Amendment to Requirements for Consumer Registration of Durable Infant or Toddler Products, 49947-49950 [2019-20049]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 185 / Tuesday, September 24, 2019 / Rules and Regulations independent inspection of all areas of the engine fan hub referenced in paragraph (g)(2)(ii) of this AD for damage. (iv) Thereafter, repeat the inspections required by paragraphs (g)(2)(i) through (iii) of this AD at each disassembly and reassembly of the engine fan hub blade lock assembly. (v) As an optional terminating action to the inspection requirements and independent inspection requirements of paragraph (g)(2)(i) through (iii) of this AD, insert the requirements for the visual inspections and independent inspections required by these paragraphs as Required Inspection Items in the approved continuous airworthiness maintenance program for the airplane. (vi) If damage is found outside serviceable limits during the inspections required by (g)(2)(i) through (iii) of this AD, before further flight, remove the engine fan hub assembly from service and replace it with a part eligible for installation. (3) For GP7270 and GP7277 model turbofan engines with engine serial numbers P550101 through P550706, remove the engine fan hub blade lock assembly, P/N 5700451, by September 1, 2020, and replace with a part eligible for installation. Refer to EA ASB EAGP7–A72–418, Revision No. 1, dated January 11, 2019, for guidance on replacement of the engine fan hub blade lock assembly. (h) Credit for Previous Actions You may take credit for the inspections required by paragraph (g)(1)(i) through (iii) of this AD if you performed the inspections before the effective date of this AD using EA ASB EAGP7–A72–389, Revision No. 4, dated June 14, 2019, or an earlier version. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES (i) Definitions (1) For the purpose of this AD, a part eligible for installation for replacement of the engine fan hub blade lock assembly is: (i) A part that is not P/N 5700451, or (ii) An engine fan hub blade lock assembly that has been modified in accordance with EA ASB EAGP7–A72–418, Revision No. 1, dated January 11, 2019, or EA ASB EAGP7– A72–418, Revision No. 0, dated December 7, 2018. (2) For the purpose of this AD, an independent inspection is a second visual inspection performed by an individual qualified to perform inspections who was not involved in the original inspection of the engine fan hub assembly following disassembly and reassembly of the engine fan hub blade lock assembly. (j) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs) (1) The Manager, ECO Branch, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the manager of the certification office, send it to the attention of the person identified in paragraph (k) of this AD. You may email your request to: ANE-ADAMOC@faa.gov. VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:47 Sep 23, 2019 Jkt 247001 (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office/ certificate holding district office. (3) AMOCs approved for AD 2019–16–04, AD 2018–11–16 (83 FR 27891, June 15, 2018), and AD 2019–03–04 (84 FR 4694, February 19, 2019) are approved as AMOCs for the corresponding provisions of this AD. (k) Related Information For more information about this AD, contact Matthew Smith, Aerospace Engineer, ECO Branch, FAA, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA 01803; phone: 781–238– 7735; fax: 781–238–7199; email: matthew.c.smith@faa.gov. (l) Material Incorporated by Reference (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference (IBR) of the service information listed in this paragraph under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) You must use this service information as applicable to do the actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. (i) Engine Alliance (EA) Alert Service Bulletin EAGP7–A72–389, Revision No. 5, dated August 23, 2019. (ii) [Reserved] (3) For EA service information identified in this AD, contact Engine Alliance, 411 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118; phone: 800– 565–0140; email: help24@pw.utc.com; website: www.engineallianceportal.com. (4) You may view this service information at the FAA, Engine & Propeller Standards Branch, 1200 District Avenue, Burlington, MA 01803. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 781–238–7759. (5) You may view this service information that is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, email: fedreg.legal@nara.gov, or go to: http:// www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibrlocations.html. Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on September 18, 2019. Karen M. Grant, Acting Manager, Engine & Propeller Standards Branch, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2019–20599 Filed 9–23–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1130 [Docket No. CPSC–2018–0018] Amendment to Requirements for Consumer Registration of Durable Infant or Toddler Products Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 49947 In 2009, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) fulfilled a statutory requirement in the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA) to issue a rule requiring manufacturers of durable infant or toddler products to establish a consumer registration program. The Commission is now finalizing an amendment to the definition of ‘‘durable infant or toddler product’’ in the rule to include the full statutory definition; clarify that the scope of each listed product category is further defined in the applicable mandatory standard; clarify listed product categories using the product name in the applicable mandatory standard; and clarify the scope of the infant carriers and bassinets and cradles product categories. DATES: Effective Date: The rule will become effective on October 24, 2019. Compliance Date for Contoured Changing Pads: Contoured changing pads, a subcategory of baby changing products in § 1130.2(a)(14), must comply with this rule starting on September 24, 2020. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Keysha L. Walker, Compliance Officer, Office of Compliance & Field Operations, Regulatory Enforcement Division, Consumer Product Safety Commission, 4330 East-West Highway, Bethesda, MD 20814; 301–504–6820, Email: kwalker@cpsc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: I. Background and Statutory Authority Section 104 of the CPSIA is the Danny Keysar Child Product Safety Notification Act. Section 104 of the CPSIA requires that for ‘‘durable infant or toddler products,’’ the CPSC must (1) issue a mandatory rule for each product based on the applicable voluntary standard, and (2) issue a rule requiring consumer registration for such products. 15 U.S.C. 2056a(b) and (d).1 In 2009, the Commission issued a regulation to implement the second requirement, i.e., that manufacturers provide a means for consumers to register ‘‘durable infant or toddler products’’ so that consumers can receive direct notification in the event of a product recall. The rule is codified at 16 CFR part 1130, Requirements for Consumer Registration of Durable Infant or Toddler Products (part 1130, or the consumer registration rule). 1 Since 2009, the Commission has issued final rules for 23 durable infant or toddler products. Mandatory standards for durable infant or toddler products are codified in 16 CFR parts 1215 through 1235, and parts 1237 and 1238. Currently, part 1236 is reserved for Inclined Infant Sleep Products, a proposed rule that has not been finalized. E:\FR\FM\24SER1.SGM 24SER1 49948 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 185 / Tuesday, September 24, 2019 / Rules and Regulations The two aspects of section 104, consumer registration and product standards, are both based on the definition of ‘‘durable infant or toddler product’’ set forth in section 104(f) of the CPSIA: ‘‘durable products intended for use, or that may be reasonably expected to be used, by children under the age of 5 years.’’ The statute lists 12 product categories included within the definition, such as cribs, toddler beds, high chairs, strollers, and swings. In a 2009 rulemaking, the Commission explained that the list of products in section 104(f), and codified in the Commission’s consumer registration rule in 16 CFR 1130.2, is not static. At that time, the Commission added six product categories to the 12 listed in the CPSIA. 74 FR 68668, 68669 (Dec. 29, 2009). On October 9, 2018, the Commission issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR), proposing to make the following changes to part 1130 to clarify the scope of products covered by the rule: • State the full statutory definition of ‘‘durable infant or toddler product’’ in section 104(f)(1); • Specify that the listed product categories are further defined in the applicable mandatory standards; • List ‘‘sling carriers,’’ ‘‘soft infant and toddler carriers,’’ ‘‘handheld infant carriers,’’ and ‘‘frame child carriers’’ as a subset of infant carriers, to avoid confusion regarding whether these products are subject to the consumer registration rule, and to reflect each product category using the name of the applicable mandatory standard; • Clarify that ‘‘bedside sleepers’’ are a subset of bassinets, to avoid confusion regarding whether bedside sleepers are subject to the consumer registration rule, and to reflect the product name used in the mandatory standard; and • Revise the term ‘‘changing tables’’ to ‘‘baby changing products,’’ to reflect the product name used in the mandatory standard. 83 FR 50542. After reviewing the comments, the Commission is finalizing this rule, without modification. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES II. Response to Comments CPSC received seven comments on the NPR. Only one comment addressed a substantive issue, while all of the remaining comments generally support the concept of the consumer registration rule, and support amending the definition of ‘‘durable infant or toddler product’’ to clarify the scope of products subject to the rule. The Commission is not making any changes in the final rule based on the comments received. Below we summarize and respond to the VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:47 Sep 23, 2019 Jkt 247001 substantive comment on the proposed rule. Comment—One commenter disagreed with the proposed 1-year effective date for contoured changing pads, stating that many of the manufacturers make other durable infant or toddler products and have registration programs in place. The commenter opines that because of technological advances, product registration programs should take no longer than 6 months to implement, even if no program is in place. The commenter recommended an effective date for contoured changing pads that is 6 months after publication of the final rule. Response—The Commission agrees that many manufacturers of contoured changing pads make other products subject to the consumer registration rule, and therefore, these manufacturers are likely to have an established consumer registration program. However, the final rule for baby changing products identified 25 firms that supply only contoured changing pads and no other changing products. At least 13 of these 25 firms are not otherwise in the durable infant and toddler product market and are unlikely to have an existing consumer registration program. The commenter provided no information, and we have none, to demonstrate that these 13 firms have established a consumer registration