Renewals of Information Collections Under the Paperwork Reduction Act, 31338-31341 [2019-14011]

Download as PDF 31338 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 126 / Monday, July 1, 2019 / Notices effect for the duration of the Reno Air Racing Association’s SRP, which will expire on September 31, 2023. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Victoria Wilkins, (775) 885–6000, email: vwilkins@blm.gov. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1–800–877–8339 to contact the above individual during normal business hours. The FRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The purpose of the temporary closure is to provide for public safety and to ensure that the Reno Air Racing Association can meet Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements for air shows which require spectators to be a certain distance away from the course. A portion of the race course occurs over public lands and there is potential for fallout of planes or plane parts in the event of an accident. This temporary closures apply to all public use, including motorized and non-motorized recreation, casual use, access through public lands, or entry for any other purposes. The public lands affected by the closures are described as follows: khammond on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES Mount Diablo Meridian, Nevada T. 21 N., R. 19 E., Sec. 8, E1⁄2 NE1⁄4, NW1⁄4NE1⁄4, and E1⁄2SE1⁄4; Sec. 16, SW1⁄4SW1⁄4NE1⁄4, NW1⁄4, and W1⁄2SE1⁄4. The areas described aggregate 450 acres, in Washoe County, Nevada. Temporary closure notices and maps of the closure areas will be posted at the BLM Nevada State Office, 1340 Financial Boulevard, Reno, Nevada, at the BLM Carson City District Office, 5665 Morgan Mill Road, Carson City, Nevada, and on the BLM website: http:// www.blm.gov. Public notification will be provided during the scheduled events and the temporary closure areas will be posted and patrolled by law enforcement. Under the authority of Section 303(a) of the Federal Lands Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1733(a)), 43 CFR 8360.0–7 and 43 CFR 8364.1, the BLM will enforce the following rules in the area described above: All public use and entry, whether motorized, on foot, or otherwise, is prohibited. Exceptions: Temporary closure restrictions do not apply to event officials, medical and rescue personnel, law enforcement, agency personnel monitoring the event, or other permitted users with written authorization from the authorized officer. VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:58 Jun 28, 2019 Jkt 247001 Penalties: Any person who violates this temporary closure may be tried before a United States Magistrate and fined in accordance with 18 U.S.C. 3571, imprisoned no more than 12 months under 43 U.S.C. 1733(a) and 43 CFR 8360.0–7, or both. In accordance with 43 CFR 8365.1–7, State or local officials may also impose penalties for violations of Nevada law. Authority: 43 U.S.C. 1733(a), 43 CFR 8360.0–7 and 43 CFR 8364.1. Victoria Wilkins, Acting Field Manager, Sierra Front Field Office. [FR Doc. 2019–13966 Filed 6–28–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–HC–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Indian Gaming Commission Renewals of Information Collections Under the Paperwork Reduction Act National Indian Gaming Commission, Interior. ACTION: Notice of request for comments. AGENCY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC or Commission) is seeking comments on the renewal of information collections for the following activities: Compliance and enforcement actions under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, as authorized by Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Control Number 3141–0001; approval of tribal ordinances, and background investigation and issuance of licenses, as authorized by OMB Control Number 3141–0003; National Environmental Policy Act submissions, as authorized by OMB Control Number 3141–0006; and issuance to tribes of certificates of self-regulation for Class II gaming, as authorized by OMB Control Number 3141–0008. These information collections all expire on January 31, 2020. SUMMARY: Submit comments on or before August 30, 2019. ADDRESSES: Comments can be mailed, faxed, or emailed to the attention of: Tim Osumi, National Indian Gaming Commission, 1849 C Street NW, MS 1621, Washington, DC 20240. Comments may be faxed to (202) 632– 7066, and may be sent electronically to info@nigc.gov, subject: PRA renewals. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tim Osumi at (202) 632–7054; fax (202) 632– 7066 (not toll-free numbers). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 I. Request for Comments You are invited to comment on these collections concerning: (i) Whether the collections of information are necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; (ii) the accuracy of the agency’s estimates of the burdens (including the hours and dollar costs) of the proposed collections of information, including the validity of the methodologies and assumptions used; (iii) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; (iv) ways to minimize the burdens of the information collections on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other collection techniques or forms of information technology. Please note that an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and an individual need not respond to, a collection of information unless it has a valid OMB Control Number. It is the Commission’s policy to make all comments available to the public for review at the location listed in the ADDRESSES section. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personally identifiable information (PII) in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your PII—may be made publicly available at any time. While you may ask in your comment that the Commission withhold your PII from public review, the Commission cannot guarantee that it will be able to do so. II. Data Title: Indian Gaming Compliance and Enforcement. OMB Control Number: 3141–0001. Brief Description of Collection: Although IGRA places primary responsibility with the tribes for regulating their gaming activities, 25 U.S.C. 2706(b) directs the Commission to monitor gaming conducted on Indian lands on a continuing basis. Amongst other actions necessary to carry out the Commission’s statutory duties, the Act authorizes the Commission to access and inspect all papers, books, and records relating to gross revenues of a gaming operation. The Act also requires tribes to provide the Commission with annual independent audits of their gaming operations, including audits of all contracts in excess of $25,000. 