or as inlays in luxury objects including furniture, chests and boxes, writing and painting equipment, musical instruments, games, cosmetic containers, combs, and jewelry. 5. Seals and Stamps—Small devices with at least one side engraved with a design for stamping or sealing; they can be discoid, cuboid, or conoid; may include animals, human figures, and/or inscriptions in various languages. 6. Human Remains—Bone and bone fragments. II. Ethnological Material Ethnological material of Islamic cultural heritage form part of the remains of the Islamic period culture and civilization ranging in date from A.D. 1517 to 1918. Some of these items may occur in archaeological contexts. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES A. Stone 1. Architectural Elements—Primarily in limestone, marble, and sandstone; including blocks from walls, floors, and ceilings; columns, capitals, bases, lintels, jambs, friezes, and pilasters; doors, door frames, and window fittings; altars, prayer niches, screens, fountains, mosaics, and inlays. May be plain, molded, carved, or inscribed in Arabic. Common decorative motifs include geometric, floral, and religious motifs, and may be incised or in high relief. 2. Non-Architectural Relief Sculpture—In alabaster, limestone, marble, and other types of stone. Types include carved slabs with religious, floral, or geometric motifs. Includes inscribed plaques, stelae, memorial stones, and tombstones; primarily in marble; may be engraved with Arabic script. 3. Statuary—Primarily in marble, but also in limestone and sandstone. Largeand small-scale, such as human and animal figures. May be inscribed. Includes fragments of statues. Some pieces may also include different material types, including multiple types of stone, metal staffs, shell or bone eyes, and metal and semi-precious stone jewelry inlay. 4. Vessels and Containers—Primarily in alabaster, softstone (chlorite), and limestone; may also be marble, basalt, or other stone. Vessels may be conventional shapes such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, platters, and flasks, and include smaller funerary urns, incense burners, and lamps. VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:12 Feb 06, 2020 Jkt 250001 B. Metal 1. Architectural Elements—Primarily copper, brass, lead, and alloys, including doors, door fixtures, chandeliers, screens. 2. Vessels and Containers—In brass, copper, silver, or gold; plain, engraved, or hammered. May include forms such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, strainers, buckets, pitchers, plates, tea pots, boxes, oil lamps, incense burners, lamps, and scroll or manuscript containers. 3. Tools and Instruments—In copper, bronze, iron, silver, and gold. Types include hooks, weights, axes, scrapers, trowels, keys, ladles, tools of craftspersons such as carpenters, masons, and metal smiths, and scientific instruments such as measuring containers, clocks, and astrolabes. 4. Weapons and Armor—In copper, bronze, and iron. Body armor, such as helmets, cuirasses, shin guards, shields, and horse armor; often decorated with elaborate engraved, embossed, or perforated designs. Launching weapons (spears, javelins, socketed arrowheads); hand-to-hand combat weapons (swords, daggers, jambiyas); and sheaths. 5. Jewelry and Other Items for Personal Adornment—In iron, bronze, silver, and gold. Metal can be inlaid (with items such as colored stones, and glass). Types include necklaces, amulets and pendants, rings, bracelets, anklets, earrings, diadems, wreaths and crowns, beads, buttons, purses, belts, belt buckles, mirrors, and make-up accessories and tools. 6. Ceremonial and Religious— Includes boxes (such as Quran boxes), plaques, amulets and pendants, stamps, and seal rings. C. Ceramic and Clay 1. Architectural Elements—Baked clay (terracotta) elements used to decorate buildings. Elements include painted and relief plaques, revetments, carved and molded brick, wall ornaments and panels and/or painted tile wall ornaments and panels, sometimes with Arabic script. 2. Vessels and Containers—Include utilitarian types and fine tableware, incense burners, and oil lamps. Include glazed, molded, and painted ceramics, and molds. Types include boxes, plates, lamps, jars, and flasks. May be plain or decorated with floral or geometric patterns, or Arabic script, primarily using blue, green, brown, black, or yellow colors. D. Glass 1. Beads—Forms include cylindrical, spherical, conical, disc, and others; may have cut, incised, or raised decoration; various colors. PO 00000 Frm 00023 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 7213 E. Painting and Drawing May depict courtly themes (e.g., rulers, musicians, riders on camels) and city and architectural views, among others; may also be represented in manuscripts. F. Textiles, Basketry, and Rope 1. Religious Textiles—In linen, silk, and wool. Islamic textiles and fragments. Includes garments, hangings, shrine covers, and fragments. 2. Clothing—Embroidered veils and head coverings, traditional Islamic wedding and ceremonial clothing, for both religious and secular purposes. 3. Rugs—Primarily in wool; sometimes with reeds or leather. Both for decorative purposes as well as prayer. Often woven with floral or geometric designs in bright colors. 4. Baskets and Woven Mats—Plant fibers used to make baskets and containers in a variety of shapes and sizes; sandals and mats. 5. Nets and Ropes—Rope and string used for a variety of purposes, including binding, lifting water for irrigation, fishing, measuring, and stringing beads for jewelry and garments. G. Leather and Parchment 1. Books and Manuscripts—Either as sheets or bound volumes; including both secular texts and Islamic religious texts such as Qurans. Text is often written on vellum or other parchment (cattle, sheep, goat, or camel) then gathered in leather bindings. Paper may also be used. Types include books, scrolls, and manuscripts. May be decorated with colorful religious, geometric, or floral motifs. 2. Saddles, Saddle Bags, and Saddle Covers—Made of leather; for riding horses or camels. 3. Bags—In addition to saddlebags, include leather Quran pouches, or water pouches. 