program since issuance of the rule for changing products. Additionally, the baby changing products rule (16 CFR part 1235) went into effect on June 26, 2018, a year after publication of the final rule. For these reasons, the rule provides a 12-month effective date for a consumer registration program for contoured changing pads, consistent with previous effective periods for new products subject to the consumer registration requirement in part 1130. III. Description of the Final Rule A. Definition The final rule updates the definition of ‘‘durable infant or toddler product’’ in 16 CFR 1130.2(a) to state the full statutory definition of ‘‘durable infant or toddler product’’ and to clarify that the scope of the product categories listed can be found in the applicable mandatory standard. B. Product Categories The final rule updates the description of product categories subject to the rule by listing the name of each product category that aligns with the name of the product category used in the applicable PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 voluntary or mandatory standard.2 Furthermore, to provide information on the scope of the products covered by a product category, the final rule states that the scope of each product category is further defined in the applicable mandatory standard. 1. Infant Carriers Section 104(f)(H) of the CPSIA lists ‘‘infant carriers’’ as a product category included in the term ‘‘durable infant or toddler products.’’ ASTM International has four separate voluntary standards for infant carriers, and the Commission has now issued four separate mandatory standards, one for each subtype of infant carrier: • 16 CFR part 1225, Hand-Held Infant Carriers • 16 CFR part 1226, Soft Infant and Toddler Carriers • 16 CFR part 1228, Sling Carriers • 16 CFR part 1230, Frame Child Carriers. Although the Commission added ‘‘Infant Slings’’ to the list of products in 16 CFR § 1130.2(a) when finalizing the 2009 consumer registration rule, the registration rule does not list the other sub-categories of infant carriers. To clarify that all four types of infant carriers are subject to the consumer registration requirement, the final rule amends § 1130.2(a)(8) to state: ‘‘Infant carriers, including soft infant and toddler carriers, hand-held infant carriers, sling carriers, and frame child carriers.’’ The final rule removes ‘‘infant slings’’ as a separate product category in 16 CFR 1130.2(a)(18), and changes the product name from ‘‘infant slings’’ to ‘‘sling carriers,’’ to align with the name of the mandatory rule in part 1228. 2. Bedside Sleepers Currently, the product ‘‘bedside sleepers’’ 3 is not listed in part 1130. However, when the Commission issued a mandatory standard pursuant to section 104(b) of the CPSIA for bedside sleepers (codified at 16 CFR part 1222), the Commission considered bedside sleepers to be a subset of ‘‘bassinets and cradles.’’ 79 FR 2581, 2583 (Jan. 15, 2 Some products may be listed in part 1130 before the Commission issues the corresponding mandatory standard. In those cases, the Commission will list the product category as defined in the current voluntary standard, which typically provides specificity about the scope of the product category. 3 A bedside sleeper is a bassinet-type product, intended to provide a sleeping environment for an infant up to approximately 5 months of age, or when a child begins to push up on his or her hands and knees, whichever comes first. These products are designed to be secured to an adult bed, for the purpose of having a baby sleep in close proximity to an adult. E:\FR\FM\24SER1.SGM 24SER1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 185 / Tuesday, September 24, 2019 / Rules and Regulations 2014). To resolve any confusion about whether bedside sleepers are subject to part 1130, the final rule revises § 1130.2(a)(12) to state: ‘‘Bassinets and cradles, including bedside sleepers.’’ 3. Changing Tables Currently, ‘‘changing tables’’ is listed as a durable infant or toddler product in 16 CFR 1130.2(14). However, the Commission’s standard for these products is called ‘‘Safety Standard for Baby Changing Products,’’ codified at 16 CFR part 1235.4 CPSC’s standard covers products that are included in the scope of the voluntary standard on which it is based, ASTM F2388–18, Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Baby Changing Products for Domestic Use. Accordingly, CPSC’s standard includes changing tables, changing table accessories, contoured changing pads, and add-on changing units. The final rule revises § 1130.2(a)(14) to use the term ‘‘baby changing products’’ to be consistent with the Commission’s mandatory standard. III. Effective Date and Compliance Date The Administrative Procedure Act generally requires that the effective date of a rule be at least 30 days after publication of the final rule. The final rule takes effect 30 days after publication, but has a different compliance date for contoured changing pads, as follows. khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES A. Thirty-Day Effective Date Most of the changes in the final rule are clarifications to the definition of ‘‘durable infant or toddler product’’ to state the full statutory definition, and to identify more clearly product categories that already are subject to the consumer registration rule (i.e., the statutory definition, infant carrier list, and bedside sleepers). Because these revisions clarify the text of the rule and do not impose new burden on any manufacturer, the final rule has a 30-day effective date for the addition of the statutory language in § 1130.2(a), and for the clarifications to product categories in sections 1130.2(a)(8), (a)(11), and (a)(12). B. Twelve-Month Compliance Date for Contoured Changing Pads For the reasons stated in the NPR and section II of this preamble, the final rule has a 12-month compliance date for contoured changing pads. The other types of ‘‘baby changing products’’ (changing tables, changing table accessories, and add-on changing units) 4 The final rule for baby changing products was published on June 26, 2018, and became effective on June 26, 2019. VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:47 Sep 23, 2019 Jkt 247001 have all been required to be in compliance with part 1130 since December 29, 2010, under the previously listed category ‘‘changing tables.’’ 