Caribou-Targhee National Forest; Idaho; Caribou-Targhee National Forest and Curlew National Grassland Integrated Weed Management Analysis, 59765-59767 [2019-24222]

Download as PDF 59765 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 215 / Wednesday, November 6, 2019 / Notices respondent. Of the 238,644 households requesting four replacement EBT cards, about 26,424 are estimated to be in the six States where the agencies have opted to follow our regulations at 274.6(b)(5) to withhold replacement cards. FNS estimates that half of all recipients who receive a notice upon issuance of their fourth card will request a fifth card. Estimated Time per Response: FNS estimates that it will take State personnel approximately 2 minutes to generate and mail each required notice to the client, to comply with 7 CFR 274.6; and that it will take SNAP recipients approximately 2 minutes to read each notice they receive and 28 minutes to make contact with the State agency when required. There is an average estimated time of 0.04557373 hours for each response. Estimated Total Annual Burden on Respondents: 22,956 hours (14,560.85 burden hours for individuals/ households and 8,396.20 for State agencies). The currently approved annual burden is 21,941 hours. The revision reflects two adjustments, neither of which is related to an FNS program change: (1) Because the number of households participating in SNAP has decreased, Estimated number respondents Respondent Activity Individuals or Household (I/H) .................. Read Withhold Replacement Card Warning Notice (274.6(b)(5)). Read Replacement Card Withheld Notice & Contact State Agency (274.6(b)(5)). Read Excessive Replacement Card Notice (274.6(b)(6)). we have fewer excessive replacement EBT card requests and therefore fewer notices, and (2) more States opt to follow our regulations at 274.6(b)(5) to withhold replacement cards, which requires some households to make contact with the State agency if they request excessive replacement cards See the table below for estimated total reporting annual burden for each type of respondent. There is no recordkeeping or thirdparty disclosure burden contained in this information collection request. Responses annually per respondent Total annual responses Estimated average number of hours per response Estimated total hours 26,424 1.00 26,424 0.03 880.81 * 13,212 1.00 13,212 0.50 6,606.05 212,220 1.00 212,220 0.03 7,073.99 Individuals/Households Subtotal ....... ................................................................... 238,644 ...................... 251,856 ...................... 14,560.85 State Agency ............................................ Send Withhold Replacement Card Warning Notice (274.6(b)(5)). Send Replacement Card Withheld Notice (274.6(b)(5)). Send Excessive Replacement Card Notice (274.6(b)(6)). 6 4,404.03 26,424 0.03 880.81 6 2,202.02 13,212 0.03 440.40 47 4,515.31 212,220 0.03 7,073.99 State Agencies Subtotal .................... ................................................................... 53 ...................... 251,856 ...................... 8,395.20 Overall Grand Total Burden ....... ................................................................... 238,697 2.11 503,712 0.0455737 22,956.05 * Note: The 13,212 Individuals/Households SNAP participants are the same I/H accounted for in the 26,424 and therefore not double counted. Dated: October 18, 2019. Pamilyn Miller, Administrator, Food and Nutrition Service. [FR Doc. 2019–24097 Filed 11–5–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–30–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Caribou-Targhee National Forest; Idaho; Caribou-Targhee National Forest and Curlew National Grassland Integrated Weed Management Analysis Forest Service, USDA. Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement. AGENCY: ACTION: The Caribou-Targhee National Forest will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) for invasive plant management. Invasive plants are a major threat to the biological diversity and ecological integrity within and outside the Caribou-Targhee National Forest and the Curlew National Grassland (Forests). The Forests propose to implement adaptive and integrated SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:43 Nov 05, 2019 Jkt 250001 invasive plan management on current and potential infested areas forest-wide. A clear and comprehensive integrated invasive plant management strategy would allow for the implementation of timely and effective invasive plant management and prevention projects and programs on the Forests. In the absence of an aggressive invasive plant management program, the number, density, and distribution of invasive plants on both Forests is expected to increase. Comments concerning the scope of the analysis must be received by December 23, 2019. The draft EIS is expected in May 2020 and the final EIS is expected in November 2020. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Caribou-Targhee National Forest, 1405 Hollipark Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83401. Comments may also be sent via email to FS-comments-intermtn-cariboutarghee@usda.gov or via facsimile to (208) 557–5827. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Heidi Heyrend at (208) 557–5791 or heidi.heyrend@usda.gov. Individuals DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1– 800–877–8339 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., Eastern Time, Monday through Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Invasive plants create many adverse environmental effects, including, but not limited to: Displacement of native plants; reduction in functionality of habitat for wildlife; loss of threatened, endangered, and sensitive species; increased soil erosion and reduced water quality; alteration of physical and biological properties of soil, including reduced soil productivity; changes to the intensity and frequency of fires, and loss of recreational opportunities. Within the 2.9 million acres of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest and Curlew National Grassland, less than two percent are identified as being infested with invasive, non-native, and/ or state-listed noxious weeds. These invasive plant infestations have a high potential to expand on lands within and adjacent to the Forests, degrading desired plant communities E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1 59766 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 215 / Wednesday, November 6, 2019 / Notices and the values provided by those communities. Forest lands are also threatened by invasive plants that have not been found on the Forests but are known to occur on adjacent lands. Infestations can be prevented, eliminated, or controlled through the use of specific management practices. Purpose and Need for Action The overall purpose of the proposed action is to reduce the negative effects of invasive plants on the structure and function of native plant communities and on other natural resource values. The proposal is in response to an underlying need to implement policy and direction provided at the national, regional, state, and forest levels (Executive Order 13112—Invasive Species, 2004 National Invasive Species Strategy and Implementation Plan, 2008–2012 National Invasive Species Management Plan, 2009 Intermountain Region Invasive Species Management Strategy, 2005 Idaho Strategic Plan for Managing Noxious and Invasive Weeds, and the amended Land and Resource Management Plans for the CaribouTarghee National Forest and Curlew National Grassland). The need for the proposed action is multifaceted. Forest resources are negatively impacted by existing and expanding invasive plant species populations. These species are known to out-compete native plants, which can result in reduced productivity and biodiversity, habitat loss, and associated economic impacts. A timely response to new infestations, new invasive plant species, and landscape scale disturbances is needed. On the Forests, landscape-level tree mortality and disturbance from insects and wildfires have increased and are likely to continue to increase the potential for invasive plant infestations. Existing decisions for invasive plant management on the Forests do not address new species or provide priorities for managing new infestations. Updating these decisions would allow the Forests to satisfy the need to incorporate early detection and rapid response into the invasive plant management program. Invasive plant infestations already exist throughout the Forests and without management will likely increase in density and distribution. Active and adaptive integrated management is necessary to contain invasive plants within existing boundaries, reduce infestation densities, and retard the establishment of new infestations. Control efforts would be focused on infestations that can realize the greatest resource benefits—those with the highest risk of spread, those VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:43 Nov 05, 2019 Jkt 250001 that have not become established, and those that have the best likelihood of success of control. New analysis and planning is needed to make available the most current tools and guide their best use. Rehabilitation of degraded landscapes can inhibit the spread and establishment of invasive plants. Appropriate rehabilitation efforts are a critical component of a fully functional invasive plant management program. The goals of rehabilitating degraded areas may include preventing new infestations, preventing the reoccurrence of eradicated infestations, and/or reducing the density and spread of existing infestations. Post-fire rehabilitation efforts may incorporate one or more of the established control techniques outlined in the proposed action. size of known infestations, proximity to vectors or susceptible habitat, and ability to outcompete desirable plant species. The priority of species to be treated would vary based on these factors and could change over time. These priorities would be used to guide selection of specific management activities for particular infestations. Rehabilitation activities would be designed and implemented based on the conditions found in and around infested areas. Both active revegetation and passive revegetation (allowing plants on site to fill in a treated area) would