Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN, 38050-38052 [2019-16690]

Download as PDF 38050 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 150 / Monday, August 5, 2019 / Notices jspears on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Valley constitutes the western Mojave Desert. Archaeological and ethnographic evidence suggests that this region was inhabited by Serran speakers of the Takic family of languages. More specifically, based on John P. Harrington’s notes and mission records, the desert group occupying the Antelope Valley were speakers of the Serrano language. Inclusive of a few groups, the region was within the traditional territory of the Desert Serrano (referred to by some early Spanish explorers—and later ethnographers referencing their diaries—as the ‘‘Vanyume’’ or ‘‘Beneme’’). Serrano peoples’ oral traditions place them in this portion of their ancestral territory since time immemorial. Archaeologists have traditionally suggested that Serrano speakers have continuously occupied the San Bernardino Mountains and the areas north, northwest, and west of the San Bernardino Mountains for at least 3,000 years, but newer studies have lengthened their occupancy up to 5,000–6,000 years B.P. The Tataviam, a desert group that spoke a language distinct from Serrano, are also tied to the land in the southwestern portion of the Antelope Valley, including the northern foothills of the Liebre Mountains. The Tataviam language is derived from the Takic languages of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock, and is associated with villages that held Serrano and Kitanemuk speakers. There are mapped native settlements in the Antelope Valley which are known to have been inhabited by Tataviam, Serrano, and/or Kitanemuk- speaking peoples—sometimes separately and sometimes simultaneously. Such places in the Antelope Valley area, include but are not limited to, Amutskupiat/ Amutskupeat, or Big Rock, and Maviayek/Maviajeh’, or Little Rock Creek. Some of the occupants of these villages were recruited to Mission San Fernando and Mission San Gabriel, but it also appears that some people successfully avoided missionization. The cultural affiliation of both Serrano and Tataviam includes the welldocumented Lovejoy Springs site (CA– LAN–942), also known as the village of Tameobit/Tameonga. Determinations Made by the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History Officials of the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of eight VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:42 Aug 02, 2019 Jkt 247001 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation), and, if joined, the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians, a non-federally recognized Indian group. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Amy Gusick, Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, 900 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007, telephone (213) 763–3370, email agusick@nhm.org, by September 4, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation) and the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians (if joined to San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California) may proceed. The Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying The Consulted and Invited Indian Tribes and Groups that this notice has been published. Dated: July 9, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–16683 Filed 8–2–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0028406; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in consultation with the appropriate SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Federally-recognized Indian Tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Federally-recognized Indian Tribes. Representatives of any Federally-recognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the TVA. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Federally-recognized Indian Tribe stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Federallyrecognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the TVA at the address in this notice by September 4, 2019. ADDRESSES: Dr. Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632– 7458, email tomaher@tva.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN, and stored at the Alabama Museum of Natural History (AMNH) at the University of Alabama. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from the following archeological sites in Lauderdale County, AL: 1LU21, 1LU92, 1LU64, 1LU67, and 1LU72. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by TVA professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas); Alabama- E:\FR\FM\05AUN1.SGM 05AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 150 / Monday, August 5, 2019 / Notices jspears on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Quassarte Tribal Town; Cherokee Nation; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creeks (previously listed as the Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama); The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; Thlopthlocco Tribal Town; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains The sites listed in this notice were excavated as part of TVA’s Pickwick reservoir project by the Alabama Museum of Natural History (AMNH) at the University of Alabama, using labor and funds provided by the Works Progress Administration. Details regarding these excavations and sites may be found in An Archaeological Survey of Pickwick Basin in the Adjacent Portions of the States of Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee, by William S. Webb and David L. DeJarnette. The human remains and associated funerary objects listed in this notice have been in the physical custody of AMNH at the University of Alabama since excavation but are under the control of the TVA. Human remains and other associated funerary objects from these sites were previously listed in a Notice of Inventory Completion (81 FR 60377–60380, September 1, 2016) and transferred to The Chickasaw Nation. Additional human remains and associated funerary objects were found during a recent improvement in the curation of the TVA archeological collections at AMNH. From August 1937 to April 1938, human remains representing, at minimum, 28 individuals were removed from site 1LU21, in Lauderdale County, AL. Excavation commenced after TVA had acquired the land encompassing this site on February 19, 1937. Excavations focused on the earthen mound at this site. The mound was constructed in four stages, and supported at least four superimposed structures and two peripheral single post structures. The adjacent village was not part of these excavations. The primary occupation of this mound was during the Kogers Island phase of the Mississippian period (A.D. 1200–1500). These human remains represent four infants and 24 adults. The human remains were too fragmentary to identify sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. From October 1937 to December 1938, human remains representing, at VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:42 Aug 02, 2019 Jkt 247001 minimum, nine individuals were removed from site 1LU92, Lauderdale County, AL. Excavation commenced after TVA purchased this land November 27, 1935 for the Pickwick project. Site 1LU92 was composed of both a village and a cemetery. Excavations focused on the cemetery. There was no clear stratigraphy at the site. The excavators believed the village midden predates the cemetery. The later occupation is attributed to the Kogers