Notice of Inventory Completion: Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner, Tucson, AZ, 65407-65409 [2019-25732]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 229 / Wednesday, November 27, 2019 / Notices excavated by Walker date as early as the intermediate period (1000 B.C. to A.D. 1000), but the site is mostly a late prehistoric to historic settlement that contained both residential and ceremonial elements. The Fernanden˜o consider these three archeological sites as a single multi-component settlement known as Momonga, while the Chumash use the term Calucscoho. A number of rock art panels have been documented at the Chatsworth site, and the excavations by Pence, Walker, and McIntyre uncovered objects consistent with Native American occupation. An article by Sanburg et al. (1978) states: The Chatsworth Site was occupied into historic times (Walker 1952:85; Leonard 1974), but there is some conflict as to which group, the Fernandeno or the Chumash, was associated with it. Kroeber (1925: 621) and Johnston (1966: 9, 11) consider the site to be within the Fernandeno area whose boundary with the Chumash they set a short distance to the west at the Santa Susana Pass. This has been questioned by Forbes (1966: 138) who states that the Chumash extended as far east as El Escorpion, located in the southwestern section of the San Fernando Valley and probably were found to the north all along the valley’s western edge. [Sanburg et al. 1978, page 28]. Sanburg et al. (1978) conclude that the ‘‘petrographic art present at the Chatsworth Site relates well to the previously presented material from the Chumash Area.’’ Based on the documentary evidence, the site most likely had dual-ethnic components with either simultaneous or subsequent use or occupation. Therefore, the site holds significant ritual and ceremonial importance to both the Fernanden˜o and Chumash people. During consultation, Pierce College received correspondence from the Tribal President of the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band, Rudy J. Ortega Jr., citing various archeological and historic publications linking the Fernanden˜o Tribe to the site. Mr. Ortega’s letter also included information about the Tribe’s ethnic makeup, territorial boundaries, and connection to the Momonga site (CA LAN 357/CA LAN 21). One individual was recovered from a burial at CA LAN 357 during Pence’s excavations in 1970 and 1971. The human remains were found in very poor condition, with 65–70% of the skull and torso missing. Several photographs taken during the burial excavation show the bones of the lower portion (legs) of an individual in the flexed (fetal) position. According to the excavators, the individual was a middle-aged adult of undetermined sex. One individual was recovered from the excavation of a burial during the VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:21 Nov 26, 2019 Jkt 250001 1972 field season. The human remains recovered are too fragmentary to allow specification of the sex, age, or stature of the individual. According to the excavators, the individual was a young adult of undetermined sex, but the excavators considered the individual to be male because of the associated objects recovered with the burial. These items, consisting mostly of hammerstone fragments and chipped stone tools, could not be located. Four individuals are represented by solitary teeth that were recovered from excavation units during Pence’s 1970s field seasons. The teeth were found in individually labeled small bags and consist of one fragment of a molar from excavation unit L28, one premolar (reg. no. 72–1202), one incisor (reg. no. 70– 0787), and one maxillary canine (reg. no. 72–1199). One individual is represented by a solitary tibia fragment that is likely to have come from McIntyre’s excavations of the CA LAN 21 site in 1976. Human remains representing, at minimum, least 11 individuals were stored separately in boxes marked Series A, B, D, E–1, E–2, and T. Each box was treated as a separate burial context. Series A, B, D, and E–1 boxes contained fragmented human remains representing at least one individual each. Series E– 2 box contain the fragmented human remains of at least three individuals. Series’ T and K boxes contained fragmented human remains representing at least two individuals each. No known individuals were identified. The 72 associated funerary objects are 17 chipped stone scrapers, two shaped sandstone tools, six chipped stone projectile points, four chipped-stone core fragments, one rim fragment from a ground stone bowl, one small bag of ochre fragments, four sandwich bags of small animal bone fragments, three sandwich bags of chipped stone flakes and debitage, and 34 fragments of animal bones. Determinations Made by Los Angeles Pierce College Officials of Los Angeles Pierce College have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 18 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 72 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65407 identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, and, if joined, the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians, a non-federally recognized Indian group. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Ronald K Faulseit, Los Angeles Pierce College, 6201 Winnetka Avenue, Woodland Hills, CA 91371, telephone (818) 610–6560, email faulserk@piercecollege.edu, by December 27, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California, and the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians (if joined with the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California) may proceed. The Los Angeles Pierce College is responsible for notifying the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California and the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians that this notice has been published. Dated: October 8, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–25729 Filed 11–26–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0029192; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner, Tucson, AZ National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner (PCOME) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM 27NON1 65408 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 229 / Wednesday, November 27, 2019 / Notices there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the PCOME. