Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 65405-65406 [2019-25728]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 229 / Wednesday, November 27, 2019 / Notices from the Laws site, 1MS100, on Pine Island in Marshall County, AL, after TVA purchased the site on April 21, 1937. Excavations began at the levee adjacent to the river and proceeded by both vertical slicing and horizontal excavations. There appear to have been at least four occupations at this site, including a pre-ceramic period with steatite vessels; a village using limestone-tempered pottery during the Flint River phase (A.D. 500–1000); a late Mississippian occupation using shelltempered ceramics and rectilinear wall trench structures (Crow Creek phase, A.D. 1500–1700); and the EuroAmerican trade period (circa A.D. 1670– 1715). The human remains are from the Mississippian or historic Native American occupation. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Although there is no absolute certainty that Native Americans of the Mississippian period are directly related to modern federally recognized Tribes, a relationship of shared group identity can reasonably be traced between these modern Tribes and the human remains of the earlier culture identified as Mississippian. The preponderance of the evidence indicates that the cultural items from Mississippian and early historic occupations at site 1MS100 are culturally affiliated with Native Americans descendants of the Koasati/ Kaskinampo. These descendants include the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas); AlabamaQuassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Chronicles from Spanish explorers of the 16th century and French explorers of the 17th and 18th centuries indicate the presence of chiefdom-level tribal entities in the southeastern United States which resemble the Mississippian chiefdoms. Linguistic analysis of place names noted by multiple Spanish explorers indicates that Koasati speaking groups inhabited northeastern Alabama. Early maps and research into the historic Native American occupation of northeastern Alabama indicates that the Koasati (as called by the English) or the Kaskinampo (as called by the French) were found at multiple sites in Jackson and Marshall Counties in the 17th and 18th centuries. Oral history, traditions, and expert opinions of the descendants of Koasati/Kaskinampo indicate that this portion of the Tennessee River valley was a homeland of their Tribe. The subsequent involuntary diaspora of these peoples resulted in descendants of the Koasati/ VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:21 Nov 26, 2019 Jkt 250001 Kaskinampo living among multiple federally recognized Tribes. Determinations Made by the Tennessee Valley Authority Officials of the Tennessee Valley Authority have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as the Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Thomas O. Maher, TVA, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902– 1401, telephone (865) 632–7458, email tomaher@tva.gov, by December 27, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas); AlabamaQuassarte Tribal Town; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; and The Muscogee (Creek) Nation may proceed. The Tennessee Valley Authority is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: October 8, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–25731 Filed 11–26–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0029194; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65405 The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request to the Burke Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to the Burke Museum at the address in this notice by December 27, 2019. ADDRESSES: Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685–3849 x2, email plape@uw.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUMMARY: History and Description of the Cultural Items Between 1953 and 1954, two cultural items were removed from site 45–KL–27 in Klickitat County, WA, as part of a University of Washington Field Project led by Warren Caldwell. The cultural items were formally accessioned by the Burke Museum in 1966 (Burke Accn. #1966–86). The two unassociated funerary objects are two lots of unmodified wood. Site 45–KL–27 borders the Columbia River in Washington. Museum E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM 27NON1 65406 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 229 / Wednesday, November 27, 2019 / Notices documentation indicates that the cultural items were found in context with burials. Early and late published ethnographic documentation indicates that this was the aboriginal territory of the Western Columbia River Sahaptins, Wasco, Wishram, Yakima, Walla Walla, Umatilla, Tenino and Skin (Daughtery 1973, Hale 1841, Hunn and French 1998, French and French 1998, Mooney 1896, Murdock 1938, Ray 1936 and 1974, Spier 1936, Stern 1998). The descendants of these peoples are members of the present-day Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (previously listed as the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon); and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Determinations Made by the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum Officials of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the two cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim these cultural items should submit a written request with information in support of the claim to Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685–3849 x2, email plape@uw.edu, by December 27, 2019. After that date, if no additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the unassociated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed. The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. VerDate Sep<11>2014 20:21 Nov 26, 2019 Jkt 250001 Dated: October 24, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–25728 Filed 11–26–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0029091; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Los Angeles Pierce College, Woodland Hills, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Los Angeles Pierce College has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to Los Angeles Pierce College. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Los Angeles Pierce College at the address in this notice by December 27, 2019. ADDRESSES: Ronald K. Faulseit, Los Angeles Pierce College, 6201 Winnetka Avenue, Woodland Hills, CA 91371, telephone (818) 610–6560, email faulserk@piercecollege.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of Los Angeles Pierce College, Woodland Hills, CA. The human remains and associated SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 funerary objects were removed from the Chatsworth and Chatsworth Cairn archeological sites (CA LAN 357 and CA LAN 21), Los Angeles, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Los Angeles Pierce College’s professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians of the Santa Ynez Reservation, California and the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians, a nonfederally recognized Indian group. History and Description of the Remains Members of the Anthropology Department of Los Angeles Pierce College have found the human remains of, at minimum, 18 individuals and 72 associated funerary objects in the Anthropology storeroom at Pierce College. Analysis of archived field notebooks and site excavation forms in our possession demonstrates that these human remains and funerary objects were collected between 1970 and 1976 during excavations directed by Robert Pence (Pierce College) and Mike McIntyre (Californian State University Northridge [CSUN]) at the Chatsworth and Chatsworth Cairn archeological sites (CA LAN 357 and CA LAN 21). The non-funerary materials collected from CA LAN 357, such as chipped stone tools, worked animal bone, and ground stone items, indicate clear prehistoric Native American affiliation, while the project notebooks and forms contain no indication that any of the items collected were of non-native origin. CA LAN 357 is a well-documented archeological site that today is found mostly on the grounds of the Chatsworth Hills Academy in Chatsworth, CA (McIntyre 1975). It is associated with two other nearby sites, CA LAN 209 (now mostly covered by California state highway 118) and the Chatsworth Cairn site, CA LAN 21. The latter site was excavated originally by Edwin Walker in 1939, and later by McIntyre of CSUN. Today, the location consists of multiple housing developments (Raab 1986). According to Hull (2012), some of the features E:\FR\FM\27NON1.SGM 27NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 229 (Wednesday, November 27, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65405-65406]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-25728]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0029194; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Thomas Burke 
Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke 
Museum), in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native 
Hawaiian organizations, has determined that the cultural items listed 
in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. 
Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim 
these cultural items should submit a written request to the Burke 
Museum. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of 
the cultural items to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native 
Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
claim these cultural items should submit a written request with 
information in support of the claim to the Burke Museum at the address 
in this notice by December 27, 2019.

