Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Moody Air Force Base Comprehensive Airspace Initiative, Georgia, 65790-65791 [2019-25885]

Download as PDF 65790 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 230 / Friday, November 29, 2019 / Notices FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Alberta E. Mills, Division of the Secretariat, Office of the General Counsel, Consumer Product Safety Commission, 4330 East West Highway, Bethesda, MD 20814; telephone 301– 504–7479; email: amills@cpsc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background For several years, CPSC has been studying the potential risks associated with crib bumpers. In May 2012, the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Associated (JPMA) submitted a petition asking the Commission to initiate rulemaking under sections 7 and 9 of the Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA) to distinguish ‘‘hazardous pillow-like’’ crib bumpers from ‘‘nonhazardous traditional’’ crib bumpers. In 2013, the Commission voted to grant the petition and provided specific direction to staff. In the FY 2017 Operating Plan, the Commission directed staff to develop a proposed standard under section 104 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA). On September 4, 2019, in response to this direction, CPSC staff submitted a briefing package, including a draft proposed rule, for crib bumpers/ liners. [https://www.cpsc.gov/s3fspublic/Proposed%20Rule%20%20Safety%20Standard%20for %20Crib%20Bumpers-Liners%20Under %20the%20Danny%20..__0.pdf]. II. The Forum khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES A. Topics for Discussion The Commission would like to hear comments and information from interested parties concerning the potential hazards associated with crib bumpers. The goal of the forum is to hear from the public about their views of the potential hazards associated with crib bumpers and their suggestions for ways to address those hazards. In addition to these general issues, the Commission invites comments on the following, more specific topics: 1. The utility/benefit of crib bumpers, including, but not limited to: (a) Whether babies suffer head injuries from crib slats without crib bumpers; and (b) whether babies suffer limb injuries from entrapment in crib slats without crib bumpers. 2. Consumers’ understanding of the ‘‘Bare is Best’’ safety messaging related to infant sleep safety, including, but not limited to, whether consumers consider the presence of crib bumpers to be consistent with that messaging. 3. Any current or proposed state laws relating to crib bumpers, and whether VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:49 Nov 27, 2019 Jkt 250001 and how those laws reflect or conflict with staff’s recommendation. 4. Any performance requirements and test methods for crib bumpers (or similar crib accessories) relevant to the identification and elimination of suffocation hazards, including, but not limited to: (a) Air permeability; (b) Firmness or the conforming of bumper materials to the facial features of infants, and (c) Any other aspects of crib bumpers (or similar crib accessories). 5. The potential effects of the preemption of state and local laws addressing crib bumpers. B. How To Make a Presentation, Attend, or Provide Written Comments The forum will be held at 10 a.m. on January 22, 2020, at the CPSC’s office in Bethesda, MD (see the ADDRESSES section of this notice for more information). The Commission forum will also be available through a webcast, but viewers will not be able to interact with the panels and presenters through the webcast. • If you would like to make an oral presentation at the forum, please send an email to cpsc-os@cpsc.gov by January 6, 2020, with a summary of your presentation, as well as a brief biography. Presentations should be limited to approximately 10 minutes. The Commission reserves the right to impose further time limitations or other restrictions, if needed, to avoid duplication of presentations. • If you would like to provide written comments, please follow the instructions in the ADDRESSES section of this notice. Abioye E. Mosheim, Acting Secretary, U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. [FR Doc. 2019–25890 Filed 11–27–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6355–01–P DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Moody Air Force Base Comprehensive Airspace Initiative, Georgia AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, DOD. ACTION: Notice of intent. In accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations Section 1508.22, the United States Air Force (Air Force) is issuing this notice of intent to prepare SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to assess the potential environmental consequences associated with modifying existing and creating