25 U.S.C. 2710(b)(2)(C), (D); 2710(d)(1)(A)(ii). The Act also authorizes the Commission to ‘‘promulgate such regulations and E:\FR\FM\01JYN1.SGM 01JYN1 khammond on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 126 / Monday, July 1, 2019 / Notices guidelines as it deems appropriate to implement’’ IGRA. 25 U.S.C. 2706(b)(10). Part 571 of title 25, Code of Federal Regulations, implements these statutory requirements. Section 571.7(a) requires Indian gaming operations to keep/maintain permanent books of account and records sufficient to establish the amount of gross and net income, deductions and expenses, receipts and disbursements, and other relevant financial information. Section 571.7(c) requires that these records be kept for at least five years. Under § 571.7(b), the Commission may require a gaming operation to submit statements, reports, accountings, and specific records that will enable the NIGC to determine whether or not such operation is liable for fees payable to the Commission (and in what amount). Section 571.7(d) requires a gaming operation to keep copies of all enforcement actions that a tribe or a state has taken against the operation. Section 571.12 requires tribes to prepare comparative financial statements covering all financial activities of each class II and class III gaming operation on the tribe’s Indian lands, and to engage an independent certified public accountant to provide an annual audit of the financial statements of each gaming operation. Section 571.13 requires tribes to prepare and submit to the Commission two paper copies or one electronic copy of the financial statements and audits, together with management letter(s) and other documented auditor communications and/or reports as a result of the audit, setting forth the results of each fiscal year. The submission must be sent to the Commission within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year of each gaming operation, including when a gaming operation changes its fiscal year or when gaming ceases to operate. Section 571.14 requires tribes to reconcile quarterly fee reports with audited financial statements and to keep/ maintain this information to be available to the NIGC upon request in order to facilitate the performance of compliance audits. This information collection is mandatory and allows the Commission to fulfill its statutory responsibilities under IGRA to regulate gaming on Indian lands. Respondents: Indian tribal gaming operations. Estimated Number of Respondents: 931. Estimated Annual Responses: 931. Estimated Time per Response: Depending on the type of information VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:58 Jun 28, 2019 Jkt 247001 collection, the range of time can vary from 40 burden hours to 1,105 burden hours for one item. Frequency of Responses: 1 per year. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours on Respondents: 406,905. Estimated Total Non-hour Cost Burden: $34,349,884. Title: Approval of Class II and Class III Ordinances, Background Investigations, and Gaming Licenses. OMB Control Number: 3141–0003. Brief Description of Collection: The Act sets standards for the regulation of gaming on Indian lands, including requirements for the approval or disapproval of tribal gaming ordinances. Specifically, § 2705(a)(3) requires the NIGC Chair to review all class II and class III tribal gaming ordinances. Section 2710 sets forth the specific requirements for the tribal gaming ordinances, including the requirement that there be adequate systems in place: To cause background investigations to be conducted on individuals in key employee and primary management official (PMO) positions (§ 2710(b)(2)(F)(i)); and to provide two prompt notifications to the Commission, including one containing the results of the background investigations before the issuance of any gaming licenses, and the other one of the issuance of such gaming licenses to key employees and PMOs (§ 2710(b)(2)(F)(ii)). In addition, § 2710(d)(2)(D)(ii) requires tribes who have, in their sole discretion, revoked any prior class III ordinance or resolution to submit a notice of such revocation to the NIGC Chair. The Act also authorizes the Commission to ‘‘promulgate such regulations and guidelines as it deems appropriate to implement’’ IGRA. 25 U.S.C. 2706(b)(10). Parts 519, 522, 556, and 558 of title 25, Code of Federal Regulations, implement these statutory requirements. Sections 519.1 and 519.2 require a tribe, management contractor, and a tribal operator to designate an agent for service of process, and § 522.2(g) requires it to be submitted by written notification to the Commission. Section 522.2(a) requires a tribe to submit a copy of an ordinance or resolution certified as authentic, and that meets the approval requirements in 25 CFR 522.4(b) or 522.6. Sections 522.10 and 522.11 require tribes to submit, respectively, an ordinance for the licensing of individually owned gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986, and for the licensing of individually owned gaming operations operating on September 1, 1986. Section 522.3(a) requires a tribe to submit an amendment to an ordinance PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 31339 or resolution within 15 days after adoption of such amendment. Section 522.2(b)–(h) requires tribes to submit to the Commission: (i) Procedures that the tribe will employ in conducting background investigations on key employees and PMOs, and to ensure that key employees and PMOs are notified of their rights under the Privacy Act; (ii) procedures that the tribe will use to issue licenses to key employees and PMOs; (iii) copies of all tribal gaming regulations; (iv) a copy of any applicable tribal-state compact or procedures as prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior; (v) procedures for resolving disputes between the gaming public and the tribe or the management contractor; and (vi) the identification of the law enforcement agent that will take fingerprints and the procedures for conducting criminal history checks, including a check of criminal history records information maintained by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Section 522.3(b) requires a tribe to submit any amendment to these submissions within 15 days after adoption of such amendment. Section 522.12(a) requires a tribe to submit to the Commission a copy of an authentic ordinance revocation or resolution. Section 556.4 requires tribes to mandate the submission of the following information from applicants for key employee and PMO positions: (i) Name(s), Social Security number(s), date and place of birth, citizenship, gender, and languages; (ii) present and past business and employment positions, ownership interests, business and residential addresses, and driver’s license number(s); (iii) the names and addresses of personal references; (iv) current business and personal telephone numbers; (v) a description of any existing and previous business relationships with Indian tribes, including ownership interests; (vi) a description of any existing and previous business relationships with the gaming industry generally, including ownership interests; (vii) the name and address of any licensing/regulatory agency with which the person has filed an application for a license or permit related to gaming, even if the license or permit was not granted; (viii) for each ongoing felony prosecution or conviction, the charge, the name and address of the court, and the date and disposition, if any; (ix) for each misdemeanor conviction or ongoing prosecution within the past 10 years, the name and address of the court and the date and disposition; (x) for each criminal charge in the past 10 years that is not otherwise listed, the criminal charge, the name and address of the E:\FR\FM\01JYN1.SGM 01JYN1 khammond on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES 31340 Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 126 / Monday, July 1, 2019 / Notices court, and the date and disposition; (xi) the name and address of any licensing/ regulatory agency with which the person has filed an application for an occupational license