Migratory Birds; Double-Crested Cormorant Increased Take Limits for Depredation Permits in the Central and Eastern United States, 69762-69763 [2019-27415]

Download as PDF 69762 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 244 / Thursday, December 19, 2019 / Notices Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R3–ES–2019–N169; FXES11130300000–201–FF03E00000] Endangered and Threatened Species; Receipt of Recovery Permit Applications Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of receipt of permit applications; request for comments. AGENCY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, have received applications for permits to conduct activities intended to enhance the propagation or survival of endangered or threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. We invite the public and local, State, Tribal, and Federal agencies to comment on these applications. Before issuing any of the requested permits, we will take into consideration any information that we receive during the public comment period. DATES: We must receive your written comments on or before January 21, 2020. SUMMARY: Application No. Applicant TE43605A .......... Daniel Cox, Streator, IL. TE60750D .......... Aaron Geheber, Warrensburg, MO. lotter on DSKBCFDHB2PROD with NOTICES Background The Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA; 16 U.S.C. 1531 et Permit Applications Available for Review and Comment We invite local, State, and Federal agencies, Tribes, and the public to comment on the following applications. Permit action Location Activity Type of take Add Gray bat (Myotis grisescens) to existing permitted species: Indiana bat (M. sodalis), northern long-eared bat (M. septentrionalis). Topeka shiner (Notropis topeka). Add new location—FL—to existing authorized locations: AL, AR, CT, DE, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NH, NJ, NY, NC, ND, OH, OK, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, VT, VA, WV, WI, WY. MO ............................................... Conduct presence/absence surveys, document habitat use, conduct population monitoring, evaluate impacts. Capture, handle, mistnet, harp trap, band, radio-tag, release. Amend. Conduct scientific research. Captive reared individuals: Transport, handle, temporary hold, euthanize. New. Written comments we receive become part of the administrative record associated with this action. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can request in your comment that we withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Moreover, all submissions from organizations or businesses, and from individuals identifying themselves as representatives or officials of organizations or businesses, will be 19:13 Dec 18, 2019 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: seq.), prohibits certain activities with endangered and threatened species unless authorized by a Federal permit. The ESA and our implementing regulations in part 17 of title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) provide for the issuance of such permits and require that we invite public comment before issuing permits for activities involving endangered species. A recovery permit issued by us under section 10(a)(1)(A) of the ESA authorizes the permittee to conduct activities with endangered species for scientific purposes that promote recovery or for enhancement of propagation or survival of the species. Our regulations implementing section 10(a)(1)(A) for these permits are found at 50 CFR 17.22 for endangered wildlife species, 50 CFR 17.32 for threatened wildlife species, 50 CFR 17.62 for endangered plant species, and 50 CFR 17.72 for threatened plant species. Species Public Availability of Comments VerDate Sep<11>2014 Document availability and comment submission: Submit requests for copies of the applications and related documents, as well as any comments, by one of the following methods. All requests and comments should specify the applicant name(s) and application number(s) (e.g., TEXXXXXX): • Email: permitsR3ES@fws.gov. Please refer to the respective application number (e.g., Application No. TEXXXXXX) in the subject line of your email message. • U.S. Mail: Regional Director, Attn: Nathan Rathbun, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services, 5600 American Blvd. West, Suite 990, Bloomington, MN 55437–1458. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Nathan Rathbun, 612–713–5343 (phone); permitsR3ES@fws.gov (email). Individuals who are hearing or speech impaired may call the Federal Relay Service at 1–800–877–8339 for TTY assistance. ADDRESSES: DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Jkt 250001 made available for public disclosure in their entirety. Next Steps If we decide to issue permits to any of the applicants listed in this notice, we will publish a notice in the Federal Register. Authority We publish this notice under section 10(c) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Lori Nordstrom, Assistant Regional Director, Ecological Services, Region 3. [FR Doc. 2019–27337 Filed 12–18–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P PO 00000 Frm 00043 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–HQ–MB–2019–N148; FF09M29000– 190–FXMB1232090BPP0] Migratory Birds; Double-Crested Cormorant Increased Take Limits for Depredation Permits in the Central and Eastern United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: In November 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services, completed an environmental assessment (EA) and finding of no significant impact for the issuance of depredation permits for double-crested cormorants. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\19DEN1.SGM 19DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 244 / Thursday, December 19, 2019 / Notices The scope of the EA covered issuance of depredation permits for the purposes of health and human safety, aquaculture, property damage, and concern for conesting threatened or endangered species. This notice is to inform the public that, based on an adaptive management approach, we have reviewed recent data and are moving from the preferred alternative to the proposed action of using a higher annual take threshold, as prescribed in the 2017 EA. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jerome Ford, Assistant Director, Migratory Birds, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, at 202–208–1050. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is the Federal agency delegated the primary responsibility for managing migratory birds. Our authority derives from the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, as amended (MBTA or Act, 16 U.S.C. 703 et seq.), which implements conventions with Great Britain (for Canada), Mexico, Japan, and the Russia Federation. The MBTA protects certain migratory birds from take, except as permitted under the Act. We implement the provisions of the MBTA through regulations in parts 10, 13, 20, 21, and 22 of title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Regulations pertaining to migratory bird permits are at 50 CFR part 21. The double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is a fish-eating migratory bird that is distributed across a large portion of North America. These birds are generalist predators whose diet varies considerably between seasons and locations and tends to reflect fish species composition. lotter on DSKBCFDHB2PROD with NOTICES Environmental Assessment In 2017, we completed an environmental assessment (EA) on the issuance of depredation permits for double-crested cormorants across 37 central and eastern states and the District of Columbia (see 82 FR 52936; Nov. 15, 2017). The scope of the EA covered issuance of depredation permits for the purposes of protecting human safety and health, aquaculture, property, and co-nesting threatened or endangered species. Our preferred alternative in 2017 allowed a take of 51,571 cormorants per year. This alternative limited take to amounts previously authorized in the period 2010–2015, well below the lower limit of the potential take limit (PTL) model conducted for the Environmental Assessment. This more conservative VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:13 Dec 18, 2019 Jkt 250001 limit was taken in order to assess the continued need for individual permits and allow an adaptive approach if needed, while staying within the limits in the PTL model. In the EA, we noted that, by using an adaptive management approach, the Service may consider transitioning from the preferred alternative (reduced take alternative) to the less restrictive take authorized in the proposed action using the lower limit of the PTL. The PTL models estimated that the annual maximum allowable take of 74,396 cormorants per year would maintain the cormorant populations considered in the proposed action. Current Situation and Response In 2018, authorized take of cormorants was 51,154, and 10 permittees requested amendments to increase the authorized take of cormorants in their individual permits. In two cases, the amendments for increased take were requested multiple times. As of October 3, 2019, authorized take in 2019 was already 40,960 birds, and we have received 8 amendment requests. In one case, the amendment for an increase was requested a second time. This notice is to inform the public that, based on an adaptive management approach and our review of the recent data just described, we are moving from the preferred alternative in the 2017 EA to the proposed action of using a higher annual take threshold. To ensure that authorized take is not having a significant effect on cormorant populations, the Service will assess cormorant survey data and update the PTL at least every 10 years using data acquired from the Service Permits Information Tracking System. We will publish a notice in the Federal Register if we determine that the take of doublecrested cormorants should be changed again in the future. Dated: October 31, 2019. Margaret E. Everson, Principal Deputy Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Exercising the Authority of the Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2019–27415 Filed 12–18–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4333–15–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs [120 A2100DD/AAKC001030/ A0A501010.999900] Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe Alcohol Control Ordinance AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 ACTION: 69763 Notice. This notice publishes the Alcohol Control Ordinance of the SaukSuiattle Indian Tribe. The alcohol control ordinance is to regulate and control the possession, sale, manufacture, and distribution of alcohol in conformity with the laws of the State of Washington for the purpose of generating new Tribal revenues. Enactment of this ordinance will help provide a source of revenue to strengthen Tribal government, provide for the economic viability of Tribal enterprises, and improve delivery of Tribal government services. DATES: This code shall take effect on December 19, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Greg Norton, Tribal Government Specialist, Northwest Regional Office, Bureau of Indian Affairs, 911 NE 11th Avenue, Portland, OR 97232, Phone: (503) 231–6702; Fax: (503) 231–2201. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to the Act of August 15, 1953, Public Law 83–277, 67 Stat. 586, 18 U.S.C. 1161, as interpreted by the Supreme Court in Rice v. Rehner, 463 U.S. 713 (1983), the Secretary of the Interior shall certify and publish in the Federal Register notice of adopted liquor ordinances for the purpose of regulating liquor transactions in Indian country. The Sauk-Suiattle Tribal Council duly adopted the Alcohol Control Ordinance of the Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe on May 16, 2019. This notice is published in accordance with the authority delegated by the Secretary of the Interior to the Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs. I certify that the Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribal Council duly adopted the Alcohol Control Ordinance of the SaukSuiattle Indian Tribe by Resolution No. 05/19A/2019 dated May 16, 2019. SUMMARY: Dated: November 18, 2019. Tara Lean Sweeney, Assistant Secretary—Indian Affairs. Alcohol Control Ordinance of the SaukSuiattle Indian Tribe Section 1. Definitions. a. Alcoholic Liquor. Alcoholic liquor means any alcoholic beverage containing more than one half of one percent alcohol by volume, and every liquid or solid, patented or not, containing alcohol and capable of being consumed by a human being. b. Barrel. Barrel means 31 gallons for beer or malt beverages. c. Beer or Malt Beverage. Beer or malt beverage means any alcoholic beverage obtained by the fermentation of any infusion or decoction of barley, malt, E:\FR\FM\19DEN1.SGM 19DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 244 (Thursday, December 19, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 69762-69763]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-27415]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-HQ-MB-2019-N148; FF09M29000-190-FXMB1232090BPP0]