ADDRESSES: Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 
353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685-3849 x2, email 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the 
control of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, 
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, that meet the definition of 
unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    Between 1953 and 1954, two cultural items were removed from site 
45-KL-27 in Klickitat County, WA, as part of a University of Washington 
Field Project led by Warren Caldwell. The cultural items were formally 
accessioned by the Burke Museum in 1966 (Burke Accn. #1966-86). The two 
unassociated funerary objects are two lots of unmodified wood.
    Site 45-KL-27 borders the Columbia River in Washington. Museum

[[Page 65406]]

documentation indicates that the cultural items were found in context 
with burials. Early and late published ethnographic documentation 
indicates that this was the aboriginal territory of the Western 
Columbia River Sahaptins, Wasco, Wishram, Yakima, Walla Walla, 
Umatilla, Tenino and Skin (Daughtery 1973, Hale 1841, Hunn and French 
1998, French and French 1998, Mooney 1896, Murdock 1938, Ray 1936 and 
1974, Spier 1936, Stern 1998). The descendants of these peoples are 
members of the present-day Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama 
Nation; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 
(previously listed as the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla 
Reservation, Oregon); and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs 
Reservation of Oregon (hereafter referred to as ``The Tribes'').

Determinations Made by the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State 
Museum

    Officials of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the two cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
unassociated funerary objects and The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to claim 
these cultural items should submit a written request with information 
in support of the claim to Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of 
Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685-3849 x2, 
email [email protected], by December 27, 2019. After that date, if no 
additional claimants have come forward, transfer of control of the 
unassociated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed.
    The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum is responsible 
for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: October 24, 2019.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2019-25728 Filed 11-26-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P