4. Items for Personal Adornment— Primarily in leather, including belts, sandals, shoes, armor, necklaces, bracelets, and other types of jewelry. H. Wood 1. Architectural Elements—Includes doors, door fixtures, panels, beams, balconies, altars, stages, screens, ceilings, and tent posts. Types include doors, door frames, windows, window frames, walls, panels, beams, ceilings, balconies, altars. May be decorated with religious, geometric, or floral motifs; may have Arabic script. 2. Architectural and NonArchitectural Relief Sculpture—Carved and inlaid wood panels, rooms, beams, balconies, stages, panels, ceilings, and doors, frequently decorated with E:\FR\FM\07FER1.SGM 07FER1 7214 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 26 / Friday, February 7, 2020 / Rules and Regulations religious, floral, or geometric motifs; may have script in Arabic. 3. Ceremonial and Religious— Includes pulpits (minbars) and prayer niches (mihrabs); book holders, lecterns, and cabinets; Quran boxes or other smaller objects such as chests and cases; Islamic study tables. 4. Vessels and Containers—Boxes, containers, chests, and other utilitarian objects. May be carved, painted, or inlaid. May be decorated with religious, geometric, or floral motifs; may have Arabic script. 5. Furniture—Includes thrones, chairs, tables, book holders, and cabinets. I. Bone and Ivory 1. Vessels and Containers—Forms include small jars, perfume and unguent jars, and ritual vessels; may have cut, incised, raised, or painted decoration. May be decorated with religious, geometric, or floral motifs; may have Arabic script. 2. Ceremonial and Religious—Types include boxes, reliquaries (and their contents), plaques, amulets and pendants, stamps, and seal rings. 3. Inlays—For decorative furniture and architectural elements above. Inapplicability of Notice and Delayed Effective Date This amendment involves a foreign affairs function of the United States and is, therefore, being made without notice or public procedure (5 U.S.C. 553(a)(1)). For the same reason, a delayed effective date is not required under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3). Regulatory Flexibility Act Because no notice of proposed rulemaking is required, the provisions of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) do not apply. Executive Orders 12866 and 13771 CBP has determined that this document is not a regulation or rule subject to the provisions of Executive Order 12866 or Executive Order 13771 because it pertains to a foreign affairs function of the United States, as described above, and therefore is specifically exempted by section 3(d)(2) of Executive Order 12866 and section 4(a) of Executive Order 13771. Signing Authority This regulation is being issued in accordance with 19 CFR 0.1(a)(1) pertaining to the Secretary of the Treasury’s authority (or that of his/her delegate) to approve regulations related to customs revenue functions. List of Subjects in 19 CFR Part 12 Cultural property, Customs duties and inspection, Imports, Prohibited merchandise, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Amendment to CBP Regulations For the reasons set forth above, part 12 of title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR part 12) is amended as set forth below: PART 12—SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE 1. The general authority citation for part 12 and the specific authority for § 12.104g continue to read as follows: ■ Authority: 5 U.S.C. 301; 19 U.S.C. 66, 1202 (General Note 3(i), Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS)), 1624. * * * * * Sections 12.104 through 12.104i also issued under 19 U.S.C. 2612; * * * * * 2. In § 12.104g, the table in paragraph (b) is amended by adding Yemen to the list to read as follows: ■ § 12.104g Specific items or categories designated by agreements or emergency actions. * * * (b) * * * * * TABLE 2 TO PARAGRAPH (b) State party Cultural property Yemen .................... Archaeological and ethnological material from Yemen ................................................................... Dated: February 4, 2020. Mark A. Morgan, Acting Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Approved: Timothy E. Skud, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. Decision No. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Transportation Security Administration 19 CFR Chapter I [FR Doc. 2020–02553 Filed 2–5–20; 4:15 pm] 49 CFR Chapter XII BILLING CODE 9111–14–P Notification of Arrival Restrictions Applicable to Flights Carrying Persons Who Have Recently Traveled From or Were Otherwise Present Within the People’s Republic of China U.S. Customs and Border Protection and U.S. Transportation Security Administration, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: Notification of arrival restrictions. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with RULES AGENCY: This document announces a modification to the January 31, 2020 SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:12 Feb 06, 2020 Jkt 250001 PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 CBP Dec. 20–01. decision of the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to direct all flights to the United States carrying persons who have recently traveled from, or were otherwise present within, the People’s Republic of China to arrive at one of the United States airports where the United States Government is focusing public health resources. This document adds four additional airports to the list of airports where flights can land and describes when the arrival restrictions will include those airports. Flights departing after 5 p.m. EST on Sunday, February 2, 2020 and covered by the arrival restrictions are required to land at one of the airports identified in the January 31, 2020 document (JFK, ORD, SFO, SEA, HNL, LAX, ATL) or at IAD. Beginning at 6:30 a.m. EST on Monday February 3, 2020, DHS will expand the list of authorized airports to include EWR. Beginning at 7:30 a.m. EST on Monday, February 3, DATES: E:\FR\FM\07FER1.SGM 07FER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 26 (Friday, February 7, 2020)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 7209-7214]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-02553]