Migratory Birds; Double-Crested Cormorant Increased Take Limits 
for Depredation Permits in the Central and Eastern United States

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In November 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, working 
in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife 
Services, completed an environmental assessment (EA) and finding of no 
significant impact for the issuance of depredation permits for double-
crested cormorants.

[[Page 69763]]

The scope of the EA covered issuance of depredation permits for the 
purposes of health and human safety, aquaculture, property damage, and 
concern for co-nesting threatened or endangered species. This notice is 
to inform the public that, based on an adaptive management approach, we 
have reviewed recent data and are moving from the preferred alternative 
to the proposed action of using a higher annual take threshold, as 
prescribed in the 2017 EA.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jerome Ford, Assistant Director, 
Migratory Birds, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, at 202-208-1050.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is the Federal agency 
delegated the primary responsibility for managing migratory birds. Our 
authority derives from the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, as 
amended (MBTA or Act, 16 U.S.C. 703 et seq.), which implements 
conventions with Great Britain (for Canada), Mexico, Japan, and the 
Russia Federation. The MBTA protects certain migratory birds from take, 
except as permitted under the Act. We implement the provisions of the 
MBTA through regulations in parts 10, 13, 20, 21, and 22 of title 50 of 
the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Regulations pertaining to 
migratory bird permits are at 50 CFR part 21.
    The double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) is a fish-
eating migratory bird that is distributed across a large portion of 
North America. These birds are generalist predators whose diet varies 
considerably between seasons and locations and tends to reflect fish 
species composition.

Environmental Assessment

    In 2017, we completed an environmental assessment (EA) on the 
issuance of depredation permits for double-crested cormorants across 37 
central and eastern states and the District of Columbia (see 82 FR 
52936; Nov. 15, 2017). The scope of the EA covered issuance of 
depredation permits for the purposes of protecting human safety and 
health, aquaculture, property, and co-nesting threatened or endangered 
species.
    Our preferred alternative in 2017 allowed a take of 51,571 
cormorants per year. This alternative limited take to amounts 
previously authorized in the period 2010-2015, well below the lower 
limit of the potential take limit (PTL) model conducted for the 
Environmental Assessment. This more conservative limit was taken in 
order to assess the continued need for individual permits and allow an 
adaptive approach if needed, while staying within the limits in the PTL 
model. In the EA, we noted that, by using an adaptive management 
approach, the Service may consider transitioning from the preferred 
alternative (reduced take alternative) to the less restrictive take 
authorized in the proposed action using the lower limit of the PTL. The 
PTL models estimated that the annual maximum allowable take of 74,396 
cormorants per year would maintain the cormorant populations considered 
in the proposed action.

Current Situation and Response

    In 2018, authorized take of cormorants was 51,154, and 10 
permittees requested amendments to increase the authorized take of 
cormorants in their individual permits. In two cases, the amendments 
for increased take were requested multiple times. As of October 3, 
2019, authorized take in 2019 was already 40,960 birds, and we have 
received 8 amendment requests. In one case, the amendment for an 
increase was requested a second time.
    This notice is to inform the public that, based on an adaptive 
management approach and our review of the recent data just described, 
we are moving from the preferred alternative in the 2017 EA to the 
proposed action of using a higher annual take threshold.
    To ensure that authorized take is not having a significant effect 
on cormorant populations, the Service will assess cormorant survey data 
and update the PTL at least every 10 years using data acquired from the 
Service Permits Information Tracking System. We will publish a notice 
in the Federal Register if we determine that the take of double-crested 
cormorants should be changed again in the future.

    Dated: October 31, 2019.
Margaret E. Everson,
Principal Deputy Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Exercising 
the Authority of the Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
[FR Doc. 2019-27415 Filed 12-18-19; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4333-15-P