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the PCOME at the address in this notice by December 27, 2019. ADDRESSES: Dr. Bruce Anderson, Forensic Anthropologist, Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner, 2825 E District Street, Tucson, AZ 85714, telephone (520) 724–8600, email bruce.anderson@pima.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner, Tucson, AZ. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from San Manuel, Pinal County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the PCOME professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ak-Chin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:21 Nov 26, 2019 Jkt 250001 Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains On July 7, 2009, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from a wash near the San Pedro River in San Manuel, Pinal County, AZ. The human remains were discovered in the base of a dried wash by a young man on a run that morning. Personnel from the Pinal County Sheriff’s Office arrived on the scene, where they recovered and transported the recovered human remains to the Pinal County Medical Examiner’s Office. On July 8, 2009, the Pinal County Medical Examiner, Dr. Rebecca Hsu, transferred the human remains to the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner, to be examined by the Pima County Forensic Anthropologist, Dr. Bruce Anderson. According to Dr. Anderson, the human remains are of an adult individual of Native American ancestry, and are likely prehistoric. The human remains were designated case ML09–01398, and they have since resided in the PCOME as an unidentified, prehistoric case. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Although the human remains were not discovered at a known archeological site, the area where the human remains were recovered, near the San Pedro River and south of the Gila River, constitutes part of the core area of the Hohokam tradition. The Grewe-Casa Grande settlement complex on the middle Gila River is one of the largest Hohokam settlements in the prehistoric American Southwest. The classic period of Hohokam Culture (A.D. 1150–1450) is characterized by the aggregation of Hohokam villages into larger villages located primarily along the middle Gila and lower San Pedro Rivers where the human remains were discovered. On December 15, 2010, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were discovered near the San Pedro River in San Manuel, Pinal County, AZ. The human remains were discovered on the south bank of a wash by an unknown individual whom had been removing a tree on the wash bank. The human remains were recovered by PO 00000 Frm 00062 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 personnel of the Pinal County Sherriff’s Office and brought to the Pinal County Medical Examiner, Dr. Rebecca Hsu. On December 16, 2010, the human remains were transferred to the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner to be examined by the Pima County Forensic Anthropologist, Dr. Bruce Anderson. According to Dr. Anderson, the human remains were prehistoric due to the condition of the remains, the dental wear, and the associated funerary objects. In addition, Dr. Anderson estimated the human remains to be a probable female 20 years old (+/¥ 3 years). The human remains were designated case ML10–02448, and have resided in the PCOME as an unidentified prehistoric case. No known individuals were identified. The 387 associated funerary objects are 387 conus shell beads. The human remains were discovered near a site discovered along the San Pedro River, on part of the Johnny Rhodes’ Sacaton Ranch, where a burial containing a possible necklace composed of conus shell beads had been found. Prehistoric ruins, as well as sherds of Gila Polychrome pottery and Tanque Verde Red-on Brown pottery were also discovered at the site. Sites along the lower San Pedro River are associated with the Classic Period (A.D. 1150–1450) of Hohokam Culture. Determinations Made by the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner Officials of the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 387 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Bruce Anderson, E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM 27NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 229 / Wednesday, November 27, 2019 / Notices Forensic Anthropologist, Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner, 2825 E District Street, Tucson, AZ 85714, telephone (520) 724–8600, email bruce.anderson@pima.gov, by December 27, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona may proceed. The Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner is responsible for notifying the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona and The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: October 24, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–25732 Filed 11–26–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–AKR–ANIA–CAKR–DENA–GAAR– KOVA–LACL–WRST–28636;PPAKAKROR4, PPMPRLE1Y.LS0000] Request for Nominations for the National Park Service Alaska Region Subsistence Resource Commission Program National Park Service, Interior. Request for nominations. AGENCY: ACTION: The National Park Service (NPS) is seeking nominations for new members to represent subsistence users on the following Subsistence Resource Commissions (SRC): The Aniakchak National Monument SRC, the Cape Krusenstern National Monument SRC, the Denali National Park SRC, the Gates of the Arctic National Park SRC, the Lake Clark National Park SRC, the Kobuk Valley National Park SRC, and the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park SRC. DATES: Nominations must be postmarked by December 27, 2019. ADDRESSES: Nominations should be sent to: Joshua T. Ream, Ph.D., (Xı´xch’i Toowo´o), Subsistence Program Manager, National Park Service, Alaska Regional Office, 240 W 5th Avenue, Anchorage, AK 99501, or email at joshua_ream@ nps.