new special use airspace (SUA) in the Moody Airspace Complex to support the training missions at Moody Air Force Base (AFB). DATES: A public scoping meeting will be held at the University of Georgia, Tifton Campus Conference Center, 15 R D C Road, Tifton, Georgia 31794, on Thursday, December 5, 2019, 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. (local time). Although comments can be submitted to the Air Force any time during the EIS process, scoping comments are requested by December 20, 2019, to ensure full consideration in the Draft EIS. ADDRESSES: For questions regarding the Proposed Action, scoping, and EIS development, please contact the Moody AFB Public Affairs Office at (229) 257– 4146 or at 23wg.pa@us.af.mil. The public and interested parties can submit their comments through the project website at www.moodyafbairspaceeis.com; mail comments to AFCEC/CZN, Attn: Moody AFB Comprehensive Airspace Initiative, 2261 Hughes Avenue, Suite 155, JBSA Lackland, TX 78236–9853; FedEx and UPS deliveries to AFCEC/CZN, Attn: Moody AFB Comprehensive Airspace Initiative; 3515 S General McMullen, San Antonio, TX 78226–9853; and/or attend the public scoping meeting. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Moody Airspace Complex, located above 28 counties in south Georgia and north Florida, consists primarily of midto higher-altitude (8,000 feet above mean sea level [MSL] to FL180 [18,000 feet]) SUA with limited low-altitude SUA (less than 8,000 feet MSL). A–10C, A–29, HH–60G, and HC–130J aircrews assigned to Moody Air Force Base (AFB), Georgia, have severely constrained access to few existing, overly congested low-altitude SUAs wherein they can conduct required training operations at low-altitude to gain operational proficiency and meet their low-altitude close air support (CAS), personnel recovery (PR), and combat search and rescue (CSAR) mission objectives for combat readiness. Providing additional low-altitude Moody AFB-controlled SUA would support the low-altitude training missions (CSAR, PR, CAS) for aircrews stationed at Moody AFB to ensure aircrew protection, readiness, and increase aircrew lethality in addition to survivability in real-world combat situations. The Air Force has preliminarily identified three action alternatives to E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1 khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 230 / Friday, November 29, 2019 / Notices expand low-altitude training airspace at Moody AFB as meeting the purpose of and need for this Proposed Action, and a No Action Alternative. The three action alternatives would create new low-altitude Military Operations Areas (MOAs) beneath and within the lateral confines of existing MOAs and Restricted Areas of the Moody Airspace Complex. While the three alternatives are independent of each other, the decision maker may choose to implement one, a combination of lowaltitude MOAs from among the three, or none of the alternatives based on the analysis provided in the EIS. Alternative 1 would create the Corsair North Low, Corsair South Low, Mustang Low, and Warhawk Low MOAs with a floor of 1,000 feet AGL and a ceiling of 7,999 feet MSL; create a Thud Low MOA with a floor of 4,000 feet AGL and a ceiling of 7,999 feet MSL; a Grand Bay MOA with a floor of 100 feet AGL and a ceiling of 499 feet AGL; and lower the floor of the existing Moody 2 North MOA from 500 feet AGL to 100 feet AGL. Alternative 2 would create and modify MOAs as described under Alternative 1, except that the new Corsair North Low, Corsair South Low, Mustang Low, and Warhawk Low MOAs would be created with a floor of 2,000 feet AGL instead of 1,000 feet AGL. Alternative 3 would create and modify MOAs as described under Alternative 1, except that the new Corsair North Low, Corsair South Low, Mustang Low, and Warhawk Low MOAs would be created with a floor of 4,000 feet AGL instead of 1,000 feet AGL. Training within the new low MOAs would include the use of chaff and flares, with flare use limited to altitudes above 2,000 feet AGL and no use of chaff allowed in the Corsair North Low MOA. Urban Close Air Support, helicopter landing zones, drop zones, and the use of training ordnance at the Grand Bay Range would continue unchanged under all three alternatives. The Proposed Action would not change the number of sorties at Moody AFB airfield or the number of aircraft operations in the Moody Airspace Complex. Under the No Action Alternative, there would be no addition of lowaltitude SUA at Moody Airspace Complex. As such, aircrews at Moody AFB would either continue to conduct limited training operations within existing low-altitude MOAs or continue the time- and cost-intensive practice of scheduling and traveling to distant lowaltitude airspace complexes within the region where their ability to actually train within scheduled airspaces