Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Recovery Plan for the Dakota Skipper, 4336-4338 [2020-01201]

Download as PDF 4336 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 16 / Friday, January 24, 2020 / Notices RUSTY PATCHED BUMBLE BEE CONSERVATION UNITS (CU), TOTAL NUMBER OF HISTORICALLY OCCUPIED POPULATIONS PER CONSERVATION UNIT, MINIMUM NUMBER OF POPULATIONS PER CONSERVATION UNIT (DOWNLISTING CRITERION 1), AND THE MINIMUM NUMBER OF HEALTHY POPULATIONS PER CONSERVATION UNIT (DOWNLISTING CRITERION 2) Number of historically occupied populations per CU Conservation Unit CU1: CU2: CU3: CU4: CU5: Upper West ........................................................................ Lower West ........................................................................ Midwest .............................................................................. Southeast ........................................................................... Northeast ............................................................................ 274 125 347 250 389 32 14 40 29 45 16 7 20 14 22 Total ...................................................................................... 1,385 159 80 Delisting Criteria DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Criterion 1: Downlisting criteria 1, 2, and 3 have been met. Criterion 2: Mechanisms are in place that provide a high level of certainty that downlisting Criteria 1, 2, and 3 will continue to be met into the foreseeable future. In achieving delisting Criterion 2, Conservation Unit-specific mechanisms should ensure: 2.1 Population abundance, numbers, and distribution will be maintained at the levels required to meet downlisting criteria, 2.2 Sufficient quality and quantity of suitable habitat will be maintained, and 2.3 The negative effects of the primary threats (including but not limited to pathogens, pesticides, climate change, and managed bees) will be managed. Fish and Wildlife Service Availability of Public Comments Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Authority lotter on DSKBCFDHB2PROD with NOTICES Minimum number of healthy populations per CU (Criterion 2) Minimum number of populations per CU (Criterion 1) The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f). Lori Nordstrom, Assistant Regional Director, Ecological Services, Midwest Region. [FR Doc. 2020–01203 Filed 1–23–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:03 Jan 23, 2020 Jkt 250001 [FWS–R3–ES–2018–N148; FXES11130300000–189–FF03E00000] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Recovery Plan for the Dakota Skipper Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability and request for public comment. AGENCY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the availability of the draft recovery plan for the threatened Dakota skipper for public review and comment. We request review and comment on this draft recovery plan from local, State, and Federal agencies, and the public. DATES: In order to be considered, comments must be received on or before February 24, 2020. ADDRESSES: Document availability: You may obtain a copy of the draft recovery plan by one of the following methods: • U.S. mail: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Minnesota-Wisconsin Ecological Services Field Office, Attention: Peter Fasbender; 4101 American Blvd. East, Bloomington, MN 55425. • Telephone: Peter Fasbender, 952– 252–0092. • internet: Download the document at the Service’s Midwest Region website at https://www.fws.gov/midwest/ Endangered/insects/dask/index.html. Comment submission: You may submit comments by one of the following methods: • Mail or hand-delivery: Submit written comments to the above U.S. mail address. • Fax: 952–646–2873, Attention: Peter Fasbender. Please include ‘‘Dakota Skipper DRP’’ in the subject line. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00068 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 • Email: peter_fasbender@fws.gov. Please include ‘‘Dakota Skipper DRP’’ in the subject line. For additional information about submitting comments, see Availability of Public Comments in SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Peter Fasbender, by one of the methods in ADDRESSES. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the availability of the draft recovery plan for the threatened Dakota skipper (Hesperia dacotae) for public review and comment. The draft recovery plan includes objective, measurable criteria and management actions as may be necessary for removal of the species from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife. We request review and comment on this draft recovery plan from local, State, and Federal agencies, and the public. Recovery Planning Section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), requires the development of recovery plans for listed species, unless such a plan would not promote the conservation of a particular species. Also pursuant to section 4(f) of the Act, a recovery plan must, to the maximum extent practicable, include (1) a description of site-specific management actions as may be necessary to achieve the plan’s goals for the conservation and survival of the species; (2) objective, measurable criteria that, when met, would support a determination under section 4(a)(1) that the species should be removed from the List of Endangered and Threatened Species; and (3) estimates of the time and costs required to carry out those measures needed to achieve the plan’s goal and to achieve intermediate steps toward that goal. The Service has revised its approach to recovery planning. The revised process is intended to reduce the time E:\FR\FM\24JAN1.SGM 24JAN1 4337 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 16 / Friday, January 24, 2020 / Notices needed to develop and implement recovery plans, increase recovery plan relevancy over a longer timeframe, and add flexibility to recovery plans so they can be adjusted to new information or circumstances. A recovery plan will include statutorily required elements (objective, measurable criteria, sitespecific management actions, and estimates of time and costs), along with a concise introduction and our strategy for how we plan to achieve species recovery. The recovery plan is supported by a separate Species Status Assessment. The essential component to flexible implementation under this recovery process is producing a separate working document called the Recovery Implementation Strategy (implementation strategy). The implementation strategy steps down from the more general description of actions in the recovery plan to detail the specific, near-term activities needed to implement the recovery plan. The implementation strategy will be adaptable by being able to incorporate new information without having to concurrently revise the recovery plan, unless changes to statutory elements are required. The implementation strategy will be developed following publication of the final recovery plan and will be made available on the Service’s website at that time. Species Background The Dakota skipper is a small butterfly with a 1-inch wingspan. Like other skippers, it has a thick body and faster, more powerful flight than most butterflies. The Dakota skipper inhabits remnants of tallgrass prairie and mixedgrass prairie in the north-central United States and into southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba Provinces of Canada. Within the native prairie patches where it persists, the species relies on highquality habitat conditions—diverse native grassland plant communities— and on natural or human disturbances that maintain the integrity of these plant communities while minimizing mortality to vulnerable life stages. Populations may also be influenced significantly at local, landscape, regional, and continental scales by other factors that include activities such as grazing, haying, burning, pesticide use, and lack of management. (Refer to the Species Status Assessment Report (USFWS 2018) for a full discussion of the species’ biology and threats.) Under the Act, the Service added the Dakota skipper as a threatened species to the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife on October 24, 2014 (79 FR 63672). Recovery Plan The draft recovery strategy and criteria are summarized below. For a complete description of these components, as well as the actions and estimated time and costs associate with recovery, refer to the Draft Recovery Plan for the Dakota Skipper (see ADDRESSES for document availability). Recovery Strategy To recover the Dakota skipper, we will work with our public, private, and tribal partners to design and implement actions that will meet the four goals described below. 1. To ensure that the species’ adaptive capacity is preserved, recovery efforts will focus on maintaining Dakota skipper persistence across its current range of adaptive variation. We identified four conservation areas, referred to as Conservation Units (CU), to focus and manage our recovery efforts. 2. To foster the Dakota skipper’s ability to withstand environmental stochasticity, stressors, and catastrophes, recovery efforts should ensure that populations are healthy. Those healthy populations need to be supported by native prairie habitats typified by plant communities that reflect historical conditions and that contain a low abundance of non-native species. Recovery actions will also focus on ensuring that healthy populations are distributed across heterogeneous conditions within each CU. 3. Successful recovery requires a better understanding of some fundamental aspects of Dakota skipper ecology. Employing a well-designed adaptive management and monitoring framework for recovery implementation will allow us to better manage for suitable habitat conditions, protect against wide-range and simultaneous population declines due to environmental stochasticity and catastrophes, and respond to adverse effects of climate change. 4. Achieving the above goals is highly dependent on the cooperation and contributions of conservation partners. Specifically, attaining recovery will necessitate the cooperation and dedication of native prairie managers, conservationists, ranchers, farmers, agencies, and those with expertise needed to design and evaluate the effects of land management actions on the species. It will be critical to ensure that recovery goals are met in a manner that is in concert with the missions, objectives, and aspirations of our conservation partners. Recovery Criteria The ultimate recovery goal is to remove the Dakota skipper from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife (delist) by ensuring the long-term viability of the species in the wild. In the recovery plan, we define the following delisting criteria based on the best available information on the species: Criterion 1. A probability of persistence (pP) ≥ 0.95 over 50 years in each CU. Each CU must also have a minimum of five healthy populations. Criterion 2. A minimum of an additional 29 populations with each having a probability of persistence (pP) ≥ 0.75 over 50 years and distributed across CUs as specified in Table 1. TABLE 1—THE MINIMUM NUMBER OF POPULATIONS REQUIRED TO MEET CRITERIA 1 AND 2 Number of populations— Criterion 1 lotter on DSKBCFDHB2PROD with NOTICES Conservation unit CU CU CU CU 1: 2: 3: 4: Dry Steppes Ecoregion ..................................................................................................... Steppes Ecoregion ............................................................................................................ Red River Valley Section .................................................................................................. Prairie Coteau Section ...................................................................................................... Criterion 3. Each population considered under Criteria 1 and 2 has a written management plan in place that promotes population persistence. VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:03 Jan 23, 2020 Jkt 250001 Availability of Public Comments Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other PO 00000 Frm 00069 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 5 5 5 5 Number of populations— Criterion 2 9 6 4 10 Number of populations 14 11 9 15 personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may E:\FR\FM\24JAN1.SGM 24JAN1 4338 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 16 / Friday, January 24, 2020 / Notices be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Authority The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f). Lori Nordstrom, Assistant Regional Director, Ecological Services, Midwest Region. [FR Doc. 2020–01201 Filed 1–23–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs [DR5B211A000716] Deadline for Submitting Completed Applications To Begin Participation in the Tribal Self-Governance Program in Fiscal Year 2021 or Calendar Year 2021 Office of Self-Governance, Interior. ACTION: Notice of application deadline. AGENCY: In this notice, the Office of Self-Governance (OSG) establishes a March 1, 2020, deadline for Indian Tribes/consortia to submit completed applications to begin participation in the Tribal self-governance program in fiscal year 2021 or calendar year 2021. DATES: Completed application packages must be received by the Director, Office of Self-Governance, by March 1, 2020. ADDRESSES: Application packages for inclusion in the applicant pool should be sent to Sharee M. Freeman, Director, Office of Self-Governance, Department of the Interior, Mail Stop 3624–MIB, 1849 C Street NW, Washington, DC 20240. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Kenneth D. Reinfeld, Office of SelfGovernance, Telephone (703) 390–6551. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Tribal Self-Governance Act of 1994 (Pub. L. 103–413), as amended by the Fiscal Year 1997 Omnibus Appropriations Bill (Pub. L. 104–208), and section 1000.15(a) of Title 25 of the Code of Federal Regulations, the OSG Director may select up to 50 additional participating Tribes/consortia per year for the Tribal self-governance program and negotiate and enter into a written funding agreement with each participating Tribe. The Act mandates that the Secretary of the Interior submit copies of the funding agreements at least 90 days before the proposed effective lotter on DSKBCFDHB2PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:03 Jan 23, 2020 Jkt 250001 date to the appropriate committees of the Congress and to each Tribe that is served by the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ agency that is serving the Tribe that is a party to the funding agreement. Initial negotiations with a Tribe/consortium located in a region and/or agency which has not previously been involved with self-governance negotiations will take approximately 2 months from start to finish. Agreements for an October 1 to September 30 funding year need to be signed and submitted by July 1. Agreements for a January 1 to December 31 funding year need to be signed and submitted by October 1. Purpose of Notice The regulations at 25 CFR 1000.10 to 1000.31 will be used to govern the application and selection process for Tribes/consortia to begin their participation in the Tribal selfgovernance program in fiscal year 2021 and calendar year 2021. Applicants should be guided by the requirements in these subparts in preparing their applications. Copies of these subparts may be obtained from the information contact person identified in this notice. Tribes/consortia wishing to be considered for participation in the Tribal self-governance program in fiscal year 2021 or calendar year 2021 must respond to this notice, except for those Tribes/consortia which are: (1) Currently involved in negotiations with the Department; or (2) one of the 129 Tribal entities with signed agreements. Information Collection This information collection is authorized by OMB Control Number 1076–0143, Tribal Self-Governance Program, which expires June 30, 2022. Dated: December 18, 2019. Tara Sweeney, Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs. [FR Doc. 2020–01211 Filed 1–23–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4337–15–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [(LLCAD01000.L13400000.DO0000.20X) MO#4500140922] Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Haiwee Geothermal Leasing Area, California, and the Proposed Amendment to the California Desert Conservation Area Plan Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. AGENCY: PO 00000 Frm 00070 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA), and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, as amended (FLPMA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has prepared a Final Amendment to the California Desert Conservation Area (CDCA) Plan and a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Haiwee Geothermal Leasing Area (HGLA), Inyo County, California, and by this notice is announcing its availability. The proposed action is to amend the CDCA Plan to allow for geothermal leasing within approximately 22,805 acres. The proposed action also responds to three geothermal lease applications for 4,460 acres of public lands within the HGLA. DATES: BLM planning regulations state that any person who meets the conditions as described in the regulations may protest the BLM’s Proposed Land Use Plan Amendment and Final EIS. A person who meets the conditions and files a protest must file the protest within 30 days of the date that the Environmental Protection Agency publishes its Notice of Availability in the Federal Register. ADDRESSES: The Final EIS and Proposed Land Use Plan Amendment is available on the internet at https://go.usa.gov/ xEnvy. Hard copies of the Final EIS and Proposed Land Use Plan Amendment are available for public inspection at the BLM-Ridgecrest Field Office at 300 South Richmond Road, Ridgecrest, CA 93555, and at the California Desert District Office, 22835 Calle San Juan De Los Lagos, Moreno Valley, CA 92553. Hard copies of the Final EIS and Proposed Land Use Plan Amendment have been sent to affected Federal, State, local, and tribal government agencies and to other stakeholders. All protests must be in writing and filed with the BLM Director, either as a hard copy or electronically via the BLM’s ePlanning project website listed previously. To submit a protest electronically, go to the ePlanning project website and follow the protest instructions highlighted at the top of the home page. If submitting a protest in hard copy, it must be mailed to one of the following addresses: Regular Mail: BLM Director (210), Attention: Protest Coordinator, P.O. Box 71383, Washington, DC 20024–1383. Overnight Delivery: BLM Director (210), Attention: Protest Coordinator, 20 M Street SE, Room 2134LM, Washington, DC 20003. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Greg Miller, Assistant District Manager— Resources, telephone: 951–697–5216; address: 22835 Calle San Juan De Los Lagos, Moreno Valley, CA 92553; email: SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\24JAN1.SGM 24JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 16 (Friday, January 24, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 4336-4338]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2020-01201]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R3-ES-2018-N148; FXES11130300000-189-FF03E00000]


Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Recovery 
Plan for the Dakota Skipper

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of availability and request for public comment.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the 
availability of the draft recovery plan for the threatened Dakota 
skipper for public review and comment. We request review and comment on 
this draft recovery plan from local, State, and Federal agencies, and 
the public.

DATES: In order to be considered, comments must be received on or 
before February 24, 2020.

ADDRESSES: 
    Document availability: You may obtain a copy of the draft recovery 
plan by one of the following methods:
     U.S. mail: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Minnesota-
Wisconsin Ecological Services Field Office, Attention: Peter Fasbender; 
4101 American Blvd. East, Bloomington, MN 55425.
     Telephone: Peter Fasbender, 952-252-0092.
     internet: Download the document at the Service's Midwest 
Region website at https://www.fws.gov/midwest/Endangered/insects/dask/index.html.
    Comment submission: You may submit comments by one of the following 
methods:
     Mail or hand-delivery: Submit written comments to the 
above U.S. mail address.
     Fax: 952-646-2873, Attention: Peter Fasbender. Please 
include ``Dakota Skipper DRP'' in the subject line.
     Email: [email protected]. Please include ``Dakota 
Skipper DRP'' in the subject line.
    For additional information about submitting comments, see 
Availability of Public Comments in SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Peter Fasbender, by one of the methods 
in ADDRESSES.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
(Service), announce the availability of the draft recovery plan for the 
threatened Dakota skipper (Hesperia dacotae) for public review and 
comment. The draft recovery plan includes objective, measurable 
criteria and management actions as may be necessary for removal of the 
species from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife. We 
request review and comment on this draft recovery plan from local, 
State, and Federal agencies, and the public.

Recovery Planning

    Section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended 
(Act; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), requires the development of recovery 
plans for listed species, unless such a plan would not promote the 
conservation of a particular species. Also pursuant to section 4(f) of 
the Act, a recovery plan must, to the maximum extent practicable, 
include (1) a description of site-specific management actions as may be 
necessary to achieve the plan's goals for the conservation and survival 
of the species; (2) objective, measurable criteria that, when met, 
would support a determination under section 4(a)(1) that the species 
should be removed from the List of Endangered and Threatened Species; 
and (3) estimates of the time and costs required to carry out those 
measures needed to achieve the plan's goal and to achieve intermediate 
steps toward that goal.
    The Service has revised its approach to recovery planning. The 
revised process is intended to reduce the time

[[Page 4337]]

needed to develop and implement recovery plans, increase recovery plan 
relevancy over a longer timeframe, and add flexibility to recovery 
plans so they can be adjusted to new information or circumstances. A 
recovery plan will include statutorily required elements (objective, 
measurable criteria, site-specific management actions, and estimates of 
time and costs), along with a concise introduction and our strategy for 
how we plan to achieve species recovery. The recovery plan is supported 
by a separate Species Status Assessment. The essential component to 
flexible implementation under this recovery process is producing a 
separate working document called the Recovery Implementation Strategy 
(implementation strategy). The implementation strategy steps down from 
the more general description of actions in the recovery plan to detail 
the specific, near-term activities needed to implement the recovery 
plan. The implementation strategy will be adaptable by being able to 
incorporate new information without having to concurrently revise the 
recovery plan, unless changes to statutory elements are required. The 
implementation strategy will be developed following publication of the 
final recovery plan and will be made available on the Service's website 
at that time.