or permit, even if the license or permit was not granted; (xii) a photograph; and (xiii) fingerprints. Sections 556.2 and 556.3, respectively, require tribes to place a specific Privacy Act notice on their key employee and PMO applications, and to warn applicants regarding the penalty for false statements by also placing a specific false statement notice on their applications. Sections 556.6(a) and 558.3(e) require tribes to keep/maintain the individuals’ complete application files, investigative reports, and eligibility determinations during their employment and for at least three years after termination of their employment. Section 556.6(b)(1) requires tribes to create and maintain an investigative report on each background investigation that includes: (i) The steps taken in conducting a background investigation; (ii) the results obtained; (iii) the conclusions reached; and (iv) the basis for those conclusions. Section 556.6(b)(2) requires tribes to submit, no later than 60 days after an applicant begins work, a notice of results of the applicant’s background investigation that includes: (i) The applicant’s name, date of birth, and Social Security number; (ii) the date on which the applicant began or will begin work as a key employee or PMO; (iii) a summary of the information presented in the investigative report; and (iv) a copy of the eligibility determination. Section 558.3(b) requires a tribe to notify the Commission of the issuance of PMO and key employee licenses within 30 days after such issuance. Section 558.3(d) requires a tribe to notify the Commission if the tribe does not issue a license to an applicant, and requires it to forward copies of its eligibility determination and notice of results to the Commission for inclusion in the Indian Gaming Individuals Record System. Section 558.4(e) requires a tribe, after a gaming license revocation hearing, to notify the Commission of its decision to revoke or reinstate a gaming license within 45 days of receiving notification from the Commission that a specific individual in a PMO or key employee position is not eligible for continued employment. These information collections are mandatory and allow the Commission to carry out its statutory duties. Respondents: Indian tribal gaming operations. Estimated Number of Respondents: 1,597. VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:58 Jun 28, 2019 Jkt 247001 Estimated Annual Responses: 202,509. Estimated Time per Response: Depending on the type of information collection, the range of time can vary from 1.0 burden hour to 1,483 burden hours for one item. Frequency of Response: Varies. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours on Respondents: 1,121,340. Estimated Total Non-hour Cost Burden: $3,070,189. Title: NEPA Compliance. OMB Control Number: 3141–0006. Brief Description of Collection: The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. 4321, et seq., and the Council on Environmental Quality’s (CEQ) implementing regulations, require federal agencies to prepare (or cause to be prepared) environmental documents for agency actions that may have a significant impact on the environment. Under NEPA, an Environmental Assessment (EA) must be prepared when the agency action cannot be categorically excluded, or the environmental consequences of the agency action will not result in a significant impact or the environmental impacts are unclear and need to be further defined. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) must be prepared when the agency action will likely result in significant impacts to the environment. Amongst other actions necessary to carry out the Commission’s statutory duties, the Act requires the NIGC Chair to review and approve third-party management contracts that involve the operation of tribal gaming facilities. 25 U.S.C. 2711. The Commission has taken the position that the NEPA process is triggered when a tribe and a potential contractor seek approval of a management contract. Normally, an EA or EIS and its supporting documents are prepared by an environmental consulting firm and submitted to the Commission by the tribe. In the case of an EA, the Commission independently evaluates the NEPA document, verifies its content, and assumes responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained therein. In the case of an EIS, the Commission directs and is responsible for the preparation of the NEPA document, but the tribe or potential contractor is responsible for paying for the preparation of the document. The information collected includes, but is not limited to, maps, charts, technical studies, correspondence from other agencies (federal, tribal, state, and local), and comments from the public. These information collections are mandatory PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 and allow the Commission to carry out its statutory duties. Respondents: Tribal governing bodies, management companies. Estimated Number of Respondents: 3. Estimated Annual Responses: 3. Estimated Time per Response: Depending on whether the response is an EA or an EIS, the range of time can vary from 2.5 burden hours to 12.0 burden hours for one item. Frequency of Response: Varies. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours on Respondents: 26.5. Estimated Total Non-hour Cost Burden: $14,846,686. Title: Issuance of Certificates of SelfRegulation to Tribes for Class II Gaming. OMB Control Number: 3141–0008. Brief Description of Collection: The Act sets the standards for the regulation of Indian gaming, including a framework for the issuance of certificates of self-regulation for class II gaming operations to tribes that meet certain qualifications. Specifically, 25 U.S.C. 2710(c) authorizes the Commission to issue a certificate of selfregulation if it determines that a tribe has: (i) Conducted its gaming activity in a manner that has resulted in an effective and honest accounting of all revenues, in a reputation for safe, fair, and honest operation of the activity, and has been generally free of evidence of criminal or dishonest activity; (ii) adopted and is implementing adequate systems for the accounting of all revenues from the activity, for the investigation, licensing, and monitoring of all employees of the gaming activity, and for the investigation, enforcement, and prosecution of violations of its gaming ordinance and regulations; and (iii) conducted the operation on a fiscally and economically sound basis. The Act also authorizes the Commission to ‘‘promulgate such regulations and guidelines as it deems appropriate to implement’’ IGRA. 25 U.S.C. 2706(b)(10). Part 518 of title 25, Code of Federal Regulations, implements these statutory requirements. Section 518.3(e) requires a tribe’s gaming operation(s) and the tribal regulatory body (TRB) to have kept all records needed to support the petition for self-regulation for the three years immediately preceding the date of the petition submission. Section 518.4 requires a tribe petitioning for a certificate of self-regulation to submit the following to the Commission, accompanied by supporting documentation: (i) Two copies of a petition for self-regulation approved by the tribal governing body and certified as authentic; (ii) a description of how the tribe meets the eligibility criteria in E:\FR\FM\01JYN1.SGM 01JYN1 khammond on DSKBBV9HB2PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 84, No. 126 / Monday, July 