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DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

19 CFR Part 12

[CBP Dec. 20-01]
RIN 1515-AE50


Emergency Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological and 
Ethnological Material From Yemen

AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland 
Security; Department of the Treasury.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This final rule amends the U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
(CBP) regulations to reflect the imposition of emergency import 
restrictions on certain archaeological and ethnological material from 
the Republic of Yemen (Yemen). The Assistant Secretary for Educational 
and Cultural Affairs, United States Department of State, has determined 
that conditions warrant the imposition of emergency restrictions on 
categories of archaeological material and ethnological material of the 
Islamic cultural heritage of Yemen. This document contains the 
Designated List of Archaeological and Ethnological Material of Yemen 
that describes the types of objects or categories of archaeological and 
ethnological material to which the import restrictions apply. The 
emergency import restrictions imposed on certain archaeological and 
ethnological material from Yemen will be in effect for a five-year 
period from the date on which Yemen requested that such restrictions be 
imposed, until September 11, 2024, unless renewed. These restrictions 
are being imposed pursuant to determinations of the United States 
Department of State made under the terms of the Convention on Cultural 
Property Implementation Act.

DATES: Effective on February 5, 2020.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For legal aspects, Lisa L. Burley, 
Chief, Cargo Security, Carriers and Restricted Merchandise Branch, 
Regulations and Rulings, Office of Trade, (202) 325-0300, 
[email protected]. For operational aspects, Genevieve S. 
Dozier, Management and Program Analyst, Commercial Targeting and 
Analysis Center, Trade Policy and Programs, Office of Trade, (202) 945-
2952, [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    The Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act, Public Law 
97-446, 19 U.S.C. 2601 et seq. (``the Cultural Property Implementation 
Act'' or ``Act''), implements the 1970 United Nations Educational, 
Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Convention on the Means 
of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer 
of Ownership of Cultural Property (823 U.N.T.S. 231 (1972)) (``the 
Convention''). Pursuant to the Cultural Property Implementation Act, 
the United States may enter into international agreements with another 
State Party to the Convention to impose import restrictions on eligible 
archaeological and ethnological material under procedures and 
requirements prescribed by the Act.
    Under certain limited circumstances, the Cultural Property 
Implementation Act authorizes the imposition of import restrictions on 
an emergency basis (19 U.S.C. 2603). The emergency restrictions are 
effective for no more than five years from the date of the State 
Party's request and may be extended for three years where it is 
determined that the emergency condition continues to apply with respect 
to the covered material (19 U.S.C. 2603(c)(3)). These restrictions may 
also be continued pursuant to an agreement concluded within the meaning 
of the Act (19 U.S.C. 2603(c)(4)).
    Pursuant to 19 U.S.C. 2602(a), the government of the Republic of 
Yemen (Yemen), a State Party to the Convention, requested on September 
11, 2019, that import restrictions be imposed on certain archaeological 
and ethnological material, the pillage of which jeopardizes the 
cultural heritage of Yemen. The Cultural Property Implementation Act 
authorizes the President (or designee) to apply import restrictions on 
an emergency basis if the President determines that an emergency 
condition applies with respect to any archaeological or ethnological 
material of any requesting state (19 U.S.C. 2603).
    On December 5, 2019, the Assistant Secretary for Educational and 
Cultural Affairs, United States Department of State, after consultation 
with and recommendation by the Cultural Property Advisory Committee, 
made the determinations necessary under the Act for the emergency 
imposition of import restrictions on certain archaeological material 
and ethnological material of the Islamic cultural heritage of Yemen. 
The Designated List below sets forth the categories of material to 
which the import restrictions apply. Thus, U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) is amending Sec.  12.104g(b) of title 19 of the Code 
of Federal Regulations (19 CFR 12.104g(b)) accordingly.
    Importation of covered material from Yemen will be restricted for a 
five-year period from the date of request by Yemen, through September 
11, 2024. Importation of such material from Yemen will continue to be 
restricted through that date unless the conditions set forth in 19 
U.S.C. 2606 and 19 CFR 12.104c are met.

Designated List of Archaeological and Ethnological Material of Yemen

Table of Contents

I. Archaeological Material
    A. Stone
    B. Metal
    C. Ceramic and Clay
    D. Glass, Faience, and Semi-Precious Stone
    E. Painting
    F. Plaster
    G. Textiles
    H. Leather, Parchment, and Paper
    I. Wood, Bone, Ivory, Shell, and Other Organics

[[Page 7210]]

II. Ethnological Material
    A. Stone
    B. Metal
    C. Ceramic and Clay
    D. Glass
    E. Painting and Drawing
    F. Textiles, Basketry, and Rope
    G. Leather and Parchment
    H. Wood
    I. Bone and Ivory

I. Archaeological Material

    Archaeological material dates from approximately 200,000 B.C. to 
A.D. 1750 and represents the following periods, styles, and cultures: 
Paleolithic, Neolithic, South Arabian, Abyssinian, Sasanian, and 
Islamic (Umayyad, Abbasid, Ziyadid, Zaydi, Najahid, Sulaihid, Zurayid, 
Ayyubid, Rasulid, and Tahirid), among others. A chronological outline 
of pre-Islamic Yemen includes the Paleolithic Period (c. 200,000-8000 
B.C.), Neolithic Period (8000-3000 B.C.), Post-Neolithic/Bronze Age 
(3500-1200 B.C.), South Arabian Period (Sabaean, Minean, Qataban, 
Hadhramaut, Himyarite) (1200 B.C.-A.D. 570), Abyssinian (c. 4th century 
A.D.-A.D. 578), and the Sasanian Period (A.D. 570-628). Subsequent 
archaeological material from the Islamic Period covers A.D. 628-1750. 
The Designated List set forth below is representative only. Any dates 
and dimensions are approximate.