could be denied. Under the No Action VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:49 Nov 27, 2019 Jkt 250001 Alternative, the current airspace constraints would continue and would not provide for realistic training within SUAs associated with Moody AFB. The analysis of the No Action Alternative will provide a benchmark to enable Air Force decision makers to compare the magnitude of the environmental effects of the Proposed Action. Scoping and Agency Coordination: To effectively define the full range of issues and alternatives to be evaluated in the EIS, the Air Force will determine the scope of the analysis by soliciting comments from interested local, state, and federal elected officials and agencies, as well as interested members of the public and others. The Air Force will also pursue government-togovernment consultations with interested Native American tribes. Adriane Paris, Acting Air Force Federal Register Liaison Officer. [FR Doc. 2019–25885 Filed 11–27–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 5001–10–P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; High School Equivalency Program Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Department of Education (Department) is issuing a notice inviting applications for fiscal year (FY) 2020 for the High School Equivalency Program (HEP), Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number 84.141A. This notice relates to the approved information collection under OMB control number 1894–0006. DATES: Applications Available: December 2, 2019. Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: January 28, 2020. Deadline for Intergovernmental Review: March 30, 2020. Pre-Application Webinar Information: The Department will hold a preapplication workshop via webinar for prospective applicants on December 11, 2019, 1:30 p.m. Eastern Time. ADDRESSES: For the addresses for obtaining and submitting an application, please refer to our Common Instructions for Applicants to Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the Federal Register on February 13, 2019 (84 FR 3768) and available at www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-201902-13/pdf/2019-02206.pdf. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00016 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65791 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steven Carr, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Room 3E321, Washington, DC 20202. Telephone: (202) 260–2067. Email: steven.carr@ed.gov. If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call the Federal Relay Service (FRS), toll free, at 1–800–877– 8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Full Text of Announcement I. Funding Opportunity Description Purpose of Program: The HEP is designed to assist migratory or seasonal farmworkers (or immediate family members of such workers) to obtain the equivalent of a secondary school diploma and subsequently to gain improved employment, enter into military service, or be placed in an institution of higher education (IHE) or other postsecondary education or training. Priorities: This competition includes two competitive preference priorities and one invitational priority. Competitive Preference Priority 1 is from the Secretary’s Final Supplemental Priorities and Definitions for Discretionary Grant Programs (Supplemental Priorities) published in the Federal Register on March 2, 2018 (83 FR 9096). In accordance with 34 CFR 75.105(b)(2)(iv), Competitive Preference Priority 2 is from section 418A(e) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA) (20 U.S.C. 1070d–2(e)). The purpose of the program aligns with priority 9(c) of the Supplemental Priorities, which promotes projects aimed at creating or supporting alternative paths to a regular high school diploma (as defined in section 8101(43) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended) or recognized postsecondary credentials (as defined in section 3(52) of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act) for students whose environments outside of school, disengagement with a traditional curriculum, homelessness, or other challenges make it more difficult for them to complete an educational program. Competitive Preference Priorities: For FY 2020 and any subsequent year in which we make awards from the list of unfunded applications from this competition, these priorities are competitive preference priorities. Under 34 CFR 75.105(c)(2)(i) we award up to an additional 5 points to an application for Competitive Preference Priority 1 and up to an additional 15 points to an E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 230 (Friday, November 29, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65790-65791]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-25885]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