Species Background

    The Dakota skipper is a small butterfly with a 1-inch wingspan. 
Like other skippers, it has a thick body and faster, more powerful 
flight than most butterflies. The Dakota skipper inhabits remnants of 
tallgrass prairie and mixed-grass prairie in the north-central United 
States and into southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba Provinces of Canada. 
Within the native prairie patches where it persists, the species relies 
on high-quality habitat conditions--diverse native grassland plant 
communities--and on natural or human disturbances that maintain the 
integrity of these plant communities while minimizing mortality to 
vulnerable life stages. Populations may also be influenced 
significantly at local, landscape, regional, and continental scales by 
other factors that include activities such as grazing, haying, burning, 
pesticide use, and lack of management. (Refer to the Species Status 
Assessment Report (USFWS 2018) for a full discussion of the species' 
biology and threats.) Under the Act, the Service added the Dakota 
skipper as a threatened species to the Federal List of Endangered and 
Threatened Wildlife on October 24, 2014 (79 FR 63672).

Recovery Plan

    The draft recovery strategy and criteria are summarized below. For 
a complete description of these components, as well as the actions and 
estimated time and costs associate with recovery, refer to the Draft 
Recovery Plan for the Dakota Skipper (see ADDRESSES for document 
availability).

Recovery Strategy

    To recover the Dakota skipper, we will work with our public, 
private, and tribal partners to design and implement actions that will 
meet the four goals described below.
    1. To ensure that the species' adaptive capacity is preserved, 
recovery efforts will focus on maintaining Dakota skipper persistence 
across its current range of adaptive variation. We identified four 
conservation areas, referred to as Conservation Units (CU), to focus 
and manage our recovery efforts.
    2. To foster the Dakota skipper's ability to withstand 
environmental stochasticity, stressors, and catastrophes, recovery 
efforts should ensure that populations are healthy. Those healthy 
populations need to be supported by native prairie habitats typified by 
plant communities that reflect historical conditions and that contain a 
low abundance of non-native species. Recovery actions will also focus 
on ensuring that healthy populations are distributed across 
heterogeneous conditions within each CU.
    3. Successful recovery requires a better understanding of some 
fundamental aspects of Dakota skipper ecology. Employing a well-
designed adaptive management and monitoring framework for recovery 
implementation will allow us to better manage for suitable habitat 
conditions, protect against wide-range and simultaneous population 
declines due to environmental stochasticity and catastrophes, and 
respond to adverse effects of climate change.
    4. Achieving the above goals is highly dependent on the cooperation 
and contributions of conservation partners. Specifically, attaining 
recovery will necessitate the cooperation and dedication of native 
prairie managers, conservationists, ranchers, farmers, agencies, and 
those with expertise needed to design and evaluate the effects of land 
management actions on the species. It will be critical to ensure that 
recovery goals are met in a manner that is in concert with the 
missions, objectives, and aspirations of our conservation partners.

Recovery Criteria

    The ultimate recovery goal is to remove the Dakota skipper from the 
Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife (delist) by ensuring 
the long-term viability of the species in the wild. In the recovery 
plan, we define the following delisting criteria based on the best 
available information on the species:
    Criterion 1. A probability of persistence (pP) >= 0.95 over 50 
years in each CU. Each CU must also have a minimum of five healthy 
populations.
    Criterion 2. A minimum of an additional 29 populations with each 
having a probability of persistence (pP) >= 0.75 over 50 years and 
distributed across CUs as specified in Table 1.

                  Table 1--The Minimum Number of Populations Required To Meet Criteria 1 and 2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Number of               Number of
                Conservation unit                 populations--Criterion  populations--Criterion     Number of
                                                             1                       2              populations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CU 1: Dry Steppes Ecoregion.....................                   5                       9                  14
CU 2: Steppes Ecoregion.........................                   5                       6                  11
CU 3: Red River Valley Section..................                   5                       4                   9
CU 4: Prairie Coteau Section....................                   5                      10                  15
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Criterion 3. Each population considered under Criteria 1 and 2 has 
a written management plan in place that promotes population 
persistence.

Availability of Public Comments

    Before including your address, phone number, email address, or 
other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be 
aware that your entire comment--including your personal identifying 
information--may

[[Page 4338]]

be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your 
comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public 
review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.

Authority

    The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered 
Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f).

Lori Nordstrom,
Assistant Regional Director, Ecological Services, Midwest Region.
[FR Doc. 2020-01201 Filed 1-23-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P