be considered. Rehabilitation techniques would be assessed and implemented in order to promote native plant communities that are resistant to infestation by invasive plants. Proposed Action The Forests propose to implement adaptive and integrated invasive plant management on current and potential infested areas forest-wide, including the Jedidiah Smith Wilderness Area and the Winegar Hole Wilderness Area. Management activities would include inventory and assessment designed to support early detection and rapid response, control methods, implementation and effectiveness monitoring, and rehabilitation. Activities would be implemented with federal, state, and local partners where opportunities exist. Infestations outside of currently identified areas may include new sites that arise in the future, or sites that currently exist, but have not been identified in Forest inventories to date. The proposed action includes the use of ground-based and aerial herbicide applications, manual and mechanical treatments, aquatic treatments, biological treatments, and combinations of these treatments. Proposed control methods would be based on integrated pest management principles and methods known to be effective for each target species. They include, but are not limited to, mechanical techniques, such as mowing and pulling; cultural practices, such as the use of certified noxious weed-free hay; biological control agents, such as pathogens, insects, and controlled grazing; and herbicides that target specific invasive plant species. Control methods could be employed alone or in combination. Treatment methods would be based on the extent, location, type, and character of an infestation and would be implemented using project design features. Management priority would be based on factors such as number and The No Action/Current Management Alternative would continue current weed management programs, treatments, and levels of effort for controlling weeds on both Forests. Because of limited ability to respond rapidly to new treatment areas and updated methods, it is anticipated that continuation of the current weed treatment program would not keep pace with the spread of weeds on both Forests. New weed invaders would continue to establish populations that would likely increase in size. Under this Alternative, it would likely not be possible to be consistent with management direction in all of the management areas on both Forests or to implement effectiveness monitoring and adaptive management as prescribed in the amended Land and Resource Management Plans. PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Possible Alternatives Responsible Official The responsible official will be the Forest Supervisor for the CaribouTarghee National Forest and the Curlew National Grassland. Nature of Decision To Be Made The responsible official will decide whether or not to treat invasive plants on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest and the Curlew National Grassland, including the Jedidiah Smith Wilderness Area (123,451 acres) and the Winegar Hole Wilderness Area (10,721 acres), and if so, what methods and treatments will be used. Permits or Licenses Required Applicators must be licensed Idaho professional herbicide applicators per Idaho Department of Agriculture Rules Governing Pesticide Use and Application (Idaho Code § 22–3404). E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 215 / Wednesday, November 6, 2019 / Notices Scoping Process This notice of intent initiates the scoping process, which guides the development of the EIS. Comments that would be most useful are those concerning developing or refining the proposed action, and in particular, are site-specific concerns and those that can help us develop treatments that would be responsive to our goal to control, contain, or eradicate invasive plants. It is important that reviewers provide their comments at such times and in such manner that they are useful to the agency’s preparation of the EIS. Therefore, comments should be provided prior to the close of the comment period and should clearly articulate the reviewer’s concerns and contentions. Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment, will be part of the public record for this proposed action. The decision for this project will be subject to the objection process at 36 CFR 218 subparts A and B. Only individuals or entities who submit timely and specific written comments concerning the project during this or another designated public comment period established by the responsible official will be eligible to file on objection. Dated: October 16, 2019. Allen Rowley, Associate Deputy Chief, National Forest System. [FR Doc. 2019–24222 Filed 11–5–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3411–15–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection: Cooperative Wildland Fire Management and Stafford Act Response Agreements Forest Service, USDA, Bureau of Land Management DOI, Fish and Wildlife Service DOI, National Park Service DOI, and Bureau of Indian Affairs DOI. ACTION: Notice and request for comment. AGENCY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Forest Service is