Special Conditions: The Boeing Company Model 777-9 Airplane; Electronic Flight-Control System and Control-Surface-Position Awareness, 38115-38117 [2019-16729]

Download as PDF 38115 Rules and Regulations Federal Register Vol. 84, No. 151 Tuesday, August 6, 2019 This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed to and codified in the Code of Federal Regulations, which is published under 50 titles pursuant to 44 U.S.C. 1510. The Code of Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 12 CFR Part 248 [Docket No. R–1643] RIN 7100–AF33 FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 12 CFR Part 351 RIN 3064–AE88 COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 75 RIN 3038–AE72 SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 255 [Release No. BHCA–6; File No. S7–30–18] RIN 3235–AM43 Revisions to Prohibitions and Restrictions on Proprietary Trading and Certain Interests in, and Relationships With, Hedge Funds and Private Equity Funds Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Board); Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC); Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC); and Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), collectively, the Agencies. ACTION: Final rule; correction. AGENCY: The Agencies published a final rule in the Federal Register on July 22, 2019, that adopted final rules to amend regulations implementing Section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act (the Volcker Rule) in a manner consistent with the statutory amendments made pursuant to certain sections of the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act. This document corrects jbell on DSK3GLQ082PROD with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:16 Aug 05, 2019 Jkt 247001 errors in amendatory instructions in the rule. DATES: Effective August 6, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Board: Flora Ahn, Special Counsel, (202) 452–2317, Gregory Frischmann, Senior Counsel, (202) 452–2803, Kirin Walsh, Attorney, (202) 452–3058, or Sarah Podrygula, Attorney, (202) 912– 4658, Legal Division, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 20th and C Streets NW, Washington, DC 20551. FDIC: Michael B. Phillips, Counsel, mphillips@fdic.gov, Benjamin J. Klein, Counsel, bklein@fdic.gov, or Annmarie H. Boyd, Counsel, aboyd@fdic.gov, Legal Division, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 550 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20429. SEC: Andrew R. Bernstein, Senior Special Counsel, Sam Litz, AttorneyAdviser, Aaron Washington, Special Counsel, Office of Derivatives Policy and Trading Practices, Division of Trading and Markets, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street NE, Washington, DC 20549. CFTC: Cantrell Dumas, Special Counsel, (202) 418–5043, cdumas@ cftc.gov; Mark Fajfar, Assistant General Counsel, (202) 418–6636, mfajfar@ cftc.gov, Office of the General Counsel; Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Three Lafayette Centre, 1155 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20581. This document corrects errors in amendatory instructions in a final rule published on July 22, 2019, affecting 12 CFR 248.11, 12 CFR 351.11, 17 CFR 75.11, and 17 CFR 255.11 of the Agencies’ regulations. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Correction In final rule FR Doc. 2019–15019 published in the Federal Register on July 22, 2019 (84 FR 35008), beginning on page 35020, make the following corrections: ■ 1. On page 35020, in the third column, correct amendatory instruction 11 to read as follows: ‘‘11. Revise paragraph (a)(6) to read as follows:’’ ■ 2. On page 35021, in the second column, correct amendatory instruction 16 to read as follows: ‘‘16. Revise paragraph (a)(6) to read as follows:’’ ■ PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 3. On page 35022, in the first column, correct amendatory instruction 21 to read as follows: ‘‘21. Revise paragraph (a)(6) to read as follows:’’ ■ 4. On page 35022, in the second column, correct amendatory instruction 26 to read as follows: ‘‘26. Revise paragraph (a)(6) to read as follows:’’ ■ Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, July 26, 2019. Ann E. Misback, Secretary of the Board. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Dated at Washington, DC, on July 23, 2019. Valerie J. Best, Assistant Executive Secretary. Issued in Washington, DC, on July 23, 2019, by the Commission. Christopher Kirkpatrick, Secretary of the Commission. By the Securities and Exchange Commission Dated: July 23, 2019. J. Lynn Taylor, Assistant Secretary. [FR Doc. 2019–16634 Filed 8–5–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8011–01–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 [Docket No. FAA–2018–1016; Special Conditions No. 25–753–SC] Special Conditions: The Boeing Company Model 777–9 Airplane; Electronic Flight-Control System and Control-Surface-Position Awareness Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final special conditions. AGENCY: These special conditions are issued for The Boeing Company (Boeing) Model 777–9 airplane. This airplane will have a novel or unusual design feature when compared to the state of technology envisioned in the airworthiness standards for transportcategory airplanes. This design feature is an electronic flight-control system requiring control-surface-position awareness. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\06AUR1.SGM 06AUR1 38116 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 151 / Tuesday, August 6, 2019 / Rules and Regulations appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards. DATES: Effective September 5, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joe Jacobsen, Airplane & Flight Crew Interface Section, AIR–671, Transport Standards Branch, Policy and Innovation Division, Aircraft Certification Service, Federal Aviation Administration, 2200 South 216th Street, Des Moines, Washington 98198; telephone and fax 206–231–3158; email joe.jacobsen@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background On December 6, 2013, Boeing applied for an amendment to Type Certificate No. T00001SE to include the new 777– 9 airplane. This airplane, which is a derivative of the Boeing Model 777 airplane currently approved under Type Certificate No. T00001SE, is a twinengine, transport-category airplane with seating for 495 passengers and a maximum takeoff weight of 775,000 pounds. jbell on DSK3GLQ082PROD with RULES Type Certification Basis Under the provisions of title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 21.101, Boeing must show that the Model 777– 9 airplane meets the applicable provisions of the regulations listed in Type Certificate No. T00001SE, or the applicable regulations in effect on the date of application for the change, except for earlier amendments as agreed upon by the FAA. If the Administrator finds that the applicable airworthiness regulations (i.e., 14 CFR part 25) do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for the Boeing Model 777–9 airplane because of a novel or unusual design feature, special conditions are prescribed under the provisions of § 21.16. Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which they are issued. Should the type certificate for that model be amended later to include any other model that incorporates the same novel or unusual design feature, or should any other model already included on the same type certificate be modified to incorporate the same novel or unusual design feature, these special conditions would also apply to the other model under § 21.101. In addition to the applicable airworthiness regulations and special VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:16 Aug 05, 2019 Jkt 247001 conditions, the Boeing Model 777–9 airplane must comply with the fuel-vent and exhaust-emission requirements of 14 CFR part 34, and the noisecertification requirements of 14 CFR part 36. The FAA issues special conditions, as defined in 14 CFR 11.19, in accordance with § 11.38, and they become part of the type certification basis under § 21.101. Novel or Unusual Design Features The Boeing Model 777–9 airplane will incorporate the following novel or unusual design feature: An electronic flight-control system requiring control-surface-position awareness. Discussion With a response-command type of flight-control system and no direct coupling from the cockpit controller to control surface, such as on the Boeing Model 777 and 787 airplanes, the pilot is not aware of the actual surfacedeflection position during flight maneuvers. This feature of this design is novel and unusual when compared to the state of technology envisioned in the airworthiness standards for transportcategory airplanes. These special conditions are intended to contain the additional safety standard. Some unusual flight conditions, arising from atmospheric conditions, or airplane or engine failures, or both, may result in full or nearly full controlsurface deflection. Unless the flightcrew is made aware of excessive deflection or impending control-surface deflection limiting, piloted or the automated flightcontrol system control of the airplane could be inadvertently continued in a way that would cause loss of control, or other unsafe handling or performance situations. The special conditions require that suitable annunciation be provided to the flightcrew when a flight condition exists in which nearly full control-surface deflection occurs. Suitability of such an annunciation must take into account that some pilot-demanded maneuvers, such as a rapid roll, are necessarily associated with intended full or nearly full control-surface deflection. Simple alerting systems, which would function in both intended and unexpected control-limiting situations, must be properly balanced between providing needed crew awareness and avoiding nuisance warnings. The special conditions are derived initially from standardized requirements the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) developed, a committee comprising representatives of PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 the FAA, Europe’s Joint Aviation Authorities (now replaced by the European Aviation Safety Agency), and industry representatives. In the case of some of these requirements, a draft notice of proposed rulemaking has been prepared but no final rule has been issued. The special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards. Discussion of Comments The FAA issued Notice of Proposed Special Conditions No. 25–19–06–SC for the Boeing Model 777–9 airplane, which was published in the Federal Register on May 8, 2019 (84 FR 20053). No comments were received, and the special conditions are adopted as proposed. Applicability As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable to the Boeing Model 777–9 airplane. Should Boeing apply at a later date for a change to the type certificate to include another model incorporating the same novel or unusual design feature, these special conditions would apply to that model as well. Conclusion This action affects only a certain novel or unusual design feature on one model of airplane. It is not a rule of general applicability. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 25 Aircraft, Aviation safety, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. Authority Citation The authority citation for these special conditions is as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(f), 106(g), 40113, 44701, 44702, 44704. The Special Conditions Accordingly, pursuant to the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the following special conditions are issued as part of the type certification basis for Boeing Model 777–9 airplanes. In addition to compliance with §§ 25.143, 25.671, and 25.672, the following special conditions apply. (1) The system design must ensure that the flightcrew is made suitably aware whenever the primary control means nears the limit of control authority. This indication should direct the pilot to take appropriate action to avoid the unsafe condition in E:\FR\FM\06AUR1.SGM 06AUR1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 151 / Tuesday, August 6, 2019 / Rules and Regulations accordance with appropriate airplane flight manual instructions. Depending on the application, suitable annunciations may include flight-deck control position, annunciator light, or surface position indicators. Furthermore, this requirement applies at limits of control authority, not necessarily at limits of any individual surface travel. (2) Suitability of such a display or alerting must take into account that some pilot-demanded maneuvers are necessarily associated with intended full performance, which may require full surface deflection. Therefore, simple alerting systems, which would function in both intended or unexpected control-limiting situations, must be properly