 Department of the Air Force


Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for 
the Moody Air Force Base Comprehensive Airspace Initiative, Georgia

AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, DOD.

ACTION: Notice of intent.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations Section 
1508.22, the United States Air Force (Air Force) is issuing this notice 
of intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to assess 
the potential environmental consequences associated with modifying 
existing and creating new special use airspace (SUA) in the Moody 
Airspace Complex to support the training missions at Moody Air Force 
Base (AFB).

DATES: A public scoping meeting will be held at the University of 
Georgia, Tifton Campus Conference Center, 15 R D C Road, Tifton, 
Georgia 31794, on Thursday, December 5, 2019, 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. 
(local time). Although comments can be submitted to the Air Force any 
time during the EIS process, scoping comments are requested by December 
20, 2019, to ensure full consideration in the Draft EIS.

ADDRESSES: For questions regarding the Proposed Action, scoping, and 
EIS development, please contact the Moody AFB Public Affairs Office at 
(229) 257-4146 or at [email protected]. The public and interested 
parties can submit their comments through the project website at 
www.moodyafbairspaceeis.com; mail comments to AFCEC/CZN, Attn: Moody 
AFB Comprehensive Airspace Initiative, 2261 Hughes Avenue, Suite 155, 
JBSA Lackland, TX 78236-9853; FedEx and UPS deliveries to AFCEC/CZN, 
Attn: Moody AFB Comprehensive Airspace Initiative; 3515 S General 
McMullen, San Antonio, TX 78226-9853; and/or attend the public scoping 
meeting.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Moody Airspace Complex, located above 28 
counties in south Georgia and north Florida, consists primarily of mid- 
to higher-altitude (8,000 feet above mean sea level [MSL] to FL180 
[18,000 feet]) SUA with limited low-altitude SUA (less than 8,000 feet 
MSL). A-10C, A-29, HH-60G, and HC-130J aircrews assigned to Moody Air 
Force Base (AFB), Georgia, have severely constrained access to few 
existing, overly congested low-altitude SUAs wherein they can conduct 
required training operations at low-altitude to gain operational 
proficiency and meet their low-altitude close air support (CAS), 
personnel recovery (PR), and combat search and rescue (CSAR) mission 
objectives for combat readiness. Providing additional low-altitude 
Moody AFB-controlled SUA would support the low-altitude training 
missions (CSAR, PR, CAS) for aircrews stationed at Moody AFB to ensure 
aircrew protection, readiness, and increase aircrew lethality in 
addition to survivability in real-world combat situations.
    The Air Force has preliminarily identified three action 
alternatives to

[[Page 65791]]

expand low-altitude training airspace at Moody AFB as meeting the 
purpose of and need for this Proposed Action, and a No Action 
Alternative. The three action alternatives would create new low-
altitude Military Operations Areas (MOAs) beneath and within the 
lateral confines of existing MOAs and Restricted Areas of the Moody 
Airspace Complex. While the three alternatives are independent of each 
other, the decision maker may choose to implement one, a combination of 
low-altitude MOAs from among the three, or none of the alternatives 
based on the analysis provided in the EIS. Alternative 1 would create 
the Corsair North Low, Corsair South Low, Mustang Low, and Warhawk Low 
MOAs with a floor of 1,000 feet AGL and a ceiling of 7,999 feet MSL; 
create a Thud Low MOA with a floor of 4,000 feet AGL and a ceiling of 
7,999 feet MSL; a Grand Bay MOA with a floor of 100 feet AGL and a 
ceiling of 499 feet AGL; and lower the floor of the existing Moody 2 
North MOA from 500 feet AGL to 100 feet AGL. Alternative 2 would create 
and modify MOAs as described under Alternative 1, except that the new 
Corsair North Low, Corsair South Low, Mustang Low, and Warhawk Low MOAs 
would be created with a floor of 2,000 feet AGL instead of 1,000 feet 
AGL. Alternative 3 would create and modify MOAs as described under 
Alternative 1, except that the new Corsair North Low, Corsair South 
Low, Mustang Low, and Warhawk Low MOAs would be created with a floor of 
4,000 feet AGL instead of 1,000 feet AGL.
    Training within the new low MOAs would include the use of chaff and 
flares, with flare use limited to altitudes above 2,000 feet AGL and no 
use of chaff allowed in the Corsair North Low MOA. Urban Close Air 
Support, helicopter landing zones, drop zones, and the use of training 
ordnance at the Grand Bay Range would continue unchanged under all 
three alternatives. The Proposed Action would not change the number of 
sorties at Moody AFB airfield or the number of aircraft operations in 
the Moody Airspace Complex.
    Under the No Action Alternative, there would be no addition of low-
altitude SUA at Moody Airspace Complex. As such, aircrews at Moody AFB 
would either continue to conduct limited training operations within 
existing low-altitude MOAs or continue the time- and cost-intensive 
practice of scheduling and traveling to distant low-altitude airspace 
complexes within the region where their ability to actually train 
within scheduled airspaces could be denied. Under the No Action 
Alternative, the current airspace constraints would continue and would 
not provide for realistic training within SUAs associated with Moody 
AFB. The analysis of the No Action Alternative will provide a benchmark 
to enable Air Force decision makers to compare the magnitude of the 
environmental effects of the Proposed Action.
    Scoping and Agency Coordination: To effectively define the full 
range of issues and alternatives to be evaluated in the EIS, the Air 
Force will determine the scope of the analysis by soliciting comments 
from interested local, state, and federal elected officials and 
agencies, as well as interested members of the public and others. The 
Air Force will also pursue government-to-government consultations with 
interested Native American tribes.

Adriane Paris,
Acting Air Force Federal Register Liaison Officer.
[FR Doc. 2019-25885 Filed 11-27-19; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 5001-10-P