1, 2019 / Notices § 518.3; (iii) a brief history of each gaming operation, including the opening dates and periods of voluntary or involuntary closure(s); (iv) a TRB organizational chart; (v) a brief description of the criteria that individuals must meet before being eligible for employment as a tribal regulator; (vi) a brief description of the process by which the TRB is funded, and the funding level for the three years immediately preceding the date of the petition; (vii) a list of the current regulators and TRB employees, their complete resumes, their titles, the dates that they began employment, and if serving limited terms, the expiration date of such terms; (viii) a brief description of the accounting system(s) at the gaming operation that tracks the flow of the gaming revenues; (ix) a list of the gaming activity internal controls at the gaming operation(s); (x) a description of the recordkeeping system(s) for all investigations, enforcement actions, and prosecutions of violations of the tribal gaming ordinance or regulations, for the threeyear period immediately preceding the date of the petition; and (xi) the tribe’s current set of gaming regulations, if not included in the approved tribal gaming ordinance. Section 518.10 requires each Indian gaming tribe that has been issued a certificate of self-regulation to submit to the Commission the following information by April 15th of each year following the first year of selfregulation, or within 120 days after the end of each gaming operation’s fiscal year: (i) An annual independent audit; and (ii) a complete resume for all TRB employees hired and licensed by the tribe subsequent to its receipt of a certificate of self-regulation. Submission of the petition and supporting documentation is voluntary. Once a certificate of self-regulation has been issued, the submission of certain other information is mandatory. Respondents: Tribal governments. Estimated Number of Respondents: 7. Estimated Annual Responses: 7. Estimated Time per Response: Depending on the information collection, the range of time can vary from 3.66 burden hours to 1,940 burden hours for one item. Frequency of Responses: Varies. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours on Respondents: 2,092. Estimated Total Non-hour Cost Burden: $821,545. Dated: June 26, 2019. Christinia Thomas, Chief of Staff (Acting). [FR Doc. 2019–14011 Filed 6–28–19; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7565–01–P VerDate Sep<11>2014 19:58 Jun 28, 2019 Jkt 247001 INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731–TA–1145 (Second Review)] Steel Threaded Rod From China; Institution of a Five-Year Review United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it has instituted a review pursuant to the Tariff Act of 1930 (‘‘the Act’’), as amended, to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on steel threaded rod from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury. Pursuant to the Act, interested parties are requested to respond to this notice by submitting the information specified below to the Commission. DATES: Instituted July 1, 2019. To be assured of consideration, the deadline for responses is July 31, 2019. Comments on the adequacy of responses may be filed with the Commission by September 12, 2019. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mary Messer (202–205–3193), Office of Investigations, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20436. Hearingimpaired persons can obtain information on this matter by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on 202– 205–1810. Persons with mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should contact the Office of the Secretary at 202–205–2000. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its internet server (https:// www.usitc.gov). The public record for this proceeding may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at https://edis.usitc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background.— On April 14, 2009, the Department of Commerce issued an antidumping duty order on imports of certain steel threaded rod from China (74 FR 17154). Following first five-year reviews by Commerce and the Commission, effective August 19, 2014, Commerce issued a continuation of the antidumping duty order on imports of certain steel threaded rod from China (79 FR 49050). The Commission is now conducting a second review pursuant to section 751(c) of the Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1675(c)), to determine whether revocation of the order would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury to the SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 31341 domestic industry within a reasonably foreseeable time. Provisions concerning the conduct of this proceeding may be found in the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure at 19 CFR parts 201, subparts A and B and 19 CFR part 207, subparts A and F. The Commission will assess the adequacy of interested party responses to this notice of institution to determine whether to conduct a full review or an expedited review. The Commission’s determination in any expedited review will be based on the facts available, which may include information provided in response to this notice. Definitions.—The following definitions apply to this review: (1) Subject Merchandise is the class or kind of merchandise that is within the scope of the five-year review, as defined by the Department of Commerce. (2) The Subject Country in this review is China. (3) The Domestic Like Product is the domestically produced product or products which are like, or in the absence of like, most similar in characteristics and uses with, the Subject Merchandise. In its original determination and its expedited first five-year review determination, the Commission defined a single Domestic Like Product consisting of certain steel threaded rod, coextensive with Commerce’s scope. (4) The Domestic Industry is the U.S. producers as a whole of the Domestic Like Product, or those producers whose collective output of the Domestic Like Product constitutes a major proportion of the total domestic production of the product. In its original determination and its expedited first five-year review determination, the Commission defined a single Domestic Industry consisting of all U.S. producers of certain steel threaded rod. (5) An Importer is any person or firm engaged, either directly or through a parent company or subsidiary, in importing the Subject Merchandise into the United States from a foreign manufacturer or through its selling agent. Participation in the proceeding and public service list.—Persons, including industrial users of the Subject Merchandise and, if the merchandise is sold at the retail level, representative consumer organizations, wishing to participate in the proceeding as parties must file an entry of appearance with the Secretary to the Commission, as provided in section 201.11(b)(4) of the Commission’s rules, no later than 21 days after publication of this notice in the Federal Register. The Secretary will maintain a public service list containing E:\FR\FM\01JYN1.SGM 01JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 84, Number 126 (Monday, July 1, 2019)]
[Notices]
[Pages 31338-31341]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2019-14011]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Indian Gaming Commission