74 FR at 68669. Therefore, the 12-month compliance date applies only to contoured changing pads. IV. Regulatory Flexibility Act The Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA), 5 U.S.C. 601–612, requires that agencies review a proposed rule and a final rule for the rule’s potential economic impact on small entities, including small businesses. Section 604 of the RFA generally requires that agencies prepare a final regulatory flexibility analysis (FRFA) when promulgating final rules, unless the head of the agency certifies that the rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. Pursuant to section 104(d)(1) of the CPSIA, however, the provision that establishes the requirement for a consumer registration rule, the RFA does not apply when promulgating a rule under this provision. Consequently, the Commission has not prepared an FRFA and no certification is necessary. We note that the amendment mostly provides clarifications that would not have any economic impact. Providing a longer (12 month) compliance date for the one product that has not been subject to the registration rule, contoured changing pads, should reduce the economic impact on manufacturers of those products. V. Environmental Considerations The Commission’s regulations address whether the agency is required to prepare an environmental assessment or an environmental impact statement. Under these regulations, certain categories of CPSC actions normally have ‘‘little or no potential for affecting the human environment,’’ and therefore, they do not require an environmental assessment or an environmental impact statement. 16 CFR 1021.5. This final rule falls within the categorical exclusion to prepare an environmental impact statement. VI. Paperwork Reduction Act Section 104(d)(1) of the CPSIA excludes this rulemaking from the requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act, 44 U.S.C. 3501 through 3520. Consequently, no Paperwork Reduction Act analysis is necessary. VII. Preemption Section 26(a) of the CPSA, 15 U.S.C. 2075(a), provides that when a consumer product safety standard is in effect and applies to a product, no state or political PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 49949 subdivision of a state may either establish or continue in effect a standard or regulation that prescribes requirements for the performance, composition, contents, design, finish, construction, packaging, or labeling of such product dealing with the same risk of injury unless the state requirement is identical to the federal standard. The Commission’s authority to issue this consumer registration rule is section 16(b) of the CPSA, 15 U.S.C. 2065(b). Accordingly, this rule is not a consumer product safety standard, and the preemption provision of section 26(a) of the CPSA does not apply to the Commission’s final rule. VIII. Congressional Review Act The Congressional Review Act (CRA; 5 U.S.C. 801–808) states that, before a rule may take effect, the agency issuing the rule must submit the rule, and certain related information, to each House of Congress and the Comptroller General. 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1). The submission must indicate whether the rule is a ‘‘major rule.’’ The CRA states that the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) determines whether a rule qualifies as a ‘‘major rule.’’ Pursuant to the CRA, OIRA designated this rule as not a ‘‘major rule,’’ as defined in 5 U.S.C. 804(2). Additionally, to comply with the CRA, the Office of the General Counsel will submit the required information to each House of Congress and the Comptroller General. List of Subjects in 16 CFR Part 1130 Administrative practice and procedure, Business and industry, Consumer protection, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Commission amends Part 1130 of Title 16 of the Code of Federal Regulations as follows: PART 1130—REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSUMER REGISTRATION OF DURABLE INFANT OR TODDLER PRODUCTS 1. The authority citation for part 1130 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 15 U.S.C. 2056a, 2065(b). 2. Amend § 1130.1 by revising the last sentence in paragraph (c) to read as follows: ■ § 1130.1 date. Purpose, scope, and effective * * * * * (c) * * * Compliance with this part 1130 shall be required on September 24, 2020 for contoured changing pads (a E:\FR\FM\24SER1.SGM 24SER1 49950 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 185 / Tuesday, September 24, 2019 / Rules and Regulations type of baby changing product). The rule shall apply to durable infant or toddler products, as defined in § 1130.2(a), that are manufactured on or after those dates. 3. Amend § 1130.2 by revising paragraphs (a) introductory text, (a)(8), (11), (12), (14), (17), and removing paragraph (a)(18) ■ § 1130.2 (17) Bed rails. * * * Medical Policy, 6401 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21235–6401, (410) 965–1020. For information on eligibility or filing for benefits, call our national toll-free number, 1–800–772– 1213, or TTY 1–800–325–0778, or visit our internet site, Social Security Online, at http://www.socialsecurity.