Notice of Inventory Completion: School of Social Science and Global Studies, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, 341-343 [2019-28376]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 2 / Friday, January 3, 2020 / Notices definition of a sacred object under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Item In 1997, one cultural item was brought to the Burke Museum by Rocky Ka’iouliokahihikolo’Ehu Jensen. This cultural item is a Lama wood sculptural carving of Laka, the founder of the discipline of Hula. Information provided during consultation between the Burke Museum and Na¯ Lei O Manu’akepa representatives confirmed that the Laka sculpture is a necessary component which holds a very important role in the sacred Kuahu Ceremony of traditional Hula practitioners. The sculpture is seen as a manifestation of the Hula patron, Laka, to which traditional Hula practitioners conduct ceremonies and rituals with offerings for inspiration, guidance and protection in their present day cultural work and practices. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum Officials of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the one cultural item described above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American Hawaiian religions by their present-day adherents. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object and Na¯ Lei O Manu’akepa, a Native Hawaiian organization. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Holly Barker, Curator for Oceanic and Asian Culture, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 616–6891, email hmbarker@uw.edu, by February 3, 2020. After that date, if no VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:29 Jan 02, 2020 Jkt 250001 additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the sacred object to Na¯ Lei O Manu’akepa, a Native Hawaiian organization, may proceed. The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum is responsible for notifying Na¯ Lei O Manu’akepa that this notice has been published. Dated: November 14, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–28379 Filed 1–2–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0029320; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: School of Social Science and Global Studies, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Southern Mississippi has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the University of Southern Mississippi. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Southern Mississippi at the address in this notice by February 3, 2020. ADDRESSES: Marie Elaine Danforth, Professor, School of Social Science and Global Studies, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive #5108, Hattiesburg, MS 39406–0001, telephone (601) 266–5629, email m.danforth@ usm.edu. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00045 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 341 Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the School of Social Science and Global Studies, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS. The human remains were removed from Hancock, Jackson, and Harrison Counties, MS. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Southern Mississippi professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma (hereafter, they are referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). The Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Caddo Nation of Oklahoma; Catawba Indian Nation (aka Catawba Tribe of South Carolina); Cherokee Nation; Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians; Kialegee Tribal Town; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians; Poarch Band of Creeks (previously listed as the Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); Seminole Tribe of Florida (previously listed as the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations)); Shawnee Tribe; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma, were invited to consult but did not participate (hereafter, they are referred to as ‘‘The Invited Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains In 2014, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from the Bass site (22HR636) in Hancock County, MS. The human remains were found on the surface by archeologist Brad Lieb (The Chickasaw Nation) in a chance visit to the site after utility work had taken place. The proximal femora appear to belong to two adult probable males and the temporal, humerus, ulna, axial elements, tibia, E:\FR\FM\03JAN1.SGM 03JAN1 jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES 342 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 2 / Friday, January 3, 2020 / Notices patella, talus, and hand elements are all adult. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1991, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from the Cedarland site (22HA506) in Hancock County, MS. The human remains were initially discovered in the back dirt pile of a pothunter in 1991, by H. Edwin Jackson, a university archeologist conducting an excavation at the site. They were rediscovered while moving collections in early 2019. The proximal ulnar belongs to an adult male and an adult of undetermined sex and the humerus, femur, tibia, rib, and hand bones are all adult. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The remainder of the human remains listed in this notice were recently transferred from the Mississippi Department of Archives and History to the University of Southern Mississippi. Most of these human remains originally formed part of the collections of an amateur archeologist, who conducted numerous excavations on the Mississippi Coast from the 1960s through 1990s. No artifacts were reported to have been recovered in association with these human remains. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from the Godsey site (22HR591) in MS. The human remains, which include a proximal femur and metacarpal, are adult. The gracile appearance of the femur suggests it belongs to a female. In addition, a third individual, represented by a single infant vertebral body, who was initially recovered in the early 1990s during excavation at the site by the University of Southern Mississippi, was rediscovered while moving archeological collections in early 2019. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1969–70, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the Harvey site (22HR534) in MS. The human remains from at least one adult individual of indeterminate sex were recovered as part of an ossuary excavation conducted by the amateur archeologist. The human remains include small portions of a cranium, as well as the proximal sections of an ulna and femur. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from Fugan VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:29 Jan 02, 2020 Jkt 250001 Ridge Road in Jackson County, MS, when a grader cut into a shell midden. The skeletal elements were recovered by a collector, who gave them to the amateur archeologist. Fragments of femur and humerus appear to represent two adult individuals, one probable female and one probable male. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the 1970’s, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Bang’s Lake on the east side of Bayou Cumbest in Jackson County, MS. The human remains represent at least three individuals, as indicated by three left zygomatics and three right proximal femora. Except for some vault fragments that might be juvenile, the skeletal elements appear to be adult. The human remains include a nearly complete female adult cranial vault, as well as numerous other fragments of cranium. The axial elements include several vertebrae, parts of scapulae, and portions of ossa coxae. Long bones comprise the largest portion of the assemblage. Four foot bones are also present. Elements belonging to both sexes appear to be present. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from the area of the J&N Railroad Bridge in Gautier, Jackson County, MS. A single cranium was recovered and given to the amateur archeologist. The vault of the cranium is relatively complete, but the facial region is missing. It appears to belong to a young to middle adult male and exhibits cranial modification. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Bayou Cumbest I in Jackson County, MS; no site number is found for such a name. The human remains belong to a single adult, and are likely a male based on robusticity. They include some cranial vault fragments, as well as several long bone portions. Part of the ischium and one hand phalanx are also present. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Taneksanya (22JA504) in Jackson County, MS. Some of the human remains were exposed when an oak tree was overturned. Others were recovered after the site had been looted. While the minimum number of individuals is based on the presence of three right fragments of occipital base, PO 00000 Frm 00046 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 the actual number of individuals present could be larger. At least one individual was male, based on cranial and pelvic morphology. A range of robusticity among the other skeletal elements was noted. No juveniles were present. The skeletal elements recovered include one posterior portion of cranium along with a number of other vault fragments from other individuals. Several parts of maxillae and mandibles were seen, as were axial portions, including sternum, vertebrae and ribs. Several ossa coxae fragments were present, including one that belonged to a male. Diaphyseal fragments from all of the long bones were present, as were several and foot bones. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the 1970’s, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from Deer Island (22HR500) in Harrison County, MS. A cranium and ulna were found on the beach to the south of the villagemidden site; both likely belonged to adult males, but not necessarily the same individual, since they were reportedly not in immediate proximity. Additional adult and juvenile human remains were recovered in a trench excavation on the east side of the site. According to notes accompanying the human remains, these additional individuals included a female in a flexed position with an infant in her arms. However, the presence of a female cannot be confirmed by the elements present, which include a small maxilla fragment and several loose teeth; portions of the diaphysis of femur, radius, and ulna; and a hand phalanx. The juvenile elements include three vault portions of differing thickness and color, a complete right ilium consistent with an infant aged 3–4 months old, and a vertebral arch consistent with a child aged 3–4 years old. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals, were removed from Greenwood Island (22JA516) in Jackson County, MS. The human remains had been recovered primarily as isolated elements on the beach after eroding out of a nearby Early Woodland site. While the minimum number of individuals is based on portions of left mandible present, the actual number of individuals present could be larger. The human remains include several cranial fragments, mostly from the vault, and several loose teeth. Axial elements include left and right ilium and ischium fragments that are consistent with a single adult male, portions of scapula E:\FR\FM\03JAN1.SGM 03JAN1 Federal Register / Vol. 85, No. 2 / Friday, January 3, 2020 / Notices and clavicle, and a number of vertebrae. The appendicular elements include a number of upper limb long bones and several hand bones; femoral fragments from at least four different individuals; a pair of patellae; tibial and fibular portions; and numerous foot bones. Several of the elements appeared to be male based on robusticity, but at least one femur and humerus have epiphyses suggesting a female. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from Deer Island (22HR500), Taneksanya (22JA504), and Greenwood Island (22JA516), MS. While in storage, the human remains from these three sites were commingled before being given to MDAH, and thus had to be analyzed as a single group. While the minimum number of human remains is based on the presence of right left tali and two left humeral midshafts, the actual number of individuals present could be larger. Skeletal elements include a number of vault fragments, portions of scapula and ischium, several ribs and vertebrae, segments of all upper limb long bones, proximal femur, portions of fibula, and numerous foot bones. Based on the range of size and robusticity seen, both males and females are present. Recent fusion of two metacarpal epiphyses are consistent with one individual being an adolescent. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. jbell on DSKJLSW7X2PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by the University of Southern Mississippi Officials of the University of Southern Mississippi have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 28 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and The Consulted Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Marie Elaine Danforth, Professor, School of Social Science and Global Studies, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive #5108, Hattiesburg, MS 39406–0001, telephone VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:29 Jan 02, 2020 Jkt 250001 (601) 266–5629, email m.danforth@ usm.edu, by February 3, 2020. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to The Consulted Tribes may proceed. The University of Southern Mississippi is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes and The Invited Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: November 14, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–28376 Filed 1–2–20; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. CP2018–123; CP2019–69; MC2020–81 and CP2020–80; MC2020–82 and CP2020–81; MC2020–83 and CP2020– 82] New Postal Products Postal Regulatory Commission. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Commission is noticing a recent Postal Service filing for the Commission’s consideration concerning negotiated service agreements. This notice informs the public of the filing, invites public comment, and takes other administrative steps. DATES: Comments are due: January 6, 2020. SUMMARY: Submit comments electronically via the Commission’s Filing Online system at https:// www.prc.gov. Those who cannot submit comments electronically should contact the person identified in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section by telephone for advice on filing alternatives. ADDRESSES: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David A. Trissell, General Counsel, at 202–789–6820. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Contents I. Introduction II. Docketed Proceeding(s) I. Introduction The Commission gives notice that the Postal Service filed request(s) for the Commission to consider matters related to negotiated service agreement(s). The request(s) may propose the addition or removal of a negotiated service agreement from the market dominant or the competitive product list, or the modification of an existing product currently appearing on the market PO 00000 Frm 00047 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 343 dominant or the competitive product list. Section II identifies the docket number(s) associated with each Postal Service request, the title of each Postal Service request, the request’s acceptance date, and the authority cited by the Postal Service for each request. For each request, the Commission appoints an officer of the Commission to represent the interests of the general public in the proceeding, pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 505 (Public Representative). Section II also establishes comment deadline(s) pertaining to each request. The public portions of the Postal Service’s request(s) can be accessed via the Commission’s website (https:// www.prc.gov). Non-public portions of the Postal Service’s request(s), if any, can be accessed through compliance with the requirements of 39 CFR 3007.301.1 The Commission invites comments on whether the Postal Service’s request(s) in the captioned docket(s) are consistent with the policies of title 39. For request(s) that the Postal Service states concern market dominant product(s), applicable statutory and regulatory requirements include 39 U.S.C. 3622, 39 U.S.C. 3642, 39 CFR part 3010, and 39 CFR part 3020, subpart B. For request(s) that the Postal Service states concern competitive product(s), applicable statutory and regulatory requirements include 39 U.S.C. 3632, 39 U.S.C. 3633, 39 U.S.C. 3642, 39 CFR part 3015, and 39 CFR part 3020, subpart B. Comment deadline(s) for each request appear in section II. II. Docketed Proceeding(s) 1. Docket No(s).: CP2018–123; Filing Title: USPS Notice of Amendment to Priority Mail Express & Priority Mail Contract 55, Filed Under Seal; Filing Acceptance Date: December 23, 2019; Filing Authority: 39 CFR 3015.5; Public Representative: Curtis E. Kidd; Comments Due: January 6, 2020. 2. Docket No(s).: CP2019–69; Filing Title: USPS Notice of Amendment to Parcel Select & Parcel Return Service Contract 7, Filed Under Seal; Filing Acceptance Date: December 23, 2019; Filing Authority: 39 CFR 3015.5; Public Representative: Curtis E. Kidd; Comments Due: January 6, 2020. 3. Docket No(s).: MC2020–81 and CP2020–80; Filing Title: USPS Request to Add Priority Mail Express, Priority Mail, First-Class Package Service & Parcel Select Contract 4 to Competitive 1 See Docket No. RM2018–3, Order Adopting Final Rules Relating to Non-Public Information, June 27, 2018, Attachment A at 19–22 (Order No. 4679). E:\FR\FM\03JAN1.SGM 03JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 85, Number 2 (Friday, January 3, 2020)]
[Notices]
[Pages 341-343]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-28376]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0029320; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: School of Social Science and 
Global Studies, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Southern Mississippi has completed an 
inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian 
Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there 
is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day 
Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or 
representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains should submit a written request to the University 
of Southern Mississippi. If no additional requestors come forward, 
transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, 
Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian 
organization not identified in this notice that wish to request 
transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written 
request with information in support of the request to the University of 
Southern Mississippi at the address in this notice by February 3, 2020.