balanced between needed flightcrew awareness and nuisance factors. A monitoring system, which might compare airplane motion, surface deflection, and pilot demand, could be useful for eliminating nuisance alerting. Issued in Des Moines, Washington, on July 31, 2019. Victor Wicklund, Manager, Transport Standards Branch, Policy and Innovation Division, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2019–16729 Filed 8–5–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration 15 CFR Part 315 [Docket No. 180223210–8210–01] RIN 0625–AB14 Elimination of Regulations Implementing the Automotive Products Trade Act of 1965 International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: Through this final rule, the International Trade Administration (ITA), U.S. Department of Commerce, removes the regulations implementing the Automotive Products Trade Act of 1965 (Act). That statute implemented the 1965 Canada-United States Automotive Products Agreement (Auto Pact). Since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) came into effect in 1994, trade in automotive products between the United States and Canada is no longer governed by the Auto Pact or the Act. Implementing regulations for the Act are thus obsolete and unnecessary. jbell on DSK3GLQ082PROD with RULES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 16:16 Aug 05, 2019 Jkt 247001 DATES: This rule is effective August 6, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Scott Kennedy, Office of Transportation and Machinery, U.S. Department of Commerce, 1401 Constitution Avenue NW, Room 38032, Washington, DC 20230; telephone: (202) 482–1474. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background In 1965, the United States and Canada entered into the Auto Pact concerning trade between Canada and the United States in automotive parts. Under the Auto Pact, the United States agreed to accord duty-free treatment to imports of certain automotive products of Canada. Specifically, Annex B of the Auto Pact listed certain kinds of motor vehicles and fabricated components that would receive duty-free treatment upon entry into the United States, subject to a limitation relating to non-Canadian content. Annex B limited the duty-free treatment of automotive parts upon entry into the United States to those ‘‘for use as original equipment in the manufacture of motor vehicles’’ described in Annex B. The United States implemented the Auto Pact through the Automotive Products Trade Act of 1965, Public Law 89–283 (the Act). The Act gave the President the authority to proclaim modifications to the Tariff Schedules of the United States (tariff schedules), as provided in the Auto Pact. Section 404 of the Act defined the term ‘‘original motor vehicle equipment’’ as an imported Canadian article ‘‘which has been obtained from a supplier in Canada under or pursuant to a written order, contract or letter of intent from a bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturer in the United States, and which is a fabricated component intended for use as original equipment in the manufacture in the United States of a motor vehicle.’’ The Act directed the Secretary of Commerce to publish periodically in the Federal Register a list of bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturers. In 1980, the Department of Commerce promulgated regulations to establish a procedure by which a person could apply to be determined to be a bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturer (15 CFR part 315). Trade in automobiles and automotive products between the United States and Canada is now governed by the NAFTA, which went into effect on January 1, 1994. Imports of the products described in the Auto Pact and the Act now enter the United States duty-free, with no distinction based on the nature of the importer. The amendments to the tariff schedules proclaimed by the President PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 38117 on October 21, 1965, regarding bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturers, ceased to be relevant when the NAFTA went into effect. Since that date, no person has applied to be determined to be a bona fide motor-vehicle manufacturer, and the Secretary has published no listing in the Federal Register of bona fide motorvehicle manufacturers. As a result, the regulations found at 15 CFR part 315 are obsolete and unnecessary. Classification This final rule was drafted in accordance with Executive Orders 12866, 13563, and 13771. OMB has determined that this rule is not significant for purposes of Executive Orders 12866. This final rule to eliminate 15 CFR part 315 is a deregulatory action under Executive Order 13771. Since the regulation has not been utilized in almost 25 years, there are no cost savings associated with this elimination. Administrative Procedure Act and Regulatory Flexibility Act Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(B), there is good cause to waive prior notice and opportunity for public comment on this action, as notice and comment are unnecessary. This rule removes obsolete regulations that were superseded by the implementation of the NAFTA, and that will remain obsolete under the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), once that agreement is implemented. Therefore, public comment would serve no purpose and is unnecessary. There is also good cause under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3) to waive the 30-day delay in the date of effectiveness for this final rule. Because this rule does not alter the rights or responsibilities of any party, delaying implementation of this rule would serve no purpose. Because prior notice and opportunity for public comment are not required pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553, or any other law, the analytical requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) do not apply. Therefore, a regulatory flexibility analysis has not been prepared. Congressional Review Act This final rule is not major under the Congressional Review Act (5 U.S.C. 801 et seq.). Executive Order No. 13132 This final rule does not contain policies that have federalism implications. E:\FR\FM\06AUR1.SGM 06AUR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 151 (Tuesday, August 6, 2019)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 38115-38117]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-16729]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 25