Renewals of Information Collections Under the Paperwork Reduction 
Act

AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the 
National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC or Commission) is seeking 
comments on the renewal of information collections for the following 
activities: Compliance and enforcement actions under the Indian Gaming 
Regulatory Act, as authorized by Office of Management and Budget (OMB) 
Control Number 3141-0001; approval of tribal ordinances, and background 
investigation and issuance of licenses, as authorized by OMB Control 
Number 3141-0003; National Environmental Policy Act submissions, as 
authorized by OMB Control Number 3141-0006; and issuance to tribes of 
certificates of self-regulation for Class II gaming, as authorized by 
OMB Control Number 3141-0008. These information collections all expire 
on January 31, 2020.

DATES: Submit comments on or before August 30, 2019.

ADDRESSES: Comments can be mailed, faxed, or emailed to the attention 
of: Tim Osumi, National Indian Gaming Commission, 1849 C Street NW, MS 
1621, Washington, DC 20240. Comments may be faxed to (202) 632-7066, 
and may be sent electronically to [email protected], subject: PRA renewals.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tim Osumi at (202) 632-7054; fax (202) 
632-7066 (not toll-free numbers).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Request for Comments

    You are invited to comment on these collections concerning: (i) 
Whether the collections of information are necessary for the proper 
performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the 
information will have practical utility; (ii) the accuracy of the 
agency's estimates of the burdens (including the hours and dollar 
costs) of the proposed collections of information, including the 
validity of the methodologies and assumptions used; (iii) ways to 
enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be 
collected; (iv) ways to minimize the burdens of the information 
collections on those who are to respond, including through the use of 
appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other collection 
techniques or forms of information technology.
    Please note that an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and an 
individual need not respond to, a collection of information unless it 
has a valid OMB Control Number.
    It is the Commission's policy to make all comments available to the 
public for review at the location listed in the ADDRESSES section. 
Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other 
personally identifiable information (PII) in your comment, you should 
be aware that your entire comment--including your PII--may be made 
publicly available at any time. While you may ask in your comment that 
the Commission withhold your PII from public review, the Commission 
cannot guarantee that it will be able to do so.