ADDRESSES: Marie Elaine Danforth, Professor, School of Social Science 
and Global Studies, University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College 
Drive #5108, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001, telephone (601) 266-5629, 
email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the School of Social Science and Global Studies, 
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS. The human remains 
were removed from Hancock, Jackson, and Harrison Counties, MS.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
University of Southern Mississippi professional staff in consultation 
with representatives of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and The 
Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma (hereafter, they are referred to as ``The 
Consulted Tribes'').
    The Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Caddo Nation of 
Oklahoma; Catawba Indian Nation (aka Catawba Tribe of South Carolina); 
Cherokee Nation; Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana; Coushatta Tribe of 
Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians; Kialegee Tribal Town; 
Miccosukee Tribe of Indians; Poarch Band of Creeks (previously listed 
as the Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); Seminole Tribe of 
Florida (previously listed as the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big 
Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations)); Shawnee Tribe; The 
Muscogee (Creek) Nation; The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Tunica-Biloxi 
Indian Tribe; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in 
Oklahoma, were invited to consult but did not participate (hereafter, 
they are referred to as ``The Invited Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    In 2014, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from the Bass site (22HR636) in Hancock County, MS. The 
human remains were found on the surface by archeologist Brad Lieb (The 
Chickasaw Nation) in a chance visit to the site after utility work had 
taken place. The proximal femora appear to belong to two adult probable 
males and the temporal, humerus, ulna, axial elements, tibia,

[[Page 342]]

patella, talus, and hand elements are all adult. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1991, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals 
were removed from the Cedarland site (22HA506) in Hancock County, MS. 
The human remains were initially discovered in the back dirt pile of a 
pothunter in 1991, by H. Edwin Jackson, a university archeologist 
conducting an excavation at the site. They were rediscovered while 
moving collections in early 2019. The proximal ulnar belongs to an 
adult male and an adult of undetermined sex and the humerus, femur, 
tibia, rib, and hand bones are all adult. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The remainder of the human remains listed in this notice were 
recently transferred from the Mississippi Department of Archives and 
History to the University of Southern Mississippi. Most of these human 
remains originally formed part of the collections of an amateur 
archeologist, who conducted numerous excavations on the Mississippi 
Coast from the 1960s through 1990s. No artifacts were reported to have 
been recovered in association with these human remains.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from the Godsey site (22HR591) in MS. The 
human remains, which include a proximal femur and metacarpal, are 
adult. The gracile appearance of the femur suggests it belongs to a 
female. In addition, a third individual, represented by a single infant 
vertebral body, who was initially recovered in the early 1990s during 
excavation at the site by the University of Southern Mississippi, was 
rediscovered while moving archeological collections in early 2019. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1969-70, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from the Harvey site (22HR534) in MS. The human remains 
from at least one adult individual of indeterminate sex were recovered 
as part of an ossuary excavation conducted by the amateur archeologist. 
The human remains include small portions of a cranium, as well as the 
proximal sections of an ulna and femur. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from Fugan Ridge Road in Jackson County, MS, 
when a grader cut into a shell midden. The skeletal elements were 
recovered by a collector, who gave them to the amateur archeologist. 
Fragments of femur and humerus appear to represent two adult 
individuals, one probable female and one probable male. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In the 1970's, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from Bang's Lake on the east side of Bayou 
Cumbest in Jackson County, MS. The human remains represent at least 
three individuals, as indicated by three left zygomatics and three 
right proximal femora. Except for some vault fragments that might be 
juvenile, the skeletal elements appear to be adult. The human remains 
include a nearly complete female adult cranial vault, as well as 
numerous other fragments of cranium. The axial elements include several 
vertebrae, parts of scapulae, and portions of ossa coxae. Long bones 
comprise the largest portion of the assemblage. Four foot bones are 
also present. Elements belonging to both sexes appear to be present. No 
known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1969, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from the area of the J&N Railroad Bridge in Gautier, 
Jackson County, MS. A single cranium was recovered and given to the 
amateur archeologist. The vault of the cranium is relatively complete, 
but the facial region is missing. It appears to belong to a young to 
middle adult male and exhibits cranial modification. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from Bayou Cumbest I in Jackson County, MS; no 
site number is found for such a name. The human remains belong to a 
single adult, and are likely a male based on robusticity. They include 
some cranial vault fragments, as well as several long bone portions. 
