Official United States Standards for Grain, 50293-50294 [2019-20295]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 186 / Wednesday, September 25, 2019 / Rules and Regulations 50293 INFANT MEAL PATTERNS Infants Birth through 5 months Breakfast, Lunch, or Supper ............ 4–6 fluid ounces breastmilk 1 or formula 2. Snack ................................................ 4–6 fluid ounces breastmilk 1 or formula 2. 6 through 11 months 6–8 fluid ounces breastmilk 1 or formula; 2 and 0–4 tablespoons infant cereal,3 meat, fish, poultry, whole egg, cooked dry beans, or cooked dry peas; or 0–2 ounces of cheese; or 0–4 ounces (volume) of cottage cheese; or 0–4 ounces or 1⁄2 cup of yogurt; 4 or a combination of the above; 5 and 0–2 tablespoons vegetable or fruit, or a combination of both.5 6 2–4 fluid ounces breastmilk 1 or formula 2; and 0-1⁄2 slice bread; 3 7 or 0–2 crackers; 3 7 or 0–4 tablespoons infant cereal 2 3 7 or ready-to-eat breakfast cereal; 3 5 7 8 and 0–2 tablespoons vegetable or fruit, or a combination of both 5 6 1 Breastmilk or formula, or portions of both, must be served; however, it is recommended that breastmilk be served in place of formula from birth through 11 months. For some breastfed infants who regularly consume less than the minimum amount of breastmilk per feeding, a serving of less than the minimum amount of breastmilk may be offered, with additional breastmilk offered at a later time if the infant will consume more. 2 Infant formula and dry infant cereal must be iron-fortified. 3 Beginning October 1, 2021, ounce equivalents are used to determine the quantity of creditable grains. 4 Yogurt must contain no more than 23 grams of total sugars per 6 ounces. 5 A serving of this component is required when the infant is developmentally ready to accept it. 6 Fruit and vegetable juices must not be served. 7 A serving of grains must be whole grain-rich, enriched meal, or enriched flour. 8 Breakfast cereals must contain no more than 6 grams of sugar per dry ounce (no more than 21.2 grams sucrose and other sugars per 100 grams of dry cereal). * * * * * 7. In § 226.23, revise the third sentence in paragraph (e)(1)(iii)(E) to read as follows: ■ § 226.23 Free and reduced-price meals. * * * * * (e) * * * (1) * * * (iii) * * * (E) * * * You must include the last four digits of the social security number of the adult household member who signs the meal benefit form.* * * * * * * * Dated: September 19, 2019. Pamilyn Miller, Administrator, Food and Nutrition Service. [FR Doc. 2019–20808 Filed 9–24–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–30–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 810 [Doc No. AMS–FGIS–19–0033] jbell on DSK3GLQ082PROD with RULES Official United States Standards for Grain Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Final action. AGENCY: The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) will not SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:12 Sep 24, 2019 Jkt 247001 pursue changes to the United States (U.S.) Standards for Corn and Soybeans under the United States Grain Standards Act (USGSA). DATES: September 25, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patrick McCluskey, USDA AMS; Telephone: (816) 659–8403; Email: Patrick.J.McCluskey@ams.usda.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 4 of the USGSA (7 U.S.C. 76(a)) grants the Secretary of Agriculture the authority to establish standards for grain regarding kind, class, quality, and condition. AMS published two requests for information on June 29, 2018, in the Federal Register (83 FR 30591 and 83 FR 30592), wherein AMS invited interested parties to submit comments, ideas, and suggestions on all aspects of the official procedures and the U.S. Standards for Soybeans. AMS received a total of six comments on the U.S. Standards for Soybeans. AMS received one comment from a stakeholder requesting the comment period for the U.S. Standards for Soybeans be extended. AMS reopened the comment period in a Federal Register publication on October 2, 2018. AMS received a total of six comments on the U.S. Standards for Soybeans. Two comments were not germane to the rulemaking and accordingly AMS will not take action based on the comments. AMS received one comment from stakeholders representing grain handlers and exporters requesting the comment PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 period for the U.S. Standards for Soybeans be extended and accordingly, the comment period was reopened on October 2, 2018. During the re-opened comment period, the same commenter group joined with soy processors recommending that AMS withdraw the Request for Information. AMS considers this to mean the commenters request no changes to the soybean standards. One commenter recommended revising the standard to include a minimum protein content, and to establish a maximum limit of three percent of gluten containing grains in U.S. #1 and U.S. #2 soybeans. Protein content specifications in grain and oilseed commerce are typically handled contractually. Likewise, a maximum limit for gluten containing grains at the contracted grade can be a contract term. Accordingly, AMS will not take action based on this comment. One commenter made three recommendations: First, that AMS change the table of Grades and Grade Requirements in the soybean Regulations to match the same table in Grain Inspection Handbook II, Chapter 10, Soybeans. AMS observes that the table of Grades and Grade Requirements is correct in both the Regulations and the Handbook, with only differences in format. AMS prefers the format of the table in the Regulations and AMS will format the layout of the table in the Handbook to match the Regulations. E:\FR\FM\25SER1.SGM 25SER1 50294 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 186 / Wednesday, September 25, 2019 / Rules and Regulations Second, the commenter asked AMS to remove ‘‘germ damage’’ from the definition of Damaged Kernels in the Regulations, stating: ‘‘There is not a germ location on a soybean, instead the area where the sprout protruded from the soybean is called the ‘‘hilum.’’ AMS agrees that there is no ‘‘germ’’ in soybeans. However, the hilum is not where a sprout emerges from the seedcoat, rather, the hilum is the point of attachment of the seed to the pod. AMS has no instruction, however, for assessing germ damage in soybeans, thus AMS inspectors never assesses germ damage. Third, the commenter recommend AMS change the term ‘‘Interpretive Line Picture’’ to ‘‘Interpretive Line Print.’’ AMS agrees that a technical correction would be appropriate to clarify the regulations on germ inspection and ‘‘Interpretative Line Picture.’’ AMS plans a subsequent rulemaking to addresses technical corrections throughout the Regulations. Accordingly, AMS will not pursue amendment of the U.S. Standards for Soybeans and the U.S. Standards for Corn at this time. Authority: USGSA (7 U.S.C. 71–87k). Dated: September 16, 2019. Bruce Summers, Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service. [FR Doc. 2019–20295 Filed 9–24–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–02–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1217 [Document Number AMS–SC–19–0015] Softwood Lumber Research, Promotion, Consumer Education and Industry Information Order; Change in Membership, Nominations, Procedures, and Continuance Referenda Period Agricultural Marketing Service. Final rule. AGENCY: ACTION: This rule changes the membership, nominations, procedures, and continuance referenda period for the Softwood Lumber Board (Board) established under the Softwood Lumber Research, Promotion, Consumer Education and Industry Information Order (Order). The Board administers the Order with oversight by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). This action will also make administrative changes to other provisions of the Order. jbell on DSK3GLQ082PROD with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:54 Sep 24, 2019 Jkt 247001 DATES: Effective Date: October 25, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Andrea Ricci, Marketing Specialist, Promotion and Economics Division, Specialty Crops Program, AMS, USDA, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Room 1406–S, Washington, DC 20250; telephone: (202) 572–1442; facsimile (202) 205–2800; or electronic mail: Andrea.Ricci@usda.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This rule affecting 7 CFR part 1217 (the Softwood Lumber Research, Promotion, Consumer Education and Industry Information (Order)) is authorized under the Commodity Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 1996 (1996 Act) (7 U.S.C. 7411–7425). Executive Orders 12866, 13563, and 13771 Executive Orders 12866 and 13563 direct agencies to assess all costs and benefits of available regulatory alternatives and, if regulation is necessary, to select regulatory approaches that maximize net benefits (including potential economic, environmental, public health and safety effects, distributive impacts and equity). Executive Order 13563 emphasizes the importance of quantifying both costs and benefits, reducing costs, harmonizing rules and promoting flexibility. This action falls within a category of regulatory actions that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) exempted from Executive Order 12866 review. Additionally, because this rule does not meet the definition of a significant regulatory action it does not trigger the requirements contained in Executive Order 13771. See OMB’s Memorandum titled ‘‘Interim Guidance Implementing Section 2 of the Executive Order of January 30, 2017, titled ‘Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Costs’’’ (February 2, 2017). Executive Order 13175 This action has been reviewed in accordance with the requirements of Executive Order 13175, Consultation and Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments. The review reveals that this regulation would not have substantial and direct effects on Tribal governments and would not have significant Tribal implications. Executive Order 12988 This rule has been reviewed under Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform. It is not intended to have retroactive effect. Section 524 of the 1996 Act (7 U.S.C. 7423) provides that it shall not affect or preempt any other Federal or State law authorizing PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 promotion or research relating to an agricultural commodity. Pursuant to the Congressional Review Act (5 U.S.C. 801 et seq.), the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs designated this rule as not a major rule, as defined by 5 U.S.C. 804(2). Under section 519 of the 1996 Act (7 U.S.C. 7418), a person subject to an order may file a written petition with USDA stating that an order, any provision of an order, or any obligation imposed in connection with an order, is not established in accordance with the law, and request a modification of an order or an exemption from an order. Any petition filed challenging an order, any provision of an order, or any obligation imposed in connection with an order, shall be filed within two years after the effective date of an order, provision, or obligation subject to challenge in the petition. The petitioner will have the opportunity for a hearing on the petition. Thereafter, USDA will issue a ruling on the petition. The 1996 Act provides that the district court of the United States for any district in which the petitioner resides or conducts business shall have the jurisdiction to review a final ruling on the petition, if the petitioner files a complaint for that purpose not later than 20 days after the date of the entry of USDA’s final ruling. Background This rule changes the Board’s membership, nominations, procedures, and continuance referenda period under the Order. The Board administers the Order with oversight by USDA. Under the Order, assessments are collected from manufacturers and importers and used for projects to promote softwood lumber within the United States. This rule reduces the number of Board members from 19 to 14, revises the nomination procedures, and revises the quorum and voting procedures. This rule also revises the time frame for periodic continuance referenda from five to seven years. Finally, this rule makes clarifying and conforming changes to other provisions of the Order. All of these changes will help facilitate program operations and were recommended to the Secretary by the Board at its November 28, 2018 meeting. Board Membership and Geographical Distribution Pursuant to § 1217.40(b), the Board is composed of 18 or 19 members, depending upon whether an additional importer member is appointed to the Board. Seats on the Board are apportioned based on the volume of softwood lumber manufactured and shipped within the United States by E:\FR\FM\25SER1.SGM 25SER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 186 (Wednesday, September 25, 2019)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 50293-50294]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-20295]


