Notice of Inventory Completion: Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, Los Angeles, CA, 38048-38050 [2019-16683]

Download as PDF 38048 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 150 / Monday, August 5, 2019 / Notices Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona at the address in this notice by September 4, 2019. ADDRESSES: Claire S. Barker, Repatriation Coordinator, Arizona State Museum, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626– 0320, email csbarker@ email.arizona.edu. DATES: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the correction of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Pima County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects the minimum number of individuals and number of associated funerary objects published in a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register (79 FR 53754–53759, September 10, 2014). The number of human remains and associated funerary objects has changed due to a search through uncatalogued collections. Transfer of control of the items in this correction notice has not occurred. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: jspears on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Correction In the Federal Register (79 FR 53757, September 10, 2014), column 1, paragraph 1, sentence 5 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: The 106 associated funerary objects include 62 animal bones, three bone awls, 16 ceramic sherds, one ceramic vessel, one lot of charcoal, 16 chipped stones, one ground stone, two minerals, three soil samples, and one turquoise fragment. In the Federal Register (79 FR 53757, September 10, 2014), column 1, paragraph 3, sentence 1 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:42 Aug 02, 2019 Jkt 247001 In the years 1981 to 1987, human remains representing, at minimum, 57 individuals were removed from the Redtail Village site, AZ AA:12:149(ASM), in Tucson, Pima County, AZ. In the Federal Register (79 FR 53757, September 10, 2014), column 1, paragraph 3, sentence 7 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: The 965 associated funerary objects are 45 animal bones, two ceramic bowls, two ceramic jars, two ceramic scoops, 730 ceramic sherds, five lots of charcoal, 74 chipped stones, 78 flotation fraction lots, two ground stones, one metate, one mineral, five pollen samples, three shells, two stone projectile points, and 13 turquoise fragments. In the Federal Register (79 FR 53757, September 10, 2014), column 3, paragraph 1, sentence 5 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: The 142 associated funerary objects are two animal bones, two lots of botanical material, 126 ceramic sherds, one lot of charcoal, and 11 chipped stones. In the Federal Register (79 FR 53758, September 10, 2014), column 1, paragraph 2, sentence 6 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: The 259 associated funerary objects are six ceramic bowls, three ceramic jars, 17 ceramic jar fragments, 166 ceramic sherds, two lot of charcoal, 27 chipped stones, two chipped stone knives, two flotation fraction lots, 20 flotation samples, one glass fragment, one ground stone, one mano, three minerals, two polishing stones, one shell, one shell bracelet, one soil sample, two stone artifacts, and one stone palette fragment. In the Federal Register (79 FR 53758, September 10, 2014), column 3, paragraph 4, sentence 1 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 626 individuals of Native American ancestry. In the Federal Register (79 FR 53758, September 10, 2014), column 3, paragraph 4, sentence 2 is corrected by substituting the following sentence: Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 7,419 objects described in this notice are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control PO 00000 Frm 00063 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Claire S. Barker, Repatriation Coordinator, Arizona State Museum, P.O. Box 210026, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626– 0320, email csbarker@ email.arizona.edu, by September 4, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the AkChin Indian Community (previously listed as the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona); Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico; hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes,’’ may proceed. The Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: July 16, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–16687 Filed 8–2–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0028401; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, Los Angeles, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request to the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History. If no additional requestors come forward, SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\05AUN1.SGM 05AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 150 / Monday, August 5, 2019 / Notices jspears on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History at the address in this notice by September 4, 2019. ADDRESSES: Amy E. Gusick, NAGPRA Officer, Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, 900 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007, telephone (213) 763–3370, email agusick@nhm.org. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under the control of the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, Los Angeles, CA. The human remains were removed from the Antelope Valley in northern Los Angeles County and the southeast portion of Kern County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History (LACMNH) professional staff in consultation with representatives of the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation) and the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians, a non-federally recognized Indian group. The Morongo Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Morongo Reservation); Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California; and the Tejon Indian Tribe were invited to consult but deferred to the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:42 Aug 02, 2019 Jkt 247001 Manual Reservation) and the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians, a non-federally recognized Indian group. Hereafter, all Indian Tribes and Indian groups listed in this section are referred to as ‘‘The Consulted and Invited Indian Tribes and Groups.’’ History and Description of the Remains Prior to 1947, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual (LACMNH Catalog Number L.2397.66) were removed by Nestor A. Young, Jr. of Sierra Madre, CA, from the Nestor Young Ranch at Barrel Springs, located near Palmdale in Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, CA. According to the 2013 book Legendary Locals of Antelope Valley by Norma Gurba, Young actively collected artifacts from his large ranch property near Barrel Spring, in Antelope Valley. At the time, the human remains consisted of a cranium and a jar containing cremated human remains. In December 1947, the human remains were sold to the Laboratory of Anthropology Hancock Foundation (a now disbanded museum once part of the University of Southern California) and recorded in its logbook with the designation CH: 1 1/70. On February 1, 1966, the Laboratory of Anthropology Hancock Foundation anthropology collection was loaned to LACMNH. On March 29, 1983, the collection was transferred as a gift to LACMNH. In 1995, LACMNH staff conducted an inventory of the human remains in the museum’s collections, and identified a mandible whose designation (CH: 1 1/70) matched the designation in the logbook, thus indicating it came from the Young Ranch in Antelope Valley, CA. The human remains, consisting of one mandible broken into two pieces, belong to an adult 20–25 years old. The rest of the cranium and the jar containing the cremated human remains are not in the LACMNH collection; likely they were not transferred in 1966. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Between 1920 and 1979, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals were removed from an unknown location in the Antelope Valley, CA. They were accepted into the collections of the Antelope Valley Museum by either H. Arden Edwards, the museum founder, or by Grace W. Oliver, a later owner of the museum. One individual, cataloged as LACMNH Catalog Number F.A.2175.79–127, consist of a cranium representing an adult male 20–25 years old and has the number SK–9 written on the cranium. Notes accompanying the cranium state PO 00000 Frm 00064 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 38049 that the human remains were collected from an undisclosed location in the Antelope Valley. Four individuals, cataloged as LACMNH Catalog Number F.A.2175.79–137, consists of three incomplete crania with teeth, one premolar, and one upper incisor. The three crania represent one possible male age 30–35 years; one possible adult female age 30–40 years; and one individual of unknown sex and age. The premolar and upper incisor represent a fourth adult individual of unknown sex and age. A slip of paper found inside of one of the crania identifies them as SK– 8 and notes that the human remains were collected from Antelope Valley at an unidentified location. Two individuals, cataloged as LACMNH Catalog Number F.A.2175.79–174, consist of one nearly complete skeleton of an adult male age 20–25 years, one left humerus, and one right ulna from a second possible adult female. Old exhibit label copy from the Antelope Valley Museum found with the human remains includes the geographic information as Antelope Valley, Indian Meadow, near Little Rock, CA. In 1979, Grace W. Oliver transferred items by deed of gift from the Antelope Valley Museum to LACMNH. A list of items transferred includes the SK–9 and SK–8 numbers, but does not contain any information about the human remains from Little Rock. In 1979, the State of California purchased the Antelope Valley Museum property from Oliver, who donated the collections held by the museum to the State of California. On December 3, 1979, the SK–9, SK–8, and Little Rock remains were transferred to LACMNH as part of accession F.A.2175.79. The SK–9 cranium was accessioned as F.A.2175.79–127, the humans remains identified as SK–8 were accessioned as F.A.2175.79–137 and the remains from Little Rock were accessioned as F.A.2175.79–174. In 1995, LACNHM conducted an inventory of human remains in its collections and identified the cranium designated as SK–9 in its holdings and the nearly complete male skeleton, one left humerus, and one right ulna recovered from near Little Rock. In 2016, LACMNH reexamined the human remains in the F.A.2175.79 accession number and found a slip of paper inside one of the crania that identified the human remains of the four individuals designated SK–8 by the Antelope Valley Museum. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Bounded by the Tehachapi and Sierra Nevada mountains on the west and the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains on the south, Antelope E:\FR\FM\05AUN1.SGM 05AUN1 38050 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 150 / Monday, August 5, 2019 / Notices jspears on DSK3GMQ082PROD with NOTICES Valley constitutes the western Mojave Desert. Archaeological and ethnographic evidence suggests that this region was inhabited by Serran speakers of the Takic family of languages. More specifically, based on John P. Harrington’s notes and mission records, the desert group occupying the Antelope Valley were speakers of the Serrano language. Inclusive of a few groups, the region was within the traditional territory of the Desert Serrano (referred to by some early Spanish explorers—and later ethnographers referencing their diaries—as the ‘‘Vanyume’’ or ‘‘Beneme’’). Serrano peoples’ oral traditions place them in this portion of their ancestral territory since time immemorial. Archaeologists have traditionally suggested that Serrano speakers have continuously occupied the San Bernardino Mountains and the areas north, northwest, and west of the San Bernardino Mountains for at least 3,000 years, but newer studies have lengthened their occupancy up to 5,000–6,000 years B.P. The Tataviam, a desert group that spoke a language distinct from Serrano, are also tied to the land in the southwestern portion of the Antelope Valley, including the northern foothills of the Liebre Mountains. The Tataviam language is derived from the Takic languages of the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock, and is associated with villages that held Serrano and Kitanemuk speakers. There are mapped native settlements in the Antelope Valley which are known to have been inhabited by Tataviam, Serrano, and/or Kitanemuk- speaking peoples—sometimes separately and sometimes simultaneously. Such places in the Antelope Valley area, include but are not limited to, Amutskupiat/ Amutskupeat, or Big Rock, and Maviayek/Maviajeh’, or Little Rock Creek. Some of the occupants of these villages were recruited to Mission San Fernando and Mission San Gabriel, but it also appears that some people successfully avoided missionization. The cultural affiliation of both Serrano and Tataviam includes the welldocumented Lovejoy Springs site (CA– LAN–942), also known as the village of Tameobit/Tameonga. Determinations Made by the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History Officials of the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of eight VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:42 Aug 02, 2019 Jkt 247001 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation), and, if joined, the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians, a non-federally recognized Indian group. Additional Requestors and Disposition Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a written request with information in support of the request to Amy Gusick, Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, 900 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007, telephone (213) 763–3370, email agusick@nhm.org, by September 4, 2019. After that date, if no additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the human remains to the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation) and the Fernanden˜o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians (if joined to San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California) may proceed. The Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying The Consulted and Invited Indian Tribes and Groups that this notice has been published. Dated: July 9, 2019. Melanie O’Brien, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2019–16683 Filed 8–2–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–NPS0028406; PPWOCRADN0–PCU00RP14.R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in consultation with the appropriate SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00065 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Federally-recognized Indian Tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Federally-recognized Indian Tribes. Representatives of any Federally-recognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the TVA. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Federally-recognized Indian Tribe stated in this notice may proceed. DATES: Representatives of any Federallyrecognized Indian Tribe not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control of these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request with information in support of the request to the TVA at the address in this notice by September 4, 2019. ADDRESSES: Dr. Thomas O. Maher, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT11C, Knoxville, TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632– 7458, email tomaher@tva.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects under the control of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Knoxville, TN, and stored at the Alabama Museum of Natural History (AMNH) at the University of Alabama. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from the following archeological sites in Lauderdale County, AL: 1LU21, 1LU92, 1LU64, 1LU67, and 1LU72. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by TVA professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas (previously listed as the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas); Alabama- E:\FR\FM\05AUN1.SGM 05AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 150 (Monday, August 5, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 38048-38050]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-16683]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-NPS0028401; PPWOCRADN0-PCU00RP14.R50000]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Los Angeles County Museum of 
Natural History, Los Angeles, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History has completed 
an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate 
Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that 
there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-
day Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations. Lineal descendants 
or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native Hawaiian organization 
not identified in this notice that wish to request transfer of control 
of these human remains should submit a written request to the Los 
Angeles County Museum of Natural History. If no additional requestors 
come forward,