[Docket No. FAA-2018-1016; Special Conditions No. 25-753-SC]


Special Conditions: The Boeing Company Model 777-9 Airplane; 
Electronic Flight-Control System and Control-Surface-Position Awareness

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final special conditions.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: These special conditions are issued for The Boeing Company 
(Boeing) Model 777-9 airplane. This airplane will have a novel or 
unusual design feature when compared to the state of technology 
envisioned in the airworthiness standards for transport-category 
airplanes. This design feature is an electronic flight-control system 
requiring control-surface-position awareness. The applicable 
airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or

[[Page 38116]]

appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These special 
conditions contain the additional safety standards that the 
Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety 
equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards.

DATES: Effective September 5, 2019.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joe Jacobsen, Airplane & Flight Crew 
Interface Section, AIR-671, Transport Standards Branch, Policy and 
Innovation Division, Aircraft Certification Service, Federal Aviation 
Administration, 2200 South 216th Street, Des Moines, Washington 98198; 
telephone and fax 206-231-3158; email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    On December 6, 2013, Boeing applied for an amendment to Type 
Certificate No. T00001SE to include the new 777-9 airplane. This 
airplane, which is a derivative of the Boeing Model 777 airplane 
currently approved under Type Certificate No. T00001SE, is a twin-
engine, transport-category airplane with seating for 495 passengers and 
a maximum takeoff weight of 775,000 pounds.

Type Certification Basis

    Under the provisions of title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 
CFR) 21.101, Boeing must show that the Model 777-9 airplane meets the 
applicable provisions of the regulations listed in Type Certificate No. 
T00001SE, or the applicable regulations in effect on the date of 
application for the change, except for earlier amendments as agreed 
upon by the FAA.
    If the Administrator finds that the applicable airworthiness 
regulations (i.e., 14 CFR part 25) do not contain adequate or 
appropriate safety standards for the Boeing Model 777-9 airplane 
because of a novel or unusual design feature, special conditions are 
prescribed under the provisions of Sec.  21.16.
    Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which 
they are issued. Should the type certificate for that model be amended 
later to include any other model that incorporates the same novel or 
unusual design feature, or should any other model already included on 
the same type certificate be modified to incorporate the same novel or 
unusual design feature, these special conditions would also apply to 
the other model under Sec.  21.101.
    In addition to the applicable airworthiness regulations and special 
conditions, the Boeing Model 777-9 airplane must comply with the fuel-
vent and exhaust-emission requirements of 14 CFR part 34, and the 
noise-certification requirements of 14 CFR part 36.
    The FAA issues special conditions, as defined in 14 CFR 11.19, in 
accordance with Sec.  11.38, and they become part of the type 
certification basis under Sec.  21.101.