A. Stone

    1. Architectural Elements--Primarily in limestone, marble, and 
sandstone; including blocks from walls, floors, and ceilings; columns, 
capitals, bases, lintels, jambs, friezes, and pilasters; doors, door 
frames, and window fittings; engaged columns, altars, prayer niches, 
screens, fountains, mosaics, and inlays. May be plain, molded, carved, 
or inscribed in various languages and scripts. Common decorative motifs 
include ibex heads and full animals, oxen or bull heads, rosettes, and 
curvilinear vine and floral patterns, and may be incised or in high 
relief. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 1750.
    2. Non-Architectural Relief Sculpture--In alabaster, limestone, 
marble, calcite, and other kinds of stone. Types include carved slabs 
and plaques, funerary and votive stelae, and bases and base revetments. 
These may be painted, incised, or carved with relief sculpture, 
decorated with moldings, and/or carry dedicatory or funerary 
inscriptions. South Arabian Period styles include face plaques and 
stelae: Funerary images of faces; may be combined with ceramic or 
plaster sculpture; may be inscribed or painted. Common decorative 
motifs either incised or in high relief include oxen or bull heads, 
other animals, mythological creatures, human figures, which are usually 
clothed, and vegetative and floral patterns; may be inscribed in South 
Arabian script. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 570.
    3. Statuary--Primarily in alabaster, also in calcite, limestone, 
sandstone, softstone (chlorite), and marble. Large- and small-scale, 
including deities; human figures, which are usually clothed; animals 
such as bulls, ibex, and camels; and hybrid or mythological creatures. 
May be inscribed. Includes fragments of statues. Some pieces may also 
include different material types, including multiple types of stone, 
metal staffs, shell or bone eyes, and metal, glass, and semi-precious 
stone jewelry inlay. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 570.
    4. Vessels and Containers--Primarily in alabaster, softstone 
(chlorite), and limestone; may also be marble, basalt, or other stone. 
Vessels may be conventional shapes such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, 
platters, and flasks, and also include smaller funerary urns and 
incense burners. Common forms include, but are not limited to:
    a. South Arabian Period containers for unguents, powders, and 
liquids in all shapes and sizes. They are flat-bottomed and often have 
lids. Some pieces have protruding pierced lug handles, which may or may 
not be in the shape of an animal, usually a bull or ibex. Vessels may 
be otherwise decorated or inscribed with South Arabian, or other 
script. Other forms include pedestal dishes, bowls, saucers, and three-
legged cosmetic palettes, as well as small, rectangular, square-sided 
boxes, usually decorated with bull's heads, used as containers for 
smaller bottles. Incense burners from the South Arabian period are 
usually cuboid and decorated with astral symbols or South Arabian 
script. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 570.
    b. Stone vessels continue in similar form through the Sasanian and 
Islamic Periods, particularly in softstone and alabaster. Includes all 
vessel types and lamps, usually with geometric incised decoration; may 
have Arabic script. Approximate date: A.D. 570-1750.
    5. Furniture--In marble, alabaster, and other stone. May include 
thrones, tables, and other examples. Also includes pieces of furniture 
such as legs and feet that may have been attached to a wooden frame; 
may be funerary. Includes South Arabian Period libation and sacrificial 
altars, which are oblong or square slabs with raised rims; altars have 
a run-off channel for liquid, usually in the form of an animal 
including bull's head or ibex. Approximate date: 200,000-1200 B.C.
    6. Tools and Weapons--In flint/chert, obsidian, limestone, tuff, 
basalt, and other stones. Prehistoric and protohistoric microliths 
(small stone tools). Chipped stone types include blades, borers, 
scrapers, sickles, cores, and arrowheads. Ground stone types include 
grinders (e.g., mortars, pestles, millstones, whetstones), choppers, 
axes, hammers, and mace heads. Approximate date: 200,000-1200 B.C.
    7. Jewelry, Seals, and Beads--In marble, limestone, and various 
semi-precious stones, including rock crystal, amethyst, garnet, jasper, 
agate, steatite, and carnelian. Seals may include animals, human 
figures, and/or inscriptions in various languages. Beads include 
cylindrical, spherical, conical, disc, and other types; may have cut, 
incised, or raised decoration.

B. Metal

    1. Non-Architectural Relief Sculpture--Includes cast relief plaques 
or tablets, appliques, stelae, and masks; often in bronze or copper. 
Decoration includes human and animal figures, geometric, and floral 
motifs. May be inscribed/cast relief in South Arabian, Arabic, or other 
script. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 1750.
    2. Statuary--Primarily in copper, bronze, silver, or gold; includes 
fragments of statues. Range from larger-than-life-size to small 
figurines; forms include human figures, which may be clothed or not; 
animals such as camels, ibex, oxen, bulls, and lions; or mythological 
creatures/figures; and trophies such as votive hands. May be painted or 
inscribed/cast relief in South Arabian, Arabic, or other script.
    3. Vessels and Containers--Primarily in copper, bronze, or iron; 
Islamic Period includes more examples in silver and gold. May include 
forms such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, strainers, buckets, cauldrons, 
boxes, oil lamps, incense burners, and scroll or manuscript containers; 
may occur in the shape of an animal or part of an animal. Decoration 
may include humans or animal figures, or geometric or floral motifs in 
relief. Incense burners from this period may be square or cylindrical; 
front decorated with astral symbols and/or animals. May be inscribed/
cast relief in South Arabian, Arabic, or other script.
    4. Furniture--Primarily in bronze and iron; may include thrones, 
tables, and other examples. Includes pieces of furniture and decorative 
fittings such as legs and feet that may have been attached to a wooden 
frame; or thin metal sheets with engraved or impressed designs.

[[Page 7211]]

