Proposed Data Collection Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations, 57435-57437 [2019-23366]

Download as PDF 57435 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 207 / Friday, October 25, 2019 / Notices From 2007 to 2016, fall death ageadjusted rates increased by 31% with almost 30,000 older adults dying as the result of a fall in 2016. The economic consequences of falls are significant and growing as the population ages, with medical costs of older adult falls estimated at $50 billion. CDC created the Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries (STEADI) initiative to guide health care providers’ fall prevention activities in the primary care setting. This new data collection effort is an essential component to determine the impact of CDC’s Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries (STEADI) initiative on falls, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations due to falls. It will help CDC determine the impact of less resource intense versions of STEADI and evaluate the process of implementing STEADI fall prevention initiative in a primary care setting to provide context for the impact evaluations. The study population will be limited to adults 65 and older who have an outpatient visit during the study period and screen as high risk for falls at the selected primary care clinics implementing the STEADI fall prevention initiative. The study population for the process evaluation will include the clinical implementation staff at the selected clinics where the intervention will take place (physicians, physician assistants/nurse practitioners, study research nurses, and practice or operations manager). Two data collection methods will be used; the CDC’s Stay Independent Fall Risk Screener will be administered to older adult patients at selected primary care clinics to determine which older adults are at high risk for a fall. Those who screen at high risk will be assigned, based on clinic attended and week of attendance, to one of three study arms. Patient surveys will be used to determine whether these patients experience a fall during the study period, are treated for a fall, and/or use any fall prevention strategies throughout the study period. Four surveys will be administered to each patient during a 12-month period: One baseline survey and three follow-up surveys. Older adults will also be asked to keep track of their falls in a monthly falls diary, so they can accurately recall and report the information during the 12-month period for the patient surveys. The process evaluation interviews will be used to understand the attitudes of clinical staff towards the implementation process, barriers and facilitators to implementation, and the implementation fidelity to core components of the STEADI initiative. Descriptive statistics and cross tabulations will be used to describe quantitative data from the patient survey and process evaluation data. Risk ratios of the effect of the intervention on post-intervention falls will be calculated comparing intervention and control groups while controlling for demographic, health, attitude, and behavior variables. The data collected from this study will be used to demonstrate the impact of STEADI and different components of STEADI on falls and fall injuries in a primary care setting, and improve the implementation of STEADI in a primary care setting. There are no costs to the respondents other than their time. The total estimated annualized burden is 1,578 hours. ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of responses per respondent Number of respondents Average burden per response (hours) Type of respondent Form name Patient ............................................................. Stay Independent Fall Risk Screener (Att. D) Consent Form (Att. C) .................................... Patient Baseline Survey (Att. B1) .................. Patient Follow-up Survey (Att. B2) ................ Provider Interview Guide/Consent (Att. E1) ... 4,035 1,235 1,000 896 3 1 1 1 3 1 6/60 12/60 15/60 15/60 50/60 Operations Manager Interview Guide/Consent (Att. E2). 2 1 50/60 Physician/Physician Assistants/Nurse Practitioners. Clinic Operations Manager ............................. Jeffrey M. Zirger, Lead, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific Integrity, Office of Science, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [FR Doc. 2019–23365 Filed 10–24–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4163–18–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [60Day–20–1158; Docket No. CDC–2019– 0095] Proposed Data Collection Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). AGENCY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Oct 24, 2019 Jkt 250001 ACTION: Notice with comment period. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as part of its continuing effort to reduce public burden and maximize the utility of government information, invites the general public and other Federal agencies the opportunity to comment on a proposed and/or continuing information collection, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. This notice invites comment on a proposed information collection project titled CDC Ideation Catalyst (I-Catalyst) Program and Customer Engagement Information Collection. CDC will collect qualitative information from potential customers and other stakeholders about their needs and preferred approaches to solving public health problems. Findings will be used to improve SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 customer satisfaction with, and usability of, CDC’s products, programs, and services. CDC must receive written comments on or before December 24, 2019. DATES: You may submit comments, identified by Docket No. CDC–2019– 0095 by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments. • Mail: Jeffrey M. Zirger, Information Collection Review Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS–D74, Atlanta, Georgia 30329. Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name and Docket Number. CDC will post, without ADDRESSES: E:\FR\FM\25OCN1.SGM 25OCN1 57436 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 207 / Friday, October 25, 2019 / Notices change, all relevant comments to Regulations.gov. Please note: Submit all comments through the Federal eRulemaking portal (regulations.gov) or by U.S. mail to the address listed above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request more information on the proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, contact Jeffrey M. Zirger, Information Collection Review Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS– D74, Atlanta, Georgia 30329; phone: 404–639–7570; Email: omb@cdc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501–3520), Federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor. In addition, the PRA also requires Federal agencies to provide a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each new proposed collection, each proposed extension of existing collection of information, and each reinstatement of previously approved information collection before submitting the collection to the OMB for approval. To comply with this requirement, we are publishing this notice of a proposed data collection as described below. The OMB is particularly interested in comments that will help: 1. Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; 2. Evaluate the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; 3. Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and 4. Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submissions of responses. 5. Assess information collection costs. Proposed Project CDC Ideation Catalyst (I-Catalyst) Program and Customer Engagement Information Collection (OMB Control No. 0920–1158, Exp. 1/31/2020)— VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Oct 24, 2019 Jkt 250001 Revision—Office of Science (OS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description The CDC Office of Technology and Innovation (OTI) within Office of Science (OS) fosters innovative science and promotes the testing and implementation of innovative ideas that improve CDC’s ability to have public health impact. To arm CDC staff with an expanded skill-set and tools to evaluate and translate their insights and ideas into solutions, CDC developed an experiential innovation curriculum called Ideation Catalyst (I-Catalyst). The program was created with the belief that innovation should be customer-driven, be based on user research, and is something people at all levels of an organization can engage in. CDC also obtained OMB approval for a generic clearance to support the collection of information from stakeholders and customers, utilizing I-Catalyst program principles and methodology (CDC ICatalyst Program, OMB Control No. 0920–1158, Exp. date 1/31/2020). The goal of the I-Catalyst program is to help CDC employees test and explore their ideas through a discovery, ideation, and prototyping process. ICatalyst offers a process for defining problems and developing strategies to solutions that will help improve the quality and efficiency of innovation efforts and, as a result, overall performance. Through the I-Catalyst Program, teams work to define and articulate their problem space to find effective solutions and CDC programs receive consultation from OTI staff to implement the I-Catalyst process with specific projects. Participating teams will go through a hypothesis-testing, scientific method of discovery to gather important insights and identify issues associated with their projects. Teams are forced ‘‘out of the classroom’’ to conduct interviews, study customer/ stakeholder needs, collect feedback, and find partnership opportunities. It is expected that participants will gain the ability to evaluate and translate their insights into solutions. The I-Catalyst process provides CDC staff with real-world, hands-on entrepreneurship training and consultation from OTI staff. Through ICatalyst, CDC staff make hypotheses about how the world works, and then test them by getting out of the building and talking to customers and/or stakeholders. Only conversations with potential customers/stakeholders can provide the facts from which hypotheses are proven or disproven about whether a solution (whether a PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 product, process, etc.) creates value for the intended beneficiaries. Participants have to go out into the world and learn by doing. I-Catalyst methods engage customers/stakeholders in a process that will identify what they most value and need, and source solutions that will have high levels of efficacy and user acceptability. The majority of data will be obtained through on-site, unstructured interviews with individuals who represent the customers or stakeholders CDC teams are attempting to serve or benefit. CDC may also collect information through telephone interviews, questionnaires, or web-based surveys. With each CDC program project, teams will interview their customers/stakeholders with a burden per response ranging from 20–60 minutes (an average of 30 minutes). Each team will interview approximately 25 respondents. With 10–20 teams participating annually and CDC program consultations, approximately 500 respondents will be interviewed. Data to be collected includes information regarding needs, values, and barriers, and facilitators to potential solutions. CDC expects that teams participating in the I-Catalyst process and OTI consultations will be empowered to implement innovative strategies and solutions that create value for a set of beneficiaries. The ultimate goal is to give CDC staff skills to successfully transfer knowledge into value-based solutions that benefit society and broaden the agency’s impact. In this Revision request, CDC seeks approval for minor changes to the ICatalyst generic clearance. The number of burden hours will decrease based on participation in the I-Catalyst training program during the period 2017–2019. However, through related technical assistance provided by OTI to CDC/ ATSDR programs, CDC has identified additional opportunities for information collection compatible with I-Catalyst goals and methods. During the next three-year period CDC anticipates utilization of the I-Catalyst generic clearance by previous participants in the I-Catalyst training program, as well as other CDC programs implementing customer discovery projects. The title of the clearance is being updated to reflect its use by additional