Novel or Unusual Design Features

    The Boeing Model 777-9 airplane will incorporate the following 
novel or unusual design feature:
    An electronic flight-control system requiring control-surface-
position awareness.

Discussion

    With a response-command type of flight-control system and no direct 
coupling from the cockpit controller to control surface, such as on the 
Boeing Model 777 and 787 airplanes, the pilot is not aware of the 
actual surface-deflection position during flight maneuvers. This 
feature of this design is novel and unusual when compared to the state 
of technology envisioned in the airworthiness standards for transport-
category airplanes. These special conditions are intended to contain 
the additional safety standard.
    Some unusual flight conditions, arising from atmospheric 
conditions, or airplane or engine failures, or both, may result in full 
or nearly full control-surface deflection. Unless the flightcrew is 
made aware of excessive deflection or impending control-surface 
deflection limiting, piloted or the automated flight-control system 
control of the airplane could be inadvertently continued in a way that 
would cause loss of control, or other unsafe handling or performance 
situations.
    The special conditions require that suitable annunciation be 
provided to the flightcrew when a flight condition exists in which 
nearly full control-surface deflection occurs. Suitability of such an 
annunciation must take into account that some pilot-demanded maneuvers, 
such as a rapid roll, are necessarily associated with intended full or 
nearly full control-surface deflection. Simple alerting systems, which 
would function in both intended and unexpected control-limiting 
situations, must be properly balanced between providing needed crew 
awareness and avoiding nuisance warnings.
    The special conditions are derived initially from standardized 
requirements the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) 
developed, a committee comprising representatives of the FAA, Europe's 
Joint Aviation Authorities (now replaced by the European Aviation 
Safety Agency), and industry representatives. In the case of some of 
these requirements, a draft notice of proposed rulemaking has been 
prepared but no final rule has been issued.
    The special conditions contain the additional safety standards that 
the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety 
equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards.

Discussion of Comments

    The FAA issued Notice of Proposed Special Conditions No. 25-19-06-
SC for the Boeing Model 777-9 airplane, which was published in the 
Federal Register on May 8, 2019 (84 FR 20053). No comments were 
received, and the special conditions are adopted as proposed.

Applicability

    As discussed above, these special conditions are applicable to the 
Boeing Model 777-9 airplane. Should Boeing apply at a later date for a 
change to the type certificate to include another model incorporating 
the same novel or unusual design feature, these special conditions 
would apply to that model as well.

Conclusion

    This action affects only a certain novel or unusual design feature 
on one model of airplane. It is not a rule of general applicability.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 25

    Aircraft, Aviation safety, Reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements.

Authority Citation

    The authority citation for these special conditions is as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(f), 106(g), 40113, 44701, 44702, 44704.

The Special Conditions

    Accordingly, pursuant to the authority delegated to me by the 
Administrator, the following special conditions are issued as part of 
the type certification basis for Boeing Model 777-9 airplanes.
    In addition to compliance with Sec. Sec.  25.143, 25.671, and 
25.672, the following special conditions apply.
    (1) The system design must ensure that the flightcrew is made 
suitably aware whenever the primary control means nears the limit of 
control authority. This indication should direct the pilot to take 
appropriate action to avoid the unsafe condition in

[[Page 38117]]

accordance with appropriate airplane flight manual instructions. 
Depending on the application, suitable annunciations may include 
flight-deck control position, annunciator light, or surface position 
indicators. Furthermore, this requirement applies at limits of control 
authority, not necessarily at limits of any individual surface travel.
    (2) Suitability of such a display or alerting must take into 
account that some pilot-demanded maneuvers are necessarily associated 
with intended full performance, which may require full surface 
deflection. Therefore, simple alerting systems, which would function in 
both intended or unexpected control-limiting situations, must be 
properly balanced between needed flightcrew awareness and nuisance 
factors. A monitoring system, which might compare airplane motion, 
surface deflection, and pilot demand, could be useful for eliminating 
nuisance alerting.

    Issued in Des Moines, Washington, on July 31, 2019.
Victor Wicklund,
Manager, Transport Standards Branch, Policy and Innovation Division, 
Aircraft Certification Service.
[FR Doc. 2019-16729 Filed 8-5-19; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 4910-13-P