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: * Alberta E. Mills, Secretary, Consumer Product Safety Commission. [FR Doc. 2019–20049 Filed 9–23–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6355–01–P SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Definitions. (a) Definition of Durable Infant or Toddler Product means the following products intended for use, or that may be reasonably expected to be used, by children under the age of 5 years. The listed product categories are further defined in the applicable standards that the Commission issues under section 104(b) of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008, and include products that are combinations of the following product categories: * * * * * (8) Infant carrier, including soft infant and toddler carriers, hand-held infant carriers, sling carriers, and frame child carriers; * * * * * (11) Swings; (12) Bassinets and cradles, including bedside sleepers; * * * * * (14) Baby changing products; * * * * * khammond on DSKJM1Z7X2PROD with RULES * 20 CFR Part 404 [Docket No. SSA–2019–0036] RIN 0960–AI44 Extension of Expiration Dates for Two Body System Listings Social Security Administration. Final rule. AGENCY: ACTION: We are extending the expiration dates of the following body systems in the Listing of Impairments (listings) in our regulations: Respiratory Disorders and Genitourinary Disorders. We are making no other revisions to these body systems in this final rule. This extension ensures that we will continue to have the criteria we need to evaluate impairments in the affected body systems at step three of the sequential evaluation processes for initial claims and continuing disability reviews. DATES: This final rule is effective on September 24, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cheryl A. Williams, Director, Office of SUMMARY: Background We use the listings in appendix 1 to subpart P of part 404 of 20 CFR at the third step of the sequential evaluation process to evaluate claims filed by adults and children for benefits based on disability under the title II and title XVI programs.1 20 CFR 404.1520(d), 416.920(d), 416.924(d). The listings are in two parts: Part A has listings criteria for adults and Part B has listings criteria for children. If you are age 18 or over, we apply the listings criteria in part A when we assess your impairment or combination of impairments. If you are under age 18, we first use the criteria in part B of the listings when we assess your impairment(s). If the criteria in part B do not apply, we may use the criteria in part A when those criteria consider the effects of your impairment(s). 20 CFR 404.1525(b), 416.925(b). Explanation of Changes In this final rule, we are extending the dates on which the listings for the following two body systems will no longer be effective as set out in the following chart: Listing Current expiration date Respiratory Disorders 3.00 and 103.00 ............................................................... Genitourinary Disorders 6.00 and 106.00 ............................................................ October 7, 2019 .................................... December 9, 2019 ................................ We continue to revise and update the listings on a regular basis, including those body systems not affected by this final rule.2 We intend to update the two listings affected by this final rule as necessary based on medical advances as quickly as possible, but may not be able to publish final rules revising these listings by the current expiration dates. Therefore, we are extending the expiration dates listed above. Regulatory Procedures 1 We also use the listings in the sequential evaluation processes we use to determine whether a beneficiary’s disability continues. See 20 CFR 404.1594, 416.994, and 416.994a. 2 Since we last extended the expiration dates of the listings affected by this final rule in June 2016 (81 FR 37138) and October 2014 (79 FR 61221), we published final rules revising the medical criteria for evaluating hematological disorders (80 FR 21159 (2015)), cancer (malignant neoplastic diseases) (80 FR 28821 (2015)), neurological disorders (81 FR 66137 (2016)), mental disorders (81 FR 66137 VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:47 Sep 23, 2019 Jkt 247001 Justification for Final Rule We follow the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) rulemaking procedures specified in 5 U.S.C. 553 in promulgating regulations. Section 702(a)(5) of the Social Security Act, 42 U.S.C. 902(a)(5). Generally, the APA requires that an agency provide prior notice and opportunity for public comment before issuing a final regulation. The APA provides exceptions to the notice-and-comment PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Extended expiration date December 10, 2021. December 10, 2021. requirements when an agency finds there is good cause for dispensing with such procedures because they are impracticable, unnecessary, or contrary to the public interest. We determined that good cause exists for dispensing with the notice and public comment procedures. 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B). This final rule only extends the date on which two body system listings will no longer be effective. It makes no substantive changes to our rules. Our current regulations 3 provide that we may extend, revise, or (2016)), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (81 FR 86915 (2016)). 3 See the first sentence of appendix 1 to subpart P of part 404 of 20 CFR. E:\FR\FM\24SER1.SGM 24SER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 185 (Tuesday, September 24, 2019)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 49947-49950]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-20049]