    5. Tools and Instruments--In copper, bronze, iron, silver, and 
gold. Types include hooks, weights, axes, scrapers, trowels, keys, 
ladles, tools of craftspersons such as carpenters, masons, and metal 
smiths. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 570.
    6. Weapons and Armor--In copper, bronze, and iron. Body armor, such 
as helmets, cuirasses, shin guards, shields, and horse armor; often 
decorated with elaborate engraved, embossed, or perforated designs. 
Launching weapons (spears, javelins, socketed arrowheads); hand-to-hand 
combat weapons (swords, daggers, jambiyas); and sheaths. Approximate 
date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 570.
    7. Jewelry and Other Items for Personal Adornment--In iron, bronze, 
silver, and gold. Metal can be inlaid (with items such as colored 
stones, and glass). Types include necklaces, amulets and pendants, 
rings, bracelets, anklets, earrings, diadems, wreaths and crowns, 
beads, buttons, purses, belts, belt buckles, mirrors, and make-up 
accessories and tools.
    8. Seals and Stamps--In lead, tin, copper, bronze, silver, and 
gold. Small devices with at least one side engraved with a design for 
stamping or sealing; includes rings, amulets, and seals with a shank; 
may include animals, human figures, and/or inscriptions in various 
languages.
    9. Coins--A reference book for ancient, pre-Islamic material in 
Yemen is M. Huth, Coinage of the Caravan Kingdoms: Ancient Arabian 
Coins from the Collection of Martin Huth, New York, 2010, pp. 68-152. A 
reference book for Islamic coinage to A.D. 1750 is S. Album, Checklist 
of Islamic Coins, Santa Rosa, 2011, pp. 116-127. Some of the best-known 
types are described below:
    a. Ancient--In gold, silver, and bronze/copper, with units ranging 
from tetradrachms down to various fractional levels.
    i. Earliest coins from Yemen are imitations of silver tetradrachms 
from Athens; feature a bust of Athena on the obverse and an owl on the 
reverse. The style of these imitations is distinctive, and they are 
usually marked with Arabian monograms or graffiti. Approximate date: 
500 B.C. and later.
    ii. Minaeans produced schematic imitations of the Athenian coinage; 
these coins have angular shapes, often triangular. Style is distinctive 
with monograms with Arabian letters. Approximate date: 200 B.C.
    iii. Sabaeans struck distinctive local imitations of Athenian 
tetradrachms, with or without monograms, often with the curved symbol 
of Almaqah to the right of the owl, and of smaller units than 
previously. In the 1st century A.D., the head of Athena is replaced 
with a male bust resembling Augustus; owl on the reverse continues, as 
do monograms and the curved symbol. In the 2nd and 3rd centuries A.D., 
a beardless male head appears on the coins with the curved symbol, and 
a facing bucranium (a bull's head) appears on the reverse with the 
curved symbol and monograms. Approximate date: 400 B.C.-A.D. 300.
    iv. Himyarite coins feature beardless male heads on the obverse 
coupled with bearded male heads on the reverse. Various South Arabian 
monograms appear on the coins. Rulers include Yuhabirr, Karib'il 
Yehun`im Wattar, Amdan Yuhaqbid, Amdan Bayan, Tha'ran Ya`ub, Shamnar 
Yuhan`am, and unknown kings. Approximate date: 110 B.C.-A.D. 200.
    v. Qatabians produced imitations of Athenian coins also in 2nd-4th 
century B.C., with or without monograms; distinctive style. From the 
2nd century B.C. to the 2nd century A.D., head of Athena is replaced 
with male ruler portraits, including those of Yad'ab Dhubyan Yuhargib, 
Dhub, Hawfi`Amm Yuhan`am III, Shahr Yagul, Waraw'il Ghaylan, Shahr 
Hilal, Yad`ab Yanaf, and various unknown rulers. Reverses of early 
types have the owl, while later types have a second portrait on the 
reverse. Approximate date: 400 B.C.-A.D. 200.
    vi. Bronze coins from Hadramawt have radiate male portraits in a 
circle on the obverse and a standing bull on the reverse; Arabian 
symbols appear. Approximate date: A.D. 200-400.
    vii. Various South Arabian types imitate Athenian coins, 
Hellenistic Alexander tetradrachms with a head of Herakles on the 
obverse and Zeus seated on the reverse, and Ptolemaic coins with a 
cornucopia on the reverse. Style is distinctive; designs are 
accompanied by Arabian monograms.
    b. Islamic Period--In gold, silver, and bronze, and including 
anonymous mints in Yemen, and coins of unknown rulers attributed to 
Yemen. Non-exclusive mints are the primary manufacturers of the listed 
coins, but there may be other production mints.
    i. `Abbasid coins struck in gold, silver, and bronze, at non-
exclusive mints San`a, Zabid, `Adan, Dhamar, `Aththar, and Baysh mints. 
Approximate date: A.D. 786-974.
    ii. Coins of the Amirs of San`a, struck in gold, at the mint of 
San`a. Approximate date: A.D. 909-911.
    iii. Rassid (1st period) coins struck in gold and silver at Sa`da, 
San`a, Tukhla', and `Aththar. Approximate date: A.D. 898-1014.
    iv. Coins of the Amirs of Yemen, struck in silver, at an uncertain 
mint. Approximate date: A.D. 1000-1100.
    v. Coins of the Amirs of `Aththar, struck in gold, at the mint of 
`Aththar. Approximate date: A.D. 957-988.
    vi. Tarafid coins, struck in silver, at the mint of `Aththar. 
Approximate date: A.D. 991-1004.
    vii. Ziyadid coins, struck in gold and silver, at non-exclusive 
mint Zabid. Approximate date: A.D. 955-1050s.
    viii. Khawlanid coins, struck in silver, at the mint of San`a. 
Approximate date: A.D. 1046-1047.
    ix. Najjahid coins, struck in gold, at the mints Zabid and Dathina. 
Approximate date: A.D. 1021-1158.
    x. Sulayhid coins, struck in gold and debased silver, at non-
exclusive mints Zabid, `Aththar, `Adan, Dhu Jibla. Approximate date: 
A.D. 1047-1137.
    xi. Zuray'id coins, struck in gold, at the mints of `Adan and Dhu 
Jibla. Approximate date: A.D. 1111-1174.
    xii. Coins of Mahdid of Zabid, struck in silver, at the mint of 
Zabid. Approximate date: A.D. 1159-1174.
    xiii. Rassid (2nd period) coins, struck in gold and silver, at non-
exclusive mints Zufar, San`a, Sa`da, Huth, Dhirwah, Kahlan, Muda', 
`Ayyan, Bukur, al-Jahili, and Dhamar. Approximate date: A.D. 1185-1390.
    xiv. Ayyubid coins, struck in gold, silver, and bronze, at the 
mints of Zabid, `Adan, Ta`izz, San`a, al-Dumluwa, Bukur, and Mayban. 
Approximate date: A.D. 1174-1236.
    xv. Rasulid coins, struck in gold, silver, and bronze, at non-
exclusive mints `Adan, Zabid, al-Mahjam, Ta`izz, San`a, Tha'bat, and 
Hajja. Approximate date: A.D. 1229-1439.
    xvi. Tahirid coins, struck in silver, at the mint of `Adan. 
Approximate date: A.D. 1517-1538.
    xvii. Rassid (3rd period) coins, struck in silver and bronze, at 
the mints of San`a, Zafir, and Thula. Approximate date: A.D. 1506-1572.
    xviii. Ottoman coins, struck in gold, silver and bronze, at the 
mints of Zabid, San`a, `Adan, Kawkaban, Ta`izz, Sa`da, al-Mukha, and 
Malhaz. Approximate date: A.D. 1520-1750.