seeking comments from all interested individuals and organizations on the extension with no changes to the information collection, Cooperative Wildland Fire Management and Stafford Act Response Agreements. DATES: Comments must be received in writing on or before January 6, 2020 to be assured of consideration. Comments SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:43 Nov 05, 2019 Jkt 250001 received after that date will be considered to the extent practicable. ADDRESSES: Comments concerning this notice should be addressed to Tim Melchert, Cooperative Fire Specialist, USDA Forest Service, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20250. Comments also may be submitted via facsimile to 208–387–5398 or by email to: SM.FS.Fire-Agrmts@usda.gov. The public may inspect comments received at Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20250 during normal business hours. Visitors are encouraged to call ahead to 202–205–1637 to facilitate entry to the building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tim Melchert, Cooperative Fire Specialist, at USDA Forest Service, 208–387–5887. Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1–800– 877–8339 twenty-four hours a day, every day of the year, including holidays. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Forest Service will submit a request for a new information collection to Office of Management and Budget. Title: Cooperative Wildland Fire Management and Stafford Act Response Agreements. OMB Number: 0596–0242. Type of Request: Extension of a currently approved information collection. Abstract: To allow the performance of specific activities in cooperation with Federal, State, local, and Tribal governments, Congress enacted authorities allowing the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and United States Department of the Interior (DOI) to enter into cooperative agreements with fire organizations to improve efficiency. These include: 1. Facilitating the coordination and exchange of personnel, equipment, supplies, services, and funds among the parties. 2. Sustaining Wildland Fire Management activities, such as prevention, preparedness, communication and education, fuels treatment and hazard mitigation, fire planning. 3. Response strategies, tactics and alternatives, suppression and post-fire rehabilitation and restoration. 4. Allow for the parties to respond to presidentially declared emergencies or disasters. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 59767 The primary authorities allowing for the agreements are the Reciprocal Fire Protection Act, 42 U.S.C 1856, and the Stafford Act, 42 U.S.C. 5121. The proposed Cooperative Wildland Fire Management and Stafford Act Response Agreement template will allow authorized agencies to streamline coordination with other Federal, State, local, and Tribal governments in wildland fire protection activities, and to document in an agreement the roles and responsibilities among the parties, ensuring maximum protection of resources. To negotiate, develop, and administer Cooperative Wildland Fire Management and Stafford Act Response Agreements, the USDA Forest Service, DOI Bureau of Land Management, DOI Fish and Wildlife Service, DOI National Park Service, and DOI Bureau of Indian Affairs must collect information from willing State, local, and Tribal governments from the pre-agreement to the closeout stage via telephone calls, emails, postal mail, and person-toperson meetings. There are multiple means to communicate responses, which include forms, optional forms, templates, electronic documents, in person, telephone, and email. The scope of information collected includes the project type, project scope, financial plan, statement of work, and cooperator’s business information. Without the collected information, authorized Federal agencies would not be able to negotiate, create, develop, and administer cooperative agreements with stakeholders for wildland fire protection, approved fire severity activities, and presidentially declared emergencies or disasters. Authorized Federal agencies would be unable to develop or monitor projects, make payments, or identify financial and accounting errors. The regulations governing Federal financial assistance relationships are not applicable to agreement templates under this information collection request. The regulations in 2 CFR 200 set forth the general rules that are applicable to all grants and cooperative agreements made by the Department of Agriculture and Department of the Interior. Because the Federal government’s use of Cooperative Wildland Fire Management and Stafford Act Response Agreements entered into under cited Federal statutes are not financial assistance for the benefit of the recipient, but instead are entered into for the mutual benefit of the Federal government and the non-Federal cooperators, the assistance regulations in 2 CFR 200, as adopted and supplemented by the Department of E:\FR\FM\06NON1.SGM 06NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 215 (Wednesday, November 6, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 59765-59767]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-24222]