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CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION

16 CFR Part 1130

[Docket No. CPSC-2018-0018]


Amendment to Requirements for Consumer Registration of Durable 
Infant or Toddler Products

AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission.

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: In 2009, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) 
fulfilled a statutory requirement in the Consumer Product Safety 
Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA) to issue a rule requiring manufacturers 
of durable infant or toddler products to establish a consumer 
registration program. The Commission is now finalizing an amendment to 
the definition of ``durable infant or toddler product'' in the rule to 
include the full statutory definition; clarify that the scope of each 
listed product category is further defined in the applicable mandatory 
standard; clarify listed product categories using the product name in 
the applicable mandatory standard; and clarify the scope of the infant 
carriers and bassinets and cradles product categories.

DATES: 
    Effective Date: The rule will become effective on October 24, 2019.
    Compliance Date for Contoured Changing Pads: Contoured changing 
pads, a subcategory of baby changing products in Sec.  1130.2(a)(14), 
must comply with this rule starting on September 24, 2020.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Keysha L. Walker, Compliance Officer, 
Office of Compliance & Field Operations, Regulatory Enforcement 
Division, Consumer Product Safety Commission, 4330 East-West Highway, 
Bethesda, MD 20814; 301-504-6820, Email: [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background and Statutory Authority

    Section 104 of the CPSIA is the Danny Keysar Child Product Safety 
Notification Act. Section 104 of the CPSIA requires that for ``durable 
infant or toddler products,'' the CPSC must (1) issue a mandatory rule 
for each product based on the applicable voluntary standard, and (2) 
issue a rule requiring consumer registration for such products. 15 
U.S.C. 2056a(b) and (d).\1\ In 2009, the Commission issued a regulation 
to implement the second requirement, i.e., that manufacturers provide a 
means for consumers to register ``durable infant or toddler products'' 
so that consumers can receive direct notification in the event of a 
product recall. The rule is codified at 16 CFR part 1130, Requirements 
for Consumer Registration of Durable Infant or Toddler Products (part 
1130, or the consumer registration rule).
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    \1\ Since 2009, the Commission has issued final rules for 23 
durable infant or toddler products. Mandatory standards for durable 
infant or toddler products are codified in 16 CFR parts 1215 through 
1235, and parts 1237 and 1238. Currently, part 1236 is reserved for 
Inclined Infant Sleep Products, a proposed rule that has not been 
finalized.

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[[Page 49948]]

    The two aspects of section 104, consumer registration and product 
standards, are both based on the definition of ``durable infant or 
toddler product'' set forth in section 104(f) of the CPSIA: ``durable 
products intended for use, or that may be reasonably expected to be 
used, by children under the age of 5 years.'' The statute lists 12 
product categories included within the definition, such as cribs, 
toddler beds, high chairs, strollers, and swings. In a 2009 rulemaking, 
the Commission explained that the list of products in section 104(f), 
and codified in the Commission's consumer registration rule in 16 CFR 
1130.2, is not static. At that time, the Commission added six product 
categories to the 12 listed in the CPSIA. 74 FR 68668, 68669 (Dec. 29, 
2009).
    On October 9, 2018, the Commission issued a notice of proposed 
rulemaking (NPR), proposing to make the following changes to part 1130 
to clarify the scope of products covered by the rule:
     State the full statutory definition of ``durable infant or 
toddler product'' in section 104(f)(1);
     Specify that the listed product categories are further 
defined in the applicable mandatory standards;
     List ``sling carriers,'' ``soft infant and toddler 
carriers,'' ``handheld infant carriers,'' and ``frame child carriers'' 
as a subset of infant carriers, to avoid confusion regarding whether 
these products are subject to the consumer registration rule, and to 
reflect each product category using the name of the applicable 
mandatory standard;
     Clarify that ``bedside sleepers'' are a subset of 
bassinets, to avoid confusion regarding whether bedside sleepers are 
subject to the consumer registration rule, and to reflect the product 
name used in the mandatory standard; and
     Revise the term ``changing tables'' to ``baby changing 
products,'' to reflect the product name used in the mandatory standard.

83 FR 50542. After reviewing the comments, the Commission is finalizing 
this rule, without modification.

II. Response to Comments

    CPSC received seven comments on the NPR. Only one comment addressed 
a substantive issue, while all of the remaining comments generally 
support the concept of the consumer registration rule, and support 
amending the definition of ``durable infant or toddler product'' to 
clarify the scope of products subject to the rule. The Commission is 
not making any changes in the final rule based on the comments 
received. Below we summarize and respond to the substantive comment on 
the proposed rule.
    Comment--One commenter disagreed with the proposed 1-year effective 
date for contoured changing pads, stating that many of the 
manufacturers make other durable infant or toddler products and have 
registration programs in place. The commenter opines that because of 
technological advances, product registration programs should take no 
longer than 6 months to implement, even if no program is in place. The 
commenter recommended an effective date for contoured changing pads 
that is 6 months after publication of the final rule.
    Response--The Commission agrees that many manufacturers of 
contoured changing pads make other products subject to the consumer 
registration rule, and therefore, these manufacturers are likely to 
have an established consumer registration program. However, the final 
rule for baby changing products identified 25 firms that supply only 
contoured changing pads and no other changing products. At least 13 of 
these 25 firms are not otherwise in the durable infant and toddler 
product market and are unlikely to have an existing consumer 
registration program. The commenter provided no information, and we 
have none, to demonstrate that these 13 firms have established a 
consumer registration program since issuance of the rule for changing 
products. Additionally, the baby changing products rule (16 CFR part 
1235) went into effect on June 26, 2018, a year after publication of 
the final rule. For these reasons, the rule provides a 12-month 
effective date for a consumer registration program for contoured 
changing pads, consistent with previous effective periods for new 
products subject to the consumer registration requirement in part 1130.

III. Description of the Final Rule

A. Definition

    The final rule updates the definition of ``durable infant or 
toddler product'' in 16 CFR 1130.2(a) to state the full statutory 
definition of ``durable infant or toddler product'' and to clarify that 
the scope of the product categories listed can be found in the 
applicable mandatory standard.