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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Agricultural Marketing Service

7 CFR Part 810

[Doc No. AMS-FGIS-19-0033]


Official United States Standards for Grain

AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA.

ACTION: Final action.

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SUMMARY: The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) 
Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) will not pursue changes to the 
United States (U.S.) Standards for Corn and Soybeans under the United 
States Grain Standards Act (USGSA).

DATES: September 25, 2019.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patrick McCluskey, USDA AMS; 
Telephone: (816) 659-8403; Email: [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 4 of the USGSA (7 U.S.C. 76(a)) 
grants the Secretary of Agriculture the authority to establish 
standards for grain regarding kind, class, quality, and condition. AMS 
published two requests for information on June 29, 2018, in the Federal 
Register (83 FR 30591 and 83 FR 30592), wherein AMS invited interested 
parties to submit comments, ideas, and suggestions on all aspects of 
the official procedures and the U.S. Standards for Soybeans.
    AMS received a total of six comments on the U.S. Standards for 
Soybeans. AMS received one comment from a stakeholder requesting the 
comment period for the U.S. Standards for Soybeans be extended. AMS 
reopened the comment period in a Federal Register publication on 
October 2, 2018.
    AMS received a total of six comments on the U.S. Standards for 
Soybeans. Two comments were not germane to the rulemaking and 
accordingly AMS will not take action based on the comments.
    AMS received one comment from stakeholders representing grain 
handlers and exporters requesting the comment period for the U.S. 
Standards for Soybeans be extended and accordingly, the comment period 
was reopened on October 2, 2018. During the re-opened comment period, 
the same commenter group joined with soy processors recommending that 
AMS withdraw the Request for Information. AMS considers this to mean 
the commenters request no changes to the soybean standards.
    One commenter recommended revising the standard to include a 
minimum protein content, and to establish a maximum limit of three 
percent of gluten containing grains in U.S. #1 and U.S. #2 soybeans. 
Protein content specifications in grain and oilseed commerce are 
typically handled contractually. Likewise, a maximum limit for gluten 
containing grains at the contracted grade can be a contract term. 
Accordingly, AMS will not take action based on this comment.
    One commenter made three recommendations: First, that AMS change 
the table of Grades and Grade Requirements in the soybean Regulations 
to match the same table in Grain Inspection Handbook II, Chapter 10, 
Soybeans. AMS observes that the table of Grades and Grade Requirements 
is correct in both the Regulations and the Handbook, with only 
differences in format. AMS prefers the format of the table in the 
Regulations and AMS will format the layout of the table in the Handbook 
to match the Regulations.

[[Page 50294]]

    Second, the commenter asked AMS to remove ``germ damage'' from the 
definition of Damaged Kernels in the Regulations, stating: ``There is 
not a germ location on a soybean, instead the area where the sprout 
protruded from the soybean is called the ``hilum.'' AMS agrees that 
there is no ``germ'' in soybeans. However, the hilum is not where a 
sprout emerges from the seedcoat, rather, the hilum is the point of 
attachment of the seed to the pod. AMS has no instruction, however, for 
assessing germ damage in soybeans, thus AMS inspectors never assesses 
germ damage. Third, the commenter recommend AMS change the term 
``Interpretive Line Picture'' to ``Interpretive Line Print.'' AMS 
agrees that a technical correction would be appropriate to clarify the 
regulations on germ inspection and ``Interpretative Line Picture.'' AMS 
plans a subsequent rulemaking to addresses technical corrections 
throughout the Regulations.
    Accordingly, AMS will not pursue amendment of the U.S. Standards 
for Soybeans and the U.S. Standards for Corn at this time.

    Authority: USGSA (7 U.S.C. 71-87k).

    Dated: September 16, 2019.
Bruce Summers,
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service.
[FR Doc. 2019-20295 Filed 9-24-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3410-02-P