C. Ceramic and Clay

    1. Architectural Elements--Baked clay (terracotta) elements used to 
decorate buildings. Elements include acroteria, antefixes, painted and 
relief plaques, revetments, carved and molded brick, and wall ornaments 
and panels.
    2. Non-Architectural Relief Sculpture--Types include carved slabs 
and plaques, funerary and votive stelae, and bases and base revetments. 
Common decorative motifs include ibex

[[Page 7212]]

heads and full animals, oxen or bull heads, rosettes, and curvilinear 
vine and floral patterns, and may be incised or in high relief; 
inscribed with South Arabian, Arabic, or other script. Includes face 
plaques and stelae: Funerary images of faces; may be combined with 
ceramic or plaster sculpture; may be inscribed or painted. Approximate 
date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 1750.
    3. Statuary--Range from large to small figurines; forms include 
human figures, usually clothed; animals such as camels, ibex, oxen, 
bulls, and lions; or mythological creatures/figures; and trophies such 
as votive hands. May be glazed or painted; may include South Arabian 
script. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 570.
    4. Vessels--Include utilitarian types and fine tableware, incense 
burners, and oil lamps.
    a. Post-Neolithic/Bronze Age--Includes hand built grey-brown or 
reddish-brown coarseware with large black or white inclusions, 
occasionally burnished; and fineware, which can have slipwash or 
burnish with incised or punctate decoration. Some pieces may also have 
imprints of basketry. Common forms include but are not limited to 
platters and shallow bowls with flat bases, deep bowls and basins with 
rounded bases, rimmed hemispheric bowls with rounded bases, hole-
mouthed jars, necked jars, and large storage jars. Approximate date: 
3500-900 B.C.
    b. South Arabian Period--Includes hand built reddish-brown, yellow, 
and gray fabrics, which may be unfinished, burnished, or slip-glazed; 
the most common is red-burnished slip with carinated vessel shapes. 
Common forms include but are not limited to small rimmed jugs with flat 
base; small beakers and goblets; rimmed bowls, jars, and vases with 
ring bases; cooking pots with flat bases and straight walls; 
hemispherical bowls with ledge handles, often with black burnished 
slip; plates/platters with flat bases; goblets; amphorae; and oil 
lamps. Decoration includes paint, punctuation, incised or pressed 
designs including South Arabian script, and raised dots. Imported Roman 
terra sigillata ware, Nabatean painted pottery, Iranian fine orange 
painted ware, and Indian red polished ware are also common. Incense 
burners from this period may be square or cylindrical; decorated with 
astral symbols or South Arabian script. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.-
A.D. 570.
    c. Sasanian-Islamic Period--Includes stoneware, pottery, and 
porcelain, which may be unglazed utilitarian wares or glazed types; 
local types include but are not limited to reddish, pink, and white 
fabrics with glaze styles including turquoise slip-painted, bright 
yellow glaze, green-painted glaze, salad ware (light green), pseudo-
celadon glazed, brown-painted, and blue glazed on white slip; may 
include Arabic calligraphy. Imported types are also common and include 
Abbasid Period alkaline blue Sasanian-Islamic jars (A.D. 700-1100); 
Abbasid Period opaque white glazed bowls, either plain or decorated 
with cobalt (A.D. 800-900); and sgraffiatto types in various forms with 
red fabric and incised and painted designs on white slip including 
floral, geometric, human, and animal motifs (A.D. 1100-1400); other 
types from China, Arabo-Persian Gulf, Indian Ocean, and East Africa are 
also present. Oil lamps from this period typically have rounded bodies 
with a hole on the top and in the nozzle, and may have handles or lugs 
and figural motifs; include glazed ceramic lamps, which may have a 
straight or round bulbous body with flared top, and several branches. 
Approximate date: A.D. 570-1750.

D. Glass, Faience, and Semi-Precious Stone

    1. Architectural Elements--Mosaics; designs include landscapes, 
scenes of deities, humans, or animals, and activities such as hunting 
and fishing. There may also be vegetative, floral, or geometric motifs; 
often with religious imagery. Approximate date: A.D. 500-1750.
    2. Vessels--Forms include small jars, bowls, animal-shaped vessels, 
goblets, spherical forms, candle holders, perfume and unguent jars, and 
lamps; may have cut, incised, raised, enameled, molded, or painted 
decoration; various colors. South Arabian Period and early Islamic 
Period types may be engraved and/or colorless or blue, green, or 
orange; may include floral, and/or geometric motifs; may include Arabic 
calligraphy. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 1750.
    3. Jewelry--Forms include beads that may be cylindrical, spherical, 
conical, disc, and others; may have cut, incised, or raised decoration; 
various colors; molded and carved glass gemstones; may include other 
types of glass inlay. Approximate date: 1200 B.C.-A.D. 1750.

E. Painting

    1. Rock Art--Incised, pecked, or painted drawings on natural rock 
surfaces. Decoration includes crosses; humans; animals, particularly 
camels, ibex, and snakes; and geometric and/or floral designs; includes 
fragments. May include pre-Islamic graffiti, commonly in South Arabian 
script. Approximate date: 12,000 B.C.-A.D. 100.
    2. Wall Painting--Decoration includes crosses; humans; animals, 
particularly camels, ibex, and snakes; and geometric and/or floral 
designs; includes fragments. Painted on wood, stone, and plaster. May 
be on domestic or public walls or tombs.

F. Plaster

    1. Stucco--Stucco reliefs, plaques, stelae, and inlays or other 
architectural decoration in stucco.
    2. Face Plaques and Stelae--Funerary images of faces; may be 
combined with stone or ceramic sculpture; may be inscribed or painted.