B. Product Categories

    The final rule updates the description of product categories 
subject to the rule by listing the name of each product category that 
aligns with the name of the product category used in the applicable 
voluntary or mandatory standard.\2\ Furthermore, to provide information 
on the scope of the products covered by a product category, the final 
rule states that the scope of each product category is further defined 
in the applicable mandatory standard.
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    \2\ Some products may be listed in part 1130 before the 
Commission issues the corresponding mandatory standard. In those 
cases, the Commission will list the product category as defined in 
the current voluntary standard, which typically provides specificity 
about the scope of the product category.
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1. Infant Carriers
    Section 104(f)(H) of the CPSIA lists ``infant carriers'' as a 
product category included in the term ``durable infant or toddler 
products.'' ASTM International has four separate voluntary standards 
for infant carriers, and the Commission has now issued four separate 
mandatory standards, one for each subtype of infant carrier:

 16 CFR part 1225, Hand-Held Infant Carriers
 16 CFR part 1226, Soft Infant and Toddler Carriers
 16 CFR part 1228, Sling Carriers
 16 CFR part 1230, Frame Child Carriers.

    Although the Commission added ``Infant Slings'' to the list of 
products in 16 CFR Sec.  1130.2(a) when finalizing the 2009 consumer 
registration rule, the registration rule does not list the other sub-
categories of infant carriers. To clarify that all four types of infant 
carriers are subject to the consumer registration requirement, the 
final rule amends Sec.  1130.2(a)(8) to state: ``Infant carriers, 
including soft infant and toddler carriers, hand-held infant carriers, 
sling carriers, and frame child carriers.'' The final rule removes 
``infant slings'' as a separate product category in 16 CFR 
1130.2(a)(18), and changes the product name from ``infant slings'' to 
``sling carriers,'' to align with the name of the mandatory rule in 
part 1228.
2. Bedside Sleepers
    Currently, the product ``bedside sleepers'' \3\ is not listed in 
part 1130. However, when the Commission issued a mandatory standard 
pursuant to section 104(b) of the CPSIA for bedside sleepers (codified 
at 16 CFR part 1222), the Commission considered bedside sleepers to be 
a subset of ``bassinets and cradles.'' 79 FR 2581, 2583 (Jan. 15,

[[Page 49949]]

2014). To resolve any confusion about whether bedside sleepers are 
subject to part 1130, the final rule revises Sec.  1130.2(a)(12) to 
state: ``Bassinets and cradles, including bedside sleepers.''
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    \3\ A bedside sleeper is a bassinet-type product, intended to 
provide a sleeping environment for an infant up to approximately 5 
months of age, or when a child begins to push up on his or her hands 
and knees, whichever comes first. These products are designed to be 
secured to an adult bed, for the purpose of having a baby sleep in 
close proximity to an adult.
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3. Changing Tables
    Currently, ``changing tables'' is listed as a durable infant or 
toddler product in 16 CFR 1130.2(14). However, the Commission's 
standard for these products is called ``Safety Standard for Baby 
Changing Products,'' codified at 16 CFR part 1235.\4\ CPSC's standard 
covers products that are included in the scope of the voluntary 
standard on which it is based, ASTM F2388-18, Standard Consumer Safety 
Specification for Baby Changing Products for Domestic Use. Accordingly, 
CPSC's standard includes changing tables, changing table accessories, 
contoured changing pads, and add-on changing units. The final rule 
revises Sec.  1130.2(a)(14) to use the term ``baby changing products'' 
to be consistent with the Commission's mandatory standard.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ The final rule for baby changing products was published on 
June 26, 2018, and became effective on June 26, 2019.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

III. Effective Date and Compliance Date

    The Administrative Procedure Act generally requires that the 
effective date of a rule be at least 30 days after publication of the 
final rule. The final rule takes effect 30 days after publication, but 
has a different compliance date for contoured changing pads, as 
follows.

A. Thirty-Day Effective Date

    Most of the changes in the final rule are clarifications to the 
definition of ``durable infant or toddler product'' to state the full 
statutory definition, and to identify more clearly product categories 
that already are subject to the consumer registration rule (i.e., the 
statutory definition, infant carrier list, and bedside sleepers). 
Because these revisions clarify the text of the rule and do not impose 
new burden on any manufacturer, the final rule has a 30-day effective 
date for the addition of the statutory language in Sec.  1130.2(a), and 
for the clarifications to product categories in sections 1130.2(a)(8), 
(a)(11), and (a)(12).

B. Twelve-Month Compliance Date for Contoured Changing Pads

    For the reasons stated in the NPR and section II of this preamble, 
the final rule has a 12-month compliance date for contoured changing 
pads. The other types of ``baby changing products'' (changing tables, 
changing table accessories, and add-on changing units) have all been 
required to be in compliance with part 1130 since December 29, 2010, 
under the previously listed category ``changing tables.'' 74 FR at 
68669. Therefore, the 12-month compliance date applies only to 
contoured changing pads.