II. Data

    Title: Indian Gaming Compliance and Enforcement.
    OMB Control Number: 3141-0001.
    Brief Description of Collection: Although IGRA places primary 
responsibility with the tribes for regulating their gaming activities, 
25 U.S.C. 2706(b) directs the Commission to monitor gaming conducted on 
Indian lands on a continuing basis. Amongst other actions necessary to 
carry out the Commission's statutory duties, the Act authorizes the 
Commission to access and inspect all papers, books, and records 
relating to gross revenues of a gaming operation. The Act also requires 
tribes to provide the Commission with annual independent audits of 
their gaming operations, including audits of all contracts in excess of 
$25,000. 25 U.S.C. 2710(b)(2)(C), (D); 2710(d)(1)(A)(ii). The Act also 
authorizes the Commission to ``promulgate such regulations and

[[Page 31339]]

guidelines as it deems appropriate to implement'' IGRA. 25 U.S.C. 
2706(b)(10). Part 571 of title 25, Code of Federal Regulations, 
implements these statutory requirements.
    Section 571.7(a) requires Indian gaming operations to keep/maintain 
permanent books of account and records sufficient to establish the 
amount of gross and net income, deductions and expenses, receipts and 
disbursements, and other relevant financial information. Section 
571.7(c) requires that these records be kept for at least five years. 
Under Sec.  571.7(b), the Commission may require a gaming operation to 
submit statements, reports, accountings, and specific records that will 
enable the NIGC to determine whether or not such operation is liable 
for fees payable to the Commission (and in what amount). Section 
571.7(d) requires a gaming operation to keep copies of all enforcement 
actions that a tribe or a state has taken against the operation.
    Section 571.12 requires tribes to prepare comparative financial 
statements covering all financial activities of each class II and class 
III gaming operation on the tribe's Indian lands, and to engage an 
independent certified public accountant to provide an annual audit of 
the financial statements of each gaming operation. Section 571.13 
requires tribes to prepare and submit to the Commission two paper 
copies or one electronic copy of the financial statements and audits, 
together with management letter(s) and other documented auditor 
communications and/or reports as a result of the audit, setting forth 
the results of each fiscal year. The submission must be sent to the 
Commission within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year of each 
gaming operation, including when a gaming operation changes its fiscal 
year or when gaming ceases to operate. Section 571.14 requires tribes 
to reconcile quarterly fee reports with audited financial statements 
and to keep/maintain this information to be available to the NIGC upon 
request in order to facilitate the performance of compliance audits.
    This information collection is mandatory and allows the Commission 
to fulfill its statutory responsibilities under IGRA to regulate gaming 
on Indian lands.
    Respondents: Indian tribal gaming operations.
    Estimated Number of Respondents: 931.
    Estimated Annual Responses: 931.
    Estimated Time per Response: Depending on the type of information 
collection, the range of time can vary from 40 burden hours to 1,105 
burden hours for one item.
    Frequency of Responses: 1 per year.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours on Respondents: 406,905.
    Estimated Total Non-hour Cost Burden: $34,349,884.

    Title: Approval of Class II and Class III Ordinances, Background 
Investigations, and Gaming Licenses.
    OMB Control Number: 3141-0003.
    Brief Description of Collection: The Act sets standards for the 
regulation of gaming on Indian lands, including requirements for the 
approval or disapproval of tribal gaming ordinances. Specifically, 
Sec.  2705(a)(3) requires the NIGC Chair to review all class II and 
class III tribal gaming ordinances. Section 2710 sets forth the 
specific requirements for the tribal gaming ordinances, including the 
requirement that there be adequate systems in place: To cause 
background investigations to be conducted on individuals in key 
employee and primary management official (PMO) positions (Sec.  
2710(b)(2)(F)(i)); and to provide two prompt notifications to the 
Commission, including one containing the results of the background 
investigations before the issuance of any gaming licenses, and the 
other one of the issuance of such gaming licenses to key employees and 
PMOs (Sec.  2710(b)(2)(F)(ii)). In addition, Sec.  2710(d)(2)(D)(ii) 
requires tribes who have, in their sole discretion, revoked any prior 
class III ordinance or resolution to submit a notice of such revocation 
to the NIGC Chair. The Act also authorizes the Commission to 
``promulgate such regulations and guidelines as it deems appropriate to 
implement'' IGRA. 25 U.S.C. 2706(b)(10). Parts 519, 522, 556, and 558 
of title 25, Code of Federal Regulations, implement these statutory 
requirements.
    Sections 519.1 and 519.2 require a tribe, management contractor, 
and a tribal operator to designate an agent for service of process, and 
Sec.  522.2(g) requires it to be submitted by written notification to 
the Commission. Section 522.2(a) requires a tribe to submit a copy of 
an ordinance or resolution certified as authentic, and that meets the 
approval requirements in 25 CFR 522.4(b) or 522.6. Sections 522.10 and 
522.11 require tribes to submit, respectively, an ordinance for the 
licensing of individually owned gaming operations other than those 
operating on September 1, 1986, and for the licensing of individually 
owned gaming operations operating on September 1, 1986. Section 
522.3(a) requires a tribe to submit an amendment to an ordinance or 
resolution within 15 days after adoption of such amendment.
    Section 522.2(b)-(h) requires tribes to submit to the Commission: 
(i) Procedures that the tribe will employ in conducting background 
investigations on key employees and PMOs, and to ensure that key 
employees and PMOs are notified of their rights under the Privacy Act; 
(ii) procedures that the tribe will use to issue licenses to key 
employees and PMOs; (iii) copies of all tribal gaming regulations; (iv) 
a copy of any applicable tribal-state compact or procedures as 
prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior; (v) procedures for 
resolving disputes between the gaming public and the tribe or the 
management contractor; and (vi) the identification of the law 
enforcement agent that will take fingerprints and the procedures for 
conducting criminal history checks, including a check of criminal 
history records information maintained by the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation. Section 522.3(b) requires a tribe to submit any 
amendment to these submissions within 15 days after adoption of such 
amendment. Section 522.12(a) requires a tribe to submit to the 
Commission a copy of an authentic ordinance revocation or resolution.
    Section 556.4 requires tribes to mandate the submission of the 
following information from applicants for key employee and PMO 
positions: (i) Name(s), Social Security number(s), date and place of 
birth, citizenship, gender, and languages; (ii) present and past 
business and employment positions, ownership interests, business and 
residential addresses, and driver's license number(s); (iii) the names 
and addresses of personal references; (iv) current business and 
personal telephone numbers; (v) a description of any existing and 
previous business relationships with Indian tribes, including ownership 
interests; (vi) a description of any existing and previous business 
relationships with the gaming industry generally, including ownership 
interests; (vii) the name and address of any licensing/regulatory 
agency with which the person has filed an application for a license or 
permit related to gaming, even if the license or permit was not 
granted; (viii) for each ongoing felony prosecution or conviction, the 
charge, the name and address of the court, and the date and 
disposition, if any; (ix) for each misdemeanor conviction or ongoing 
prosecution within the past 10 years, the name and address of the court 
and the date and disposition; (x) for each criminal charge in the past 
10 years that is not otherwise listed, the criminal charge, the name 
and address of the