CDC/ATSDR project teams approved by OTI. The ICatalyst clearance will continue to be used for information collections necessary to explore the needs and preferences of specific stakeholder groups, and to facilitate and improve the acceptance and usability of CDC products, programs, and technologies. All projects submitted to OMB for approval under the I-Catalyst generic E:\FR\FM\25OCN1.SGM 25OCN1 57437 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 207 / Friday, October 25, 2019 / Notices clearance will be consistent with CDC/ OTI goals for promoting scientific innovation, customer engagement, and entrepreneurship in public health. OMB approval is requested for three years. Individual projects must be approved by CDC’s OTI before they are submitted to OMB for final review and approval. CDC estimates the estimated annual burden hours to be 250. Participation is voluntary, and there are no costs to respondents other than their time. ESTIMATED ANNUALIZED BURDEN HOURS Number of respondents Number of responses per respondent Avg. burden per response (in hrs.) Total burden (in hrs.) Type of respondents Form name External Partners, Stakeholders, or Customers. Interview Guides, Questionnaires, and Surveys. 500 1 30/60 250 Total ........................................... ........................................................... ........................ ........................ ........................ 250 Jeffrey M. Zirger, Lead, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific Integrity, Office of Science, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [FR Doc. 2019–23366 Filed 10–24–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4163–18–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [30Day–20–1128] Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has submitted the information collection request titled ‘‘State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System (SUDORS)’’ to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. CDC previously published a ‘‘Proposed Data Collection Submitted for Public Comment and Recommendations’’ notice on April 2, 2019 to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. CDC did not receive comments related to the previous notice. This notice serves to allow an additional 30 days for public and affected agency comments. CDC will accept all comments for this proposed information collection project. The Office of Management and Budget is particularly interested in comments that: (a) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) Evaluate the accuracy of the agencies estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Oct 24, 2019 Jkt 250001 (c) Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (d) Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including, through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses; and (e) Assess information collection costs. To request additional information on the proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan and instruments, call (404) 639–7570 or send an email to omb@cdc.gov. Direct written comments and/or suggestions regarding the items contained in this notice to the Attention: CDC Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, 725 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20503 or by fax to (202) 395–5806. Provide written comments within 30 days of notice publication. Proposed Project State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System (SUDORS) (OMB Control No. 0920–1128, Exp. 10/31/ 2020)—Revision—National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Background and Brief Description There has been a rapid increase in opioid overdose deaths since 2013. In the United States, more people are now dying of drug overdose than automobile crashes, although opioids—both opioid pain relievers (OPRs) and illicit forms such as heroin—are also a major factor in overdose-related automobile crashes. On October 26, 2017, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) declared the opioid overdose epidemic to be a national public health emergency. PO 00000 Frm 00056 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 CDC established the State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System (SUDORS) in order to detect new trends in fatal unintentional drug overdoses, support targeting of drug overdose prevention efforts, and assess the progress of the HHS initiative to reduce opioid misuse and overdoses. Respondents are state- or jurisdictionlevel health departments. The SUDORS surveillance system generates detailed, timely public health information on unintentional, fatal opioid-related drug overdoses and has been used to inform prevention and response efforts at the national, state, and local levels. SUDORS consolidates and supplements information available to health departments, including vital statistics and records created by medical examiners and coroners (ME/C). SUDORS is built on a web-based software platform and a collaborative surveillance and data integration model developed by CDC and health departments to improve understanding of homicide, suicide, undetermined deaths, and unintentional firearm deaths (National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS), OMB No. 0920–0607, exp. 11/30/2020). Through SUDORS, CDC currently collects information that is not provided on death certificates, such as whether the drug(s) causing the overdoses were injected or taken orally; a toxicology report on the decedent, if available; and risk factors for fatal drug overdoses including previous drug overdoses, decedent’s mental health, and whether the decedent recently exited a treatment program. Without this information, efforts to prevent drug overdose deaths are often based on limited information available on the death certificate and anecdotal evidence. During the next three years, CDC will update the web-based SUDORS interface to improve system performance, functionality, and accessibility. CDC and health E:\FR\FM\25OCN1.SGM 25OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 207 (Friday, October 25, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 57435-57437]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-23366]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