[[Page 38049]]

transfer of control of the human remains to the lineal descendants, 
Indian Tribes, or Native Hawaiian organizations stated in this notice 
may proceed.

DATES: Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or 
Native Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to the Los 
Angeles County Museum of Natural History at the address in this notice 
by September 4, 2019.

ADDRESSES: Amy E. Gusick, NAGPRA Officer, Los Angeles County Museum of 
Natural History, 900 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007, 
telephone (213) 763-3370, email [email protected].

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains under 
the control of the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, Los 
Angeles, CA. The human remains were removed from the Antelope Valley in 
northern Los Angeles County and the southeast portion of Kern County, 
CA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Los 
Angeles County Museum of Natural History (LACMNH) professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the San Manuel Band of Mission 
Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of 
Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation) and the 
Fernande[ntilde]o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians, a non-federally 
recognized Indian group. The Morongo Band of Mission Indians, 
California (previously listed as the Morongo Band of Cahuilla Mission 
Indians of the Morongo Reservation); Santa Rosa Indian Community of the 
Santa Rosa Rancheria, California; and the Tejon Indian Tribe were 
invited to consult but deferred to the San Manuel Band of Mission 
Indians, California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of 
Serrano Mission Indians of the San Manual Reservation) and the 
Fernande[ntilde]o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians, a non-federally 
recognized Indian group.
    Hereafter, all Indian Tribes and Indian groups listed in this 
section are referred to as ``The Consulted and Invited Indian Tribes 
and Groups.''

History and Description of the Remains

    Prior to 1947, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual (LACMNH Catalog Number L.2397.66) were removed by Nestor A. 
Young, Jr. of Sierra Madre, CA, from the Nestor Young Ranch at Barrel 
Springs, located near Palmdale in Antelope Valley, Los Angeles County, 
CA. According to the 2013 book Legendary Locals of Antelope Valley by 
Norma Gurba, Young actively collected artifacts from his large ranch 
property near Barrel Spring, in Antelope Valley. At the time, the human 
remains consisted of a cranium and a jar containing cremated human 
remains. In December 1947, the human remains were sold to the 
Laboratory of Anthropology Hancock Foundation (a now disbanded museum 
once part of the University of Southern California) and recorded in its 
logbook with the designation CH: 1 1/70. On February 1, 1966, the 
Laboratory of Anthropology Hancock Foundation anthropology collection 
was loaned to LACMNH. On March 29, 1983, the collection was transferred 
as a gift to LACMNH. In 1995, LACMNH staff conducted an inventory of 
the human remains in the museum's collections, and identified a 
mandible whose designation (CH: 1 1/70) matched the designation in the 
logbook, thus indicating it came from the Young Ranch in Antelope 
Valley, CA. The human remains, consisting of one mandible broken into 
two pieces, belong to an adult 20-25 years old. The rest of the cranium 
and the jar containing the cremated human remains are not in the LACMNH 
collection; likely they were not transferred in 1966. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Between 1920 and 1979, human remains representing, at minimum, 
seven individuals were removed from an unknown location in the Antelope 
Valley, CA. They were accepted into the collections of the Antelope 
Valley Museum by either H. Arden Edwards, the museum founder, or by 
Grace W. Oliver, a later owner of the museum. One individual, cataloged 
as LACMNH Catalog Number F.A.2175.79-127, consist of a cranium 
representing an adult male 20-25 years old and has the number SK-9 
written on the cranium. Notes accompanying the cranium state that the 
human remains were collected from an undisclosed location in the 
Antelope Valley. Four individuals, cataloged as LACMNH Catalog Number 
F.A.2175.79-137, consists of three incomplete crania with teeth, one 
premolar, and one upper incisor. The three crania represent one 
possible male age 30-35 years; one possible adult female age 30-40 
years; and one individual of unknown sex and age. The premolar and 
upper incisor represent a fourth adult individual of unknown sex and 
age. A slip of paper found inside of one of the crania identifies them 
as SK-8 and notes that the human remains were collected from Antelope 
Valley at an unidentified location. Two individuals, cataloged as 
LACMNH Catalog Number F.A.2175.79-174, consist of one nearly complete 
skeleton of an adult male age 20-25 years, one left humerus, and one 
right ulna from a second possible adult female. Old exhibit label copy 
from the Antelope Valley Museum found with the human remains includes 
the geographic information as Antelope Valley, Indian Meadow, near 
Little Rock, CA.
    In 1979, Grace W. Oliver transferred items by deed of gift from the 
Antelope Valley Museum to LACMNH. A list of items transferred includes 
the SK-9 and SK-8 numbers, but does not contain any information about 
the human remains from Little Rock. In 1979, the State of California 
purchased the Antelope Valley Museum property from Oliver, who donated 
the collections held by the museum to the State of California. On 
December 3, 1979, the SK-9, SK-8, and Little Rock remains were 
transferred to LACMNH as part of accession F.A.2175.79. The SK-9 
cranium was accessioned as F.A.2175.79-127, the humans remains 
identified as SK-8 were accessioned as F.A.2175.79-137 and the remains 
from Little Rock were accessioned as F.A.2175.79-174. In 1995, LACNHM 
conducted an inventory of human remains in its collections and 
identified the cranium designated as SK-9 in its holdings and the 
nearly complete male skeleton, one left humerus, and one right ulna 
recovered from near Little Rock. In 2016, LACMNH reexamined the human 
remains in the F.A.2175.79 accession number and found a slip of paper 
inside one of the crania that identified the human remains of the four 
individuals designated SK-8 by the Antelope Valley Museum. No known 
individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Bounded by the Tehachapi and Sierra Nevada mountains on the west 
and the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains on the south, Antelope