IV. Regulatory Flexibility Act

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA), 5 U.S.C. 601-612, requires 
that agencies review a proposed rule and a final rule for the rule's 
potential economic impact on small entities, including small 
businesses. Section 604 of the RFA generally requires that agencies 
prepare a final regulatory flexibility analysis (FRFA) when 
promulgating final rules, unless the head of the agency certifies that 
the rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial 
number of small entities. Pursuant to section 104(d)(1) of the CPSIA, 
however, the provision that establishes the requirement for a consumer 
registration rule, the RFA does not apply when promulgating a rule 
under this provision. Consequently, the Commission has not prepared an 
FRFA and no certification is necessary. We note that the amendment 
mostly provides clarifications that would not have any economic impact. 
Providing a longer (12 month) compliance date for the one product that 
has not been subject to the registration rule, contoured changing pads, 
should reduce the economic impact on manufacturers of those products.

V. Environmental Considerations

    The Commission's regulations address whether the agency is required 
to prepare an environmental assessment or an environmental impact 
statement. Under these regulations, certain categories of CPSC actions 
normally have ``little or no potential for affecting the human 
environment,'' and therefore, they do not require an environmental 
assessment or an environmental impact statement. 16 CFR 1021.5. This 
final rule falls within the categorical exclusion to prepare an 
environmental impact statement.

VI. Paperwork Reduction Act

    Section 104(d)(1) of the CPSIA excludes this rulemaking from the 
requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act, 44 U.S.C. 3501 through 
3520. Consequently, no Paperwork Reduction Act analysis is necessary.

VII. Preemption

    Section 26(a) of the CPSA, 15 U.S.C. 2075(a), provides that when a 
consumer product safety standard is in effect and applies to a product, 
no state or political subdivision of a state may either establish or 
continue in effect a standard or regulation that prescribes 
requirements for the performance, composition, contents, design, 
finish, construction, packaging, or labeling of such product dealing 
with the same risk of injury unless the state requirement is identical 
to the federal standard. The Commission's authority to issue this 
consumer registration rule is section 16(b) of the CPSA, 15 U.S.C. 
2065(b). Accordingly, this rule is not a consumer product safety 
standard, and the preemption provision of section 26(a) of the CPSA 
does not apply to the Commission's final rule.

VIII. Congressional Review Act

    The Congressional Review Act (CRA; 5 U.S.C. 801-808) states that, 
before a rule may take effect, the agency issuing the rule must submit 
the rule, and certain related information, to each House of Congress 
and the Comptroller General. 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1). The submission must 
indicate whether the rule is a ``major rule.'' The CRA states that the 
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) determines whether 
a rule qualifies as a ``major rule.''
    Pursuant to the CRA, OIRA designated this rule as not a ``major 
rule,'' as defined in 5 U.S.C. 804(2). Additionally, to comply with the 
CRA, the Office of the General Counsel will submit the required 
information to each House of Congress and the Comptroller General.

List of Subjects in 16 CFR Part 1130

    Administrative practice and procedure, Business and industry, 
Consumer protection, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

    For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Commission amends 
Part 1130 of Title 16 of the Code of Federal Regulations as follows:

PART 1130--REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSUMER REGISTRATION OF DURABLE INFANT 
OR TODDLER PRODUCTS

0
1. The authority citation for part 1130 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 15 U.S.C. 2056a, 2065(b).


0
2. Amend Sec.  1130.1 by revising the last sentence in paragraph (c) to 
read as follows:


Sec.  1130.1  Purpose, scope, and effective date.

* * * * *
    (c) * * * Compliance with this part 1130 shall be required on 
September 24, 2020 for contoured changing pads (a

[[Page 49950]]

type of baby changing product). The rule shall apply to durable infant 
or toddler products, as defined in Sec.  1130.2(a), that are 
manufactured on or after those dates.

0
3. Amend Sec.  1130.2 by revising paragraphs (a) introductory text, 
(a)(8), (11), (12), (14), (17), and removing paragraph (a)(18)


Sec.  1130.2  Definitions.

    (a) Definition of Durable Infant or Toddler Product means the 
following products intended for use, or that may be reasonably expected 
to be used, by children under the age of 5 years. The listed product 
categories are further defined in the applicable standards that the 
Commission issues under section 104(b) of the Consumer Product Safety 
Improvement Act of 2008, and include products that are combinations of 
the following product categories:
* * * * *
    (8) Infant carrier, including soft infant and toddler carriers, 
hand-held infant carriers, sling carriers, and frame child carriers;
* * * * *
    (11) Swings;
    (12) Bassinets and cradles, including bedside sleepers;
* * * * *
    (14) Baby changing products;
* * * * *
    (17) Bed rails.
* * * * *

Alberta E. Mills,
Secretary, Consumer Product Safety Commission.
[FR Doc. 2019-20049 Filed 9-23-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6355-01-P