Island phase of the Mississippian period (A.D. 1200–1500). The human remains include two adults and seven subadults. The sex could not be determined. No known individuals were identified. The 121 associated funerary objects are 114 shell beads, one bone awl, and six McKee Island Plain sherds. From February to May 1937, and from February to March 1938, excavations took place at site 1LU64, 23 miles downstream from Florence, AL, on the Tennessee River in Lauderdale County, AL. TVA purchased the land encompassing site 1LU64 on October 28, 1936. Site 1LU64 was a Copena phase (A.D. 100–500) burial mound. The four associated funerary objects are two copper celts and two copper earspools. From June to September 1936, excavations took place at the Long Branch site 1LU67, in Lauderdale County, AL. Excavation commenced after TVA purchased three parcels of land encompassing this site on January 11, 1935, September 16, 1935, and February 8, 1936. Site 1LU67 was located immediately adjacent to the Tennessee River. Although described as a mound, this site appears to have been from the accumulation of discarded shell, village midden, and alluvial soils rather than an intentionally constructed earthwork. This shell midden extended to a depth of 11 feet below surface. The Long Branch site had multiple occupations, including during the Middle Archaic (6000–4000 B.C.), Late Archaic (4000–1000 B.C.), Early Woodland (500–100 B.C.), Middle Woodland (100 B.C.–A.D. 500), Late Woodland (A.D. 500–1000) and Mississippian (A.D. 900–1500). It is not possible to determine from which level of occupation a burial unit originated. The two associated funerary objects are a bone atlatl hook and a stone atlatl weight. From January to February 1938, excavations took place at the Union Hollow site 1LU72, in Lauderdale County, AL. Excavation commenced after TVA purchased the land encompassing this site in Lauderdale County, AL, on October 5, 1936 for the Pickwick Reservoir project. Site 1LU72 PO 00000 Frm 00066 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 38051 was located immediately adjacent to the Tennessee River. This shell mound was created from the accumulation of discarded shell, village midden, and alluvial soils rather than intentionally constructed earthworks. This shell midden extended to a depth of 10 feet below surface. Early flooding of the Pickwick reservoir abbreviated excavations at this site. The Union Hollow site had multiple occupations, including during the Late Archaic (4000–1000 B.C.), Early Woodland (500– 100 B.C.), and Mississippian (A.D. 1200–1500). The one associated funerary object is a Bell Plain ceramic water bottle. Determinations Made by the Tennessee Valley Authority Officials of the Tennessee Valley Authority have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice are Native American based on their presence in prehistoric archeological sites and osteological analysis. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 37 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 128 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian Tribe. • According to final judgements of the Indian Claims Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the cultural items were removed is the aboriginal land of the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. • The Treaty of September 20, 1816, indicates that the land from which the cultural items were removed is the aboriginal land of The Chickasaw Nation. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1)(ii), the disposition of the cultural items may be to the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. The Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma have declined to accept transfer of control of the human remains. The Tennessee Valley E:\FR\FM\05AUN1.SGM 05AUN1 38052 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 150 / Monday, August 5, 2019 / Notices Authority has agreed to transfer control of the human remains to The Chickasaw Nation. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(4), the Tennessee Valley Authority has agreed to transfer control of the associated funerary objects to The Chickasaw Nation. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Federallyrecognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632–7458, email tomaher@tva.gov, by September 4, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Chickasaw Nation may proceed. The Tennessee Valley Authority is responsible for notifying The Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: July 9, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–16690 Filed 8–2–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0028402; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written jspears on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:42 Aug 02, 2019 Jkt 247001 request to the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History at the address in this notice by September 4, 2019. ADDRESSES: Dr. Pamela Endzweig, Director of Collections, Museum of Natural and Cultural History, 1224 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403–1224, telephone (541) 346–5120, email endzweig@uoregon.edu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR. The human remains and associated funerary object were removed from Purdy Mound at Bob Creek, Lane County, OR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon (previously listed as the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation); Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians; Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon; and the Coquille Indian Tribe (previously listed as the Coquille Tribe PO 00000 Frm 00067 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 of Oregon), hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Consulted Tribes.’’ History and Description of the Remains In 1950, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from Purdy Mound at Bob Creek in Lane County, OR. The human remains were removed by a private party and were donated to the museum in 1950 (acc. # 100LC). They belong to an adult male (cat. # 11–262). No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are one partial bone club and fragments of one elk maxillary. The human remains are reasonably believed to be of Native American ancestry based on their archeological context. Historical documents, ethnographic sources, and oral history indicate that the Bob Creek site lies near the territorial boundary between the Alsea and the Siuslaw peoples. Both cultural groups have occupied the region since pre-contact times. Based on information obtained through consultation, the human remains are identified as Alsea. The Alsea are members or the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon. Determinations Made by the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History Officials of the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the two objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon (previously listed as the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation). Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Dr. Pamela Endzweig, Director of Collections, Museum of Natural and Cultural History, 1224 E:\FR\FM\05AUN1.SGM 05AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 150 (Monday, August 5, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 38050-38052]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-16690]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0028406; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, 
Knoxville, TN