[[Page 31340]]

court, and the date and disposition; (xi) the name and address of any 
licensing/regulatory agency with which the person has filed an 
application for an occupational license or permit, even if the license 
or permit was not granted; (xii) a photograph; and (xiii) fingerprints. 
Sections 556.2 and 556.3, respectively, require tribes to place a 
specific Privacy Act notice on their key employee and PMO applications, 
and to warn applicants regarding the penalty for false statements by 
also placing a specific false statement notice on their applications.
    Sections 556.6(a) and 558.3(e) require tribes to keep/maintain the 
individuals' complete application files, investigative reports, and 
eligibility determinations during their employment and for at least 
three years after termination of their employment. Section 556.6(b)(1) 
requires tribes to create and maintain an investigative report on each 
background investigation that includes: (i) The steps taken in 
conducting a background investigation; (ii) the results obtained; (iii) 
the conclusions reached; and (iv) the basis for those conclusions. 
Section 556.6(b)(2) requires tribes to submit, no later than 60 days 
after an applicant begins work, a notice of results of the applicant's 
background investigation that includes: (i) The applicant's name, date 
of birth, and Social Security number; (ii) the date on which the 
applicant began or will begin work as a key employee or PMO; (iii) a 
summary of the information presented in the investigative report; and 
(iv) a copy of the eligibility determination.
    Section 558.3(b) requires a tribe to notify the Commission of the 
issuance of PMO and key employee licenses within 30 days after such 
issuance. Section 558.3(d) requires a tribe to notify the Commission if 
the tribe does not issue a license to an applicant, and requires it to 
forward copies of its eligibility determination and notice of results 
to the Commission for inclusion in the Indian Gaming Individuals Record 
System. Section 558.4(e) requires a tribe, after a gaming license 
revocation hearing, to notify the Commission of its decision to revoke 
or reinstate a gaming license within 45 days of receiving notification 
from the Commission that a specific individual in a PMO or key employee 
position is not eligible for continued employment.
    These information collections are mandatory and allow the 
Commission to carry out its statutory duties.
    Respondents: Indian tribal gaming operations.
    Estimated Number of Respondents: 1,597.
    Estimated Annual Responses: 202,509.
    Estimated Time per Response: Depending on the type of information 
collection, the range of time can vary from 1.0 burden hour to 1,483 
burden hours for one item.
    Frequency of Response: Varies.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours on Respondents: 1,121,340.