Part of the ischium and one hand phalanx are also present. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In 1968, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from Taneksanya (22JA504) in Jackson County, MS. Some of 
the human remains were exposed when an oak tree was overturned. Others 
were recovered after the site had been looted. While the minimum number 
of individuals is based on the presence of three right fragments of 
occipital base, the actual number of individuals present could be 
larger. At least one individual was male, based on cranial and pelvic 
morphology. A range of robusticity among the other skeletal elements 
was noted. No juveniles were present. The skeletal elements recovered 
include one posterior portion of cranium along with a number of other 
vault fragments from other individuals. Several parts of maxillae and 
mandibles were seen, as were axial portions, including sternum, 
vertebrae and ribs. Several ossa coxae fragments were present, 
including one that belonged to a male. Diaphyseal fragments from all of 
the long bones were present, as were several and foot bones. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    In the 1970's, human remains representing, at minimum, four 
individuals were removed from Deer Island (22HR500) in Harrison County, 
MS. A cranium and ulna were found on the beach to the south of the 
village-midden site; both likely belonged to adult males, but not 
necessarily the same individual, since they were reportedly not in 
immediate proximity. Additional adult and juvenile human remains were 
recovered in a trench excavation on the east side of the site. 
According to notes accompanying the human remains, these additional 
individuals included a female in a flexed position with an infant in 
her arms. However, the presence of a female cannot be confirmed by the 
elements present, which include a small maxilla fragment and several 
loose teeth; portions of the diaphysis of femur, radius, and ulna; and 
a hand phalanx. The juvenile elements include three vault portions of 
differing thickness and color, a complete right ilium consistent with 
an infant aged 3-4 months old, and a vertebral arch consistent with a 
child aged 3-4 years old. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, five 
individuals, were removed from Greenwood Island (22JA516) in Jackson 
County, MS. The human remains had been recovered primarily as isolated 
elements on the beach after eroding out of a nearby Early Woodland 
site. While the minimum number of individuals is based on portions of 
left mandible present, the actual number of individuals present could 
be larger. The human remains include several cranial fragments, mostly 
from the vault, and several loose teeth. Axial elements include left 
and right ilium and ischium fragments that are consistent with a single 
adult male, portions of scapula

[[Page 343]]

and clavicle, and a number of vertebrae. The appendicular elements 
include a number of upper limb long bones and several hand bones; 
femoral fragments from at least four different individuals; a pair of 
patellae; tibial and fibular portions; and numerous foot bones. Several 
of the elements appeared to be male based on robusticity, but at least 
one femur and humerus have epiphyses suggesting a female. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing, at minimum, two 
individuals were removed from Deer Island (22HR500), Taneksanya 
(22JA504), and Greenwood Island (22JA516), MS. While in storage, the 
human remains from these three sites were commingled before being given 
to MDAH, and thus had to be analyzed as a single group. While the 
minimum number of human remains is based on the presence of right left 
tali and two left humeral midshafts, the actual number of individuals 
present could be larger. Skeletal elements include a number of vault 
fragments, portions of scapula and ischium, several ribs and vertebrae, 
segments of all upper limb long bones, proximal femur, portions of 
fibula, and numerous foot bones. Based on the range of size and 
robusticity seen, both males and females are present. Recent fusion of 
two metacarpal epiphyses are consistent with one individual being an 
adolescent. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.

Determinations Made by the University of Southern Mississippi

    Officials of the University of Southern Mississippi have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 28 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and The Consulted Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human should submit a written 
request with information in support of the request to Marie Elaine 
Danforth, Professor, School of Social Science and Global Studies, 
University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive #5108, 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001, telephone (601) 266-5629, email 
[email protected], by February 3, 2020. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains to The Consulted Tribes may proceed.
    The University of Southern Mississippi is responsible for notifying 
The Consulted Tribes and The Invited Tribes that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: November 14, 2019.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2019-28376 Filed 1-2-20; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P