[60Day-20-1158; Docket No. CDC-2019-0095]


Proposed Data Collection Submitted for Public Comment and 
Recommendations

AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of 
Health and Human Services (HHS).

ACTION: Notice with comment period.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as part 
of its continuing effort to reduce public burden and maximize the 
utility of government information, invites the general public and other 
Federal agencies the opportunity to comment on a proposed and/or 
continuing information collection, as required by the Paperwork 
Reduction Act of 1995. This notice invites comment on a proposed 
information collection project titled CDC Ideation Catalyst (I-
Catalyst) Program and Customer Engagement Information Collection. CDC 
will collect qualitative information from potential customers and other 
stakeholders about their needs and preferred approaches to solving 
public health problems. Findings will be used to improve customer 
satisfaction with, and usability of, CDC's products, programs, and 
services.

DATES: CDC must receive written comments on or before December 24, 
2019.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by Docket No. CDC-2019-
0095 by any of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: Regulations.gov. Follow the 
instructions for submitting comments.
     Mail: Jeffrey M. Zirger, Information Collection Review 
Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road 
NE, MS-D74, Atlanta, Georgia 30329.
    Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name 
and Docket Number. CDC will post, without

[[Page 57436]]

change, all relevant comments to Regulations.gov.
    Please note: Submit all comments through the Federal eRulemaking 
portal (regulations.gov) or by U.S. mail to the address listed above.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request more information on the 
proposed project or to obtain a copy of the information collection plan 
and instruments, contact Jeffrey M. Zirger, Information Collection 
Review Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton 
Road NE, MS-D74, Atlanta, Georgia 30329; phone: 404-639-7570; Email: 
[email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 
(PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520), Federal agencies must obtain approval from 
the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of 
information they conduct or sponsor. In addition, the PRA also requires 
Federal agencies to provide a 60-day notice in the Federal Register 
concerning each proposed collection of information, including each new 
proposed collection, each proposed extension of existing collection of 
information, and each reinstatement of previously approved information 
collection before submitting the collection to the OMB for approval. To 
comply with this requirement, we are publishing this notice of a 
proposed data collection as described below.
    The OMB is particularly interested in comments that will help:
    1. Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is 
necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, 
including whether the information will have practical utility;
    2. Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of 
the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the 
methodology and assumptions used;
    3. Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to 
be collected; and
    4. Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those 
who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, 
electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or 
other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic 
submissions of responses.
    5. Assess information collection costs.

Proposed Project

    CDC Ideation Catalyst (I-Catalyst) Program and Customer Engagement 
Information Collection (OMB Control No. 0920-1158, Exp. 1/31/2020)--
Revision--Office of Science (OS), Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC).