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Forest Service


Caribou-Targhee National Forest; Idaho; Caribou-Targhee National 
Forest and Curlew National Grassland Integrated Weed Management 
Analysis

AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA.

ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an environmental impact statement.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Caribou-Targhee National Forest will prepare an 
environmental impact statement (EIS) for invasive plant management. 
Invasive plants are a major threat to the biological diversity and 
ecological integrity within and outside the Caribou-Targhee National 
Forest and the Curlew National Grassland (Forests). The Forests propose 
to implement adaptive and integrated invasive plan management on 
current and potential infested areas forest-wide. A clear and 
comprehensive integrated invasive plant management strategy would allow 
for the implementation of timely and effective invasive plant 
management and prevention projects and programs on the Forests. In the 
absence of an aggressive invasive plant management program, the number, 
density, and distribution of invasive plants on both Forests is 
expected to increase.

DATES: Comments concerning the scope of the analysis must be received 
by December 23, 2019. The draft EIS is expected in May 2020 and the 
final EIS is expected in November 2020.

ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Caribou-Targhee National Forest, 
1405 Hollipark Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83401. Comments may also be sent 
via email to [email protected] or via 
facsimile to (208) 557-5827.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Heidi Heyrend at (208) 557-5791 or 
[email protected]. Individuals who use telecommunication devices 
for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service 
(FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., Eastern Time, 
Monday through Friday.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Invasive plants create many adverse 
environmental effects, including, but not limited to: Displacement of 
native plants; reduction in functionality of habitat for wildlife; loss 
of threatened, endangered, and sensitive species; increased soil 
erosion and reduced water quality; alteration of physical and 
biological properties of soil, including reduced soil productivity; 
changes to the intensity and frequency of fires, and loss of 
recreational opportunities. Within the 2.9 million acres of the 
Caribou-Targhee National Forest and Curlew National Grassland, less 
than two percent are identified as being infested with invasive, non-
native, and/or state-listed noxious weeds.
    These invasive plant infestations have a high potential to expand 
on lands within and adjacent to the Forests, degrading desired plant 
communities

[[Page 59766]]

and the values provided by those communities. Forest lands are also 
threatened by invasive plants that have not been found on the Forests 
but are known to occur on adjacent lands. Infestations can be 
prevented, eliminated, or controlled through the use of specific 
management practices.

Purpose and Need for Action

    The overall purpose of the proposed action is to reduce the 
negative effects of invasive plants on the structure and function of 
native plant communities and on other natural resource values. The 
proposal is in response to an underlying need to implement policy and 
direction provided at the national, regional, state, and forest levels 
(Executive Order 13112--Invasive Species, 2004 National Invasive 
Species Strategy and Implementation Plan, 2008-2012 National Invasive 
Species Management Plan, 2009 Intermountain Region Invasive Species 
Management Strategy, 2005 Idaho Strategic Plan for Managing Noxious and 
Invasive Weeds, and the amended Land and Resource Management Plans for 
the Caribou-Targhee National Forest and Curlew National Grassland).
    The need for the proposed action is multifaceted. Forest resources 
are negatively impacted by existing and expanding invasive plant 
species populations. These species are known to out-compete native 
plants, which can result in reduced productivity and biodiversity, 
habitat loss, and associated economic impacts. A timely response to new 
infestations, new invasive plant species, and landscape scale 
disturbances is needed. On the Forests, landscape-level tree mortality 
and disturbance from insects and wildfires have increased and are 
likely to continue to increase the potential for invasive plant 
infestations.
    Existing decisions for invasive plant management on the Forests do 
not address new species or provide priorities for managing new 
infestations. Updating these decisions would allow the Forests to 
satisfy the need to incorporate early detection and rapid response into 
the invasive plant management program. Invasive plant infestations 
already exist throughout the Forests and without management will likely 
increase in density and distribution. Active and adaptive integrated 
management is necessary to contain invasive plants within existing 
boundaries, reduce infestation densities, and retard the establishment 
of new infestations. Control efforts would be focused on infestations 
that can realize the greatest resource benefits--those with the highest 
risk of spread, those that have not become established, and those that 
have the best likelihood of success of control. New analysis and 
planning is needed to make available the most current tools and guide 
their best use.
    Rehabilitation of degraded landscapes can inhibit the spread and 
establishment of invasive plants. Appropriate rehabilitation efforts 
are a critical component of a fully functional invasive plant 
management program. The goals of rehabilitating degraded areas may 
include preventing new infestations, preventing the reoccurrence of 
eradicated infestations, and/or reducing the density and spread of 
existing infestations. Post-fire rehabilitation efforts may incorporate 
one or more of the established control techniques outlined in the 
proposed action.