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has completed an 
inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in 
consultation with the appropriate Federally-recognized Indian Tribes, 
and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the 
human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day 
Federally-recognized Indian Tribes. Representatives of any Federally-
recognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains and associated 
funerary objects should submit a written request to the TVA. If no 
additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human 
remains and associated funerary objects to the Federally-recognized 
Indian Tribe stated in this notice may proceed.

DATES: Representatives of any Federally-recognized Indian Tribe not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to the TVA 
at the address in this notice by September 4, 2019.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West 
Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902-1401, telephone (865) 
632-7458, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects under the control of the Tennessee Valley 
Authority, Knoxville, TN, and stored at the Alabama Museum of Natural 
History (AMNH) at the University of Alabama. The human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed from the following 
archeological sites in Lauderdale County, AL: 1LU21, 1LU92, 1LU64, 
1LU67, and 1LU72.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by TVA professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously 
listed as the Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas); Alabama-

[[Page 38051]]

Quassarte Tribal Town; Cherokee Nation; Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana; 
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Poarch Band of Creeks (previously listed as the Poarch Band of Creek 
Indians of Alabama); The Chickasaw Nation; The Choctaw Nation of 
Oklahoma; The Muscogee (Creek) Nation; Thlopthlocco Tribal Town; and 
the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma (hereafter 
referred to as ``The Consulted Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    The sites listed in this notice were excavated as part of TVA's 
Pickwick reservoir project by the Alabama Museum of Natural History 
(AMNH) at the University of Alabama, using labor and funds provided by 
the Works Progress Administration. Details regarding these excavations 
and sites may be found in An Archaeological Survey of Pickwick Basin in 
the Adjacent Portions of the States of Alabama, Mississippi and 
Tennessee, by William S. Webb and David L. DeJarnette. The human 
remains and associated funerary objects listed in this notice have been 
in the physical custody of AMNH at the University of Alabama since 
excavation but are under the control of the TVA. Human remains and 
other associated funerary objects from these sites were previously 
listed in a Notice of Inventory Completion (81 FR 60377-60380, 
September 1, 2016) and transferred to The Chickasaw Nation. Additional 
human remains and associated funerary objects were found during a 
recent improvement in the curation of the TVA archeological collections 
at AMNH.
    From August 1937 to April 1938, human remains representing, at 
minimum, 28 individuals were removed from site 1LU21, in Lauderdale 
County, AL. Excavation commenced after TVA had acquired the land 
encompassing this site on February 19, 1937. Excavations focused on the 
earthen mound at this site. The mound was constructed in four stages, 
and supported at least four superimposed structures and two peripheral 
single post structures. The adjacent village was not part of these 
excavations. The primary occupation of this mound was during the Kogers 
Island phase of the Mississippian period (A.D. 1200-1500). These human 
remains represent four infants and 24 adults. The human remains were 
too fragmentary to identify sex. No known individuals were identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    From October 1937 to December 1938, human remains representing, at 
minimum, nine individuals were removed from site 1LU92, Lauderdale 
County, AL. Excavation commenced after TVA purchased this land November 
27, 1935 for the Pickwick project. Site 1LU92 was composed of both a 
village and a cemetery. Excavations focused on the cemetery. There was 
no clear stratigraphy at the site. The excavators believed the village 
midden predates the cemetery. The later occupation is attributed to the 
Kogers Island phase of the Mississippian period (A.D. 1200-1500). The 
human remains include two adults and seven sub-adults. The sex could 
not be determined. No known individuals were identified. The 121 
associated funerary objects are 114 shell beads, one bone awl, and six 
McKee Island Plain sherds.
    From February to May 1937, and from February to March 1938, 