G. Textiles

    --Linen cloth used for mummy wrapping. Approximate date: 500 B.C.-
A.D. 500.

H. Leather, Parchment, and Paper

    1. Books and Manuscripts--Either scrolls, sheets, or bound volumes; 
including both secular texts and Islamic religious texts such as 
Qurans. Text is often written on vellum or other parchment (cattle, 
sheep, goat, or camel) and then gathered in leather bindings. Paper may 
also be used. Types include books and manuscripts, often written in 
brown ink, and then further embellished with colorful floral or 
geometric motifs; covers may also be stamped, gilded, or inset with 
metal, glass, and semi-precious stones.
    2. Items for Personal Adornment--Primarily in leather, including 
belts, sandals, shoes, armor, necklaces, bracelets, and other types of 
jewelry.

I. Wood, Bone, Ivory, Shell, and Other Organics

    1. Architectural and Non-Architectural Relief Sculpture--Carved and 
inlaid wood panels, rooms, beams, balconies, stages, panels, ceilings, 
and doors, frequently decorated with religious, floral, or geometric 
motifs; may have script in Arabic. Bone, ivory, and shell reliefs, 
plaques, stelae, and inlays may be carved or sculpted; commonly include 
human or animal figures, floral, and/or geometric motifs.
    2. Statuary and Figurines--Primarily small-size figurines; forms 
include human figures, which may be clothed or not; animals such as 
camels, ibex; oxen, bulls, and lions; or mythological creatures/
figures. May be painted or inscribed/cast relief in South Arabian, 
Arabic, or other script.
    3. Furniture--Primarily in wood; may include thrones, other chairs, 
tables, and other examples.

[[Page 7213]]

    4. Personal Ornaments and Objects of Daily Use--Types include 
amulets, combs, pins, spoons, small containers, bracelets, buckles, and 
beads. Wood, bone, ivory, and shell were also used either alone or as 
inlays in luxury objects including furniture, chests and boxes, writing 
and painting equipment, musical instruments, games, cosmetic 
containers, combs, and jewelry.
    5. Seals and Stamps--Small devices with at least one side engraved 
with a design for stamping or sealing; they can be discoid, cuboid, or 
conoid; may include animals, human figures, and/or inscriptions in 
various languages.
    6. Human Remains--Bone and bone fragments.

II. Ethnological Material

    Ethnological material of Islamic cultural heritage form part of the 
remains of the Islamic period culture and civilization ranging in date 
from A.D. 1517 to 1918. Some of these items may occur in archaeological 
contexts.

A. Stone

    1. Architectural Elements--Primarily in limestone, marble, and 
sandstone; including blocks from walls, floors, and ceilings; columns, 
capitals, bases, lintels, jambs, friezes, and pilasters; doors, door 
frames, and window fittings; altars, prayer niches, screens, fountains, 
mosaics, and inlays. May be plain, molded, carved, or inscribed in 
Arabic. Common decorative motifs include geometric, floral, and 
religious motifs, and may be incised or in high relief.
    2. Non-Architectural Relief Sculpture--In alabaster, limestone, 
marble, and other types of stone. Types include carved slabs with 
religious, floral, or geometric motifs. Includes inscribed plaques, 
stelae, memorial stones, and tombstones; primarily in marble; may be 
engraved with Arabic script.
    3. Statuary--Primarily in marble, but also in limestone and 
sandstone. Large- and small-scale, such as human and animal figures. 
May be inscribed. Includes fragments of statues. Some pieces may also 
include different material types, including multiple types of stone, 
metal staffs, shell or bone eyes, and metal and semi-precious stone 
jewelry inlay.
    4. Vessels and Containers--Primarily in alabaster, softstone 
(chlorite), and limestone; may also be marble, basalt, or other stone. 
Vessels may be conventional shapes such as bowls, cups, jars, jugs, 
platters, and flasks, and include smaller funerary urns, incense 
burners, and lamps.

B. Metal

    1. Architectural Elements--Primarily copper, brass, lead, and 
alloys, including doors, door fixtures, chandeliers, screens.
    2. Vessels and Containers--In brass, copper, silver, or gold; 
plain, engraved, or hammered. May include forms such as bowls, cups, 
jars, jugs, strainers, buckets, pitchers, plates, tea pots, boxes, oil 
lamps, incense burners, lamps, and scroll or manuscript containers.
    3. Tools and Instruments--In copper, bronze, iron, silver, and 
gold. Types include hooks, weights, axes, scrapers, trowels, keys, 
ladles, tools of craftspersons such as carpenters, masons, and metal 
smiths, and scientific instruments such as measuring containers, 
clocks, and astrolabes.
    4. Weapons and Armor--In copper, bronze, and iron. Body armor, such 
as helmets, cuirasses, shin guards, shields, and horse armor; often 
decorated with elaborate engraved, embossed, or perforated designs. 
Launching weapons (spears, javelins, socketed arrowheads); hand-to-hand 
combat weapons (swords, daggers, jambiyas); and sheaths.
    5. Jewelry and Other Items for Personal Adornment--In iron, bronze, 
silver, and gold. Metal can be inlaid (with items such as colored 
stones, and glass). Types include necklaces, amulets and pendants, 
rings, bracelets, anklets, earrings, diadems, wreaths and crowns, 
beads, buttons, purses, belts, belt buckles, mirrors, and make-up 
accessories and tools.
    6. Ceremonial and Religious--Includes boxes (such as Quran boxes), 
plaques, amulets and pendants, stamps, and seal rings.

C. Ceramic and Clay

    1. Architectural Elements--Baked clay (terracotta) elements used to 
decorate buildings. Elements include painted and relief plaques, 
revetments, carved and molded brick, wall ornaments and panels and/or 
painted tile wall ornaments and panels, sometimes with Arabic script.
    2. Vessels and Containers--Include utilitarian types and fine 
tableware, incense burners, and oil lamps. Include glazed, molded, and 
painted ceramics, and molds. Types include boxes, plates, lamps, jars, 
and flasks. May be plain or decorated with floral or geometric 
patterns, or Arabic script, primarily using blue, green, brown, black, 
or yellow colors.