Proposed Action

    The Forests propose to implement adaptive and integrated invasive 
plant management on current and potential infested areas forest-wide, 
including the Jedidiah Smith Wilderness Area and the Winegar Hole 
Wilderness Area. Management activities would include inventory and 
assessment designed to support early detection and rapid response, 
control methods, implementation and effectiveness monitoring, and 
rehabilitation.
    Activities would be implemented with federal, state, and local 
partners where opportunities exist. Infestations outside of currently 
identified areas may include new sites that arise in the future, or 
sites that currently exist, but have not been identified in Forest 
inventories to date.
    The proposed action includes the use of ground-based and aerial 
herbicide applications, manual and mechanical treatments, aquatic 
treatments, biological treatments, and combinations of these 
treatments. Proposed control methods would be based on integrated pest 
management principles and methods known to be effective for each target 
species. They include, but are not limited to, mechanical techniques, 
such as mowing and pulling; cultural practices, such as the use of 
certified noxious weed-free hay; biological control agents, such as 
pathogens, insects, and controlled grazing; and herbicides that target 
specific invasive plant species. Control methods could be employed 
alone or in combination. Treatment methods would be based on the 
extent, location, type, and character of an infestation and would be 
implemented using project design features. Management priority would be 
based on factors such as number and size of known infestations, 
proximity to vectors or susceptible habitat, and ability to outcompete 
desirable plant species. The priority of species to be treated would 
vary based on these factors and could change over time. These 
priorities would be used to guide selection of specific management 
activities for particular infestations.
    Rehabilitation activities would be designed and implemented based 
on the conditions found in and around infested areas. Both active 
revegetation and passive revegetation (allowing plants on site to fill 
in a treated area) would be considered. Rehabilitation techniques would 
be assessed and implemented in order to promote native plant 
communities that are resistant to infestation by invasive plants.

Possible Alternatives

    The No Action/Current Management Alternative would continue current 
weed management programs, treatments, and levels of effort for 
controlling weeds on both Forests. Because of limited ability to 
respond rapidly to new treatment areas and updated methods, it is 
anticipated that continuation of the current weed treatment program 
would not keep pace with the spread of weeds on both Forests. New weed 
invaders would continue to establish populations that would likely 
increase in size. Under this Alternative, it would likely not be 
possible to be consistent with management direction in all of the 
management areas on both Forests or to implement effectiveness 
monitoring and adaptive management as prescribed in the amended Land 
and Resource Management Plans.

Responsible Official

    The responsible official will be the Forest Supervisor for the 
Caribou-Targhee National Forest and the Curlew National Grassland.

Nature of Decision To Be Made

    The responsible official will decide whether or not to treat 
invasive plants on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest and the Curlew 
National Grassland, including the Jedidiah Smith Wilderness Area 
(123,451 acres) and the Winegar Hole Wilderness Area (10,721 acres), 
and if so, what methods and treatments will be used.

Permits or Licenses Required

    Applicators must be licensed Idaho professional herbicide 
applicators per Idaho Department of Agriculture Rules Governing 
Pesticide Use and Application (Idaho Code Sec.  22-3404).

[[Page 59767]]

Scoping Process

    This notice of intent initiates the scoping process, which guides 
the development of the EIS. Comments that would be most useful are 
those concerning developing or refining the proposed action, and in 
particular, are site-specific concerns and those that can help us 
develop treatments that would be responsive to our goal to control, 
contain, or eradicate invasive plants. It is important that reviewers 
provide their comments at such times and in such manner that they are 
useful to the agency's preparation of the EIS. Therefore, comments 
should be provided prior to the close of the comment period and should 
clearly articulate the reviewer's concerns and contentions. Comments 
received in response to this solicitation, including names and 
addresses of those who comment, will be part of the public record for 
this proposed action.
    The decision for this project will be subject to the objection 
process at 36 CFR 218 subparts A and B. Only individuals or entities 
who submit timely and specific written comments concerning the project 
during this or another designated public comment period established by 
the responsible official will be eligible to file on objection.

    Dated: October 16, 2019.
Allen Rowley,
Associate Deputy Chief, National Forest System.
[FR Doc. 2019-24222 Filed 11-5-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3411-15-P