excavations took place at site 1LU64, 23 miles downstream from 
Florence, AL, on the Tennessee River in Lauderdale County, AL. TVA 
purchased the land encompassing site 1LU64 on October 28, 1936. Site 
1LU64 was a Copena phase (A.D. 100-500) burial mound. The four 
associated funerary objects are two copper celts and two copper 
earspools.
    From June to September 1936, excavations took place at the Long 
Branch site 1LU67, in Lauderdale County, AL. Excavation commenced after 
TVA purchased three parcels of land encompassing this site on January 
11, 1935, September 16, 1935, and February 8, 1936. Site 1LU67 was 
located immediately adjacent to the Tennessee River. Although described 
as a mound, this site appears to have been from the accumulation of 
discarded shell, village midden, and alluvial soils rather than an 
intentionally constructed earthwork. This shell midden extended to a 
depth of 11 feet below surface. The Long Branch site had multiple 
occupations, including during the Middle Archaic (6000-4000 B.C.), Late 
Archaic (4000-1000 B.C.), Early Woodland (500-100 B.C.), Middle 
Woodland (100 B.C.-A.D. 500), Late Woodland (A.D. 500-1000) and 
Mississippian (A.D. 900-1500). It is not possible to determine from 
which level of occupation a burial unit originated. The two associated 
funerary objects are a bone atlatl hook and a stone atlatl weight.
    From January to February 1938, excavations took place at the Union 
Hollow site 1LU72, in Lauderdale County, AL. Excavation commenced after 
TVA purchased the land encompassing this site in Lauderdale County, AL, 
on October 5, 1936 for the Pickwick Reservoir project. Site 1LU72 was 
located immediately adjacent to the Tennessee River. This shell mound 
was created from the accumulation of discarded shell, village midden, 
and alluvial soils rather than intentionally constructed earthworks. 
This shell midden extended to a depth of 10 feet below surface. Early 
flooding of the Pickwick reservoir abbreviated excavations at this 
site. The Union Hollow site had multiple occupations, including during 
the Late Archaic (4000-1000 B.C.), Early Woodland (500-100 B.C.), and 
Mississippian (A.D. 1200-1500). The one associated funerary object is a 
Bell Plain ceramic water bottle.

Determinations Made by the Tennessee Valley Authority

    Officials of the Tennessee Valley Authority have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice are Native American based on their presence in 
prehistoric archeological sites and osteological analysis.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 37 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 128 objects 
described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed 
with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day 
Indian Tribe.
     According to final judgements of the Indian Claims 
Commission or the Court of Federal Claims, the land from which the 
cultural items were removed is the aboriginal land of the Cherokee 
Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; and the United Keetoowah Band 
of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma.
     The Treaty of September 20, 1816, indicates that the land 
from which the cultural items were removed is the aboriginal land of 
The Chickasaw Nation.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1)(ii), the disposition of the 
cultural items may be to the Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of Cherokee 
Indians; The Chickasaw Nation; and the United Keetoowah Band of 
Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma. The Cherokee Nation; Eastern Band of 
Cherokee Indians; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in 
Oklahoma have declined to accept transfer of control of the human 
remains. The Tennessee Valley

[[Page 38052]]

Authority has agreed to transfer control of the human remains to The 
Chickasaw Nation.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(4), the Tennessee Valley 
Authority has agreed to transfer control of the associated funerary 
objects to The Chickasaw Nation.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Federally-recognized Indian Tribe not 
identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of 
these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Dr. 
Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill 
Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902-1401, telephone (865) 632-7458, email 
[email protected], by September 4, 2019. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to The Chickasaw Nation 
may proceed.
    The Tennessee Valley Authority is responsible for notifying The 
Consulted Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: July 9, 2019.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2019-16690 Filed 8-2-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P