[[Page 38050]]

Valley constitutes the western Mojave Desert. Archaeological and 
ethnographic evidence suggests that this region was inhabited by Serran 
speakers of the Takic family of languages. More specifically, based on 
John P. Harrington's notes and mission records, the desert group 
occupying the Antelope Valley were speakers of the Serrano language. 
Inclusive of a few groups, the region was within the traditional 
territory of the Desert Serrano (referred to by some early Spanish 
explorers--and later ethnographers referencing their diaries--as the 
``Vanyume'' or ``Beneme''). Serrano peoples' oral traditions place them 
in this portion of their ancestral territory since time immemorial. 
Archaeologists have traditionally suggested that Serrano speakers have 
continuously occupied the San Bernardino Mountains and the areas north, 
northwest, and west of the San Bernardino Mountains for at least 3,000 
years, but newer studies have lengthened their occupancy up to 5,000-
6,000 years B.P.
    The Tataviam, a desert group that spoke a language distinct from 
Serrano, are also tied to the land in the southwestern portion of the 
Antelope Valley, including the northern foothills of the Liebre 
Mountains. The Tataviam language is derived from the Takic languages of 
the Uto-Aztecan linguistic stock, and is associated with villages that 
held Serrano and Kitanemuk speakers.
    There are mapped native settlements in the Antelope Valley which 
are known to have been inhabited by Tataviam, Serrano, and/or 
Kitanemuk- speaking peoples--sometimes separately and sometimes 
simultaneously. Such places in the Antelope Valley area, include but 
are not limited to, Amutskupiat/Amutskupeat, or Big Rock, and Maviayek/
Maviajeh', or Little Rock Creek. Some of the occupants of these 
villages were recruited to Mission San Fernando and Mission San 
Gabriel, but it also appears that some people successfully avoided 
missionization. The cultural affiliation of both Serrano and Tataviam 
includes the well-documented Lovejoy Springs site (CA-LAN-942), also 
known as the village of Tameobit/Tameonga.

Determinations Made by the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History

    Officials of the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History have 
determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of eight individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, 
California (previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission 
Indians of the San Manual Reservation), and, if joined, the 
Fernande[ntilde]o Tataviam Band of Mission Indians, a non-federally 
recognized Indian group.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian Tribe or Native 
Hawaiian organization not identified in this notice that wish to 
request transfer of control of these human remains should submit a 
written request with information in support of the request to Amy 
Gusick, Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, 900 Exposition 
Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007, telephone (213) 763-3370, email 
[email protected], by September 4, 2019. After that date, if no 
additional requestors have come forward, transfer of control of the 
human remains to the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, California 
(previously listed as the San Manual Band of Serrano Mission Indians of 
the San Manual Reservation) and the Fernande[ntilde]o Tataviam Band of 
Mission Indians (if joined to San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, 
California) may proceed.
    The Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History is responsible for 
notifying The Consulted and Invited Indian Tribes and Groups that this 
notice has been published.

    Dated: July 9, 2019.
Melanie O'Brien,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2019-16683 Filed 8-2-19; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-52-P