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joshua T. Ream, Ph.D., (Xı´xch’i Toowo´o), Subsistence Program Manager, National Park Service, Alaska Regional Office, 240 W 5th Avenue, Anchorage, AK 99501, or email at joshua_ream@ nps.gov, or via telephone at (907) 644– 3596. SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:21 Nov 26, 2019 Jkt 250001 The NPS SRC program is authorized under section 808 of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 3118). The SRCs hold meetings to develop NPS subsistence program recommendations and advise on related regulatory proposals and resource management issues. Each SRC is composed of nine members: (a) Three members appointed by the Secretary of the Interior; (b) three members appointed by the Governor of the State of Alaska; and (c) three members appointed by a Regional Advisory Council (RAC), established pursuant to 16 U.S.C. 3115, which has jurisdiction within the area in which the park is located. Each of the three members appointed by the RAC must be a member of either the RAC or a local advisory committee within the region who also engages in subsistence uses within the Park or Park Monument. We are now seeking nominations for those three members of each of the SRCs listed above. These members are to be appointed by the Secretary of the Interior. Members will be appointed for a term of three years. Members of the SRC serve without compensation. However, while away from their homes or regular places of business in the performance of services for the SRC, and as approved by the Designated Federal Officer (DFO), members may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, in the same manner as persons employed intermittently in Government service are allowed such expenses under Section 5703 of Title 5 of the United States Code. SRC meetings will take place at such times as designated by the DFO. Members are expected to make every effort to attend all meetings. Members may not appoint deputies or alternates. We are seeking nominations for members to represent subsistence users on each of the seven SRCs listed above. All those interested in serving as members, including current members whose terms are expiring, must follow the same nomination process. Nominations should be typed and should include a resume providing an adequate description of the nominee’s qualifications, including information that would enable the Department of the Interior to make an informed decision regarding meeting the membership requirements of the SRC, and to permit the Department to contact a potential member. Public Disclosure of Information: Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00063 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65409 nomination, you should be aware that your entire nomination—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your nomination to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Authority: 5 U.S.C. Appendix 2. Alma Ripps, Chief, Office of Policy. [FR Doc. 2019–25726 Filed 11–26–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0029205; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, at the address in this notice by December 27, 2019. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM 27NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 229 (Wednesday, November 27, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65407-65409]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-25732]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0029192; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Pima County Office of the Medical 
Examiner, Tucson, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner (PCOME) has 
completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that

[[Page 65408]]

there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and 
associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any 
Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this 
notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains 
and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the 
PCOME. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of 
the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal 
descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in 
this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to the PCOME at the address in this notice by 
December 27, 2019.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Bruce Anderson, Forensic Anthropologist, Pima County 
Office of the Medical Examiner, 2825 E District Street, Tucson, AZ 
85714, telephone (520) 724-8600, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Pima County Office 
of the Medical Examiner, Tucson, AZ. The human remains and associated 
funerary objects were removed from San Manuel, Pinal County, AZ.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the PCOME 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ak-Chin 
Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of 
the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Fort McDowell 
Yavapai Nation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River 
Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, 
Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona; Salt River 
Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; 
San Carlos Apache Tribe of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; White 
Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and the 
Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereafter referred to 
as ``The Consulted Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    On July 7, 2009, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from a wash near the San Pedro River in San 
Manuel, Pinal County, AZ. The human remains were discovered in the base 
of a dried wash by a young man on a run that morning. Personnel from 
the Pinal County Sheriff's Office arrived on the scene, where they 
recovered and transported the recovered human remains to the Pinal 
County Medical Examiner's Office. On July 8, 2009, the Pinal County 
Medical Examiner, Dr. Rebecca Hsu, transferred the human remains to the 
Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner, to be examined by the Pima 
County Forensic Anthropologist, Dr. Bruce Anderson. According to Dr. 