Background and Brief Description

    The CDC Office of Technology and Innovation (OTI) within Office of 
Science (OS) fosters innovative science and promotes the testing and 
implementation of innovative ideas that improve CDC's ability to have 
public health impact. To arm CDC staff with an expanded skill-set and 
tools to evaluate and translate their insights and ideas into 
solutions, CDC developed an experiential innovation curriculum called 
Ideation Catalyst (I-Catalyst). The program was created with the belief 
that innovation should be customer-driven, be based on user research, 
and is something people at all levels of an organization can engage in. 
CDC also obtained OMB approval for a generic clearance to support the 
collection of information from stakeholders and customers, utilizing I-
Catalyst program principles and methodology (CDC I-Catalyst Program, 
OMB Control No. 0920-1158, Exp. date 1/31/2020).
    The goal of the I-Catalyst program is to help CDC employees test 
and explore their ideas through a discovery, ideation, and prototyping 
process. I-Catalyst offers a process for defining problems and 
developing strategies to solutions that will help improve the quality 
and efficiency of innovation efforts and, as a result, overall 
performance. Through the I-Catalyst Program, teams work to define and 
articulate their problem space to find effective solutions and CDC 
programs receive consultation from OTI staff to implement the I-
Catalyst process with specific projects. Participating teams will go 
through a hypothesis-testing, scientific method of discovery to gather 
important insights and identify issues associated with their projects. 
Teams are forced ``out of the classroom'' to conduct interviews, study 
customer/stakeholder needs, collect feedback, and find partnership 
opportunities. It is expected that participants will gain the ability 
to evaluate and translate their insights into solutions.
    The I-Catalyst process provides CDC staff with real-world, hands-on 
entrepreneurship training and consultation from OTI staff. Through I-
Catalyst, CDC staff make hypotheses about how the world works, and then 
test them by getting out of the building and talking to customers and/
or stakeholders. Only conversations with potential customers/
stakeholders can provide the facts from which hypotheses are proven or 
disproven about whether a solution (whether a product, process, etc.) 
creates value for the intended beneficiaries. Participants have to go 
out into the world and learn by doing. I-Catalyst methods engage 
customers/stakeholders in a process that will identify what they most 
value and need, and source solutions that will have high levels of 
efficacy and user acceptability.
    The majority of data will be obtained through on-site, unstructured 
interviews with individuals who represent the customers or stakeholders 
CDC teams are attempting to serve or benefit. CDC may also collect 
information through telephone interviews, questionnaires, or web-based 
surveys. With each CDC program project, teams will interview their 
customers/stakeholders with a burden per response ranging from 20-60 
minutes (an average of 30 minutes). Each team will interview 
approximately 25 respondents. With 10-20 teams participating annually 
and CDC program consultations, approximately 500 respondents will be 
interviewed. Data to be collected includes information regarding needs, 
values, and barriers, and facilitators to potential solutions.
    CDC expects that teams participating in the I-Catalyst process and 
OTI consultations will be empowered to implement innovative strategies 
and solutions that create value for a set of beneficiaries. The 
ultimate goal is to give CDC staff skills to successfully transfer 
knowledge into value-based solutions that benefit society and broaden 
the agency's impact.
    In this Revision request, CDC seeks approval for minor changes to 
the I-Catalyst generic clearance. The number of burden hours will 
decrease based on participation in the I-Catalyst training program 
during the period 2017-2019. However, through related technical 
assistance provided by OTI to CDC/ATSDR programs, CDC has identified 
additional opportunities for information collection compatible with I-
Catalyst goals and methods. During the next three-year period CDC 
anticipates utilization of the I-Catalyst generic clearance by previous 
participants in the I-Catalyst training program, as well as other CDC 
programs implementing customer discovery projects. The title of the 
clearance is being updated to reflect its use by additional CDC/ATSDR 
project teams approved by OTI. The I-Catalyst clearance will continue 
to be used for information collections necessary to explore the needs 
and preferences of specific stakeholder groups, and to facilitate and 
improve the acceptance and usability of CDC products, programs, and 
technologies. All projects submitted to OMB for approval under the I-
Catalyst generic

[[Page 57437]]

clearance will be consistent with CDC/OTI goals for promoting 
scientific innovation, customer engagement, and entrepreneurship in 
public health.
    OMB approval is requested for three years. Individual projects must 
be approved by CDC's OTI before they are submitted to OMB for final 
review and approval. CDC estimates the estimated annual burden hours to 
be 250. Participation is voluntary, and there are no costs to 
respondents other than their time.

                                        Estimated Annualized Burden Hours
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     Number of      Avg. burden
      Type of respondents           Form name        Number of     responses per   per response    Total burden
                                                    respondents     respondent       (in hrs.)       (in hrs.)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
External Partners,              Interview                    500               1           30/60             250
 Stakeholders, or Customers.     Guides,
                                 Questionnaires,
                                 and Surveys.
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Total.....................  ................  ..............  ..............  ..............             250
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Jeffrey M. Zirger,
Lead, Information Collection Review Office, Office of Scientific 
Integrity, Office of Science, Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention.
[FR Doc. 2019-23366 Filed 10-24-19; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4163-18-P