    Estimated Total Non-hour Cost Burden: $3,070,189.
    Title: NEPA Compliance.
    OMB Control Number: 3141-0006.
    Brief Description of Collection: The National Environmental Policy 
Act (NEPA), 42 U.S.C. 4321, et seq., and the Council on Environmental 
Quality's (CEQ) implementing regulations, require federal agencies to 
prepare (or cause to be prepared) environmental documents for agency 
actions that may have a significant impact on the environment. Under 
NEPA, an Environmental Assessment (EA) must be prepared when the agency 
action cannot be categorically excluded, or the environmental 
consequences of the agency action will not result in a significant 
impact or the environmental impacts are unclear and need to be further 
defined. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) must be prepared when 
the agency action will likely result in significant impacts to the 
environment.
    Amongst other actions necessary to carry out the Commission's 
statutory duties, the Act requires the NIGC Chair to review and approve 
third-party management contracts that involve the operation of tribal 
gaming facilities. 25 U.S.C. 2711. The Commission has taken the 
position that the NEPA process is triggered when a tribe and a 
potential contractor seek approval of a management contract. Normally, 
an EA or EIS and its supporting documents are prepared by an 
environmental consulting firm and submitted to the Commission by the 
tribe. In the case of an EA, the Commission independently evaluates the 
NEPA document, verifies its content, and assumes responsibility for the 
accuracy of the information contained therein. In the case of an EIS, 
the Commission directs and is responsible for the preparation of the 
NEPA document, but the tribe or potential contractor is responsible for 
paying for the preparation of the document. The information collected 
includes, but is not limited to, maps, charts, technical studies, 
correspondence from other agencies (federal, tribal, state, and local), 
and comments from the public. These information collections are 
mandatory and allow the Commission to carry out its statutory duties.
    Respondents: Tribal governing bodies, management companies.
    Estimated Number of Respondents: 3.
    Estimated Annual Responses: 3.
    Estimated Time per Response: Depending on whether the response is 
an EA or an EIS, the range of time can vary from 2.5 burden hours to 
12.0 burden hours for one item.
    Frequency of Response: Varies.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours on Respondents: 26.5.
    Estimated Total Non-hour Cost Burden: $14,846,686.
    Title: Issuance of Certificates of Self-Regulation to Tribes for 
Class II Gaming.
    OMB Control Number: 3141-0008.
    Brief Description of Collection: The Act sets the standards for the 
regulation of Indian gaming, including a framework for the issuance of 
certificates of self-regulation for class II gaming operations to 
tribes that meet certain qualifications. Specifically, 25 U.S.C. 
2710(c) authorizes the Commission to issue a certificate of self-
regulation if it determines that a tribe has: (i) Conducted its gaming 
activity in a manner that has resulted in an effective and honest 
accounting of all revenues, in a reputation for safe, fair, and honest 
operation of the activity, and has been generally free of evidence of 
criminal or dishonest activity; (ii) adopted and is implementing 
adequate systems for the accounting of all revenues from the activity, 
for the investigation, licensing, and monitoring of all employees of 
the gaming activity, and for the investigation, enforcement, and 
prosecution of violations of its gaming ordinance and regulations; and 
(iii) conducted the operation on a fiscally and economically sound 
basis. The Act also authorizes the Commission to ``promulgate such 
regulations and guidelines as it deems appropriate to implement'' IGRA. 
25 U.S.C. 2706(b)(10). Part 518 of title 25, Code of Federal 
Regulations, implements these statutory requirements.
    Section 518.3(e) requires a tribe's gaming operation(s) and the 
tribal regulatory body (TRB) to have kept all records needed to support 
the petition for self-regulation for the three years immediately 
preceding the date of the petition submission. Section 518.4 requires a 
tribe petitioning for a certificate of self-regulation to submit the 
following to the Commission, accompanied by supporting documentation: 
(i) Two copies of a petition for self-regulation approved by the tribal 
governing body and certified as authentic; (ii) a description of how 
the tribe meets the eligibility criteria in

[[Page 31341]]

Sec.  518.3; (iii) a brief history of each gaming operation, including 
the opening dates and periods of voluntary or involuntary closure(s); 
(iv) a TRB organizational chart; (v) a brief description of the 
criteria that individuals must meet before being eligible for 
employment as a tribal regulator; (vi) a brief description of the 
process by which the TRB is funded, and the funding level for the three 
years immediately preceding the date of the petition; (vii) a list of 
the current regulators and TRB employees, their complete resumes, their 
titles, the dates that they began employment, and if serving limited 
terms, the expiration date of such terms; (viii) a brief description of 
the accounting system(s) at the gaming operation that tracks the flow 
of the gaming revenues; (ix) a list of the gaming activity internal 
controls at the gaming operation(s); (x) a description of the 
recordkeeping system(s) for all investigations, enforcement actions, 
and prosecutions of violations of the tribal gaming ordinance or 
regulations, for the three-year period immediately preceding the date 
of the petition; and (xi) the tribe's current set of gaming 
regulations, if not included in the approved tribal gaming ordinance. 
Section 518.10 requires each Indian gaming tribe that has been issued a 
certificate of self-regulation to submit to the Commission the 
following information by April 15th of each year following the first 
year of self-regulation, or within 120 days after the end of each 
gaming operation's fiscal year: (i) An annual independent audit; and 
(ii) a complete resume for all TRB employees hired and licensed by the 
tribe subsequent to its receipt of a certificate of self-regulation.
    Submission of the petition and supporting documentation is 
voluntary. Once a certificate of self-regulation has been issued, the 
submission of certain other information is mandatory.
    Respondents: Tribal governments.
    Estimated Number of Respondents: 7.
    Estimated Annual Responses: 7.
    Estimated Time per Response: Depending on the information 
collection, the range of time can vary from 3.66 burden hours to 1,940 
burden hours for one item.
    Frequency of Responses: Varies.
    Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours on Respondents: 2,092.
    Estimated Total Non-hour Cost Burden: $821,545.

    Dated: June 26, 2019.
Christinia Thomas,
Chief of Staff (Acting).
[FR Doc. 2019-14011 Filed 6-28-19; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 7565-01-P