Anderson, the human remains are of an adult individual of Native 
American ancestry, and are likely prehistoric. The human remains were 
designated case ML09-01398, and they have since resided in the PCOME as 
an unidentified, prehistoric case. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Although the human remains were not discovered at a known 
archeological site, the area where the human remains were recovered, 
near the San Pedro River and south of the Gila River, constitutes part 
of the core area of the Hohokam tradition. The Grewe-Casa Grande 
settlement complex on the middle Gila River is one of the largest 
Hohokam settlements in the prehistoric American Southwest. The classic 
period of Hohokam Culture (A.D. 1150-1450) is characterized by the 
aggregation of Hohokam villages into larger villages located primarily 
along the middle Gila and lower San Pedro Rivers where the human 
remains were discovered.
    On December 15, 2010, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were discovered near the San Pedro River in San Manuel, 
Pinal County, AZ. The human remains were discovered on the south bank 
of a wash by an unknown individual whom had been removing a tree on the 
wash bank. The human remains were recovered by personnel of the Pinal 
County Sherriff's Office and brought to the Pinal County Medical 
Examiner, Dr. Rebecca Hsu. On December 16, 2010, the human remains were 
transferred to the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner to be 
examined by the Pima County Forensic Anthropologist, Dr. Bruce 
Anderson. According to Dr. Anderson, the human remains were prehistoric 
due to the condition of the remains, the dental wear, and the 
associated funerary objects. In addition, Dr. Anderson estimated the 
human remains to be a probable female 20 years old (+/- 3 years). The 
human remains were designated case ML10-02448, and have resided in the 
PCOME as an unidentified prehistoric case. No known individuals were 
identified. The 387 associated funerary objects are 387 conus shell 
beads.
    The human remains were discovered near a site discovered along the 
San Pedro River, on part of the Johnny Rhodes' Sacaton Ranch, where a 
burial containing a possible necklace composed of conus shell beads had 
been found. Prehistoric ruins, as well as sherds of Gila Polychrome 
pottery and Tanque Verde Red-on Brown pottery were also discovered at 
the site. Sites along the lower San Pedro River are associated with the 
Classic Period (A.D. 1150-1450) of Hohokam Culture.

Determinations Made by the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner

    Officials of the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of two individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 387 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Tohono 
O'odham Nation of Arizona.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request with information in 
support of the request to Dr. Bruce Anderson,

[[Page 65409]]

Forensic Anthropologist, Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner, 
2825 E District Street, Tucson, AZ 85714, telephone (520) 724-8600, 
email [email protected], by December 27, 2019. After that date, 
if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of 
the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Tohono O'odham 
Nation of Arizona may proceed.
    The Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner is responsible for 
notifying the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona and The Consulted Tribes 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: October 24, 2019.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2019-25732 Filed 11-26-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P