D. Glass

    1. Beads--Forms include cylindrical, spherical, conical, disc, and 
others; may have cut, incised, or raised decoration; various colors.

E. Painting and Drawing

    May depict courtly themes (e.g., rulers, musicians, riders on 
camels) and city and architectural views, among others; may also be 
represented in manuscripts.

F. Textiles, Basketry, and Rope

    1. Religious Textiles--In linen, silk, and wool. Islamic textiles 
and fragments. Includes garments, hangings, shrine covers, and 
fragments.
    2. Clothing--Embroidered veils and head coverings, traditional 
Islamic wedding and ceremonial clothing, for both religious and secular 
purposes.
    3. Rugs--Primarily in wool; sometimes with reeds or leather. Both 
for decorative purposes as well as prayer. Often woven with floral or 
geometric designs in bright colors.
    4. Baskets and Woven Mats--Plant fibers used to make baskets and 
containers in a variety of shapes and sizes; sandals and mats.
    5. Nets and Ropes--Rope and string used for a variety of purposes, 
including binding, lifting water for irrigation, fishing, measuring, 
and stringing beads for jewelry and garments.

G. Leather and Parchment

    1. Books and Manuscripts--Either as sheets or bound volumes; 
including both secular texts and Islamic religious texts such as 
Qurans. Text is often written on vellum or other parchment (cattle, 
sheep, goat, or camel) then gathered in leather bindings. Paper may 
also be used. Types include books, scrolls, and manuscripts. May be 
decorated with colorful religious, geometric, or floral motifs.
    2. Saddles, Saddle Bags, and Saddle Covers--Made of leather; for 
riding horses or camels.
    3. Bags--In addition to saddlebags, include leather Quran pouches, 
or water pouches.
    4. Items for Personal Adornment--Primarily in leather, including 
belts, sandals, shoes, armor, necklaces, bracelets, and other types of 
jewelry.

H. Wood

    1. Architectural Elements--Includes doors, door fixtures, panels, 
beams, balconies, altars, stages, screens, ceilings, and tent posts. 
Types include doors, door frames, windows, window frames, walls, 
panels, beams, ceilings, balconies, altars. May be decorated with 
religious, geometric, or floral motifs; may have Arabic script.
    2. Architectural and Non-Architectural Relief Sculpture--Carved and 
inlaid wood panels, rooms, beams, balconies, stages, panels, ceilings, 
and doors, frequently decorated with

[[Page 7214]]

religious, floral, or geometric motifs; may have script in Arabic.
    3. Ceremonial and Religious--Includes pulpits (minbars) and prayer 
niches (mihrabs); book holders, lecterns, and cabinets; Quran boxes or 
other smaller objects such as chests and cases; Islamic study tables.
    4. Vessels and Containers--Boxes, containers, chests, and other 
utilitarian objects. May be carved, painted, or inlaid. May be 
decorated with religious, geometric, or floral motifs; may have Arabic 
script.
    5. Furniture--Includes thrones, chairs, tables, book holders, and 
cabinets.

I. Bone and Ivory

    1. Vessels and Containers--Forms include small jars, perfume and 
unguent jars, and ritual vessels; may have cut, incised, raised, or 
painted decoration. May be decorated with religious, geometric, or 
floral motifs; may have Arabic script.
    2. Ceremonial and Religious--Types include boxes, reliquaries (and 
their contents), plaques, amulets and pendants, stamps, and seal rings.
    3. Inlays--For decorative furniture and architectural elements 
above.

Inapplicability of Notice and Delayed Effective Date

    This amendment involves a foreign affairs function of the United 
States and is, therefore, being made without notice or public procedure 
(5 U.S.C. 553(a)(1)). For the same reason, a delayed effective date is 
not required under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3).

Regulatory Flexibility Act

    Because no notice of proposed rulemaking is required, the 
provisions of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) do 
not apply.

Executive Orders 12866 and 13771

    CBP has determined that this document is not a regulation or rule 
subject to the provisions of Executive Order 12866 or Executive Order 
13771 because it pertains to a foreign affairs function of the United 
States, as described above, and therefore is specifically exempted by 
section 3(d)(2) of Executive Order 12866 and section 4(a) of Executive 
Order 13771.

Signing Authority

    This regulation is being issued in accordance with 19 CFR 0.1(a)(1) 
pertaining to the Secretary of the Treasury's authority (or that of 
his/her delegate) to approve regulations related to customs revenue 
functions.

List of Subjects in 19 CFR Part 12

    Cultural property, Customs duties and inspection, Imports, 
Prohibited merchandise, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

Amendment to CBP Regulations

    For the reasons set forth above, part 12 of title 19 of the Code of 
Federal Regulations (19 CFR part 12) is amended as set forth below:

PART 12--SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE

0
1. The general authority citation for part 12 and the specific 
authority for Sec.  12.104g continue to read as follows:

    Authority: 5 U.S.C. 301; 19 U.S.C. 66, 1202 (General Note 3(i), 
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS)), 1624.
* * * * *
    Sections 12.104 through 12.104i also issued under 19 U.S.C. 
2612;
* * * * *

0
2. In Sec.  12.104g, the table in paragraph (b) is amended by adding 
Yemen to the list to read as follows:


Sec.  12.104g  Specific items or categories designated by agreements or 
emergency actions.

* * * * *
    (b) * * *

                                            Table 2 to Paragraph (b)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          State party                         Cultural property                           Decision No.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yemen.........................  Archaeological and ethnological material from  CBP Dec. 20-01.
                                 Yemen.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Dated: February 4, 2020.
Mark A. Morgan,
Acting Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.
    Approved:
Timothy E. Skud,
Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.
[FR Doc. 2020-02553 Filed 2-5-20; 4:15 pm]
 BILLING CODE 9111-14-P